The Loneliest Frog On Earth Dies, Marking The End Of Yet Another Species
The loneliest frog on Earth is dead, taking with him the hope of an entire species. Toughie was a famed Rabbs’ fringe-limbed tree frog and the last known member of his species. He had mottled brown skin and a strange bird-like call. He was described as “handsome,” had his own Wikipedia page and won the hearts of race car drivers and movie directors. The United Nations projected Toughie’s image onto its headquarters in New York City in 2014, as part of a campaign to raise awareness about the world’s sixth mass extinction ― a period scientists warn we’re abo...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 4, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

26 jaguars killed in Panama so far this year
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) A combination of camera-trapping studies and interviews reveals that 26 jaguars have been killed this year in the tiny Republic of Panama. Panama connects North and South America and is an important bridge for wildlife and migrating birds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 4, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The Heart of Mental Health and Well-Being at the United Nations
In the normally staid halls of the U.N., energy exploded as Bolivian musician Hillario Soto entered a large conference room at the back, playing his home-made bass flute, followed Pied-Piper-style by a troupe of musicians, adult vocalists, and youth singers. Leading the revelry on keyboards was internationally-acclaimed composer and singer/songwriter Russell Daisey performing his original anthem "Happy People, Happy Planet" that celebrates a joyful connection between people and the environment. Bass flute player Hillario Soto leading the troupe in the event open. Photo: Mamadou Dabo. As they paraded down th...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can Elon Musk Really Colonize Mars?
It’s extremely easy to get drunk on Mars. No, that doesn’t mean getting plastered on the actual planet. What it does mean is getting tipsy on the very topic of Mars, over the possibilities it offers us. By that non-literal measure, Elon Musk tied one on on Tuesday—and it was hard not to want to join him. Musk, the CEO of SpaceX, got his Mars high while delivering a talk at the International Astronautical Congress in Guadalajara, Mexico. The topic was larger than just how human beings could get to Mars one day, but how we can colonize it, populate it, build a self-sustaining colony of up to 1 million peopl...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - September 27, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized colonize Elon Musk Mars space Source Type: news

The History Of The United States Looks So Cool In GIFs
Social studies teachers across the country are celebrating right now. The U.S. National Archives ― aka the official record-keepers of America ― uploaded a lot of historical GIFs on Friday. Teaching just got hella more fun! The rumors are true--we're on Giphy! Jazz up your tweets with history! Details here: https://t.co/xH2kTwGNUN pic.twitter.com/fGmP28k9sW— US National Archives (@USNatArchives) September 23, 2016 The GIFs are based on historical videos, photos, animations and other media, and you can snag them all on Giphy. There are more than 100 GIFs to choose from, and new ones are being added daily. ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 26, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Preventing interpersonal violence in Panama: is a parenting intervention developed in Australia culturally appropriate? - Mejia A, Ulph F, Calam R.
OBJECTIVES: To explore cultural appropriateness of a transported parenting intervention in Panama. METHODS: Panamanian parents (n  = 25) were interviewed after participation in an Australian parenting intervention. A thematic analysis was conducte... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 4, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Program and Other Evaluations, Effectiveness Studies Source Type: news

