Medical News Today: What is refeeding?
Refeeding is reintroducing food after a period of malnourishment or starvation. If electrolytes become imbalanced as digestion resumes, a person can develop refeeding syndrome. Symptoms include fatigue and weakness, and treatment involves careful monitoring and intravenous electrolyte replacement. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

CU researchers offer insights into liver disease caused by intravenous nutrition
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) University of Colorado School of Medicine's Karim C. El Kasmi, MD, PhD, assistant professor of pediatrics, and Ronald Sokol, MD, professor of pediatrics, are authors of an article in the April 2018 Nature Communications that sheds light on the underlying cause of intestinal failure-associated liver disease and suggests new therapeutic approaches. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study identifies receptor that may be targeted to repair the heart after heart attack, cardiac arrest
This study, published in April in the journal Anesthesiology, confirmed the presence of the receptor in rodent hearts, which are similar in composition to human hearts.UCLA HealthDr. Soban Umar“This study clues us in to how we might be able to better help patients heal when they experience heart conditions,” said Dr. Soban Umar, first author of the study and an assistant professor in residence in the  department of anesthesiology and perioperative medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. “For the first time, we’re finding a particular receptor in the heart th...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Hospital's 'artificial feeding' letter to mothers criticised
The hospital described mothers who use formula milk as "artificially" feeding babies. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - March 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Two genes likely play key role in extreme nausea and vomiting during pregnancy
Most women experience some morning sickness during pregnancy, but about 2 percent of pregnant women experience a more severe form of nausea and vomiting. Sometimes the symptoms are so serious that hospitalization is required. Known as hyperemesis gravidarum, the condition is the same one that Kate Middleton, the Duchess of Cambridge, endured in her pregnancies.A new study led by researchers at UCLA and published in the journal Nature Communications has identified two genes associated with hyperemesis gravidarum, whose cause has not been determined in previous studies. The genes, known asGDF15andIGFBP7, are both involved in...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 21, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Supplemental Parenteral Nutrition in Critically Ill Adults Supplemental Parenteral Nutrition in Critically Ill Adults
How does a supplemental parenteral nutrition strategy compare with using enteral nutrition alone in terms of energy delivery?Critical Care (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Critical Care Journal Article Source Type: news

Short-term use of IV devices is common -- and risky -- study shows
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Many hospital patients get medicine or nutrition delivered straight into their bloodstream through a tiny device called a PICC. In just a decade, it's become the go-to device for intravenous care.But a new study finds that one in every four times a PICC gets inserted, the patient didn't need it long enough to justify the risks it can pose. And nearly one in ten of those patients suffered a complication linked to the device. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Training the Trainers to Ensure Customer Satisfaction
Medical device manufacturers have a thorough understanding of the science behind their products, every indication of use, and the cost savings or patient benefit when the device is used in practice. And they should, given the hundreds or thousands of hours in clinical verifications and trials required to receive regulatory clearance. As brochures are made for educating decision makers on the features and benefits of a device and instructions for use (IFUs) are produced for customers to reference before and during use, a manufacturer training program needs to be reproducible while still accommodating the preferences of...
Source: MDDI - February 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Tags: Business Source Type: news

What is DIOS?
Discussion Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor (CFTR). It is found in the epithelium of the bronchi, intestine, pancreatic duct and biliary tree. It regulates chloride, bicarbonate and water secretion. The heterozygous state helps prevent against secretory diarrhea, but the homozygous state causes thickened secretions in the hollow tubes of the lungs and digestive tract. There are multiple mutations (> 2000) which have been currently classified into classes depending on their protein production and activity. CF patients generally are l...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - December 18, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Correcting for Protein in Parenteral Nutrition Does Not Affect Hyponatremia Risk Correcting for Protein in Parenteral Nutrition Does Not Affect Hyponatremia Risk
Most patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) have hyponatremia, and PN composition does not appear to affect hyponatremia risk, according to a new study.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - December 14, 2017 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Nephrology News Source Type: news

