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In Central America, Health Workers and Communities Achieve Big Progress in the Fight against HIV
Health workers in the HIV clinic at Juan Jos é Ortega National Hospital in Coatepeque, Guatemala. Photos by Anna Watts for IntraHealth InternationalFebruary 07, 2018IntraHealth International is in the final months of an intensive two-and-a-half-year collaboration with government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and civil society groups in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Panama to accelerate progress toward reaching theUNAIDS Fast-Track targets and ending the AIDS epidemic —and the results from the first two years are striking. IntraHealth’s local partners administered 186,471 HIV tests, rea...
Source: IntraHealth International - February 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: intrahealth Source Type: news

BEAUTIFUL CO2: Higher carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere linked to more flowers blooming in tropical forests
(Natural News) The increasing levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) brought about by climate change resulted in an increase in flower production in remote tropical forests across of the globe, according to a study published in the journal Global Change Biology. A team of researchers at Florida State University examined plant materials obtained from tropical forests of Panama’s Barro Colorado... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How did a deadly tropical fungus get to the temperate environs of the Pacific Northwest?
(The Translational Genomics Research Institute) In what is being described as 'The Teddy Roosevelt effect,' a deadly fungus in the Pacific Northwest may have arrived from Brazil via the Panama Canal, according to a new study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen). Cryptococcus gattii -- which until a 1999 outbreak in British Columbia's Vancouver Island was considered primarily a tropical fungus -- can cause deadly lung and brain infections in both people and animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Jaguar conservation depends on neighbors' attitudes
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) A survey of residents near two major national parks in Panama indicates that jaguars deserve increased protection. But because most residents still support road-building in the parks, the survey team recommends further education to emphasize the connection between healthy ecosystems and jaguar survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How a Venezuelan Living with HIV Could Change the Way Mexico Deals with Refugees
Daniel (not his real name), is a Venezuelan living with HIV. Mexico gave him refugee status, based on a humanitarian cause. Credit: Sergio Ortiz/ Amnistía InternacionalBy Josefina SalomonMEXICO CITY, Dec 21 2017 (IPS)As Daniel*, a 26-year-old architect, stood before a visibly exhausted doctor in the main public hospital of the once-idyllic beach resort town of Isla Margarita, northern Venezuela, a terrifying premonition took hold of him.“We are not doing tests until further notice. The machine is not working and we don’t have any reagents,” the man in the white coat told him.It was early June 2015....
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Josefina Salomon Tags: Headlines Health Human Rights Latin America & the Caribbean LGBTQ Migration & Refugees Regional Categories Source Type: news

Boat traffic threatens the survival of Panama's Bocas Del Toro dolphins
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Bottlenose dolphins in Panama's Bocas Del Toro Archipelago should be designated as endangered say the authors of a new study. Biologists working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute discovered that the roughly 80 dolphins in the archipelago do not interbreed with other Caribbean bottlenose dolphins. Their low numbers jeopardize their long-term survival, which is threatened by increasing local boat traffic that killed at least seven dolphins in 2012. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why UHC Day Is a Call to Action for the World ’s Youth
December 14, 2017Our potential as  advocates and partners in achieving universal health coverage is woefully untapped.It ’s no accident that Universal Health Coverage Day — December 12 — falls on the heels of Human Rights Day. Universal health coverage (UHC), the goal of ensuring that all people can access essential health services without exposure to financial hardship, is a dignity and a right not afforded to many around the world.Today, I remember Gabriel, a Panamanian boy half my age who first taught me how a fractured health system fails people.Where someone lives should never deter...
Source: IntraHealth International - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Saving Cavendish: QUT grows world-first Panama disease-resistant bananas
(Queensland University of Technology) QUT researchers have developed and grown modified Cavendish bananas resistant to the devastating soil-borne fungus Fusarium wilt tropical race 4 (TR4), also known as Panama disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A giant insect ecosystem is collapsing due to humans. It's a catastrophe
Insects have triumphed for hundreds of millions of years in every habitat but the ocean. Their success is unparalleled, which makes their disappearance all the more alarmingThirty-five years ago an American biologist Terry Erwin conducted an experiment to count insect species. Using an insecticide “fog”, he managed to extract all the small living things in the canopies of 19 individuals of one species of tropical tree,Luehea seemannii, in the rainforest of Panama. He recorded about 1,200 separate species, nearly all of them coleoptera (beetles) and many new to science; and he estimated that 163 of these would b...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Michael McCarthy Tags: Insects Animals Environment Wildlife World news Butterflies Bees Farming Agriculture Science Biology Trees and forests Amazon rainforest UK news Deforestation Source Type: news