Crop domestication is a balancing act
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) The ancestors of leaf-cutter ants swapped a hunter-gatherer lifestyle for a bucolic existence on small-scale subsistence farms. A new study at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama revealed that living relatives of the earliest fungus-farming ants still have not domesticated their crop, a challenge also faced by early human farmers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 2, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Is Signal From HD164595 Evidence Of Aliens Or Just Another False Alarm?
Social media and news outlets the past few days have been abuzz with the prospects of a strong signal apparently coming from the star unromantically known at HD 164595, which is about 94 light years from Earth. Reading news reports, one would think that the signal was intercepted last week, but actually it was picked up over a year ago in May of 2015. Indeed, the buzz is reminiscent of extensive news coverage that surrounded KIC 8462852, now known as Tabby's Star, last year when it was suggested by Penn State astronomer Jason Wright that the star's odd dimming behavior might be the result of an alien civilization buildin...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 30, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Duke Health Receives Support from IBM to Advance Community Wellness Program
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-13064 Email:sarah.avery@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.orgFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Thursday, Aug. 25, 2016Duke Health Receives Support from IBM to Advance Community Wellness ProgramDURHAM, N.C. --Duke Health was named among the first recipients of the IBM Health Corps award, and will be receiving expertise from some of IBM ’s top employees to build a communications infrastructure that will help connect members of Durham community health partnerships.Duke was one of five institutions worldwide selected as part of IBM ’s new Health Corps program, which aims to address dispariti...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - August 25, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Recent connection between North and South America reaffirmed
Long ago, one great ocean flowed between North and South America. When the Isthmus of Panama joined the continents, it also separated the Atlantic from the Pacific Ocean. If this took place much earlier than the accepted date of 3 million years ago as recently asserted by some, the implications for both land and sea life would be revolutionary. A new paper firmly set the date at 2.8 million years ago. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 17, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Latin-American, Caribbean health systems need more investment as populations age
Though the health systems in Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, Jamaica, Mexico and Panama have considerable strengths, citizens still reported gaps in the way primary care is organized, financed and delivered in those countries. Those who had better experiences were less likely to say that their health system needed major reforms, outlines a new report. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 9, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Latin American, Caribbean health systems need more investment as populations age
The health systems of six Latin American and Caribbean countries have made substantial progress toward universal coverage — providing free or subsidized healthcare to the majority of their populations — but continue to face challenges managing more complex health needs such as those related to cardiovascular disease, cancer, stroke and depression, a new study from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and the Inter-American Development Bank finds. Though the health systems in Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, Jamaica, Mexico and Panama have considerable strengths, citizens still reported gaps in the way primar...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 8, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Genetically Modified Mosquitoes Approved By FDA To Fight Zika In Florida
The United States has taken another step toward clearing the way for a trial of genetically modified mosquitoes in Florida as a way of reducing populations of mosquitoes that carry the Zika virus. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Friday that a field trial testing Intrexon Corp’s genetically engineered mosquitoes would not have a significant impact on the environment. The announcement came as Florida officials ramp up aerial pesticide spraying of a neighborhood in Miami. Florida is the first state to report local transmission of the virus. Florida health authorities have identified 16 Zika cases spread by...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Viveve lands S. Korea regulatory clearance for Viveve System
Viveve (NSDQ:VIVE) said today it won regulatory approval from the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety in South Korea for its Viveve non-surgical treatment for post-partum laxity of the vaginal introitus. The company said it already inked an exclusive distribution partnership in South Korea with JOYMG, a medical device distributor in the region. “The receipt of market approval in South Korea represents another important milestone in our commercialization of the Viveve System in Asia and our quest to make this clinically proven treatment available to the millions of women around the world who are living wit...
Source: Mass Device - August 5, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Regulatory/Compliance Women's Health Viveve Source Type: news

UN Secretary-General Names Natalia Kanem as UNFPA Deputy Executive Director
Language English UNITED NATIONS, New York —United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today announced the appointment of Natalia Kanem, of Panama, as Assistant Secretary-General and Deputy Executive Director (Programme) of UNFPA, the United Nations Population Fund. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - July 28, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: chapoteau Source Type: news

Latin American Development Depends On Investing In Teenage Girls
Two Mexican teenage girls at their school. Investing in education for teenage girls in Latin America is regarded as the way forward for them to become future drivers of sustainable develpment in their societies. Credit: UNFPA LACBy Estrella GutiérrezCARACAS, Jul 11 2016 (IPS)Latin America’s teenage girls are a crucial force for change and for promoting sustainable development, if the region invests in their rights and the correction of unequal opportunities, according to Luiza Carvalho, the regional head of UN Women.“An empowered adolescent will know her rights and will stand up for them; she has tools f...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 11, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Estrella Gutiérrez Tags: Civil Society Development & Aid Editors' Choice Education Featured Gender Gender Violence Global Governance Headlines Health Human Rights Inequity IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty Source Type: news

