Suicide and Addiction
Are Suicide and Addiction Linked? When someone is suffering from an issue with addiction, there are many complications that can come along with that. These can include legal issues, family problems, declining health and even suicide. Suicide and addiction are absolutely linked. Addiction not only exponentially increases the likelihood that someone will commit suicide, but substances are often used as a means to commit suicide via overdose. According to the CDC, one in three people who die from suicide are under the influence of drugs. They are typically opiates such as oxycodone or heroin, or alcohol. When someone is suffe...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - February 14, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction Stories Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Addiction Treatment and Program Resources Depression Depression Treatment Mental Health anxiety Post Traumatic Stress Disorder PTSD suicide suicide and add Source Type: blogs

Add Hepatitis C to the List of Unintended Consequences of Abuse-Deterrent Opioids
One year ago Cato published my policy analysis, “Abuse-Deterrent Opioids and the Law of Unintended Consequences, ” which provided strong evidence that reformulating opioids, so that they could not be crushed for snorting or dissolved for injecting by nonmedical users, only served to drive nonmedical users to more dangerous, readily available, and cheaper heroin provided by the efficient black market. The evidence included a RAND  study that found “a substantial share of the dramatic increase in heroin deaths since 2010 can be attributed to the reformulation of OxyContin” which replaced regular OxyContin in 2010....
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 5, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

A real national emergency
Actually there are a few of them butRajan Menon offers a good, succinct discussion of the opioid epidemic. When a few fanatics hijacked airliners and flew them into buildings, killing about 3,000 people, the U.S. went on a nearly two decade freakout. Since then, 400,000 Americans have died from prescription or illicit opioid overdoses, some 70,000 of them in 2017.Individual 1 did indeed declare a public health emergency in that year, but never actually did anything about it. Congress did appropriate $6 billion a year to combat the crisis, but that has had no discernible effect. And let ' s be clear here: illicit drugs do n...
Source: Stayin' Alive - January 31, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Overprescribing Is a Key Component of the Opioid Crisis — Here’s How to Stop It
By DAVE CHASE  Today’s opioid crisis is one of the most dire side effects driven by our dysfunctional U.S. healthcare system. A recent JAMA Surgery report found that many surgeons prescribe four times more opioids than their patients use. This opens the door for misuse and abuse later on. In fact, the total combined cost of misuse, abuse, dependence and overdose is about $78.5 billion. Unfortunately, there’s a direct connection between the low-quality care many patients receive, and the astounding rates of opioid addiction. Often, insurance plans offer access to high-cost, volume-centric physicians and include high de...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Patients Value-Based Care Dave Chase Opioid epidemic Source Type: blogs

More Than Just Dander
First, a sort of meta-comment in the form of a shout-out to HCRenewal ' s intrepid editor, Dr. Roy Poses, for his just-published analysis of what we might call " blogging: rise and fall. " He sees decline reflected in publications long  devoted to health and health policy, yet now flaking off.Methinks, however, despite the usefulness of his overview of recent decades, Dr. P need not fret excessively. Water spilling out of the barrel ' s lip will slow down once folks come along and punch a whole bunch of little mid-section tweet-holes in it. Information still flows. (Sort of.)  In any case, surely there ' s overla...
Source: Health Care Renewal - January 25, 2019 Category: Health Management Source Type: blogs

The Merchants of Death
This study by authors including my colleague Brandon Marshall nails them. For those of you who don ' t know, pharmaceutical companies promote their products by giving physicians free meals, paying for their travel to conferences, giving them speaking fees and honoraria, consulting fees, and otherwise crossing the palm with silver. They do this because it works -- it is associated with increased prescribing of their products.It turns out the more payments they made in a U.S. county to promote opioid prescribing, the more prescriptions were written, and in turn, the more overdose deaths there were. The strongest association ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - January 25, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

The Mysteries Surrounding Rhodes Pharmaceuticals, the Sackler Family's Second Opioid Company
 Mysteries still abound in the not so wonderful world of health care dysfunction, so, quick, the game ' s afoot...Today ' s mysteries involve beneficial ownership.  Beneficial ownership questions are important to anti-corruption campaigners.  Beneficial ownership simply refers to " anyone who enjoys the benefits of ownership of a security or property, without being on the record as being the owner. " (per Wikipedia). Concealing who really owns a company enables concealing sources of funds (as in money laundering), market power (when the owner also owns competitors), and sources of political influence, and en...
Source: Health Care Renewal - January 8, 2019 Category: Health Management Tags: anechoic effect concentration of power conflicts of interest dark money deception Donald Trump health care corruption marketing narcotics Purdue Pharma Source Type: blogs

