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Occupational Safety Grows in Latin America, Except Among Young People
Young municipal workers wear uniforms and other protective equipment while cutting the grass in the Praça Paris park in the Gloria neighbourhood in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The lack of training and the breach of safety requirements by their employers make young Latin Americans the most vulnerable to accidents at work. Credit: Fabiana Frayssinet/IPSBy Fabiana FrayssinetRIO DE JANEIRO, Apr 27 2018 (IPS)Despite progress achieved in occupational safety in Latin America, the rates of work-related accidents and diseases are still worrying, especially among young people, more vulnerable in a context of labour flexibility an...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Fabiana Frayssinet Tags: Civil Society Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Headlines Health Human Rights Labour Latin America & the Caribbean Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories International Labour Organisation (ILO) workplace safety Source Type: news

Occupational Safety Improves in Latin America, Except Among Young People
Young municipal workers wear uniforms and other protective equipment while cutting the grass in the Praça Paris park in the Gloria neighbourhood in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The lack of training and the breach of safety requirements by their employers make young Latin Americans the most vulnerable to accidents at work. Credit: Fabiana Frayssinet/IPSBy Fabiana FrayssinetRIO DE JANEIRO, Apr 27 2018 (IPS)Despite progress achieved in occupational safety in Latin America, the rates of work-related accidents and diseases are still worrying, especially among young people, more vulnerable in a context of labour flexibility an...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Fabiana Frayssinet Tags: Civil Society Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Headlines Health Human Rights Labour Latin America & the Caribbean Poverty & SDGs Regional Categories International Labour Organisation (ILO) workplace safety Source Type: news

Whale shark logs longest-recorded trans-Pacific migration
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) A whale shark named Anne swam all the way across the Pacific from Coiba National Park in Panama to the Marianas Trench, setting a record as the longest-recorded migration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Community Liaisons are Resourceful and Persistent
April 06, 2018This week, we ’re featuring stories from frontline health workers all over the world. It’s just one of the ways we’re celebrating World Health Worker Week 2018. Imagine having to travel for hours to a faraway health facility to get regular, critical care —even though there’s a similar facility just down the road from your home.This is what Luis*, 49, struggles with in Western Guatemala. He wants to get the HIV care he needs, earn a living, and maintain his privacy all at the same time —but it’s difficult.“In [the closest] HIV clinic, there is a cleanin...
Source: IntraHealth International - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: intrahealth Source Type: news

Tracking Aedes mosquito invasions in Panama
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Mosquitoes in the genus Aedes, which carry viruses causing yellow fever, chikungunya and Zika, invaded the crossroads of the Americas multiple times, by land and by sea. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Frogs Fight Back From Fungal Attack
A decade after chytridiomycosis killed scores of amphibians in Panama, some species are recovering. New research indicates why. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 29, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Daily News,News & Opinion Source Type: news

Resampling of hard-hit region suggests amphibians may be developing resistance to deadly fungus
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) As amphibian populations globally continue to be ravaged by chytridiomycosis, a disease caused by a deadly fungal pathogen, a new study suggests that some populations in Panama may have started becoming more resistant to the fungus about a decade after it began significantly impacting them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 29, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Tropical forest response to drought depends on age
(University of Wyoming) Factors most important for regulation of transpiration in young forests in Panama had to do with their ability to access water in the soil, whereas older forests were more affected by atmospheric conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

In Central America, New Adherence Promoters Keep HIV Clients on Treatment
March 02, 2018Carlos considered dropping out of everything. Then he met Aracely, an adherence promoter.Carlos* remembers the exact date he found out he was HIV-positive. He was 20 years old.“January 20, 2015. I was walking with some friends and, over in the square, we saw a tent where they were giving HIV tests,” he says. “As a group of nursing assistants, we said, ‘Let’s do this! Why not?’”Carlos sat alone as he waited for his results. He was #45 in the queue that day.“When they told me I needed additional tests because my results were reactive to virus, I felt my world fall...
Source: IntraHealth International - March 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: cbales Source Type: news