Talking Openly – The Way to Prevent Teenage Pregnancy
A teenage mother and her toddler in Bonpland, a rural municipality in the northern province of Misiones in Argentina. Latin America has the second highest regional rate of early pregnancies in the world, after sub-Saharan Africa. Credit: Fabiana Frayssinet/IPSBy Fabiana FrayssinetBUENOS AIRES, Jul 8 2016 (IPS)In plain and simple language, an Argentine video aimed at teenagers explains how to get sexual pleasure while being careful. Its freedom from taboos is very necessary in Latin American countries where one in five girls becomes a mother by the time she is 19 years old.“For good sex to happen, both partners have t...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 8, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Fabiana Frayssinet Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Development & Aid Editors' Choice Education Featured Gender Headlines Health Human Rights Inequity IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs Women's Health adolescent Adolescents Source Type: news

Talking Openly – The Way to Prevent Teenage Pregnancy
A teenage mother and her toddler in Bonpland, a rural municipality in the northern province of Misiones in Argentina. Latin America has the second highest regional rate of early pregnancies in the world, after sub-Saharan Africa. Credit: Fabiana Frayssinet/IPSBy Fabiana FrayssinetBUENOS AIRES, Jul 8 2016 (IPS)In plain and simple language, an Argentine video aimed at teenagers explains how to get sexual pleasure while being careful. Its freedom from taboos is very necessary in Latin American countries where one in five girls becomes a mother by the time she is 19 years old.“For good sex to happen, both partners have t...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 8, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Fabiana Frayssinet Tags: Active Citizens Civil Society Development & Aid Editors' Choice Education Featured Gender Headlines Health Human Rights Inequity IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva Source Type: news

Viveve inks Latin American distribution deals
Viveve (NSDQ:VIVE) said today it inked 6 new distribution deals to expand the availability of its Viveve non-surgical treatment for post-partum laxity of the vaginal introitus to 14 Latin American countries. The women’s health company said it inked deals with Sirex S.A., Torregal, Alphaeon Columbia S.A.S., Vitre-Tech, Coolmed S.A., Adenor S.A. and MARC Group International to bring the system to Argentina, Peru, Paraguay, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Costa Rica, Guatemala and the Dominican Republic. “The Latin American region represents one of the world’s largest markets for aesthetic medical ...
Source: Mass Device - July 5, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Distribution Women's Health Viveve Source Type: news

Vessel Rescues 19 Fishermen from Burning Boat Off Bermuda
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A merchant vessel that pulled into New Haven, Connecticut, this week is being honored by the U.S. Coast Guard for rescuing 19 fishermen from a boat that caught fire in the Atlantic Ocean, 900 miles southeast of Bermuda. The ship, K. Coral, spotted a plume of black smoke one day last week and when it pulled closer, the crew found the boat engulfed in flames and the sailors in the water. Seventeen fishermen were hoisted aboard the vessel. Two others drifted away while clinging to wreckage. Lookouts searched for several hours through nightfall and heavy wind and rain before the crew pulled them bo...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - June 29, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: MICHAEL MELIA, Associated Press Tags: News Rescue & Vehicle Extrication Source Type: news

Vessel Rescues 19 Fishermen from Burning Boat Off Bermuda
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A merchant vessel that pulled into New Haven, Connecticut, this week is being honored by the U.S. Coast Guard for rescuing 19 fishermen from a boat that caught fire in the Atlantic Ocean, 900 miles southeast of Bermuda. The ship, K. Coral, spotted a plume of black smoke one day last week and when it pulled closer, the crew found the boat engulfed in flames and the sailors in the water. Seventeen fishermen were hoisted aboard the vessel. Two others drifted away while clinging to wreckage. Lookouts searched for several hours through nightfall and heavy wind and rain before the crew pulled them bo...
Source: JEMS Operations - June 29, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: MICHAEL MELIA, Associated Press Tags: News Rescue & Vehicle Extrication Source Type: news