Against All the Odds, Syria ’s National Soccer Team Is Close to Qualifying for the World Cup
As its cities lay in ruins and millions of its citizens continue to suffer the horrors of a vicious civil war, Syria has its eyes on a bright and unexpected goal this week: a long-sought World Cup spot. An underdog Syrian squad, ranked 75th in the world, has claimed credible draws with regional heavyweights like South Korea and Iran and beaten the likes of China, Qatar, and Uzbekistan to clinch a runners-up place and a chance to qualify for the first time for the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia. They just have a few games standing in their way. “The important thing is that the team is determined to try and qualify for...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eli Meixler Tags: Uncategorized onetime Soccer Sports Syria World World Cup Source Type: news

Pioneer of work in women ’ s reproductive health appointed head of UN Population Fund
United Nations Secretary-General Ant ó nio Guterres today appointed Natalia Kanem of Panama to head the UN ’ s women ’ s health agency. (Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population)
Source: UN News Centre - Women, Children, Population - October 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Where You Should Road Trip, Based on Your Zodiac Sign
This article originally appeared on TravelandLeisure.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Karen Ruffini / Travel + Leisure Tags: Uncategorized onetime onetimetravel Source Type: news

Mercury Mining Awaits International Control in Mexico
Artisanal gold mining in Latin America uses mercury, a practice that should be modified in countries that have ratified the international Minamata Convention for the control of this toxic metal. Credit: Thelma Mejía/IPSBy Emilio GodoyMEXICO CITY, Sep 26 2017 (IPS)For environmentalist Patricia Ruiz the only word that comes to mind is “devastating,” when describing the situation of mercury mining in her home state of Querétaro in central Mexico.“There are a large number of pits (from which the mercury is extracted), and there are the tailing ponds containing mining waste, all of which drains i...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Emilio Godoy Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Editors' Choice Environment Global Governance Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Latin America & the Caribbean Natural Resources Regional Categories gold mining mercury Mexico Minam Source Type: news

British Financial Times Journalist, 24, Thought to Have Been Killed by Crocodile in Sri Lanka
A British journalist working for the Financial Times is thought to have been killed by a crocodile while on holiday in Sri Lanka. Former Oxford University student Paul McClean, aged 24, was found dead in mud at a lagoon nicknamed ‘Crocodile Rock,’ near the coastal village of Panama in the southeast of the country. Witnesses told the Times that McClean had been seen waving in desperation as he was dragged underwater by the beast. A postmortem examination will be carried out later today. Alex Barker, the Financial Times‘ Brussels Bureau Chief, described McClean as “a first-class journalist in the maki...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kate Samuelson Tags: Uncategorized onetime United Kingdom Source Type: news

