Cincinnati Children's scientists identify hormone that might help treat malabsorption
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) Scientists at Cincinnati Children's used human intestinal organoids grown from stem cells to discover how our bodies control the absorption of nutrients from the food we eat. They further found that one hormone might be able to reverse a congenital disorder in babies who cannot adequately absorb nutrients and need intravenous feeding to survive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Practical guidance for using'MUST' to identify malnutrition during the COVID-19 pandemic, British Association for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (BAPEN)
BAPEN Malnutrition Action Group (MAG) update. Due to the variety of potential nutritional issues patients with Covid-19 may face, whether in hospital or at home, we recommend routine identification of malnutrition. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - August 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nasogastric tube placement checks before first use in critical care settings during the COVID-19 response, British Association of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
This easy reference guide has been produced because some aspects of COVID-19 presentation and treatment present special challenges for safely confirming nasogastric tube position. The dense ground-glass x-ray images can make x-ray interpretation more difficult, and the increasing use of proning manoeuvres in conscious patients increases the risk of regurgitation of gastric contents into the oesophagus and aspiration into the lungs which will render pH checks less reliable (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - May 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fact Sheet for Healthcare Providers: Emergency Use of Infusion Pumps and Infusion Pump Accessories During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Published: 5/13/2020. This two-page fact sheet informs healthcare providers of the significant known and potential risks and benefits of the emergency use of infusion pumps and infusion pump accessories. Certain infusion pumps and infusion pump accessories are authorized for emergency use by healthcare providers to treat conditions caused by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) with the controlled infusion of medications, total parenteral nutrition (TPN), and/or other fluids. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Family integrated care in single family rooms for preterm infants and late-onset sepsis: a retrospective study and mediation analysis
Conclusion(s): SFRs were associated with decreased incidences of LOS and shorter length of hospital stay. The positive effect of SFRs on LOS was mainly mediated through a decreased use of PN in SFRs. Impact: Family integrated care (FICare) in single family rooms for preterm infants was associated with less late-onset sepsis events during hospital stay and a shorter length of hospital stay after birth.FICare in single family rooms was associated with less use of peripheral or central venous catheters and parenteral nutrition.Mediation analysis provided insights into the mechanisms underlying the effect of FICare in single f...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - May 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Overlooked Virus Killer
Sales of vitamin C supplements have tripled in the last few weeks… And the most powerful kind of vitamin C is sold out on Amazon. (More on that in a minute.) I’m glad to see people turning to vitamin C. But the the chewable form you usually find at the drugstore won’t give you the boost you’re looking for. You see, absorption — or bioavailability — is an issue, and your body can only absorb about 500 mg of this conventional form of vitamin C before you hit saturation. And that’s nowhere near enough. In a moment I’ll show you a better form of vitamin C… and how you...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - May 6, 2020 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Dr.A.Sears Tags: Health Nutrition Source Type: news

High Demand Caused by COVID-19 Helps Baxter Beat 1Q20 Expectations
Baxter International is experiencing significant revenue growth because of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19). Because of the virus’s impact, the Deerfield, IL-based company beat Wall Street expectations for its 1Q20 earnings. Baxter reported results of $2.8 billion, a 6% increase from the $2.6 billion reported in 1Q19. The results beat out consensus, which came in at about $2.7 billion. Higher demand for Baxter’s continuous renal placement therapy line, generic injectables and parenteral nutrition therapies, and intravenous solutions contributed to sales growth. Executives estimated that ...
Source: MDDI - May 4, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: COVID-19 Business Source Type: news