Why are there so many types of lizards?
(Arizona State University) Researchers from Arizona State University School of Life Sciences and Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute have sequenced the complete genetic code -- the genome -- of several vertebrate species from Panama. They found that changes in genes involved in the interbrain (the site of the pineal gland and other endocrine glands), for color vision, hormones and the colorful dewlap that males bob to attract females, may contribute to the formation of boundaries between species. Genes regulating limb development also evolved especially quickly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

In Central America, Health Workers and Communities Achieve Big Progress in the Fight against HIV
Health workers in the HIV clinic at Juan Jos é Ortega National Hospital in Coatepeque, Guatemala. Photos by Anna Watts for IntraHealth InternationalFebruary 07, 2018IntraHealth International is in the final months of an intensive two-and-a-half-year collaboration with government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and civil society groups in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Panama to accelerate progress toward reaching theUNAIDS Fast-Track targets and ending the AIDS epidemic —and the results from the first two years are striking. IntraHealth’s local partners administered 186,471 HIV tests, rea...
Source: IntraHealth International - February 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: intrahealth Source Type: news

BEAUTIFUL CO2: Higher carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere linked to more flowers blooming in tropical forests
(Natural News) The increasing levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) brought about by climate change resulted in an increase in flower production in remote tropical forests across of the globe, according to a study published in the journal Global Change Biology. A team of researchers at Florida State University examined plant materials obtained from tropical forests of Panama’s Barro Colorado... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How did a deadly tropical fungus get to the temperate environs of the Pacific Northwest?
(The Translational Genomics Research Institute) In what is being described as 'The Teddy Roosevelt effect,' a deadly fungus in the Pacific Northwest may have arrived from Brazil via the Panama Canal, according to a new study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen). Cryptococcus gattii -- which until a 1999 outbreak in British Columbia's Vancouver Island was considered primarily a tropical fungus -- can cause deadly lung and brain infections in both people and animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Jaguar conservation depends on neighbors' attitudes
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) A survey of residents near two major national parks in Panama indicates that jaguars deserve increased protection. But because most residents still support road-building in the parks, the survey team recommends further education to emphasize the connection between healthy ecosystems and jaguar survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How a Venezuelan Living with HIV Could Change the Way Mexico Deals with Refugees
Daniel (not his real name), is a Venezuelan living with HIV. Mexico gave him refugee status, based on a humanitarian cause. Credit: Sergio Ortiz/ Amnistía InternacionalBy Josefina SalomonMEXICO CITY, Dec 21 2017 (IPS)As Daniel*, a 26-year-old architect, stood before a visibly exhausted doctor in the main public hospital of the once-idyllic beach resort town of Isla Margarita, northern Venezuela, a terrifying premonition took hold of him.“We are not doing tests until further notice. The machine is not working and we don’t have any reagents,” the man in the white coat told him.It was early June 2015....
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Josefina Salomon Tags: Headlines Health Human Rights Latin America & the Caribbean LGBTQ Migration & Refugees Regional Categories Source Type: news

Boat traffic threatens the survival of Panama's Bocas Del Toro dolphins
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Bottlenose dolphins in Panama's Bocas Del Toro Archipelago should be designated as endangered say the authors of a new study. Biologists working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute discovered that the roughly 80 dolphins in the archipelago do not interbreed with other Caribbean bottlenose dolphins. Their low numbers jeopardize their long-term survival, which is threatened by increasing local boat traffic that killed at least seven dolphins in 2012. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why UHC Day Is a Call to Action for the World ’s Youth
December 14, 2017Our potential as  advocates and partners in achieving universal health coverage is woefully untapped.It ’s no accident that Universal Health Coverage Day — December 12 — falls on the heels of Human Rights Day. Universal health coverage (UHC), the goal of ensuring that all people can access essential health services without exposure to financial hardship, is a dignity and a right not afforded to many around the world.Today, I remember Gabriel, a Panamanian boy half my age who first taught me how a fractured health system fails people.Where someone lives should never deter...
Source: IntraHealth International - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Saving Cavendish: QUT grows world-first Panama disease-resistant bananas
(Queensland University of Technology) QUT researchers have developed and grown modified Cavendish bananas resistant to the devastating soil-borne fungus Fusarium wilt tropical race 4 (TR4), also known as Panama disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A giant insect ecosystem is collapsing due to humans. It's a catastrophe
Insects have triumphed for hundreds of millions of years in every habitat but the ocean. Their success is unparalleled, which makes their disappearance all the more alarmingThirty-five years ago an American biologist Terry Erwin conducted an experiment to count insect species. Using an insecticide “fog”, he managed to extract all the small living things in the canopies of 19 individuals of one species of tropical tree,Luehea seemannii, in the rainforest of Panama. He recorded about 1,200 separate species, nearly all of them coleoptera (beetles) and many new to science; and he estimated that 163 of these would b...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Michael McCarthy Tags: Insects Animals Environment Wildlife World news Butterflies Bees Farming Agriculture Science Biology Trees and forests Amazon rainforest UK news Deforestation Source Type: news