Cleanliness is next to sexiness for golden-collared manakins in Panama
Male golden-collared manakins on extra testosterone cleaned up their display area before performing for females, whilst females became more aggressive on extra testosterone, according to research published inAnimal Behavior.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - September 5, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Cleanliness is next to sexiness for golden-collared manakins in Panama
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Juvenile male Golden-collared Manakins on extra testosterone cleaned up their display area before performing for females, according to research at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama published in Animal Behavior. Female manakins got more aggressive when given testosterone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Panama's native tree species excel in infertile tropical soils
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Smithsonian scientists and collaborators including the Panama Canal Authority confirm that native tree species performed very well in field trials and would be preferable to teak in the poor soils of the Panama Canal watershed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 31, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Disease-carrying mosquitoes rare in undisturbed tropical forests
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) A new study by scientists from the Smithsonian, the Panamanian government and the US Environmental Protection Agency, among other institutions, concludes that conserving old-growth tropical rainforest is 'highly recommended' to prevent new outbreaks of viral and parasitic mosquito-borne diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Smithsonian manatee count informs policy recommendations
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Smithsonian scientists use sonar to estimate Antillean Manatee populations in the murky waters of Panama's internationally protected San San Pond Sak wetlands. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Comparing the jaws of porcupine fish reveals three new species
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and colleagues compared fossil porcupine fish jaws and tooth plates collected on expeditions to Panama, Colombia, Venezuela and Brazil with those from museum specimens and modern porcupine fish, revealing three new species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 16, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The undertaker's census
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Scientists working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama tested a new technique: recruiting carrion-eating flies to detect mammals. This new method surpasses standard techniques, detecting more species than researchers could count along trails or photograph with hidden cameras. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Seeing in the dark: Minus sunlight, a general theory reveals universal patterns in ecology
(Santa Fe Institute) By omitting mechanistic drivers such as sunlight, a statistical theory accurately describes broad ecological patterns in a Panama forest, as well as other natural systems and communities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

EMT Firefighter Saves Newborn Baby
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (mypanhandle.com) -  When Panama City Firefighter and EMT, Marty McFaul, loaded up on the engine at 2 a.m., he and his crew expected nothing more than a routine medical call. It wasn't until they got on scene did they realize time was working against them. "A woman just, just had a baby unexpectedly," said McFaul. The new mom is in shock and the baby is too quiet. "The baby is not breathing, it's not moving," said McFaul. "The baby is still." Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kelsey Peck, MyPanhandle.com Tags: Airway & Respiratory News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Lianas stifle tree fruit and seed production in tropical forests
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Vines compete intensely with trees. Their numbers are on the rise in many tropical forests around the world. A new study at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama shows that lianas prevent canopy trees from producing fruit, with potentially far-reaching consequences for rainforest animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Why Was a Teenager with Bone Cancer Buried on Witch Hill in 1300 AD
Report identifies bone tumor in upper right arm of adolescent buried around 1300 AD at a site in western Panama called Cerro Brujo or Witch Hill (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - June 2, 2017 Category: Disability Tags: Anthropology Source Type: news

Why was a teenager with bone cancer buried on Witch Hill in Panama?
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Likely the first bone tumor from an ancient skeleton in Central America is reported by Smithsonian archaeologists and colleagues. The starburst-shaped tumor is in the upper right arm of the skeleton of an adolescent buried in about 1300 AD in a trash heap at a site in western Panama called Cerro Brujo or Witch Hill. The reason for what appears to be a ritual burial in this abandoned pre-Colombian settlement is unknown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 1, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Smithsonian scientists release frogs wearing mini radio transmitters in Panama
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Ninety Limosa harlequin frogs (Atelopus limosus) bred in human care are braving the elements of the wild after Smithsonian scientists sent them out into the Panamanian rainforest as part of their first-ever release trial in May. The study, led by the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project, aims to determine the factors that influence not only whether frogs survive the transition from human care to the wild, but whether they persist and go on to breed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 1, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Florida Paramedic Offers Comfort to Family During Crisis
  Panama City, Florida  - Paramedic Leah Denmark offers comfort and reassurance to a family dealing with loss and guilt.  (Read more...) (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kelsey Peck, WMBB Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Changes in tectonic activity may have shaped composition of Panama Canal rocks
Changes in the composition of magma may have caused variations in the Panama Canal volcanic rock formations, according to a new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 10, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Indigenous Peoples – Best Allies or Worst Enemies?
Credit: FAOBy Baher KamalROME, Apr 25 2017 (IPS)It all happened on the very same day—4 April. That day, indigenous peoples were simultaneously characterised as fundamental allies in the world’s war on hunger and poverty, while being declared as collective victims of a “tsunami” of imprisonments in Australia. See what happened. Australia must reduce the “astounding” rates of imprisonment for indigenous peoples and step up the fight against racism, on 4 April warned Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples.“Traditional indigenou...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 25, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Africa Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Featured Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Human Rights Indigenous Rights IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Latin America & the Caribbean TerraViva United Nations Women & Economy Source Type: news

