A Scientology Cruise Ship Has Been Quarantined for Measles. Here ’s What to Know
The Church of Scientology’s cruise ship Freewinds with 300 passengers aboard has been quarantined in port by the Caribbean nation of St. Lucia for measles after a female crew member was diagnosed with the highly contagious, preventable disease. MarineTraffic.com lists the vessel in port at St. Lucia as the Freewinds. A ship with that name is owned by a Panamanian company linked to the Church of Scientology. NBC News also reported that a St. Lucia coast guard official confirmed that the quarantined vessel belonged to the church. The Church of Scientology did not respond to TIME’s requests for comment. St. Luci...
Source: TIME: Health - May 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease onetime Travel Source Type: news

Topical cream found as less-toxic therapy to treat cutaneous leishmaniasis
(PLOS) Paromomysin-based topical treatments were shown to be effective in curing cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), according to a randomized, double blind study conducted in Panama and published with PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. Leishmaniasis, transmitted by a female phlebotomine sand fly bite, is endemic in 98 countries and has approximately 0.7 to 1.2 million CL cases each year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 2, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Defining Hurricane Michael's impact on St. Joe Bay, Florida
(Dauphin Island Sea Lab) Hurricane Michael tore a path through Panama City, Mexico Beach, and Port St. Joe, Florida in October 2018. With the support of a National Science Foundation RAPID grant, Dr. Ken Heck and Dottie Byron will lead efforts to investigate to what extent the newly formed pass is allowing tropically-associated species, such as the emerald parrotfish and green turtles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Americans Are Some of the Most Stressed-Out People in the World, a New Global Survey Says
Americans are some of the most stressed-out people in the world, according to Gallup’s annual Global Emotions report. For the report, Gallup polled about 1,000 adults in countries around the world last year about the emotions they’d experienced the day before the survey. Negative emotions and experiences — stress, anger, worry, sadness and physical pain — were common around the world, tying 2017’s record-setting levels, the report found. In the U.S., 55% of respondents told Gallup they’d felt a lot of stress the day before, well above the global average of 35%. Gallup’s research fo...
Source: TIME: Health - April 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

The truth about a true frog: Unknown Costa Rican frog hidden amongst a widespread species
(Pensoft Publishers) Known to science since 1857, a common species of frog found from north-eastern Honduras through to central Panama, turns out to have been keeping its 'multiple identities' a secret. According to herpetologists from the University of Plymouth and UCL, who recently used DNA barcoding on the species, showed that what we currently call Warszewitsch's frog is indeed a group of " cryptic " species. Their study is published in the open-access journal ZooKeys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Chemical innovation by relatives of the ice cream bean explains tropical biodiversity
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) The back-and-forth relationship between insects and their food plants may drive tropical biodiversity evolution according to work on Barro Colorado Island's 50 hectare plot in Panama. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sierra Leone: Panama Papers Trail Offers Hope to Villagers Suing for Damages
[International Consortium of Investigative Journalists] Lawyers hope the documents will force a foreign-owned company to compensate them for alleged pollution, forced removal, health complaints and human rights violations. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 12, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Bacteria in frog skin may help fight fungal infections in humans
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Scientists at the Smithsonian and INDICASAT in Panama explored the compounds produced by frog skin bacteria as potential novel antifungal sources for the benefit of humans and amphibians. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Inflammatory biomarkers, depressive symptoms and falls among the elderly in Panama - Britton GB, O'Bryant SE, Johnson LA, Hall JR, Villarreal AE, Oviedo DC, Lao ARP, Carreira MB, For The Panama Aging Research Initiative SG.
The objective of the present study was to examine the relationship between blood-based markers of inflammation ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Philadelphia International Medicine signs deal with Panama clinic
The partnership will enable the Panama Clinic to collaborate PIM's Philadelphia-area hospitals and physicians in education and clinical care. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 30, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: John George Source Type: news

Eb144/conf./7
Follow-up to the political declaration of the third high-level meeting of the General Assembly on the prevention and control of non-communicable diseases Draft decision proposed by Argentina, Barbados, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Kenya, Monaco, Panama, Peru, Russian Federation, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Uruguay and the European Union and its Member States (Source: WHO Governing Body Documentation)
Source: WHO Governing Body Documentation - January 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

10 Dead, Dozens Injured in Bombing at Colombia Police Academy
BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — A car bomb exploded at a heavily guarded police academy in Colombia's capital on Thursday, killing 10 people and injuring dozens in an attack that recalled the bloodiest chapters of the country's drug-fueled guerrilla conflict. The scene outside the General Santander police academy in southern Bogota was chaotic in the aftermath of the midmorning attack, the biggest against a police or military facility in Bogota in years. Videos circulating on social media show panicked officers hauling injured colleagues on stretchers with debris and body parts strewn in front of red tile-roofed cadet barrac...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 18, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: International Major Incidents News Terrorism & Active Shooter Mass Casualty Incidents Source Type: news

A New Spectre is Haunting Europe
Roberto Savio is founder of IPS Inter Press Service and President EmeritusBy Roberto SavioROME, Jan 17 2019 (IPS)After Teresa May’s defeat in the British parliament it is clear that a new spectre is haunting Europe. It is no longer the spectre of communism, which opens Marx’s Manifesto of 1848; it is the spectre of the failure of neoliberal globalisation, which reigned uncontested following the fall of the Berlin Wall, until the financial crisis of 2009. Roberto SavioIn 2008, governments spent the astounding amount of 62 trillion dollars to save the financial system, and close to that amount in 2009 (see Britan...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Roberto Savio Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Education Europe Featured Financial Crisis Globalisation Headlines Health Inequity TerraViva United Nations Trade & Investment Source Type: news

Madariaga virus spreads to Haiti
(PLOS) Madariaga virus (MADV), or South American eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV), has -- until now -- been found primarily in animals of South and Central America, with the first human outbreak occurring in Panama in 2010. Now, scientists writing in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases report the identification of MADV in eight children in Haiti in 2015 and 2016. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 10, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New study looks at costs and benefits of paying for ecosystem services
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) People who live within a particular ecosystem can have great influence on its ecology, particularly if they are motivated by economic forces. Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) programs may lead to improved environmental health by offering landowners economic incentives to use their land in ecologically sound ways. A recent study by Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) scientists and collaborators evaluated the economic feasibility of PES programs within the Panama Canal Watershed (PCW). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Socio-economic study looks at boosting Panama Canal reliability
(University of Wyoming) The research project met its goals to advance hydrological understanding in the steep humid tropics; understand factors affecting landowner decisions relative to paid land management plans; and combine these findings into an integrated assessment of the potential of long-term payments for hydrological ecosystem services in the Panama Canal Watershed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hantavirus disease – Republic of Panama
The Panama Ministry of Health has reported an increase in cases of hantavirus infection in Los Santos Province, Republic of Panama, to the Pan American Health Organization / World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO). Between 1 January and 22 December 2018, a total of 103 confirmed cases of hantavirus have been reported at the national level, 99 of which were reported in Los Santos Province. In Los Santos Province, 51 cases were classified as hantavirus fever1 (HF) without pulmonary syndrome and 48 cases were classified as hantavirus pulmonary syndrome2 (HPS), including four deaths. Cases were confirmed by serology and polymeras...
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - January 4, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

Surfer's ear points to ancient pearl divers in Panama
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Surfer's ear, associated with cold weather and water sports, led a bioarchaeologist at the Smithsonian in Panama to suspect that ancient shoreline residents were diving for pearls in an area of cold-water upwelling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blind creature that buries head in sand named after Donald Trump
Amphibian ’s behaviour compared to US president’s approach to global warmingA newly discovered blind and burrowing amphibian is to be officially namedDermophis donaldtrumpi,in recognition of the US president ’s climate change denial.The name was chosen by the boss ofEnviroBuild, a sustainable building materials company, who paid $25,000 ( £19,800) at an auction for the right. The small legless creature was found in Panama and EnviroBuild’s Aidan Bell said its ability to bury its head in the ground matched Donald Trump’s approach to global warming.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Donald Trump Climate change Amphibians Environment Zoology US news World news Animals Biology Science Source Type: news