Nutrition in Sepsis: A Bench-to-Bedside Review
Nutrition therapy in sepsis is challenging and differs from the standard feeding approach in critically ill patients. The dysregulated host response caused by infection induces progressive physiologic alterations, which may limit metabolic capacity by impairing mitochondrial function. Hence, early artificial nutrition should be ramped-up and emphasis laid on the post-acute phase of critical illness. This review aims to provide an overview and practical recommendations of all aspects of nutritional therapy in the setting of sepsis. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - March 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Causes Neutropenia?
Discussion Neuropenia is defined as a neutrophil count
Source: PediatricEducation.org - March 2, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Dr. Stanley Dudrick, Who Saved Post-Surgical Patients, Dies at 84
Why were they dying after “successful” operations? He discovered the cause and came up with a remedy: intravenous nutrition — a technique that has saved millions of lives. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sam Roberts Tags: Deaths (Obituaries) Diet and Nutrition Surgery and Surgeons Malnutrition University of Texas system Dudrick, Dr. Stanley J. Total Parenteral Nutrition Source Type: news

FDA OKs New Cysteine Hydrochloride Product Nouress FDA OKs New Cysteine Hydrochloride Product Nouress
Cysteine hydrochloride, critical for treating neonatal patients requiring total parenteral nutrition, remains in short supply in the United States.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Pharmacist Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pharmacist Headlines - December 18, 2019 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Pediatrics News Alert Source Type: news

FDA Approves Nouress (cysteine hydrochloride) Injection for Treating Neonate Patients Requiring Total Parenteral Nutrition (TPN)
DUBLIN, Ireland, Dec. 16, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Avadel Pharmaceuticals plc (Nasdaq: AVDL) announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Nouress (AV001), a cysteine hydrochloride injection, a critical drug for... (Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals)
Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals - December 16, 2019 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

How to eat right for YOUR age: What's good (or bad) for you all depends on your stage of life
The British Association for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (BAPEN) says UK Government guidance neglects the most important factor when it comes to healthy eating - our age. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Patients left without vital IV nutrition threaten to drag the NHS to court
More than 511 patients like Lauren Mitchell (pictured) have had their supply of intravenous nutrients stopped by the Cheshire-based company, Calea, which some are now threatening to sue. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hundreds of patients at risk amid major delays to IV feed supplies
Hundreds of patients, including children, dependent on intravenous nutrition to keep them alive are experiencing delays in vital deliveries, because of restrictions placed on the manufacturer by the medical devices regulator. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - July 23, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Winter Conference 2019: Diet and Digestive Disease
The Winter Conference this year  will be in collaboration with the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) and the British Association for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (BAPEN).Interaction between diets, nutrients and the host in the promotion of systemic health is wholly dependent upon effective digestive function. Perturbation of digestive function associates with a range of pathobiologies, but dysfunction may have systemic sequelae. The gut is exquisitely sensitive and senses the nutritional status of the lumen, however the full extent of sensing is still being discovered and its functions remain opa...
Source: The Nutrition Society - May 14, 2019 Category: Nutrition Authors: Miss Emily Ooi Source Type: news

Cochrane Clinical Answers related to COVID-19
Readable, clinically-focused, actionable answers to inform point-of-care decision-making for health professionals.  Cochrane Clinical Answers (CCAs) provide a readable, digestible, clinically-focused entry point to rigorous research from Cochrane Reviews. They are designed to be actionable and to inform point-of-care decision-making. Each CCA contains a clinical question, a short answer, and data for the outcomes from the Cochrane Review deemed most relevant to practising healthcare professionals. The evidence is displayed in a user-friendly tabulated format that includes narratives, data, and links to graphics.The fo...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - April 9, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Candida Bloodstream Infections Among Persons with Injection Drug Use --- Denver Metropolitan Area, Colorado, 2017--2018
Candidemia, a bloodstream infection caused by Candida species, is typically considered a health care-associated infection, with known risk factors including the presence of a central venous catheter, receipt of total parenteral nutrition or broad-spectrum antibiotics, recent abdominal surgery, admission to an intensive care unit, and prolonged hospitalization. (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - March 28, 2019 Category: American Health Tags: MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Candida Source Type: news

