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Papua New Guinea's genetic diversity withstood farming
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Gibbons, A. Tags: Evolution, Genetics In Depth Source Type: news

Genetic history of Papua New Guinea peoples
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Anthropology, Genetics twis Source Type: news

A Neolithic expansion, but strong genetic structure, in the independent history of New Guinea
New Guinea shows human occupation since ~50 thousand years ago (ka), independent adoption of plant cultivation ~10 ka, and great cultural and linguistic diversity today. We performed genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping on 381 individuals from 85 language groups in Papua New Guinea and find a sharp divide originating 10 to 20 ka between lowland and highland groups and a lack of non–New Guinean admixture in the latter. All highlanders share ancestry within the last 10 thousand years, with major population growth in the same period, suggesting population structure was reshaped following the Neolithic l...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Bergström, A., Oppenheimer, S. J., Mentzer, A. J., Auckland, K., Robson, K., Attenborough, R., Alpers, M. P., Koki, G., Pomat, W., Siba, P., Xue, Y., Sandhu, M. S., Tyler-Smith, C. Tags: Anthropology, Genetics reports Source Type: news

Study Examines Factors that Influence Patient Satisfaction
The Research Bogomolova S, Tan PJ, Dunn SP, et al. Understanding the factors that influence patient satisfaction with ambulance services. Health Mark Q. 2016;33(2):163–180. The Science This paper comes from data collected by the Council of Ambulance Authorities Inc., the professional organization representing 11 statewide ambulance services across Australia, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea. They send annual surveys to a patientand/or their family who had emergent requests for EMS over a randomly selected two-month period. The response rate averages 30%. The satisfaction questions ask the re...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 7, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Keith Wesley, MD, FACEP Tags: Patient Care Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Study Examines Factors that Influence Patient Satisfaction
The Research Bogomolova S, Tan PJ, Dunn SP, et al. Understanding the factors that influence patient satisfaction with ambulance services. Health Mark Q. 2016;33(2):163–180. The Science This paper comes from data collected by the Council of Ambulance Authorities Inc., the professional organization representing 11 statewide ambulance services across Australia, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea. They send annual surveys to a patientand/or their family who had emergent requests for EMS over a randomly selected two-month period. The response rate averages 30%. The satisfaction questions ask the re...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - September 7, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Keith Wesley, MD, FACEP Tags: Patient Care Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

India, China, Pakistan among 10 nations accounting for 95% of HIV infections: UN report
In Asia and Pacific region, the majority of new infections are occurring in 10 countries led by India, China, Indonesia, Pakistan, Vietmnam, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - July 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Liberia: The Country After Ebola - 'The Human Suffering Changed Me'
[Al Jazeera] Monrovia, Liberia - The storm in Liberia began three years ago this summer. The word Ebola had first passed from radio to ear across the country in spring. In June, the disease was no more than an ethereal curiosity, vaguely menacing but thankfully confined to the faraway Guinean jungles and more likely to be the butt of a joke or conspiracy theory in Monrovia than cause for real concern. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 11, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Boy's parents tried to cure eye tumour using black magic
Bongre Anton Peter, from Papua New Guinea, had signs of retinoblastoma when he was a year old. Eye drops and painkillers failed to help, as his desperate parents turned to traditional tribal beliefs. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

PharmaMar and STAsia sign licensing and marketing agreement for lurbinectedin
(Pharmamar) PharmaMar (MSE:PHM) today announced an agreement with Singapore-based Specialised Therapeutics Asia Pte, Ltd (STA) to market the marine-based anti-tumour compound of the Company, lurbinectedin (PM1183) for the treatment of platinum-resistant ovarian cancer, small-cell lung cancer, BRCA 1/2 -associated metastatic breast cancer and other future oncology indications in Australia, New Zealand and in 12 Asian countries (Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Singapore, Timor-Leste, Thailand and Vietnam). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