James Duke, 88, Globe-Trotting Authority on Healing Plants, Is Dead
As a scholar and government researcher, he did field work in remote spots, finding indigenous remedies, trying them himself and pouring them into books. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JOHN MOTYKA Tags: Duke, James A. Deaths (Obituaries) Flowers and Plants Alternative and Complementary Medicine Panama Canal and Canal Zone Department of Agriculture Source Type: news

Eb144/conf./3
Antimicrobial resistance Draft resolution proposed by Argentina, Australia, Canada, Chile, Germany, Israel, Kenya, Oman, Panama, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and United States of America (Source: WHO Governing Body Documentation)
Source: WHO Governing Body Documentation - November 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bacterial Research Points to New Mosquito-Borne Disease Strategy
(MedPage Today) -- From bathroom in Panama to vector control candidate (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - October 31, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Red Cross Volunteers Helping Pets After Hurricane Michael
Two Cats Find a New Home American Red Cross disaster responders are humanitarians, but their compassion isn’t limited to humans. Volunteer Shanda Scott was assessing the damage to homes in the North... {This is a content summary only. Click the blog post title to continue reading this post, share your comments, browse the blog and more!} (Source: Red Cross Chat)
Source: Red Cross Chat - October 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: American Red Cross Tags: Disaster cats dogs florida Hurricane Michael Panama City Beach pet rescue pet reunification Red Cross volunteers Source Type: news

Researchers observe novel bat behavior in Panama
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) According to a new report from researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) who studied Peters' tent-making bats (Uroderma bilobatum), mothers prod their young with their forearms, perhaps encouraging them to fledge and wean. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Florida Panhandle Medical Care Damaged by Hurricane Michael
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — Already sick with strep throat and asthma, Aleeah Racette got sicker when she cleaned out a soggy, moldy home after Hurricane Michael, so she sought help at the hospital where she began life. She was stunned by what she saw there. The exterior wall of Bay Medical Sacred Heart in Panama City is missing from part of the building, and huge vent tubes attached to fans blow air into upper floors through holes where windows used to be. Plywood signs with green spray-painted letters point to the entrance of the emergency room, the only part of the 323-bed hospital still operating. "I've never s...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - October 23, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: BRENDAN FARRINGTON and JAY REEVES, Associated Press Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

Florida Panhandle Medical Care Damaged by Hurricane Michael
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — Already sick with strep throat and asthma, Aleeah Racette got sicker when she cleaned out a soggy, moldy home after Hurricane Michael, so she sought help at the hospital where she began life. She was stunned by what she saw there. The exterior wall of Bay Medical Sacred Heart in Panama City is missing from part of the building, and huge vent tubes attached to fans blow air into upper floors through holes where windows used to be. Plywood signs with green spray-painted letters point to the entrance of the emergency room, the only part of the 323-bed hospital still operating. "I've never s...
Source: JEMS Operations - October 23, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: BRENDAN FARRINGTON and JAY REEVES, Associated Press Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

Families Search for the Missing in Hurricane Michael's Aftermath
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — Joanne Garone Behnke has replayed every possible scenario in her mind a hundred times. Maybe her 79-year-old aunt sought shelter at the sturdy condo nearby that withstood Hurricane Michael's devastating winds. Maybe she was rescued and is lying in a hospital bed somewhere. The pile of rubble that was once her Mexico Beach home is shallow, too shallow for a body to go unnoticed, Garone Behnke tells herself. "It's torture," says Garone Behnke, who last talked to her Aunt Aggie Vicari right before the storm hit, begging her to leave her cinderblock home. Five days after the hurricane s...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - October 16, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Russ Bynum and Kelli Kennedy, Associated Press Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