Rock giants Pink Floyd honored in naming of newly discovered, bright pink pistol shrimp
A fuchsia pink-clawed species of pistol shrimp, discovered on the Pacific coast of Panama, has been given the ultimate rock and roll name in recognition of the discoverers'favorite rock band Pink Floyd. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 12, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Rock giants Pink Floyd honored in naming of newly discovered, bright pink -- pistol shrimp
(University of Oxford) A fuchsia pink-clawed species of pistol shrimp, discovered on the Pacific coast of Panama, has been given the ultimate rock and roll name in recognition of the discoverers' favorite rock band -- Pink Floyd. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Phase 2 Zika vaccine trial begins in US, Central and South America
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Vaccinations have begun in a multi-site Phase 2/2b clinical trial testing an experimental DNA vaccine designed to protect against disease caused by Zika infection. The vaccine was developed by scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)). NIAID is leading the trial, which aims to enroll healthy participants in areas of confirmed or potential active mosquito-transmitted Zika infection, including continental United States and Puerto Rico, Brazil, Peru, Costa Rica, Panama and Mexico. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 31, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Dead zones may threaten coral reefs worldwide
Dead zones affect dozens of coral reefs around the world and threaten hundreds more according to a new study. Watching a massive coral reef die-off on the Caribbean coast of Panama, they suspected it was caused by a dead zone -- a low-oxygen area that snuffs out marine life -- rather than by ocean warming or acidification. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 21, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Gehry's Biodiversity Museum -- favorite attraction for the butterflies and moths in Panama
(Pensoft Publishers) Ahead of Gehry's Biodiversity Museum's opening in October 2014, Ph.D. candidate Patricia Esther Corro Chang studied the butterflies and moths which had been attracted by the bright colors of the walls and which were visiting the grounds of the tourist site. The resulting checklist, published in the open-access journal Biodiversity Data Journal, aims to encourage the preservation and development of the Amador Causeway and the four Causeway Islands. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

[Letter] Panama's impotent mangrove laws
Authors: Gustavo A. Castellanos-Galindo, Lotta C. Kluger, Paul Tompkins (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Gustavo A. Castellanos-Galindo Source Type: news

Affordable, Universal Health Care Can Help End AIDS -- Just Ask Canada
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New review of medicinal compounds in toad secretions compiled
The cane toad, which overran Australia when introduced there, and Panama's iconic, endangered golden frog both belong to the family Bufonidae. Researchers combed through many research papers to compile all of the known chemicals produced by members of this amphibian family well known to practitioners of folk medicine. This is a first step toward the identification of new pharmaceuticals from amphibians at a time when human diseases are becoming alarmingly antibiotic resistant. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 27, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers list reasons not to lick a toad
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) The cane toad, which overran Australia when introduced there, and Panama's iconic, endangered golden frog both belong to the family Bufonidae. Researchers combed through many research papers to compile all of the known chemicals produced by members of this amphibian family well known to practitioners of folk medicine. This is a first step toward the identification of new pharmaceuticals from amphibians at a time when human diseases are becoming alarmingly antibiotic resistant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 26, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Study finds parrotfish are critical to coral reef health
(University of California - San Diego) In the new study, published in the Jan. 23 issue of the journal Nature Communication, Scripps researchers Katie Cramer and Richard Norris developed a 3,000-year record of the abundance of parrotfish and urchins on reefs from the Caribbean side of Panama to help unravel the cause of the alarming modern-day shift from coral- to algae-dominated reefs occurring across the Caribbean. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 23, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Will climate change leave tropical birds hung out to dry?
The future of the red-capped manakin and other tropical birds in Panama looks bleak. A research project spanning more than three decades and simulating another five decades analyzes how changes in rainfall will affect bird populations. The results show that for 19 of the 20 species included in the study, there may be significantly fewer birds if conditions become dryer. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 3, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Will climate change leave tropical birds hung out to dry?
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) The future of the red-capped manakin and other tropical birds in Panama looks bleak. A University of Illinois research project spanning more than three decades and simulating another five decades analyzes how changes in rainfall will affect bird populations. The results show that for 19 of the 20 species included in the study, there may be significantly fewer birds if conditions become dryer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 3, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Predator invasion had devastating, long-term effects on native fish
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) In 1969, 60 to 100 peacock bass imported from Colombia, were introduced into a pond in Panama for sport fishing. Several individuals escaped. By the early 1970s, they colonized the reservoir forming the main channel of the Panama Canal. Forty-five years later, native fish populations in the lake still have not recovered, Smithsonian reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 12, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Google Unveils 3-Decade Time-Lapse of the Earth
Google Unveils a 3-Decade Time-Lapse of the Earth By Jeffrey Kluger It doesn’t pay to take your eyes off the Earth for a second. Look away even briefly and who knows what it will get up to? That’s not how things usually seem to human beings living on the surface of the planet. The mountain that’s here today ought to be here tomorrow. The river that meanders along the boundary of your state or your nation will be meandering into the future. If you were in orbit, however, things would look very different—especially if you were in orbit for a few decades at a time. Since 1972, the Landsat satellites&m...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: climate climate change earth Google Mining natural resources space technology timelapse Urbanization Source Type: news