Italy OKs living wills amid long-running euthanasia debate
Italy's Senate has passed a law allowing Italians to write living wills and refuse artificial nutrition and hydration, the latest step in Catholic Italy's long-running debate over euthanasia and when it's OK to pull the plug (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - December 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

How Long Do Late Preterm Infants Need Supplemental Feedings?
Discussion Premature infants have many problems to overcome because they just aren’t ready to live outside the uterine environment. Late premature infants are defined as birth between 34 0/7 weeks and 36 6/7 weeks gestation. In the U.S. this gestational age accounts for ~70% of all preterm births or ~300,000 births/year. Late preterm infants can have delayed oral feeding skills and failure to thrive along with increased hospital readmissions. Breastfeeding can be difficult as infants can have poor coordination and poor tone, along with decreased lactation in the mother. Learning Point Weight gain lags behind intraut...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - November 13, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Parent-to-parent: Tips for Home Parenteral Nutrition families
Four-year-old Thomas Onorato is a young zoologist at heart. Often seen with binoculars in hand, the adventurous preschooler is particularly drawn to bird watching. He enjoys talking about his feathery friends and studying their beauty and habitat. Thomas’ love of animals runs so deep that he says he wants to be a veterinarian when he grows up. “Thomas is obsessed with animals. It’s his love,” says his mother, Melissa. Beyond his quest to care for animals, Thomas has two other important missions — to manage the rare condition, microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) and receive the ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 7, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Parenting Dr. Bram Raphael home parenteral nutrition Microvillus inclusion disease Source Type: news

Fighting for the next family: Mom ’s experience inspires nutrition support guidelines
As Michelle Marti watched her twin sons, Nicholas and Max, run around the playground, she worried. To a stranger — like the representative of their local school’s Planning and Placement Team (PPT), there to evaluate the boys’ eligibility for special needs services in kindergarten — they looked like any other kids having fun. But their playfulness masked a serious illness: short bowel syndrome, the result of a condition called Hirschsprung’s disease. “They look healthy on the outside because all of their medical differences are under their clothes,” admits Michelle. Those difference...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 24, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Parenting Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Hirschsprung's disease Jessica McCaig short bowel syndrome (SBS). total parenteral nutrition Source Type: news

When transplant isn ’t the only option
Nine-year-old Ariana Dufane is happiest when she’s tumbling, whether she’s launching herself off the ground for a cartwheel or practicing how to perform the perfect split. In that moment, the fourth-grader focuses on nothing but strength and balance, a skill she has refined, not just in gymnastics but in life. Born with intestinal pseudo-obstruction — a disorder of abnormal intestinal motility function that may cause the body to go into intestinal failure — Ariana’s first few months were spent in and out of emergency rooms. Her symptoms began with a distended belly and an inability to hav...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 18, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Boston Children's Motility and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders Center Colorectal and Pelvic Malformation Center Intestinal and Multivisceral Transplant Program intestinal transplant Leonel Rodriguez pseudo-obstruc Source Type: news

Making connections: Bonded by short bowel syndrome
At the top of the dual slide, 4-year-old Brayden Austin is buzzing with energy, excited to go careening down to the bottom. Yet he waits patiently until a towheaded boy joins him on the neighboring chute. Two-year-old Camden Glover is a little nervous. But Brayden grabs his hand and the pair sails to the ground together, squealing with delight. It’s a typical playground scene, but also an apt metaphor for the boys’ special connection. The two children — one from Maine, one from Tennessee — have a close friendship. But they might never have met if not for one life-threatening event. Parallel lives &...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 28, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Dr. Bram Raphael Dr. Mark Puder intestinal malrotation Omegaven short bowel syndrome (SBS). TPN Source Type: news

‘An easy decision’: Finding care for short bowel syndrome
Allie DeRienzo loves to dance, sing and play with her big brother, switching from the pink-and-purple cartoon world of Shimmer and Shine to the action-packed fantasy of Star Wars with the blink of an eye. It’s a flexibility that has served her well: In just a few years, she’s endured more ups and downs than most 3-year-olds. Although her pregnancy was normal, it became clear as soon as Allie was born that something wasn’t right. “She was incredibly distended and was transferred almost immediately to a high-level neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in New York,” remembers her mother, Nanci. Co...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 22, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Danielle Stamm Dr. Bram Raphael Dr. Mark Puder G-tube short bowel syndrome (SBS). total parenteral nutrition Source Type: news

The tube, the team and the family that give life
As 2-year-old Naema Alshehhi turns the pages of her favorite book, her eyes glimmer with curiosity. Sitting with her father, Àbdulla and big sister, Dana, in their temporary Boston apartment, the inquisitive toddler points to a number of shapes and is fascinated by the rainbow of color. During this quiet moment, you see the gentle outline of Naema’s central line through her tiny shirt. The lifesaving tube — surgically inserted into her chest — provides the nourishment needed to manage the rare intestinal disorder she was born with, called microvillus inclusion dis...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 11, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Alexandra Carey Dr. Bram Raphael Dr. Rima Fawaz home parenteral nutrition micorvillus inclusion disease multivisceral transplant Source Type: news

FDA Drug Safety Communication: Serious medication errors from intravenous administration of nimodipine oral capsules
[08-02-2010] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is alerting healthcare professionals that nimodipine capsules should be given ONLY by mouth or through a feeding tube (nasogastric tube). (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - August 3, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Nutritional Guidelines for Critically Ill Children Released Nutritional Guidelines for Critically Ill Children Released
Guidelines on nutritional support therapy for critically ill children were jointly released by the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Society of Critical Care Medicine.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Critical Care News Source Type: news

Two life-threatening conditions.One remarkable wish.
When Lucas St. Onge blew out the five candles on his birthday cake, he made just one wish. He didn’t ask for ninja turtles, a T-ball set or an Xbox — the only thing he wished was to be just like any other kid. “It was a gift I couldn’t give,” says his mom, Heather. On that same day, last May, he got his wish. “He got a liver, stomach, pancreas, intestine and spleen — the five organs he needed to help him become healthy and happy,” Heather says. Heather was 18 weeks pregnant when she and her husband, Anthony, learned they were about to face a myriad of medical challe...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 28, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Our Patients’ Stories bone marrow transplant Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center Dr. Heung-Bae Kim Dr. Khashavar Vakili Dr. Rima Fawaz Intestine and Multivisceral Transplant Program Pediatric Transplant Center ( Source Type: news

Miles to go: From Mississippi to Boston for life-saving care
Whether he’s riding with his family on their all-terrain vehicle (ATV) at home in Mississippi, learning how to fish or playing with his cousins, Ethan Claborn is happiest when he’s outdoors. Simple things like a blade of grass or drop of rain are even more special for this almost four-year-old, considering he spent the first year of his life within hospital walls. Ethan’s parents, Holly and Gary, knew even before he was born that he would face several health challenges. But it still felt like a shock when, not long after birth, he was rushed into surgery to treat an intestinal blockage. Diagnosed with ile...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 16, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Dr. Biren Modi Dr. Mark Puder ileal atresia Omegaven total parenteral nutrition Source Type: news

Baxter ’ s CEO is transforming the company: Here ’ s how
From improved corporate culture to less bureaucracy to internal innovation, CEO José Almeida has been priming Baxter for success since taking over a year and a half ago. The former CEO of Covidien, who led the company to it $50 billion merger with Medtronic in January 2015, jumped at the opportunity to lead Baxter. The company “started with a great mission, products essential to health care,” Almeida said last week at Healthegy’s Medtech Conference in Minneapolis. The company among other things sells lifesaving renal and medical products, including intravenous (IV) solutions, systems...
Source: Mass Device - June 8, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Business/Financial News Wall Street Beat Baxter MedTech Source Type: news