WHO chief praises Guineans for help with Ebola vaccine
The head of the World Health Organization praised Guineans on Thursday for their role in helping to develop a vaccine against the deadly Ebola virus. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - May 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Long lost monitor lizard're-discovered' on Papua New Guinean island
Scientists have recently found and re-described a monitor lizard species from the island of New Ireland in northern Papua New Guinea. It is the only large-growing animal endemic to the island that has survived until modern times. The lizard, Varanus douarrha, was already discovered in the early 19th century, but the type specimen never reached the museum where it was destined as it appears to have been lost in a shipwreck. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 2, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Long lost monitor lizard 're-discovered' on Papua New Guinean island
(University of Turku) Scientists have recently found and re-described a monitor lizard species from the island of New Ireland in northern Papua New Guinea. It is the only large-growing animal endemic to the island that has survived until modern times. The lizard, Varanus douarrha, was already discovered in the early 19th century, but the type specimen never reached the museum where it was destined as it appears to have been lost in a shipwreck. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 2, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Niger: Energy Firm Renews Resolve to Eliminate Malaria
[CAJ News] Lagos -EXXON Mobil, the international oil and gas company, has renewed its support for local and global organisations working to end malaria around the world. The company works with partners across Angola, Cameroon, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea and Tanzania to raise awareness and advocate for solutions to fight the disease. Planned activities and public events include voluntary testing and counseling sessions, mosquito net distribution, community clean-up campaigns, school engagements, and p (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - April 26, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

He Was Searching For Intersexual Pigs And Ended Up Finding The World's Rarest Dog
Twenty years after beginning his quest to find what’s been called the world’s rarest canine species, James “Mac” McIntyre was vindicated. There on his camera screen were the images he’d been waiting years for. The New Guinea highland wild dog — an animal once feared extinct — was alive and well, his pictures showed. “I squealed like a girl,” the 62-year-old said earlier this month, speaking from his Florida home. “It was emotionally such a tremendous moment. It was justification for all the work I’ve done.” How McIntyre ended up finding the New Guinea ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Anti-malaria tools have changed during a life ’s work battling malaria
As WHO prepares to mark World Malaria Day 2017, Papua New Guinea has made major strides in the fight against malaria. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - April 20, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: malaria [subject], malaria [subject], Feature [doctype], Papua New Guinea [country], Western Pacific Region [region] Source Type: news

Despite overwhelming challenges, Papua New Guinea has made major strides against malaria
As WHO prepares to mark World Malaria Day 2017, Papua New Guinea has made major strides in the fight against malaria. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - April 20, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: malaria [subject], malaria [subject], Feature [doctype], Papua New Guinea [country], Western Pacific Region [region] Source Type: news

Papua New Guinea struggles to eradicate yaws disease
A single tablet has been shown to treat yaws cheaply and effectively but drugs and funding are in short supply (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - April 18, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Guinea: Battling a Large-Scale Measles Epidemic
Less than a year after the official end of the Ebola outbreak, the Guinean health system continues to struggle.Language English (Source: MSF News)
Source: MSF News - April 7, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Elias Primoff Source Type: news

Guinea: Battling a Large-Scale Measles Epidemic
Press releaseGuinea: Battling a Large-Scale Measles EpidemicApril 06, 2017Less than a year after the official end of the Ebola outbreak, the Guinean health system continues to struggle. (Source: MSF News)
Source: MSF News - April 6, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Brienne Prusak Source Type: news

Earthquake hazard assessment in the Momase region of Papua New Guinea - Sekac T, Jana SK, Pal I, Pal DK.
Tectonism induced Tsunami, fire, landslide along with the tremor-triggered-liquefaction are the common hazards experienced worldwide. Such hazards often lead to collapse of built-up infrastructures like roads, bridges, buildings apart from inflicting heavy... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 16, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