Celebrities help the £500 vitamin jab go mainstream
Intravenous therapy has taken off via social media after star names led the way. But its effects are unknown, doctors warnMadonna does it. Rihanna ’s done it. Katy Perry, Rita Ora and Gwyneth Paltrow have been known to dabble and while there are no clinical studies to prove the benefits of intravenous vitamin therapy, the celebrity wellness trend appears to have gone fully mass market.In a gleaming west London clinic, with plump leather recliners and a TV tuned to Netflix, Yassine Bendiabdallah explains the benefits of his IV treatments. Customers, mostly wealthy and mostly women, visit him for courses of injections ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nosheen Iqbal Tags: Health & wellbeing Nutrition Science UK news Society Source Type: news

The future of pharmacy aseptic services in England
This report summarises findings from the first phase of a review of the provision of pharmacy aseptic services including chemotherapy, parenteral nutrition, clinical trials / investigational medicinal products, and pharmacy-led radiopharmacy. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - February 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Effects of nutrition factors on mortality and sepsis occurrence in a multicenter university-based surgical intensive care unit in Thailand (THAI-SICU study)
The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of nutrition factors on a 28-d mortality outcome and sepsis occurrence in surgical intensive care unit. Nutrition factors affecting the mortality or sepsis occurrence in this study were BMI, enteral feeding or combination with parenteral nutrition, severe weight loss, preadmission albumin ≤2.5, and at risk according to NRS-2002. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - February 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Delaying Parenteral Nutrition May Improve Outcomes in Undernourished Critically Ill Children Delaying Parenteral Nutrition May Improve Outcomes in Undernourished Critically Ill Children
Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What is refeeding?
Refeeding is reintroducing food after a period of malnourishment or starvation. If electrolytes become imbalanced as digestion resumes, a person can develop refeeding syndrome. Symptoms include fatigue and weakness, and treatment involves careful monitoring and intravenous electrolyte replacement. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

CU researchers offer insights into liver disease caused by intravenous nutrition
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) University of Colorado School of Medicine's Karim C. El Kasmi, MD, PhD, assistant professor of pediatrics, and Ronald Sokol, MD, professor of pediatrics, are authors of an article in the April 2018 Nature Communications that sheds light on the underlying cause of intestinal failure-associated liver disease and suggests new therapeutic approaches. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study identifies receptor that may be targeted to repair the heart after heart attack, cardiac arrest
This study, published in April in the journal Anesthesiology, confirmed the presence of the receptor in rodent hearts, which are similar in composition to human hearts.UCLA HealthDr. Soban Umar“This study clues us in to how we might be able to better help patients heal when they experience heart conditions,” said Dr. Soban Umar, first author of the study and an assistant professor in residence in the  department of anesthesiology and perioperative medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. “For the first time, we’re finding a particular receptor in the heart th...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Hospital's 'artificial feeding' letter to mothers criticised
The hospital described mothers who use formula milk as "artificially" feeding babies. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - March 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Two genes likely play key role in extreme nausea and vomiting during pregnancy
Most women experience some morning sickness during pregnancy, but about 2 percent of pregnant women experience a more severe form of nausea and vomiting. Sometimes the symptoms are so serious that hospitalization is required. Known as hyperemesis gravidarum, the condition is the same one that Kate Middleton, the Duchess of Cambridge, endured in her pregnancies.A new study led by researchers at UCLA and published in the journal Nature Communications has identified two genes associated with hyperemesis gravidarum, whose cause has not been determined in previous studies. The genes, known asGDF15andIGFBP7, are both involved in...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 21, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Supplemental Parenteral Nutrition in Critically Ill Adults Supplemental Parenteral Nutrition in Critically Ill Adults
How does a supplemental parenteral nutrition strategy compare with using enteral nutrition alone in terms of energy delivery?Critical Care (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Critical Care Journal Article Source Type: news