Families Search for the Missing in Hurricane Michael's Aftermath
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — Joanne Garone Behnke has replayed every possible scenario in her mind a hundred times. Maybe her 79-year-old aunt sought shelter at the sturdy condo nearby that withstood Hurricane Michael's devastating winds. Maybe she was rescued and is lying in a hospital bed somewhere. The pile of rubble that was once her Mexico Beach home is shallow, too shallow for a body to go unnoticed, Garone Behnke tells herself. "It's torture," says Garone Behnke, who last talked to her Aunt Aggie Vicari right before the storm hit, begging her to leave her cinderblock home. Five days after the hurricane s...
Source: JEMS Operations - October 16, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Russ Bynum and Kelli Kennedy, Associated Press Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

HCA Healthcare pledges $1 million to Hurricane Michael relief
HCA Healthcare is donating $1 million to the American Red Cross to assist those affected by Hurricane Michael. HCA Healthcare has 45 hospitals in Florida, including Gulf Coast Regional Medical Center in Panama City. The hospital sustained significant damage and the company said it is in the process of evaluating the impact on services.    In Tampa Bay, for-profit HCA Holdings has 15 locations including Brandon Regional Hospital, Palms of Pasadena Hospital, Medical Center of Trinity and Largo… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - October 15, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Alexis Muellner Source Type: news

HCA Healthcare pledges $1 million to Hurricane Michael relief
HCA Healthcare is donating $1 million to the American Red Cross to assist those affected by Hurricane Michael. HCA Healthcare has 45 hospitals in Florida, including Gulf Coast Regional Medical Center in Panama City. The hospital sustained significant damage and the company said it is in the process of evaluating the impact on services.    In Tampa Bay, for-profit HCA Holdings has 15 locations including Brandon Regional Hospital, Palms of Pasadena Hospital, Medical Center of Trinity and Largo… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 15, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Alexis Muellner Source Type: news

Hospitals' crucial work continues amid hurricane
Patients originally at hospitals in Panama City, Florida, woke up in other facilities Friday morning after Hurricane Michael made it impossible for some health care facilities to function fully. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - October 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Death Toll Rises in Michael ’s Wake
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — Linda Marquardt rode out Hurricane Michael with her husband at their home in Mexico Beach. When their house filled with surging ocean water, they fled upstairs. Now their home is full of mud and everywhere they look there's utter devastation in their Florida Panhandle community: fishing boats tossed like toys, roofs lifted off of buildings and pine trees snapped like matchsticks in 155 mph winds. Row after row of beachfront homes were so obliterated by Michael's surging seas and howling winds that only slabs of concrete in the sand remain, a testament that this was ground zero when the epic C...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - October 12, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news

Hurricane Michael Charges into Southeast after Slamming Florida
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — The most powerful hurricane on record to hit Florida's Panhandle left wide destruction and at least two people dead and wasn't nearly finished Thursday as it crossed Georgia, now as a tropical storm, toward the Carolinas, that are still reeling from epic flooding by Hurricane Florence. A day after the supercharged storm crashed ashore amid white sand beaches, fishing towns and military bases, Michael was no longer a Category 4 monster packing 155 mph (250 kph) winds. As the tropical storm continued to weaken it was still menacing the Southeast with heavy rains, blustery winds and possible spi...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - October 11, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jay Reeves and Brendan Farrington, Associated Press Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

Hurricane Michael Charges into Southeast after Slamming Florida
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — The most powerful hurricane on record to hit Florida's Panhandle left wide destruction and at least two people dead and wasn't nearly finished Thursday as it crossed Georgia, now as a tropical storm, toward the Carolinas, that are still reeling from epic flooding by Hurricane Florence. A day after the supercharged storm crashed ashore amid white sand beaches, fishing towns and military bases, Michael was no longer a Category 4 monster packing 155 mph (250 kph) winds. As the tropical storm continued to weaken it was still menacing the Southeast with heavy rains, blustery winds and possible spi...
Source: JEMS Operations - October 11, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jay Reeves and Brendan Farrington, Associated Press Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

Some Stay as Hurricane Michael Approaches
PANAMA CITY BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Timothy Thomas isn't budging from his home on Ocean View Drive, even though it's directly in the path of Hurricane Michael. Thomas, a 50-year-old air conditioning repairman, plans to defy an evacuation order and ride out the monster storm in an apartment that's just a few hundred yards from the beach and even closer to the tea-colored Grand Lagoon, which will rise as the massive storm pushes ocean water toward the coast of the Florida Panhandle on Wednesday. An Illinois native with a beard, long hair and a streak of independence, Thomas hasn't been through a major hurricane before; he's...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - October 10, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news

Some Stay as Hurricane Michael Approaches
PANAMA CITY BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Timothy Thomas isn't budging from his home on Ocean View Drive, even though it's directly in the path of Hurricane Michael. Thomas, a 50-year-old air conditioning repairman, plans to defy an evacuation order and ride out the monster storm in an apartment that's just a few hundred yards from the beach and even closer to the tea-colored Grand Lagoon, which will rise as the massive storm pushes ocean water toward the coast of the Florida Panhandle on Wednesday. An Illinois native with a beard, long hair and a streak of independence, Thomas hasn't been through a major hurricane before; he's...
Source: JEMS Operations - October 10, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jay Reeves, Associated Press Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

Hurricane Michael Strengthens Into Category 2 As it Barrels Towards Florida
MIAMI — Hurricane Michael swiftly intensified into a Category 2 over warm Gulf of Mexico waters Tuesday amid fears it would strike Florida on Wednesday as a major hurricane. Mandatory evacuations were issued as beach dwellers rushed to board up homes just ahead of what could be a devastating hit. A hurricane hunter plane that bounced into the swirling eye off the western tip of Cuba found wind speeds rising. By 8 a.m. Tuesday, top winds had reached 100 mph (155 kph), and it was forecast to strengthen more, with winds topping 111 mph (179 kph), capable of causing devastating damage. Gov. Rick Scott warned people acro...
Source: TIME: Science - October 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

New soft coral species discovered in Panama
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Another new coral found in Panama's Coiba National Park, a UNESCO National Heritage Site, the location of the Smithsonian's newest research site. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Project Will Bring High-Quality HIV Services to the People Who Need Them Most in Five Central American Countries
August 07, 2018​IntraHealth International will expand its HIV prevention, care, and treatment efforts in Central America with a new $15 million award from the U.S. Agency for International Development. The Strengthening Care and Treatment Cascade Project will help El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Panama improve the quality and reach of their HIV services and allocate more resources where they are most needed.While the overall HIV prevalence is low in these countries, the epidemic is concentrated among key groups, including men who have sex with men, transgender women, and female sex workers. Despite these...
Source: IntraHealth International - August 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: intrahealth Source Type: news

Science ’s search for a super banana
A fruit bowl favourite and a staple food to millions, the banana is under threat from a formidable foeSome suggest the banana is on the brink of extinction. Panama disease, also known as fusarium wilt, is on the march, wiping out plantations that provide a staple food for hundreds of millions of people and a livelihood for hundreds of thousands more.Others say talk of Bananageddon is exaggerated. They point out bananas are as cheap and abundant as ever in our shops. The fungal strain that causes a new form of Panama disease has been spreading steadily for three decades, yet global production has continued to rise. Latin Am...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nic Fleming Tags: Agriculture Genetics Pesticides Farming Biology Environment Science Source Type: news