Dear Obama, Trudeau and Peña Nieto: Act Now to Save the Monarch Butterfly
MEXICO CITY -- More than 200 scientists, writers and artists have signed a letter addressed to Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, U.S. President Barack Obama and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, in advance of the North American Leaders' Summit in Ottawa later this month. The signers urge that swift and energetic actions be taken to save the monarch butterfly from the threats that endanger its survival. All three countries must work together to mitigate the loss of the butterflies' breeding habitat and to terminate all logging and mining in the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve in Michoacan, Mexico. Amo...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 17, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Video captures tadpole escape artists in Panama
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Although red-eyed tree frog embryos appear helpless within their jelly-coated eggs, they can hatch up to two days ahead of schedule, reacting within seconds to attacks by egg thieves. At the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama, scientists used high-speed video to uncover their rapid-hatching secret. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 15, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Eb139/conf./1
Dementia Draft decision proposed by the delegations of Austria, Canada, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Finland, Germany, Japan, Republic of Korea, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Panama, Switzerland, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America, Uruguay and Zambia (Source: WHO Governing Body Documentation)
Source: WHO Governing Body Documentation - May 27, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

A69/a/conf./10
Health in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Draft resolution proposed by the delegations of Japan, Panama, South Africa, Thailand, United States of America, Zambia and Zimbabwe (Source: WHO Governing Body Documentation)
Source: WHO Governing Body Documentation - May 25, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Poor communities a 'hotbed' of entrepreneurial creativity, but need help to grow long-term
(University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management) Using a national survey on entrepreneurship, researcher Laura Doering showed in a recent study that low-income entrepreneurs in Panama were just as likely as wealthier people to start early-stage businesses selling new products. But they had lower rates of sustaining those businesses into long-term profitability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 25, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

#ETComesHome to California Science Center
Co-authored by Douglas Dechow, space writer, librarian, teacher On May 21, External Tank #94 arrived at the California Science Center, where it eventually will be stacked with the orbiter Endeavour and two test rockets and displayed upright as if ready to launch. Lofty Ambitions was there to see ET-94 arrive because we couldn't imagine more fun for nerds on a Saturday night. This particular external fuel tank for the space shuttle is the only functional ET in existence. It is a lightweight version built for use with Columbia, but, in 2003, Columbia broke apart on reentry before this tank was used. By the time NASA was ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 24, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Deadly fungus threatens African frogs
Misty mountains, glistening forests and blue-green lakes make Cameroon, the wettest part of Africa, a tropical wonderland for amphibians. Africa has been mostly spared from the deadly and rampant pathogen that wiped out entire species in Australia, Madagascar and Panama -- until now. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 6, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Panama confirms four microcephaly cases tied to Zika
PANAMA CITY (Reuters) - Four babies born with microcephaly linked to the Zika virus have been confirmed in Panama, the health ministry said on Wednesday, out of 264 total cases of the mosquito-borne infection in the country. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

If You Were Rich, You'd Be a Jerk Too
Disdain for rich people has reached an all-time high. Thanks to the Panama Papers, we know the one percent shovel their billions offshore to avoid taxes and Bernie Sanders excoriates Wall Street for its corruption on a daily basis. Since the wealth gap has become so large -- the richest 62 billionaires own as much wealth as half the world's population -- we treat the upper class like a foreign species that lives in gold-encrusted glass cases. We gawk at their six-door garages and study their behaviour with disgust. It's tempting for everyone else to feel morally superior to the oligarchs sucking us dry. But the truth is, ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 4, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