Short-term use of IV devices is common -- and risky -- study shows
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Many hospital patients get medicine or nutrition delivered straight into their bloodstream through a tiny device called a PICC. In just a decade, it's become the go-to device for intravenous care.But a new study finds that one in every four times a PICC gets inserted, the patient didn't need it long enough to justify the risks it can pose. And nearly one in ten of those patients suffered a complication linked to the device. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Training the Trainers to Ensure Customer Satisfaction
Medical device manufacturers have a thorough understanding of the science behind their products, every indication of use, and the cost savings or patient benefit when the device is used in practice. And they should, given the hundreds or thousands of hours in clinical verifications and trials required to receive regulatory clearance. As brochures are made for educating decision makers on the features and benefits of a device and instructions for use (IFUs) are produced for customers to reference before and during use, a manufacturer training program needs to be reproducible while still accommodating the preferences of...
Source: MDDI - February 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Tags: Business Source Type: news

What is DIOS?
Discussion Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor (CFTR). It is found in the epithelium of the bronchi, intestine, pancreatic duct and biliary tree. It regulates chloride, bicarbonate and water secretion. The heterozygous state helps prevent against secretory diarrhea, but the homozygous state causes thickened secretions in the hollow tubes of the lungs and digestive tract. There are multiple mutations (> 2000) which have been currently classified into classes depending on their protein production and activity. CF patients generally are l...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - December 18, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Correcting for Protein in Parenteral Nutrition Does Not Affect Hyponatremia Risk Correcting for Protein in Parenteral Nutrition Does Not Affect Hyponatremia Risk
Most patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) have hyponatremia, and PN composition does not appear to affect hyponatremia risk, according to a new study.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - December 14, 2017 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Nephrology News Source Type: news

Italy OKs living wills amid long-running euthanasia debate
Italy's Senate has passed a law allowing Italians to write living wills and refuse artificial nutrition and hydration, the latest step in Catholic Italy's long-running debate over euthanasia and when it's OK to pull the plug (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - December 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

How Long Do Late Preterm Infants Need Supplemental Feedings?
Discussion Premature infants have many problems to overcome because they just aren’t ready to live outside the uterine environment. Late premature infants are defined as birth between 34 0/7 weeks and 36 6/7 weeks gestation. In the U.S. this gestational age accounts for ~70% of all preterm births or ~300,000 births/year. Late preterm infants can have delayed oral feeding skills and failure to thrive along with increased hospital readmissions. Breastfeeding can be difficult as infants can have poor coordination and poor tone, along with decreased lactation in the mother. Learning Point Weight gain lags behind intraut...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - November 13, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Parent-to-parent: Tips for Home Parenteral Nutrition families
Four-year-old Thomas Onorato is a young zoologist at heart. Often seen with binoculars in hand, the adventurous preschooler is particularly drawn to bird watching. He enjoys talking about his feathery friends and studying their beauty and habitat. Thomas’ love of animals runs so deep that he says he wants to be a veterinarian when he grows up. “Thomas is obsessed with animals. It’s his love,” says his mother, Melissa. Beyond his quest to care for animals, Thomas has two other important missions — to manage the rare condition, microvillus inclusion disease (MVID) and receive the ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 7, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Parenting Dr. Bram Raphael home parenteral nutrition Microvillus inclusion disease Source Type: news

Fighting for the next family: Mom ’s experience inspires nutrition support guidelines
As Michelle Marti watched her twin sons, Nicholas and Max, run around the playground, she worried. To a stranger — like the representative of their local school’s Planning and Placement Team (PPT), there to evaluate the boys’ eligibility for special needs services in kindergarten — they looked like any other kids having fun. But their playfulness masked a serious illness: short bowel syndrome, the result of a condition called Hirschsprung’s disease. “They look healthy on the outside because all of their medical differences are under their clothes,” admits Michelle. Those difference...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 24, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Parenting Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Hirschsprung's disease Jessica McCaig short bowel syndrome (SBS). total parenteral nutrition Source Type: news

