Samsung Unveils Hera I10 Ultrasound System
Samsung is unveiling its new Hera I10 ultrasound system designed for ob/gyn applications. The system integrates a motorized examination chair that can adjust from 18.9″ to a height of 38.6″, so patients don’t have to put up with a conventional exam table. A large high-def display screen can be moved around as the clinician prefers it, helping to increase productivity and improve ergonomics. On the side is a convenient rack of transducers and a cable support arm that makes changes easy and reduces the felt weight of the transducers. As far as the imaging, the Hera I10 features Samsung’s...
Source: Medgadget - September 27, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Ob/Gyn Radiology Reproductive Medicine Source Type: blogs

The Gazillion Of Health Data You Can Measure
From SWOLF through EDA until heart rate, heart rate variability, respiratory rate, single-lead ECG, period tracking, sleep pattern analyzing: dozens of vital signs demonstrate that there’s no single square centimeter of the human body without quantifiable data. As an experiment, we tried to collect every trackable parameter to draw the boundaries of your “health data self”. Let us know if there’s anything left out. Why is measurement useful? To know thyself The famous ancient Greek aphorism was inscribed on a wall in the Temple of Apollo at Delphi, the oracle, which was believed to tell humans about the plan...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 26, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Personalized Medicine Portable Diagnostics activity blood body brain breathing data fitness health data heart health heart rate lifestyle lung measure measurement meditation quantified self s Source Type: blogs

A 50-something woman with chest pain, BP 230/120, and LBBB with 7 mm ST Elevation
A 50-something woman with history of CHF of unknown etiology, and of HTN, presented for evaluation of chest pressure.Her BP was 223/125, Sp02 98% on RA. HR 106, RR 18. Here was her ED ECG:There is sinus rhythm with Left Bundle Branch Block (LBBB)There is a large amount of ST Elevation in V2 and V3 (more than 5 mm)Thus, this meets the unweighted Sgarbossa Criteria of 5 mm of discordant ST ElevationBut it does NOT meet the Smith Modified Sgarbossa Criteria, which depend on the ST/S ratio.This ratio is critical because LBBB with very large depolarization voltage (QRS) also has very large repolarization voltage (ST/T).Her...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - September 24, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Ethicon ’s New ECHELON CIRCULAR Powered Stapler
Ethicon, a part of J&J, just unveiled the ECHELON CIRCULAR, which the company touts as the first powered circular stapler specifically designed for colorectal, gastric, and thoracic procedures. The device features so-called “Gripping Surface Technology” that is supposedly more tender on the tissues being stapled, distributing forces to reduce potential damage. Also, the staples are slightly twisted when applied, and so grip tissues from different angles, which Ethicon says distributes compression better and reduces leaks along the staple line while not compromising perfusion. Moreover, compared with ...
Source: Medgadget - September 24, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: GI Surgery Thoracic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Suitable Antigens can Attract T Helper Cells that Act to Promote Blood Vessel Regrowth
The immune system is deeply involved in the intricate, complex processes of tissue regeneration, and the research community has much left to catalog of the countless interactions that take place between immune cells and other cell populations during regeneration. One interesting discovery is that a subclass of T helper cells can encourage growth of blood vessels. Thus, given a way of attracting and retaining the appropriate T helper cells in a tissue suffering ischemia, it may be possible to encourage sufficient regrowth of blood vessels to treat conditions involving inadequate blood flow, such as critical limb ischemia. R...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 15, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Biomaterial Tricks Immune System to Grow New Blood Vessels
Researchers from Harvard’s Wyss Institute have developed a new biomaterial that can activate T cells to promote vascularization of ischemic tissues. Their work demonstrates that the biomaterial results in local blood vessel development, increased perfusion, and new muscle growth after ischemia. Various compounds have been tested to try to improve angiogenesis in tissues that have undergone ischemia, but they have failed in various ways. New interest has developed in using the body’s own immune system to help aid this process. To this end, the Wyss researchers developed unique biomaterials to modulate the local i...
Source: Medgadget - August 7, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Siavash Parkhideh Tags: Cardiac Surgery Materials Plastic Surgery Rehab Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Bizarre T-wave inversions, with Negative U-waves and Very long QT. And a myocardial viability study.
This 60-something year old male was admitted and his hospital course complicated by GI bleed, hemodynamic instability, and a nadir hemoglobin less than 5 g/dL.  An ECG was relatively normal.The next AM, his potassium was measured at 2.9 mEq/L, so another ECG was recorded.He was asymptomatic.The previous ECG from one week prior had been relatively normal.There are bizarre inverted T-waves and also inverted U-waves (see the 2nd inverted bump?)The QT is incredibly longThere is some subtle STE in inferior leads but also STE in I, aVL.There is STE before the bizarre TU inversion in leads V3-V6.There are some artifacts that...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - July 23, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