Three Killed in Late-Season Hurricane Otto; Costa Rica Evacuates Thousands
PANAMA CITY (AP) — Late-season storm Otto strengthened into a hurricane Tuesday as civil defense officials reported three deaths in Panama amid heavy rain and Costa Rica ordered the evacuation of 4,000 people from its Caribbean coast. The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Otto was likely to gain strength as it headed for an expected Thursday afternoon landfall around the Nicaragua-Costa Rica border. It could become the first hurricane to make landfall in Costa Rica since reliable record-keeping began in 1851. The storm caused heavy rains in Panama as it moved off that nation's northern coast, and officials blamed O...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - November 22, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press Tags: News Major Incidents Source Type: news

Ant bridges connect shy tropical tree crowns
Internet and phone connections are essential for effective communicators and for success in business. New results from a study in Panama show that connections between trees may be important for maintaining the rich diversity of tropical forests. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 16, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

In rough times, some reasons for optimism: lessons from Latin America on REDD+
This article provides a summary of some important emerging lessons to date on REDD+ from the Latin American region. REDD+ has already proven to be successful, but under certain conditions A number of lessons on REDD+ can be learnt from the agreement between Norway and Brazil. First, REDD+ can achieve measurable results. While the deforestation trend in the Latin American country picked up a bit recently, the decrease from historical deforestation trends is clear. Second, a minimum level of readiness is required. Brazil had the in-house capacities on policy design, policy implementation, monitoring, and enforcement. If the...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

From the Panama Papers to an intelligence service for your own business
(Saarland University) In 2016 more than a hundred newspapers and others published revelations on tax avoidance and evasion. They were based on the Panama Papers, a collection of data that comprises 2.6 terabytes of information and 11.5 million documents. In 2015 this was leaked to the Sueddeutsche Zeitung; an international group of journalists evaluated it over the course of a year. Now, computer scientists at the Max Planck spin-off Ambiverse have analyzed the data with software in a few hours, obtaining new results. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 7, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

This Bird's Stunning Plumage Is Visible Only In The Right Light
Here’s one little bird that lives up to its billing. The fiery-throated hummingbird has plumage that’s mostly green and blue, but its throat is red, orange and yellow. You know, like a flame. The species lives in the mountains of Costa Rica and Panama, where it feeds on nectar and the occasional insect or spider. These photos were taken last April by Jess Findlay, a 24-year-old nature photographer from Vancouver, Canada. He explained the encounter in an email to The Huffington Post: “Several of these beautiful hummingbirds were visiting a nectar feeder at about 2,700-meter elevation in the Talamanca Moun...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Ant genomics help reshape biological history of the Americas
(Field Museum) Scientists have long believed that the Isthmus of Panama emerged three million years ago, triggering a massive interchange of species between the Americas. However, recent conflict in both geological and biological literature suggests that this simple story is insufficient to explain the available evidence. A new study explores questions fundamental to this interchange using genomic methods in army ants, finding that land bridges likely connected the Americas millions of years earlier than previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 25, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news