When transplant isn ’t the only option
Nine-year-old Ariana Dufane is happiest when she’s tumbling, whether she’s launching herself off the ground for a cartwheel or practicing how to perform the perfect split. In that moment, the fourth-grader focuses on nothing but strength and balance, a skill she has refined, not just in gymnastics but in life. Born with intestinal pseudo-obstruction — a disorder of abnormal intestinal motility function that may cause the body to go into intestinal failure — Ariana’s first few months were spent in and out of emergency rooms. Her symptoms began with a distended belly and an inability to hav...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 18, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Boston Children's Motility and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders Center Colorectal and Pelvic Malformation Center Intestinal and Multivisceral Transplant Program intestinal transplant Leonel Rodriguez pseudo-obstruc Source Type: news

Making connections: Bonded by short bowel syndrome
At the top of the dual slide, 4-year-old Brayden Austin is buzzing with energy, excited to go careening down to the bottom. Yet he waits patiently until a towheaded boy joins him on the neighboring chute. Two-year-old Camden Glover is a little nervous. But Brayden grabs his hand and the pair sails to the ground together, squealing with delight. It’s a typical playground scene, but also an apt metaphor for the boys’ special connection. The two children — one from Maine, one from Tennessee — have a close friendship. But they might never have met if not for one life-threatening event. Parallel lives &...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 28, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Dr. Bram Raphael Dr. Mark Puder intestinal malrotation Omegaven short bowel syndrome (SBS). TPN Source Type: news

‘An easy decision’: Finding care for short bowel syndrome
Allie DeRienzo loves to dance, sing and play with her big brother, switching from the pink-and-purple cartoon world of Shimmer and Shine to the action-packed fantasy of Star Wars with the blink of an eye. It’s a flexibility that has served her well: In just a few years, she’s endured more ups and downs than most 3-year-olds. Although her pregnancy was normal, it became clear as soon as Allie was born that something wasn’t right. “She was incredibly distended and was transferred almost immediately to a high-level neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in New York,” remembers her mother, Nanci. Co...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 22, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Danielle Stamm Dr. Bram Raphael Dr. Mark Puder G-tube short bowel syndrome (SBS). total parenteral nutrition Source Type: news

The tube, the team and the family that give life
As 2-year-old Naema Alshehhi turns the pages of her favorite book, her eyes glimmer with curiosity. Sitting with her father, Àbdulla and big sister, Dana, in their temporary Boston apartment, the inquisitive toddler points to a number of shapes and is fascinated by the rainbow of color. During this quiet moment, you see the gentle outline of Naema’s central line through her tiny shirt. The lifesaving tube — surgically inserted into her chest — provides the nourishment needed to manage the rare intestinal disorder she was born with, called microvillus inclusion dis...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 11, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Alexandra Carey Dr. Bram Raphael Dr. Rima Fawaz home parenteral nutrition micorvillus inclusion disease multivisceral transplant Source Type: news

FDA Drug Safety Communication: Serious medication errors from intravenous administration of nimodipine oral capsules
[08-02-2010] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is alerting healthcare professionals that nimodipine capsules should be given ONLY by mouth or through a feeding tube (nasogastric tube). (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - August 3, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Nutritional Guidelines for Critically Ill Children Released Nutritional Guidelines for Critically Ill Children Released
Guidelines on nutritional support therapy for critically ill children were jointly released by the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Society of Critical Care Medicine.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Critical Care News Source Type: news

Two life-threatening conditions.One remarkable wish.
When Lucas St. Onge blew out the five candles on his birthday cake, he made just one wish. He didn’t ask for ninja turtles, a T-ball set or an Xbox — the only thing he wished was to be just like any other kid. “It was a gift I couldn’t give,” says his mom, Heather. On that same day, last May, he got his wish. “He got a liver, stomach, pancreas, intestine and spleen — the five organs he needed to help him become healthy and happy,” Heather says. Heather was 18 weeks pregnant when she and her husband, Anthony, learned they were about to face a myriad of medical challe...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 28, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Our Patients’ Stories bone marrow transplant Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center Dr. Heung-Bae Kim Dr. Khashavar Vakili Dr. Rima Fawaz Intestine and Multivisceral Transplant Program Pediatric Transplant Center ( Source Type: news