Persistent tropical foraging in the highlands of terminal Pleistocene/Holocene New Guinea
We present a terminal Pleistocene/Holocene palaeoenvironmental record of carbon and oxygen isotopes in small mammal tooth enamel from the site of Kiowa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 7, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Climate change helped kill off super-sized Ice Age animals in Australia
During the last Ice Age, Australia, Tasmania and New Guinea formed a single landmass, called Sahul. It was a strange and often hostile place populated by a bizarre cast of giant animals. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 27, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Start The Year With A Social Detox
This article first appeared on QuietRev.com We don’t do all that much for the holidays. We don’t travel great distances while lugging presents or have Hollywood-level, tension-filled dinner chat with relatives who love to start loud conversations about sensitive, personal subjects. But even without the drama, I still end up exhausted from socializing by the time it’s the New Year.    My strategies for self-preservation at any celebration or family get-together are generally successful because I get some alone time by volunteering for things. I organize pickups, I run errands—anything that ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Life as Our Ancestors Lived It
January 11, 2016 In most of the time human beings have lived on Earth, it was in circumstances very different from those we encounter now. I learned about how people might have lived in Stone Age cultures when I lived in one fifty years ago. I chose to do so in order to examine facial expressions and gestures that could not have been influenced by contact with outsiders or the media. Would they be the same as I had observed in many literate cultures, or would there be new expressions I had never seen before? (They were the same.) Even if I saw familiar expressions and gestures, might they signal entirely different emotion...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 11, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

18 Diseases The World Has Turned Its Back On
This article is part HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to eliminate them. More than 1 billion people on the planet suffer from illnesses that the world pays little attention to. Neglected tropical diseases are a group of at least 18 diseases that primarily affect people living in poverty in tropical regions of the world and are virtually unknown elsewhere, according to the World Health Organization. These are diseases like river blindness, which has infected 18 million people worldwide and caused blindness in 270,000 people; or...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

18 Diseases The World Has Turned Its Back On
This article is part HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to eliminate them. More than 1 billion people on the planet suffer from illnesses that the world pays little attention to. Neglected tropical diseases are a group of at least 18 diseases that primarily affect people living in poverty in tropical regions of the world and are virtually unknown elsewhere, according to the World Health Organization. These are diseases like river blindness, which has infected 18 million people worldwide and caused blindness in 270,000 people; or...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 6, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Ocean acidification accelerates erosion of coral reefs
Scientists studying naturally high carbon dioxide coral reefs in Papua New Guinea found that erosion of essential habitat is accelerated in these highly acidified waters, even as coral growth continues to slow. The new research has important implications for coral reefs around the world as the ocean become more acidic as a result of global change. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Private Interests Valued over Human Lives in Flint, Michigan
Flint water tower. Credit: George Thomas / Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0By Phoebe BraithwaiteNEW YORK, Oct 16 2016 (IPS)When the water in Flint, Michigan was found to be eroding the engines of cars at a General Motors’ (GM) factory, government officials agreed to change the factory’s water source, yet the same water source continued to poison the residents of Flint for another year.From 17 to 20 October governments will meet in Quito, Ecuador, for HABITAT III, the UN’s most important conference about cities, which only occurs once every 20 years. HABITAT III looks to inaugurate a new urban agenda ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 16, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Phoebe Braithwaite Tags: Editors' Choice Environment Featured Headlines Health Water & Sanitation Source Type: news

Do Humans Need Meat?
Environmentalists encourage us to cut down on meat consumption in favor of vegetable foods that are less damaging to the environment. Given that our ancestors likely had plenty of meat in their diet, is going meatless a good idea? The History of Eating Meat Our chimpanzee-like ancestors were mostly vegetarian, judging from the diet of modern chimpanzees that subsist mainly on fruit, leaves, and nuts, with a rare morsel of hunted meat. After they left forests in favor of open grasslands, hominids likely increased the proportion of meat in their diet given that they would have encountered large herds of game animals. Init...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

[In Depth] First Polynesians launched from East Asia to settle Pacific
It was only 3000 years ago that humans first set foot on Fiji and other isolated islands of the Pacific, having sailed across thousands of kilometers of ocean. Yet the identity of these intrepid seafarers has been lost to time. They left a trail of distinctive red pottery but few other clues, and scientists have confronted two different scenarios: The explorers were either farmers who sailed directly from mainland East Asia to the remote islands, or people who mixed with hunter-gatherers they met along the way in Melanesia, including Papua New Guinea. Now, the first genome-wide study of ancient DNA from prehistoric Polynes...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 6, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Ann Gibbons Tags: Human Evolution Source Type: news