Health IT Is In The Front Line To Try And Stem The Opioid Crisis in The US – Relevant Here Too!
This appeared last week:Providers turning to health IT to combat the opioid crisis By Marla Durben HirschPublished December 26 2018, 7:49am ESTProviders have begun to harness technology to improve their management of opioids and avoid misuse. It ’s not a moment too soon. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s most recent reports, released in November, confirm that the opioid crisis is worsening. The number of drug overdose deaths in the United states in 2017 was 9.6 percent higher than in 2016. The rate of drug overdose deaths involving natural and semisynthetic opioids like oxycodone and hydrocodone has rise...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - January 2, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Today ’s Drug Abusers Did Not Derive From Yesterday’s Patients
We  learned last week that the 2017 drug overdose numbers reported by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention clearly show most opioid-related deaths are due to illicit fentanyl and heroin, while deaths due to prescription opioids have stabilized, continuing a steady trend for the past several years. I’ve encouraged using the term “Fentanyl Crisis” rather than “Opioid Crisis” to describe the situation, because it more accurately points to its cause—nonmedical users accessing drugs in the dangerous black market fueled by drug prohibition—hoping this wi ll redirect attention and lead to reforms...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 4, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

No Let Up On The Bad News About Overdose Deaths
The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) just issued  Data Brief Number 329, entitled “Drug Overdose Deaths in the United States, 1999-2017.” Drug overdose deaths reached a new record high, exceeding 70,000 deaths in 2017, a 9.6 percent increase over 2016. That figure includes all drug overdoses, including those due to cocaine, methamphetamines, and benzodiazepines. The actual breakdown according to drug category will be reported in mid-December. However,  estimates are opioid-related deaths will account for roughly 49,000 of the total overdose deaths. The big takeaways, quoting the report:-  The rate of ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 29, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Has Opioid Hysteria Risen to the Point Where Innovation Is Forbidden?
On November 2 the Food and Drug Administration  announced the approval of Dsuvia, a sublingual tablet containing the powerful fentanyl analog, sufentanil. Sufentanil has been used for years in the hospital setting, primarily in intravenous form for anesthesia. It is  roughly 5 to 10 times more potent than fentanyl, and thus has a significant overdose potential. The FDA reached this decision following a 10-3 vote in favor of the drug’s approval by the Anesthetic and Analgesia Drug Products Advisory Committee (AADPAC),based on data from multicenter trials.  It was not approved for outpatient use, but for use only in ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 6, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Whistleblowers Wanted
  Something happened to wheat in the 1970s during the efforts to generate a high-yield strain that required less fertilizer to make an 18- 24-inch, rather than a 48-inch, stalk. Multiple other changes occurred, including changes in the structure of  wheat germ agglutinin, changes in alpha amylase (responsible for wheat allergy), increased phytate content . . . to name a few. But chief among the changes in wheat were changes in the gliadin protein molecule. We know, for instance, that the Glia-alpha 9 sequence, absent from traditional wheat, can be found in virtually all modern wheat. This is likely the explanation un...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 25, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates Gliadin gluten gluten-free grain-free grains opiates wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Market-based approaches solving the opioid epidemic
Mary first took oxycodone after a minor surgery and found she liked it. Returning to her surgeon a month later with vague ongoing pain, she received another prescription. Her primary care provider took over from there — until one day that physician checked a urine drug screen and a prescription monitoring program (PMP) report, only to find that she was obtaining various opioids from several providers. The physician cut her off and reported her to the PMP just as crackdowns on opioid prescribers arose. The prescriptions dried up. She tried buying pills from illicit sources but found that at roughly a dollar a milligram, t...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 17, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/julie-craig" rel="tag" > Julie Craig, MD < /a > Tags: Meds Pain Management Public Health & Policy Source Type: blogs

Take a close look at the number of opioid pills you ’re prescribing
Recently, a generally healthy friend of mine had two small, unrelated surgeries over the course of a few months. For the first, a small operation on his hand, he received a prescription for 30 oxycodone pills. He used one the night after surgery, to make sure pain wouldn’t wake him. Over the next few days he used a few over the counter acetaminophen tablets for his modest discomfort, and then was all done. Two months later, a small suspicious lesion had to be removed from his leg by a different doctor. Again, he got 30 tablets of oxycodone. He used one the first night and continued with acetaminophen. Problem solved. But...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 15, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/tia-powell" rel="tag" > Tia Powell, MD < /a > Tags: Meds Pain Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Too Good to Be True? A Nonaddictive Opioid without Lethal Side Effects Shows Promise - Scientific American
With nearly 50,000 drug overdose deaths from opioids last year and an estimated two million Americans addicted, the opioid crisis continues to rage throughout the U.S. This statistic must be contrasted with another: 25 million Americans live with daily chronic pain, for which few treatment options are available apart from opioid medications.Opioid drugs like morphine and Oxycontin are still held as the gold standard when it comes to relieving pain. But it has become brutally obvious that opioids have dangerous side effects, including physical dependence, addiction and the impaired breathing that too often leads to death fr...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 19, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs