How Long After Neonatal Meningitis Should An Infant Have a Hearing Screening?
Discussion Hearing loss can range from profound deafness to fairly minor loss. The causes vary based on age, type of loss (sensoryneuronal or conductive), degree and audiometric configuration. Sensorineuronal hearing loss involves the cochlea and neural connections to the brain and auditory cortex. Conductive hearing loss involves structures from the external ear to the oval window. Deafness is defined as a hearing loss > 90 dB. A differential diagnosis of hearing loss can be found here. Learning Point After bacterial meningitis children should be screened for potential hearing loss. Data supports that screening in the ho...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - October 28, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Donna M. D'Alessandro, M.D. Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

How Long After Neonatal Meningitis Should An Infant Have a Hearing Screening?
Discussion Hearing loss can range from profound deafness to fairly minor loss. The causes vary based on age, type of loss (sensoryneuronal or conductive), degree and audiometric configuration. Sensorineuronal hearing loss involves the cochlea and neural connections to the brain and auditory cortex. Conductive hearing loss involves structures from the external ear to the oval window. Deafness is defined as a hearing loss > 90 dB. A differential diagnosis of hearing loss can be found here. Learning Point After bacterial meningitis children should be screened for potential hearing loss. Data supports that screening in the...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - October 28, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

FDA Approves Clinolipid for Intravenous Nutrition
(Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - October 14, 2013 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Possible solution to liver problems linked to intravenous feeding
Researchers know that feeding some patients intravenously can save their lives - but also can cause liver damage. Now scientists at the University of Colorado and Children's Hospital Colorado have figured out the likely culprit, one of the ingredients in intravenous food, behind the liver problems. The discovery, published in Science Translational Medicine, could point the way to better treatments for patients who are medically vulnerable and, often, very young... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 13, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Delaying Parenteral Feeding in Adult ICU Patients Delaying Parenteral Feeding in Adult ICU Patients
Delaying parenteral nutrition (PN) for the first week of intensive care reduces the incidence of muscle weakness and allows for faster recovery, according to new data from the Belgian trial EPaNIC. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - October 11, 2013 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Critical Care News Source Type: news

CU team finds likely culprit behind liver problems linked to intravenous feeding
(University of Colorado Denver) Researchers know that feeding some patients intravenously can save their lives -- but also can cause liver damage. Now scientists at the University of Colorado and Children's Hospital Colorado have figured out the likely culprit, one of the ingredients in intravenous food, behind the liver problems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 9, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

FDA approves Clinolipid for intravenous nutrition
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Clinolipid (lipid injectable emulsion, USP) for intravenous feeding (parenteral nutrition) in adult patients, providing a source of calories and essential fatty acids for adult patients who are unable to eat or drink. Clinolipid was granted a priority review to help alleviate a drug shortage. "Preventing and mitigating drug shortages is a top priority for the FDA," said Janet Woodcock, M.D., director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

FDA Approves Clinolipid for IV Nutrition, Easing ShortageFDA Approves Clinolipid for IV Nutrition, Easing Shortage
The new parenteral feeding product, which contains refined olive oil and refined soybean oil, is not indicated for children. FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Critical Care News Alert Source Type: news

FDA approves Clinolipid for intravenous nutrition
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Clinolipid (lipid injectable emulsion, USP) for intravenous feeding (parenteral nutrition) in adult patients, providing a source of calories and essential fatty acids for adult patients who are unable to eat or drink. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - October 4, 2013 Category: American Health Source Type: news

PRAC Wants Numeta G13%E Off the MarketPRAC Wants Numeta G13%E Off the Market
The committee wants marketing authorization of the intravenous nutrition preparation Numeta G13%E suspended because of a risk for hypermagnesemia in premature infants. News Alerts (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - September 7, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics News Alert Source Type: news

Prolacta study published in Journal of Pediatrics demonstrates lower incidence of intestinal disease in preemies fed exclusive human milk diet
Prolacta Bioscience announces that results of the double-blind study published in the Journal of Pediatrics demonstrate that extremely premature infants who are fed an exclusive human milk diet instead of preterm formula have a significantly lower incidence of surgery associated with the intestinal disease necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) and require fewer days of intravenous feedings through total parenteral nutrition (TPN)... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 2, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics / Children's Health Source Type: news

Intestinal failure-associated liver disease reversed in 6 months by fish oil
Children who suffer from intestinal failure, most often caused by a shortened or dysfunctional bowel, are unable to consume food orally. Instead, a nutritional cocktail of sugar, protein and fat made from soybean oil is injected through a small tube in their vein. For these children, the intravenous nutrition serves as a bridge to bowel adaptation, a process by which the intestine recovers and improves its capacity to absorb nutrition... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 16, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Fish oil is safe and effective in reversing liver disease in some
LOS ANGELES, Aug. 15 (UPI) -- Fish oil is safe and effective in reversing liver disease in children with intestinal failure who require intravenous nutrition, U.S. researchers say. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - August 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Six months of fish oil reverses liver disease in children with intestinal failure, study shows
Children who suffer from intestinal failure, most often caused by a shortened or dysfunctional bowel, are unable to consume food orally. Instead, a nutritional cocktail of sugar, protein and fat made from soybean oil is injected through a small tube in their vein.   For these children, the intravenous nutrition serves as a bridge to bowel adaptation, a process by which the intestine recovers and improves its capacity to absorb nutrition. But the soybean oil, which provides essential fatty acids and calories, has been associated with a potentially lethal complication known as intestinal failure–associat...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 14, 2013 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

6 months of fish oil reverses liver disease in children with intestinal failure, study shows
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) A clinical trial conducted at the Children's Discovery and Innovation Institute at Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA has found that, compared with soybean oil, a limited duration (24 weeks) of fish oil is safe and effective in reversing liver disease in children with intestinal failure who require intravenous nutrition. The researchers believe that fish oil may also decrease the need for liver and/or intestinal transplants -- and mortality -- associated with this disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news