The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition to publish with Wiley
(Wiley) John Wiley and Sons Inc., (NYSE:JWa) (NYSE:JWb) announced today that it has been selected by the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) as its publishing partner for its distinguished publications, The Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and Nutrition in Clinical Practice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Faces of IBD: Celebrating our patients and their caregivers
IBD nurse practitioner Caitlin Dolan educating her patient Jenna, 11 Some say it takes a village to raise a child. When it comes to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), our patients and their families depend on a “village” of caregivers — gastroenterologists, nurses, dietitians, social workers and more — to carry them through their journey. In honor of World IBD Day, May 19, we are celebrating the patients who inspire us and the dedicated Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center team that diagnose, educate and treat nearly 1,500 patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 19, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Diseases & Conditions Research and Innovation Athos Bousvaros IBD Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center Scott Snapper Source Type: news

How Common is α -1-Antitrypsin Deficiency?
Discussion α-1-Antitrypsin Deficiency (A1AT) is a common single-gene mutation disease that is homozygous recessive. The normal allele is called M and the most common abnormal allele is Z. There are other alleles though. The gene codes for one of the primary protease inhibitors in the serum, thus those who are homozygous for the Z gene are sometimes referred to as “PIZZ” or “PIZ.” α-1-Antitrypsin is found in all body tissues but is especially important in the serum and lung. As noted it is one of the primary neutrophil protease inhibitors in the serum, and acts to neutralize these enzymes...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 24, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The Unexpected Place Superbugs Are Spreading -- Hospital Sinks And Pipes
Drug-resistant bacteria can lurk in the pipes of hospital sinks, and a new study shows that these dangerous bacteria can also make their way out of sinks and continue on to reach patients. A number of recent reports have found that drug-resistant bacteria grow in the drainpipes of hospital sinks, according to the study, published today (Feb. 24) in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. “The wet, humid and relatively protected environment” of the drainpipes makes for an ideal breeding ground for bacteria, the researchers wrote. In addition, many reports have also found a genetic link between the pa...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Causes Hyperammonemia?
Discussion Reye’s syndrome (RS)is named for Dr. Douglas Reye who along with Drs. G. Morgan and J. Baral described encephalopathy and fatty accumulation and degeneration in children in a 1963 Lancet article. RS usually affects children but can occur at all ages. All organs can be affected but the liver and brain are primarily affected causing liver failure and encephalopathy as toxic metabolites (especially ammonia) accumulate, and intracranial hypertension and cerebral edema occurs. As the ammonia levels begin to rise (> 100 mg/dL) patients lose their appetite, have nausea and emesis and mental status changes whic...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - February 20, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Worth every mile: Short bowel syndrome brings family to Boston
During his most recent visit to Boston Children’s Hospital, 3-year-old Konrad Schienke resembles a tiny tornado, gleefully scampering around the room as he mugged for the camera and shouted, “Cheese!” Later, he smiles as a doctor gently felt his abdomen, giggling as if he was being tickled. “It’s hard to believe what a sick little kid he has been,” says his father, Erich. Yet, just a few years ago, this energetic boy resided in the neonatal intensive care unit at his local hospital in Pennsylvania, struggling with a diagnosis of short bowel syndrome. This rare but serious condi...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - February 16, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Mark Puder short bowel syndrome (SBS). Source Type: news

Teduglutide Can Allow Independence From Parenteral Nutrition Teduglutide Can Allow Independence From Parenteral Nutrition
Many patients with intestinal failure associated with short-bowel syndrome (SBS-IF) can achieve independence from parenteral nutrition with long-term teduglutide treatment, according to a post hoc analysis of data from five clinical trials.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - December 23, 2016 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

How To Talk To Your Health Care Provider About Your End-Of-Life Wishes
One of the most important conversations you will ever have--and also the most difficult--is to share your thoughts and feelings about the end of your life. The people closest to you need to know what you want for your last days so that they can advocate for your wishes, if you, for any reason, are unable to speak for yourself. This conversation could help you avoid being kept alive for months on a ventilator with a brain that no longer functions. Your loved ones will only be able to protect you from excessive futile medical care if they know that this is your preference. Read more here about having an end-of-life discu...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