Against All the Odds, Syria ’s National Soccer Team Is Close to Qualifying for the World Cup
As its cities lay in ruins and millions of its citizens continue to suffer the horrors of a vicious civil war, Syria has its eyes on a bright and unexpected goal this week: a long-sought World Cup spot. An underdog Syrian squad, ranked 75th in the world, has claimed credible draws with regional heavyweights like South Korea and Iran and beaten the likes of China, Qatar, and Uzbekistan to clinch a runners-up place and a chance to qualify for the first time for the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia. They just have a few games standing in their way. “The important thing is that the team is determined to try and qualify for...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eli Meixler Tags: Uncategorized onetime Soccer Sports Syria World World Cup Source Type: news

Pioneer of work in women ’ s reproductive health appointed head of UN Population Fund
United Nations Secretary-General Ant ó nio Guterres today appointed Natalia Kanem of Panama to head the UN ’ s women ’ s health agency. (Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population)
Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population - October 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Where You Should Road Trip, Based on Your Zodiac Sign
This article originally appeared on TravelandLeisure.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Karen Ruffini / Travel + Leisure Tags: Uncategorized onetime onetimetravel Source Type: news

Mercury Mining Awaits International Control in Mexico
Artisanal gold mining in Latin America uses mercury, a practice that should be modified in countries that have ratified the international Minamata Convention for the control of this toxic metal. Credit: Thelma Mejía/IPSBy Emilio GodoyMEXICO CITY, Sep 26 2017 (IPS)For environmentalist Patricia Ruiz the only word that comes to mind is “devastating,” when describing the situation of mercury mining in her home state of Querétaro in central Mexico.“There are a large number of pits (from which the mercury is extracted), and there are the tailing ponds containing mining waste, all of which drains i...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Emilio Godoy Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Environment Global Governance Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Latin America & the Caribbean Natural Resources Regional Categories gold mining mercury Mexico Minam Source Type: news

British Financial Times Journalist, 24, Thought to Have Been Killed by Crocodile in Sri Lanka
A British journalist working for the Financial Times is thought to have been killed by a crocodile while on holiday in Sri Lanka. Former Oxford University student Paul McClean, aged 24, was found dead in mud at a lagoon nicknamed ‘Crocodile Rock,’ near the coastal village of Panama in the southeast of the country. Witnesses told the Times that McClean had been seen waving in desperation as he was dragged underwater by the beast. A postmortem examination will be carried out later today. Alex Barker, the Financial Times‘ Brussels Bureau Chief, described McClean as “a first-class journalist in the maki...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kate Samuelson Tags: Uncategorized onetime United Kingdom Source Type: news

Cleanliness is next to sexiness for golden-collared manakins in Panama
Male golden-collared manakins on extra testosterone cleaned up their display area before performing for females, whilst females became more aggressive on extra testosterone, according to research published inAnimal Behavior.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - September 5, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Cleanliness is next to sexiness for golden-collared manakins in Panama
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Juvenile male Golden-collared Manakins on extra testosterone cleaned up their display area before performing for females, according to research at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama published in Animal Behavior. Female manakins got more aggressive when given testosterone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Panama's native tree species excel in infertile tropical soils
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Smithsonian scientists and collaborators including the Panama Canal Authority confirm that native tree species performed very well in field trials and would be preferable to teak in the poor soils of the Panama Canal watershed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 31, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Disease-carrying mosquitoes rare in undisturbed tropical forests
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) A new study by scientists from the Smithsonian, the Panamanian government and the US Environmental Protection Agency, among other institutions, concludes that conserving old-growth tropical rainforest is 'highly recommended' to prevent new outbreaks of viral and parasitic mosquito-borne diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Smithsonian manatee count informs policy recommendations
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Smithsonian scientists use sonar to estimate Antillean Manatee populations in the murky waters of Panama's internationally protected San San Pond Sak wetlands. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Comparing the jaws of porcupine fish reveals three new species
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and colleagues compared fossil porcupine fish jaws and tooth plates collected on expeditions to Panama, Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil with those from museum specimens and modern porcupine fish, revealing three new species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 16, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The undertaker's census
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Scientists working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama tested a new technique: recruiting carrion-eating flies to detect mammals. This new method surpasses standard techniques, detecting more species than researchers could count along trails or photograph with hidden cameras. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Seeing in the dark: Minus sunlight, a general theory reveals universal patterns in ecology
(Santa Fe Institute) By omitting mechanistic drivers such as sunlight, a statistical theory accurately describes broad ecological patterns in a Panama forest, as well as other natural systems and communities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

EMT Firefighter Saves Newborn Baby
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (mypanhandle.com) -  When Panama City Firefighter and EMT, Marty McFaul, loaded up on the engine at 2 a.m., he and his crew expected nothing more than a routine medical call. It wasn't until they got on scene did they realize time was working against them. "A woman just, just had a baby unexpectedly," said McFaul. The new mom is in shock and the baby is too quiet. "The baby is not breathing, it's not moving," said McFaul. "The baby is still." Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kelsey Peck, MyPanhandle.com Tags: Airway & Respiratory News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Lianas stifle tree fruit and seed production in tropical forests
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Vines compete intensely with trees. Their numbers are on the rise in many tropical forests around the world. A new study at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama shows that lianas prevent canopy trees from producing fruit, with potentially far-reaching consequences for rainforest animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why Was a Teenager with Bone Cancer Buried on Witch Hill in 1300 AD
Report identifies bone tumor in upper right arm of adolescent buried around 1300 AD at a site in western Panama called Cerro Brujo or Witch Hill (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - June 2, 2017 Category: Disability Tags: Anthropology Source Type: news

Why was a teenager with bone cancer buried on Witch Hill in Panama?
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Likely the first bone tumor from an ancient skeleton in Central America is reported by Smithsonian archaeologists and colleagues. The starburst-shaped tumor is in the upper right arm of the skeleton of an adolescent buried in about 1300 AD in a trash heap at a site in western Panama called Cerro Brujo or Witch Hill. The reason for what appears to be a ritual burial in this abandoned pre-Colombian settlement is unknown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 1, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Smithsonian scientists release frogs wearing mini radio transmitters in Panama
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Ninety Limosa harlequin frogs (Atelopus limosus) bred in human care are braving the elements of the wild after Smithsonian scientists sent them out into the Panamanian rainforest as part of their first-ever release trial in May. The study, led by the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project, aims to determine the factors that influence not only whether frogs survive the transition from human care to the wild, but whether they persist and go on to breed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 1, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Florida Paramedic Offers Comfort to Family During Crisis
  Panama City, Florida  - Paramedic Leah Denmark offers comfort and reassurance to a family dealing with loss and guilt.  (Read more...) (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kelsey Peck, WMBB Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Changes in tectonic activity may have shaped composition of Panama Canal rocks
Changes in the composition of magma may have caused variations in the Panama Canal volcanic rock formations, according to a new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 10, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Indigenous Peoples – Best Allies or Worst Enemies?
Credit: FAOBy Baher KamalROME, Apr 25 2017 (IPS)It all happened on the very same day—4 April. That day, indigenous peoples were simultaneously characterised as fundamental allies in the world’s war on hunger and poverty, while being declared as collective victims of a “tsunami” of imprisonments in Australia. See what happened. Australia must reduce the “astounding” rates of imprisonment for indigenous peoples and step up the fight against racism, on 4 April warned Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples.“Traditional indigenou...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 25, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Africa Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Featured Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Human Rights Indigenous Rights IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Latin America & the Caribbean TerraViva United Nations Women & Economy Source Type: news

Rock giants Pink Floyd honored in naming of newly discovered, bright pink pistol shrimp
A fuchsia pink-clawed species of pistol shrimp, discovered on the Pacific coast of Panama, has been given the ultimate rock and roll name in recognition of the discoverers'favorite rock band Pink Floyd. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 12, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Rock giants Pink Floyd honored in naming of newly discovered, bright pink -- pistol shrimp
(University of Oxford) A fuchsia pink-clawed species of pistol shrimp, discovered on the Pacific coast of Panama, has been given the ultimate rock and roll name in recognition of the discoverers' favorite rock band -- Pink Floyd. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Phase 2 Zika vaccine trial begins in US, Central and South America
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Vaccinations have begun in a multi-site Phase 2/2b clinical trial testing an experimental DNA vaccine designed to protect against disease caused by Zika infection. The vaccine was developed by scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)). NIAID is leading the trial, which aims to enroll healthy participants in areas of confirmed or potential active mosquito-transmitted Zika infection, including continental United States and Puerto Rico, Brazil, Peru, Costa Rica, Panama and Mexico. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 31, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Dead zones may threaten coral reefs worldwide
Dead zones affect dozens of coral reefs around the world and threaten hundreds more according to a new study. Watching a massive coral reef die-off on the Caribbean coast of Panama, they suspected it was caused by a dead zone -- a low-oxygen area that snuffs out marine life -- rather than by ocean warming or acidification. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 21, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Gehry's Biodiversity Museum -- favorite attraction for the butterflies and moths in Panama
(Pensoft Publishers) Ahead of Gehry's Biodiversity Museum's opening in October 2014, Ph.D. candidate Patricia Esther Corro Chang studied the butterflies and moths which had been attracted by the bright colors of the walls and which were visiting the grounds of the tourist site. The resulting checklist, published in the open-access journal Biodiversity Data Journal, aims to encourage the preservation and development of the Amador Causeway and the four Causeway Islands. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

[Letter] Panama's impotent mangrove laws
Authors: Gustavo A. Castellanos-Galindo, Lotta C. Kluger, Paul Tompkins (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Gustavo A. Castellanos-Galindo Source Type: news

Affordable, Universal Health Care Can Help End AIDS -- Just Ask Canada
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New review of medicinal compounds in toad secretions compiled
The cane toad, which overran Australia when introduced there, and Panama's iconic, endangered golden frog both belong to the family Bufonidae. Researchers combed through many research papers to compile all of the known chemicals produced by members of this amphibian family well known to practitioners of folk medicine. This is a first step toward the identification of new pharmaceuticals from amphibians at a time when human diseases are becoming alarmingly antibiotic resistant. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 27, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers list reasons not to lick a toad
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) The cane toad, which overran Australia when introduced there, and Panama's iconic, endangered golden frog both belong to the family Bufonidae. Researchers combed through many research papers to compile all of the known chemicals produced by members of this amphibian family well known to practitioners of folk medicine. This is a first step toward the identification of new pharmaceuticals from amphibians at a time when human diseases are becoming alarmingly antibiotic resistant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 26, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Study finds parrotfish are critical to coral reef health
(University of California - San Diego) In the new study, published in the Jan. 23 issue of the journal Nature Communication, Scripps researchers Katie Cramer and Richard Norris developed a 3,000-year record of the abundance of parrotfish and urchins on reefs from the Caribbean side of Panama to help unravel the cause of the alarming modern-day shift from coral- to algae-dominated reefs occurring across the Caribbean. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 23, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news