Miles to go: From Mississippi to Boston for life-saving care
Whether he’s riding with his family on their all-terrain vehicle (ATV) at home in Mississippi, learning how to fish or playing with his cousins, Ethan Claborn is happiest when he’s outdoors. Simple things like a blade of grass or drop of rain are even more special for this almost four-year-old, considering he spent the first year of his life within hospital walls. Ethan’s parents, Holly and Gary, knew even before he was born that he would face several health challenges. But it still felt like a shock when, not long after birth, he was rushed into surgery to treat an intestinal blockage. Diagnosed with ile...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 16, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Dr. Biren Modi Dr. Mark Puder ileal atresia Omegaven total parenteral nutrition Source Type: news

Baxter ’ s CEO is transforming the company: Here ’ s how
From improved corporate culture to less bureaucracy to internal innovation, CEO José Almeida has been priming Baxter for success since taking over a year and a half ago. The former CEO of Covidien, who led the company to it $50 billion merger with Medtronic in January 2015, jumped at the opportunity to lead Baxter. The company “started with a great mission, products essential to health care,” Almeida said last week at Healthegy’s Medtech Conference in Minneapolis. The company among other things sells lifesaving renal and medical products, including intravenous (IV) solutions, systems...
Source: Mass Device - June 8, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Business/Financial News Wall Street Beat Baxter MedTech Source Type: news

The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition to publish with Wiley
(Wiley) John Wiley and Sons Inc., (NYSE:JWa) (NYSE:JWb) announced today that it has been selected by the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) as its publishing partner for its distinguished publications, The Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and Nutrition in Clinical Practice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Faces of IBD: Celebrating our patients and their caregivers
IBD nurse practitioner Caitlin Dolan educating her patient Jenna, 11 Some say it takes a village to raise a child. When it comes to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), our patients and their families depend on a “village” of caregivers — gastroenterologists, nurses, dietitians, social workers and more — to carry them through their journey. In honor of World IBD Day, May 19, we are celebrating the patients who inspire us and the dedicated Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center team that diagnose, educate and treat nearly 1,500 patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 19, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Diseases & Conditions Research and Innovation Athos Bousvaros IBD Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center Scott Snapper Source Type: news

How Common is α -1-Antitrypsin Deficiency?
Discussion α-1-Antitrypsin Deficiency (A1AT) is a common single-gene mutation disease that is homozygous recessive. The normal allele is called M and the most common abnormal allele is Z. There are other alleles though. The gene codes for one of the primary protease inhibitors in the serum, thus those who are homozygous for the Z gene are sometimes referred to as “PIZZ” or “PIZ.” α-1-Antitrypsin is found in all body tissues but is especially important in the serum and lung. As noted it is one of the primary neutrophil protease inhibitors in the serum, and acts to neutralize these enzymes...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 24, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The Unexpected Place Superbugs Are Spreading -- Hospital Sinks And Pipes
Drug-resistant bacteria can lurk in the pipes of hospital sinks, and a new study shows that these dangerous bacteria can also make their way out of sinks and continue on to reach patients. A number of recent reports have found that drug-resistant bacteria grow in the drainpipes of hospital sinks, according to the study, published today (Feb. 24) in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology. “The wet, humid and relatively protected environment” of the drainpipes makes for an ideal breeding ground for bacteria, the researchers wrote. In addition, many reports have also found a genetic link between the pa...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Causes Hyperammonemia?
Discussion Reye’s syndrome (RS)is named for Dr. Douglas Reye who along with Drs. G. Morgan and J. Baral described encephalopathy and fatty accumulation and degeneration in children in a 1963 Lancet article. RS usually affects children but can occur at all ages. All organs can be affected but the liver and brain are primarily affected causing liver failure and encephalopathy as toxic metabolites (especially ammonia) accumulate, and intracranial hypertension and cerebral edema occurs. As the ammonia levels begin to rise (> 100 mg/dL) patients lose their appetite, have nausea and emesis and mental status changes whic...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - February 20, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news