Protecting adolescents in low- and middle-income countries from interpersonal violence (PRO YOUTH TRIAL): study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial of the strengthening families programme 10-14 ("Familias Fuertes") in Panama - Mejia A, Emsley R, Fichera E, Maalouf W, Segrott J, Calam R.
BACKGROUND: Interpersonal violence can significantly reduce adolescents' opportunities for becoming happy and healthy adults. Central America is the most violent region in the world and it is estimated that adolescents are involved in 82% of all homicides ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Did you solve it? World Cup arithmetic
The solutions to today ’s puzzlesOn my puzzle blog earlier today I set you three football table challenges:1) England, Tunisia, Belgium and Panama make up Group G in the 2018 World Cup. Imagine that once they have all played each other the table looks like this.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alex Bellos Tags: Mathematics Education Science Source Type: news

Occupational Safety Grows in Latin America, Except Among Young People
Young municipal workers wear uniforms and other protective equipment while cutting the grass in the Praça Paris park in the Gloria neighbourhood in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The lack of training and the breach of safety requirements by their employers make young Latin Americans the most vulnerable to accidents at work. Credit: Fabiana Frayssinet/IPSBy Fabiana FrayssinetRIO DE JANEIRO, Apr 27 2018 (IPS)Despite progress achieved in occupational safety in Latin America, the rates of work-related accidents and diseases are still worrying, especially among young people, more vulnerable in a context of labour flexibility an...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Fabiana Frayssinet Tags: Civil Society Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Headlines Health Human Rights Labour Latin America & the Caribbean Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories International Labour Organisation (ILO) workplace safety Source Type: news

Occupational Safety Improves in Latin America, Except Among Young People
Young municipal workers wear uniforms and other protective equipment while cutting the grass in the Praça Paris park in the Gloria neighbourhood in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The lack of training and the breach of safety requirements by their employers make young Latin Americans the most vulnerable to accidents at work. Credit: Fabiana Frayssinet/IPSBy Fabiana FrayssinetRIO DE JANEIRO, Apr 27 2018 (IPS)Despite progress achieved in occupational safety in Latin America, the rates of work-related accidents and diseases are still worrying, especially among young people, more vulnerable in a context of labour flexibility an...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Fabiana Frayssinet Tags: Civil Society Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Headlines Health Human Rights Labour Latin America & the Caribbean Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories International Labour Organisation (ILO) workplace safety Source Type: news

Whale shark logs longest-recorded trans-Pacific migration
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) A whale shark named Anne swam all the way across the Pacific from Coiba National Park in Panama to the Marianas Trench, setting a record as the longest-recorded migration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Community Liaisons are Resourceful and Persistent
April 06, 2018This week, we ’re featuring stories from frontline health workers all over the world. It’s just one of the ways we’re celebrating World Health Worker Week 2018. Imagine having to travel for hours to a faraway health facility to get regular, critical care —even though there’s a similar facility just down the road from your home.This is what Luis*, 49, struggles with in Western Guatemala. He wants to get the HIV care he needs, earn a living, and maintain his privacy all at the same time —but it’s difficult.“In [the closest] HIV clinic, there is a cleanin...
Source: IntraHealth International - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: intrahealth Source Type: news

Tracking Aedes mosquito invasions in Panama
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Mosquitoes in the genus Aedes, which carry viruses causing yellow fever, chikungunya and Zika, invaded the crossroads of the Americas multiple times, by land and by sea. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Frogs Fight Back From Fungal Attack
A decade after chytridiomycosis killed scores of amphibians in Panama, some species are recovering. New research indicates why. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 29, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Daily News,News & Opinion Source Type: news

Resampling of hard-hit region suggests amphibians may be developing resistance to deadly fungus
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) As amphibian populations globally continue to be ravaged by chytridiomycosis, a disease caused by a deadly fungal pathogen, a new study suggests that some populations in Panama may have started becoming more resistant to the fungus about a decade after it began significantly impacting them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 29, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Tropical forest response to drought depends on age
(University of Wyoming) Factors most important for regulation of transpiration in young forests in Panama had to do with their ability to access water in the soil, whereas older forests were more affected by atmospheric conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news