There Is An Optimal Time Of Day To Get A Flu Shot, Study Suggests
There is an optimal time of the day to get a flu shot: the morning, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Birmingham and published in the journal Vaccine. In the study, senior citizens who got their flu vaccines in the mornings produced higher levels of antibodies to certain flu strains than those who got their shots in the afternoon. This is especially important for people over 65, who are more likely to have weaker immune systems than the general population and are more likely to be hospitalized and die from the flu. If the effect is confirmed in wider studies, giving seniors a shot in the m...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 27, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Why Mosquitoes Are So Obsessed with Humans -- and Why It Matters
All of us encounter a pesky mosquito from time to time. For most people, it's little more than a momentary nuisance. A nip, a few days of itching, and we move on with our lives. Many people don't get by so easily, unfortunately. Each year, mosquito bites lead to the death of an estimated 1 million people--more than the population residing in cities as large as Detroit or Geneva. Many, many millions of additional people get tremendously sick from mosquito bites, even though they don't pass away. This widespread suffering is the result of mosquito-borne diseases - viruses and parasites that pass into our bloodstream when...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 26, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Human psychology: Why do we have equivalents of bogeyman in so many countries around the world?
Bogeyman (also spelled bogieman, boogeyman, or boogie man) is a common allusion to a mythical creature in many cultures used by adults to frighten children into good behavior. This monster has no specific appearance, and conceptions about it can vary drastically from household to household within the same community. Parents may tell their children that if they misbehave, the bogeyman will get them. Bogeymen may target a specific mischief—for instance, a bogeyman that punishes children who suck their thumbs—or general misbehavior, depending on what purpose needs serving. Source: Wikipedia.Examples - by country -...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - April 26, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Psychology Source Type: news

Paleontologists find North America's oldest monkey fossil along Panama Canal
(Iowa State University) Iowa State's Aaron Wood found a tiny, black-colored fossil tooth in 2012 when he was a postdoctoral research associate for the Florida Museum of Natural History. It turns out that find was North America's oldest monkey fossil. The journal Nature just published a paper describing the discovery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 21, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Paleontologists find first fossil monkey in North America -- but how did it get here?
(University of Florida) Seven tiny teeth tell the story of an ancient monkey that made a 100-mile ocean crossing between North and South America into modern-day Panama -- the first fossil evidence for the existence of monkeys in North America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 21, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

First North American monkey fossils are found in Panama Canal excavation
Seven fossil teeth exposed by the Panama Canal expansion project are first evidence of a monkey on the North American continent before the Isthmus of Panama connected it to South America 3.5 million years ago. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 20, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Scientists Spy Rare Carpet Of Crabs Swarming Across Deep Sea Floor
While diving in a manned submersible off the coast of Panama, scientists witnessed something you might expect to see on an anthill or beehive -- or maybe in a low-budget horror film. "There was this turbid layer, and you couldn't see a thing beyond it. We just saw this cloud but had no idea what was causing it," Jesús Pineda, a biologist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, said in a statement. "As we slowly moved down to the bottom of the seafloor, all of the sudden we saw these things." There, nearly 1,200 feet below the surface, a cloud of thousands of red crabs marched eerily al...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 12, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

How Much is an Asteroid Worth? Not as Much as You Think (or a Lot More)
This article was originally posted on Inverse. By Jacqueline Ronson ost of the time, people imagine the Earth as basically self-contained. It's a discrete planet, orbiting around the sun along with the other planets in an ordered system. But the more astronomers look to the skies, the more we learn about the enormous quantity and variety of space junk that shares this space with us -- and collisions are an unavoidable conclusion. Pluto was demoted from planet to dwarf planet because scientists started noticing a lot of space rocks that looked more like pluto than Earth or Jupiter -- there may be dozens or even hundreds of...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 12, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Diving scientists record 'cloud' of thousands of swarming crabs
Researchers ‘have no idea’ why red crabs off Panama might be behaving in such a way, says a biologist: ‘Nothing like this has ever been seen’Descending in a submersible in waters off Panama, scientists noticed something strange happening near the seafloor. It was a drifting fog of sediment, disturbed by something below. Diving deeper, the scientists found the cause: crabs, thousands of them, swarming in a way never before recorded.“We just saw this cloud but had no idea what was causing it,” said Jesús Pineda, a biologist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts an...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 12, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Alan Yuhas Tags: Marine life Animals Wildlife Environment World news Science Source Type: news

Scientists capture 'mesmerizing' video of swarming red crabs
More than a thousand feet below the surface, the ocean floor seemed to come alive before the eyes – and cameras – of a team of scientists. While studying biodiversity at the Hannibal Bank Seamount, an underwater mountain off the coast of Panama, the researchers spotted something unusual from their... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 12, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Sean Greene Source Type: news