When Is the Clinical Nadir for Guillain-Barr é Syndrome?
Discussion Guillian-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acquired, acute, inflammatory, demyelinating polyneuropathy. It is the most common cause of acute and subacute flaccid paralysis in children. GBS causes about 0.4-1.3 cases per 100,000 persons/year in children. It can occur in any age group and the incidence increases among all age groups until a peak in the 50s. Both genders are affected and there may be a slight increase in males. GBS usually occurs 2-4 weeks after a prodromonal gastroenteritis or respiratory illness. It is most often associated with Campylobacter jejunae, Haemophilus infuenza, Mycoplasma pneumoniae,...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - August 8, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Nearly half of California nursing home residents complete end-of-life care orders
UCLA-led research finds broad acceptance of written end-of-life care orders among California nursing home residents, with nearly half completing a Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment, or POLST, form in 2011. The study, published online in the peer-reviewed Journal of General Internal Medicine, also found no difference in completion of the form by race or ethnicity, suggesting wide acceptance of these orders among California’s highly diverse population. The researchers did, however, identify a few areas where the use of the forms in nursing homes could be improved.       &...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 8, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Progress Noted in Treatment of Several Common Liver DiseasesProgress Noted in Treatment of Several Common Liver Diseases
Dr William Balistreri provides an overview of the latest data on such disorders as alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, drug-induced liver injury, and parenteral nutrition-associated cholestasis. Medscape Gastroenterology (Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines)
Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines - April 8, 2016 Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Gastroenterology Commentary Source Type: news

FDA Drug Safety Communication: Serious medication errors from intravenous administration of nimodipine oral capsules
[08-02-2010] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is alerting healthcare professionals that nimodipine capsules should be given ONLY by mouth or through a feeding tube (nasogastric tube). (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - March 25, 2016 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Better Outcomes for Critically Ill Kids When IV Feeding Delayed (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Results echo earlier studies on parenteral nutrition in adults (Source: MedPage Today Pediatrics)
Source: MedPage Today Pediatrics - March 23, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Your NEJM Group Today: Mesenteric Ischemia Review, Delaying Parenteral Nutrition in Kids, New Mexico Primary Care Opportunities (FREE)
By the Editors NEJM Group offers so many valuable resources for practicing clinicians. Here's what we chose for you today:NEJM Clinical Practice … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - March 16, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Children in ICU recover faster with ‘little to no nutrition’
Children being treated in intensive care recover more quickly without artificial feeding, contrary to current practice, according to a team of international researchers. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - March 15, 2016 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Forgoing artificial nutrition and hydration
Question: Which of the following statements regarding artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH) is least supported in ethics and/or law? A. One may invoke medical futility and... (Source: Clinical Neurology News)
Source: Clinical Neurology News - March 9, 2016 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

Forgoing artificial nutrition and hydration
Question: Which of the following statements regarding artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH) is least supported in ethics and/or law? A. One may invoke medical futility and... (Source: Family Practice News)
Source: Family Practice News - March 9, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Nathan’s wild ride: An appendectomy, two transplants and the journey ahead
Nathan, pre-transplant, during his Make-A-Wish trip to the San Diego Zoo When the phone rang at the Natale family home in Loudonville, New York, during the early morning hours of Jan. 12, 2013, Nathan Natale knew exactly what it meant. “My little sister had someone sleeping over. And I was like, ‘hello parents of friend, we gotta go.’” The phone call was from Boston Children’s Hospital. A donor match had been found. The Natales quickly packed, hopped in the car and began the three-hour journey to the hospital for Nathan’s kidney and intestine transplant. But Nathan’s transplant jou...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 18, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories dialysis intestinal transplant kidney transplant Pediatric Transplant Center (PTC) Source Type: news