Facial Perception: The Human Superpower
Recognizing faces happens so naturally and swiftly that we rarely give it a second thought. However, a simple scratch of the surface reveals that facial recognition and perception are wildly complex tricks. If you glimpse a photo of a friend, parent, or celebrity, you don't need to spend any time assessing the creases and folds of their nose before you can definitively say who they are. Recognizing a face is instant and effortless. It is so effortless that it is forgivable to have never considered how we manage it. If you take a moment to think how complex a face is, yet how similar each face is to each other - two ey...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Domestic violence in PNG
Everyone back home wants to know what Papua New Guinea is like. “Is it true that cannibals still exist?” is the usual question to spring from their lips. (The answer is no. Well, not really. Actually, maybe. I still haven’t got a straight answer on that one.) (Source: MSF News)
Source: MSF News - September 27, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

[In Depth] Aborigines and Eurasians rode one migration wave
A​ustralian Aborigines have long been cast as a people apart. Although Australia is halfway around the world from our species's accepted birthplace in Africa, the continent is nevertheless home to some of the earliest undisputed signs of modern humans outside Africa, and Aborigines have unique languages and cultural adaptations. Some researchers have posited that the ancestors of the Aborigines were the first modern humans to surge out of Africa, spreading swiftly eastward along the coasts of southern Asia thousands of years before a second wave of migrants populated Eurasia. Not so, according to a trio of genomic studie...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 22, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Elizabeth Culotta Tags: Human Origins Source Type: news

DNA Evidence Sheds Light on When Humans First Left Africa
Researchers have found evidence to suggest that the ancestry of all non-Africans can be traced back to a single migration out of Africa at least 50,000 years ago. Modern humans evolved in Africa roughly 200,000 years ago, but the question of how our species went on to populate the rest of the globe has mystified scientists for decades. In a series of genetic analyses published on Wednesday, researchers believe they have found an answer. In analyses published in the academic journal Nature, three separate teams of geneticists surveyed DNA collected from cultures around the globe, many for the first time, and concluded that ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Suyin Haynes Tags: Uncategorized Africa DNA migration Science Source Type: news

Indigenous Australians most ancient civilisation on Earth, DNA study confirms
Clues left in genes of modern populations in Australian and Papua New Guinea enable scientists to trace remarkable journey made by first human explorersClaims that Indigenous Australians are the most ancient continuous civilisation on Earth have been backed by the first extensive study of their DNA, which dates their origins to more than 50,000 years ago.Scientists were able to trace the remarkable journey made by intrepid ancient humans by sifting through clues left in the DNA of modern populations in Australia and Papua New Guinea. The analysis shows that their ancestors were probably the first humans to cross an ocean, ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 21, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Indigenous Australians Science Indigenous peoples Australia news Genetics Evolution Source Type: news

When People Ate People, A Strange Disease Emerged
For decades, a rare disease crawled across Papua New Guinea. When scientists realized what was behind kuru, it caught everyone by surprise. But similar diseases can still be transmitted through food. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - September 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rae Ellen Bichell Source Type: news

Discovery of an ape virus in an Indonesian rodent species
The gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) is a medically important tool in cancer therapies. GALV is a retrovirus pathogenic to its host species, the southeast Asian lar gibbon (Hylobates lar) and thought to have originated from a cross-species transmission and may not originally be a primate virus at all. An international research team screened a wide range of rodents from southeast Asia for GALV-like sequences. The discovery of a new GALV in the grassland melomys (Melomys burtoni) from Indonesian New Guinea supports the hypothesis that this host species, and potentially related rodent lineages in Australia and Papua New Guine...
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 26, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Looking back into the future: Are corals able to resist a declining pH?
(Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)) Tropical Porites corals adjust their internal pH to enable themselves to form calcium carbonate and grow under elevated carbon dioxide concentrations -- even for a longer period of time. In order to understand the ability of pH regulation in more detail, researchers of GEOMAR have used the boron isotope method to examine samples of corals that have existed at natural carbon dioxide vents in Papua New Guinea for decades. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 4, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Dragon ants are coming: New'Game of Thrones' species identified
The dragons from'Game of Thrones' have come to life in insect form. New ant species that appear dragon-like due to their large and distinctive spines were recently found in the tropical rainforests of Papua New Guinea. Although they lack fire-breathing capabilities, the unique, spiny characteristics of the ants reminded the scientists who discovered them of the mythical dragons from the fantasy series and inspired them to name the ants after the'Game of Thrones' dragons. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 27, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Game of Ants: two new species named after Daenerys Targaryen's dragons
Two new ant species with spiny back barbs reminded scientists so much of the Khaleesi ’s dragons they named them Pheidole drogon and Pheidole viserion They reminded scientists of dragons so much, they named them after two of the fire-breathing beasts from the Game of Thrones. The two new ant species from Papua New Guinea, named P heidole drogon and Pheidole viserion, have spiny barbs along their backs and shoulders with an unusual set of muscles beneath them. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 27, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Naomi Stewart Tags: Taxonomy Insects Science Animals Biology Wildlife Source Type: news

Blue, green or 'nol'?
(Northwestern University) New Northwestern University research shows that even in infants too young to speak, the object categories infants form and their predictions about objects' behavior, are sculpted by the names we use to describe them. As English speakers, we might describe the blue lake or the green grass in a natural scene. But speakers of Berinmo, an indigenous language of Papua New Guinea, have a single term for the colors we describe as blues and greens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 18, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Cameroon: HIV Resistance - CIRC Considers Reducing Cost of Test
[Cameroon Tribune] The Director of the Chantal Biya International Reference Centre made the announcement yesterday, July 12, 2016, in Yaounde while receiving a Guinean delegation. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - July 13, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

FEATURE: Eradication of Yaws, disease that ‘begins where roads end,’ is within sight, says WHO doctor in new film
When Dr. Oriol Mitjà, a Spanish technical adviser for the United Nations World Health Organization (WHO), arrived in Lihir Island, Papua New Guinea, he expected to stay only a month. But after meeting hundreds of children covered in debilitating lesions, he stayed on, found a cure for their ailment, and spurred an international campaign that, if successful, will lead to the eradication of only the second disease in history. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - July 12, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

FEATURE: Eradication of Yaws, disease that ‘ begins where roads end, ’ is within sight, says WHO doctor in new film
When Dr. Oriol Mitj à , a Spanish technical adviser for the United Nations World Health Organization (WHO), arrived in Lihir Island, Papua New Guinea, he expected to stay only a month. But after meeting hundreds of children covered in debilitating lesions, he stayed on, found a cure for their ailment, and spurred an international campaign that, if successful, will lead to the eradication of only the second disease in history. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - July 12, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

These 2 Boys Were Born The Same Day In The Same Town, But Their Lives Will Be Dramatically Different
ANTANANARIVO, Madagascar -- Miranto is 5 years old. He proudly wears his school uniform, a blue smock, along with Mickey Mouse sneakers and a tilted baseball cap. He's been in school for two years, where he's on track and has made dozens of friends. Sitraka is a head shorter than Miranto and looks about half his age. He's not wearing any shoes, and his tiny T-shirt reads "Special Baby Boy." He's still learning to speak and has trouble sitting or standing still for any length of time, which means he can't go to school and has trouble making new friends. Both boys were born in the village of Ambohimidasy ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health services for gender-based violence: Médecins Sans Frontières experience caring for survivors in urban Papua New Guinea - Lokuge K, Verputten M, Ajakali M, Tolboom B, Joshy G, Thurber KA, Plana D, Howes S, Wakon A, Banks E.
BACKGROUND: Levels of gender-based violence in Papua New Guinea (PNG) are high; health services for survivors are limited. Evidence from the few existing health services for survivors can inform improvements in care in this and similar settings. ME... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 20, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news