Weekend Roundup: Tax Havens and Refugee Camps Describe Today's World
This week, two faces of globalization -- tax havens and refugee camps -- were dramatically on display. As the "Panama Papers" revealed, the super-rich and well-connected have been sending boatloads of money offshore to hide their wealth and escape taxation. Powerless and penniless refugees who risked their lives on rickety vessels to reach Europe's safe shores were being sent back from camps in Greece to an uncertain fate amid the violence, misery and insecurity of the regions from which they had escaped. Along with a consortium of other global media, The WorldPost this week has been following the continuing reve...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 9, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

I wish I could be shocked by the “Panama Papers”
I wish that I could write that the revelations published this weekend about the “Panama Papers” were shocking. I wish that I still had the capacity to be shocked by the rampant advance of tax avoidance by a wealthy, out-of-touch and greedy global elite. Instead, I read – disappointed but not surprised – about the actions of millionaires and billionaires who think that they shouldn’t pay the same tax as the rest of us. Think they shouldn’t contribute to the same public services as the rest of us. Think that their personal advancement – feathering their nests with sums that no-one co...
Source: UNISON Health care news - April 5, 2016 Category: UK Health Authors: Dave Prentis Tags: General secretary's blog News Tax Tax avoidance Source Type: news

Panama Papers hack was a U.S. operation: Notice how no U.S. names appear in the list?
(NaturalNews) On Monday, a bombshell story a year in the making and which will have major implications for scores of people broke: Leaders, heads of state, drug dealers and other criminal enterprises are using a number of tax havens around the world to hide wealth and conduct illegal... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is Ransomware Considered A Health Data Breach Under HIPAA?
While it’s tempting to think of ransomware as a new cyber threat, the history of digital extortion dates back to the 1980s, and one of the first examples of ransomware was the PC Cyborg Trojan. Like modern ransomware, the Cyborg Trojan (a.k.a. Aids Info Disk) first encrypted files and then demanded payment (to a PO Box in Panama) in the more friendly terminology of a software “license renewal.” (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - March 30, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Dan Munro Source Type: news

Microcephaly – Panama
On 18 March 2016, the National IHR Focal Point of Panama notified PAHO/WHO of a newborn with concomitant microcephaly, occipital encephalocele and Zika virus infection. (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - March 29, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: pesticide [subject], insecticides, fungicides, pregnancy [subject], antenatal care, prenatal care, zika, Disease outbreak news [doctype], Panama [country], Region of the Americas [region] Source Type: news

Guillain-Barré syndrome – Panama
On 15 March 2016, the National IHR Focal Point of Panama informed PAHO/WHO of a case of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) with concomitant Zika virus infection. (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - March 29, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: pesticide [subject], insecticides, fungicides, risk assessment [subject], zika, Disease outbreak news [doctype], Panama [country], Region of the Americas [region] Source Type: news

Birth Defects Tied to Zika in Panama
The World Health Organization said the death of a baby with an unusually small head and brain damage was new evidence of the epidemic’s spreading throughout the region. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SABRINA TAVERNISE Tags: Zika Virus Microcephaly Guillain-Barre Syndrome Birth Defects World Health Organization Source Type: news

WHO expects over 2,500 Zika-linked microcephaly cases in Brazil
The World Health Organization says 39 percent of suspected cases have been confirmed in Brazil. Cases are now appearing in Panama and Cape Verde as the virus keeps spreading. This is a developing story. It will be updated. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - March 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Washington Post Source Type: news

Panama finds first case of microcephaly tied to Zika
PANAMA CITY (AP) — Doctors in Panama have identified a baby born with a rare brain disorder thought to be linked to Zika, the first such case outside Brazil. (Source: U.S. News - Health)
Source: U.S. News - Health - March 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AquaBounty fined after losing track of GM salmon in Panama during barely regulated experiments
(NaturalNews) U.S. biotechnology company AquaBounty has been ordered to pay nearly the maximum possible fine for multiple violations of environmental law in its experimental genetically modified (GM) salmon-growing operation in Panama.In response, the advocacy organizations Food... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news