What Are Risk Factors for Cholelithiasis?
Discussion Bile is produced by the liver to aid absorption of fat soluble vitamins and lipids from the gastrointestinal tract and to transport bilirubin, cholesterol and other substances to the gastrointestinal tract. Bile is the main form of cholesterol excretion. Gallstones or cholelithiasis form when the balance of substances within the hepatobiliary tract favors supersaturation with crystal formation and gallstone formation. It is a dynamic state of affairs as gallstones can form and also have a high rate of resorption of up to 50%. Gallstones 3 mm are called gallstones. Gallstones, while not as common as adult popula...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - January 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Harley Street's Dr Mark Bonar 'kept patient in the dark about her terminal cancer' 
Dr Mark Bonar should have allowed the woman, who was staying in Mayfair, London, to have end-of-life care but instead allegedly gave her a form of potentially dangerous intravenous feeding. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Emerging Crisis for Seniors: It's Probably Not What You Think
As November is National Caregiver Month, I wanted to shine a light on a topic that caregivers and their loved ones are facing at increasing rates, but that very few people are talking about in public - senior malnutrition.The sheer number of malnourished elderly adults is truly staggering. One in three patients who are admitted to the hospital are affected by this condition. Patients diagnosed with malnutrition have a length of stay three times longer than those who do not arrive in a state of malnutrition. Patients who are malnourished prior to undergoing surgery have a 4 times higher risk of developing a pressure ulcer d...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 20, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

SLU hepatologist: Babies benefit from a little food in their tummies
(Saint Louis University) AJay Jain, M.D., medical director of the pediatric liver transplant program at SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center and a SLUCare pediatric hepatologist and gastroenterologist, received a $150,000 grant from the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition to study preventative strategies for total parenteral nutrition associated disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 28, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Should Ondansetron Be Used for Acute Gastroenteritis?
Discussion Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a common illness worldwide and is “…defined as a decrease in the consistency of stools (loose or liquid) and/or an increase in the frequency of evacuations with or without fever or vomiting….” It is one of the most common reasons for seeking medical care and hospitalizations. In Europe, rotavirus and noroviruses are two of the most frequent viral agents causing AGE and Campylobacter and Salmonella are the most common bacterial AGE causes. For parasitic infections Giardia, and Crytosporidium are most common parasitic infections in Europe. Recommendations f...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - August 24, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Parent Q&A: Tips for home parenteral nutrition
Thirteen-month-old Lenox Toth has an infectious smile and personality to match. At 1-day-old, Lenox was diagnosed with midgut volvulus, a condition where the intestines are twisted, or form a kink, and suddenly cut off blood supply. The tiny tot underwent a round of emergency corrective surgeries at Massachusetts General Hospital and one month later, was transferred to Boston Children’s Hospital for further surgical and nutritional management. He underwent an additional intestinal surgery at 2-months-old, and went home with his parents on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) management at 3-months-old. HPN provides a...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 6, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Our patients’ stories Dr. Bram Raphael home parenteral nutrition Source Type: news

NICE produces new draft guidelines on caring for the dying
"England's health watchdog has put forward new draft guidance to improve the care of adults in their last few days of life," BBC News reports. The guidelines, produced by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), have been proposed as an alternative to the controversial Liverpool Care Pathway, which was phased out in 2014.   What was the Liverpool Care Pathway? The Liverpool Care Pathway was developed during the late 1990s at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital, in conjunction with the Marie Curie Palliative Care Institute. It was intended to provide the best quality of care...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Source Type: news

Omega-3 fatty acids may help improve treatment and quality of life in cancer patients
(American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.)) Adding omega-3 fatty acids to anti-tumor medications may improve treatment response and quality of life for cancer patients according to a new study by researchers at the University Hospitals of Leicester in the United Kingdom. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 28, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Documentation of hospital patients' malnutrition helps maximize care and reimbursement
(American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.)) Nutrition support professionals who are well-versed in proper documentation of malnutrition diagnoses in hospital patients can help ensure that hospitals receive maximum funding for patient care according to a new review. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 12, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news