FDA Approves Bayer GBCA for Coronary Artery Disease
This week, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave the green light approval to Bayer AG ’s gadobutrol (Gadavist), a gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) used in cardiac MRI procedures for patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease. It’s the first and only approved agent for this type of procedure. “We now have an approved contrast agent for use in cardiac MRI to assess perfusion and late gadolinium enhancement in less than 1 hour, ” saidScott Flamm, MD who co-authored a statement on using the GBCA in myocardial perfusion studies. Gadavist is also used to evaluate the blood supply to the heart...
Source: radRounds - July 19, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 8th 2019
In this study, we identify a link between members of the genus Veillonella and exercise performance. We observed an increase in Veillonella relative abundance in marathon runners postmarathon and isolated a strain of Veillonella atypica from stool samples. Inoculation of this strain into mice significantly increased exhaustive treadmill run time. Veillonella utilize lactate as their sole carbon source, which prompted us to perform a shotgun metagenomic analysis in a cohort of elite athletes, finding that every gene in a major pathway metabolizing lactate to propionate is at higher relative abundance postexercise. Us...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 7, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

First Cryopreservation Following Use of Assisted Death Legislation in California
Simple human dignity and self-ownership demands the right to end one's own life on one's own terms, and to be able to help others achieve this goal where they are not capable of doing so themselves. Yet these acts remain forbidden to most people in most parts of the world. Painless, effective euthanasia requires medical assistance, and providing that service remains largely illegal. This state of affairs is slowly starting to change in the US, however, and so late last year the first cryopreservation following voluntary euthanasia took place. Cryopreservation is the only presently available end of life option that o...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 3, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs

Two patients with RBBB
Case 1.A 60-something woman presented with dyspnea.  She had a history of chronic respiratory disease and hypoxia, but hypoxia was no worse than normal.ECG:There is abnormal ST Elevation in I and aVL.Although as a general rule, there should be no ST elevation in RBBB in the absence of ischemia, there sometimes is ST elevation that looks like this.Therefore, I went to find an old ECG and it looked the same.The patient ruled out for acute MI with all negative troponins.She had a completely normal formal echo.All previous ECGs were identical.This was her baseline ST elevation, and I have seen this many times.Case 2: sent...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - June 30, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Contrast Agent Uses Heart ’s Electricity to Activate Itself
Imaging the heart for signs of disease is still quite rudimentary. While CT, ultrasound, and PET (positron-emission tomography) scanners generate impressive looking graphics, they’re a long way from giving doctors a true representation of the anatomy and function of the heart and nearby vasculature. Contrast agents are widely used to allow these modalities to produce better images of the heart, but they’re indiscriminate in what they help to illuminate. Similar to a flood light, these agents tend to make everything they permeate brighter on the output display. This results in larger vessels being visible, b...
Source: Medgadget - June 24, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Materials Nanomedicine Radiology Source Type: blogs

ROSC: does the ECG rule out OMI? And why does a heart just stop beating? And what rhythm is this?
This study had afatal flaw: they did not keep track of all the Non-STEMI patients who were NOT enrolled, but instead were sent for immediate angiogram.  It was done in Europe, where the guidelines suggest taking all shockable arrests emergently to the cath lab.  So it is highly likely that physicians were very reluctant to enroll patients; they did not want them to be randomized to no angiogram.  This strong suspicion is supported by their data:only 22 of 437 (5.0%) patients in this study had OMI.What percent of shockable arrests without STE have an OMI?  This large registry in Circulatio...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - June 17, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

ROSC: does the ECG to rule out OMI? And why does a heart just stop beating? And what rhythm is this?
This study had afatal flaw: they did not keep track of all the Non-STEMI patients who were NOT enrolled, but instead were sent for immediate angiogram.  It was done in Europe, where the guidelines suggest taking all shockable arrests emergently to the cath lab.  So it is highly likely that physicians were very reluctant to enroll patients; they did not want them to be randomized to no angiogram.  This strong suspicion is supported by their data:only 22 of 437 (5.0%) patients in this study had OMI. What percent of shockable arrests without STE have an OMI?  This large registry in Circ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - June 17, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 17th 2019
In this study, analysis of antioxidant defense was performed on the blood samples from 184 "aged" individuals aged 65-90+ years, and compared to the blood samples of 37 individuals just about at the beginning of aging, aged 55-59 years. Statistically significant decreases of Zn,Cu-superoxide dismutase (SOD-1), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were observed in elderly people in comparison with the control group. Moreover, an inverse correlation between the activities of SOD-1, CAT, and GSH-Px and the age of the examined persons was found. No age-related changes in glutathione reductase activiti...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 16, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs