Defanging HIPAA: How Your De-identified Data Was Re-identified For Profit.
BY MIKE MAGEE, M.D. Arthur Sackler continues to demonstrate just how wealthy one can become by advantaging patients and their diseases. He’s been dead since 1987, but his ghost continues to access your personal health data, pushes medical consumption and over-utilization, and expands profits exponentially for data abusers well beyond his wildest dreams. Back in 1954, he and his friend and secret business partner, Bill Frohlich, were the first to realize that individual health data could be a goldmine. That relationship would still be a secret had it not been exposed in a messy family inheritance feud unleashed by h...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 26, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ryan Bose-Roy Tags: Health Policy The Health Data Goldilocks Dilemma: Sharing? Privacy? Both? Uncategorized Arthur Sackler Congress HIPPA IMS Health Medical-Industrial Complex Mike Magee MQIC Source Type: blogs

Opioid Equianalgesic Tables are Broken
by Drew Rosielle (@drosielle)I am proposing we do away with equianalgesic table (EAT) as a tool to inform clinical decisions about opioid rotations/conversions. Fundamentally, EATs create too many problems, and there are simpler and safer ways to teach clinicians how to convert between different opioids.Part 1: New Data Can ' t Fix the EATA couple HPM fellows every year ask me which table do I prefer to use —the old EAT or the new one? By the old one, they refer to the table most of us used or were at least deeply familiar with for the last 10-20 years. By the new one, they mean the one created by Dr. Mary Lynn McPherson...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - March 21, 2022 Category: Palliative Care Tags: opioid pain rosielle Source Type: blogs

Blame to go around on the opioid epidemic
The Purdue Pharma settlement gave family members of people who were harmed by opioid prescribingthe opportunity to confront Purdue family members, a dramatic spectacle that represents some measure of justice but casts blame for the disaster of the opioid epidemic on one family. That is not the whole story, or really a true story. Prior to the 1980s, opioids were generally prescribed in the U.S. only for short-term use, after surgery or severe injury, or for people who were terminally ill.In the 1980s, for reasons which are not entirely clear, attitudes in the medical profession began to shift and physicians began to t...
Source: Stayin' Alive - March 14, 2022 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

The art of asking where it hurts
Norman Grant was a new patient. He had chronic back pain, not helped by surgery or a dozen injections after that. It all started with an industrial accident in 2001. He had settled his case and was on chronic OxyContin, which far from kept him functional. But as of January 1, his insurance was noRead more …The art of asking where it hurts originally appeared inKevinMD.com. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 5, 2021 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/a-country-doctor" rel="tag" > Hans Duvefelt, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician Primary Care Source Type: blogs

The Spillover Effects of Oxycontin's Introduction on Crime
Yongbo Sim (Rutgers University), The Spillover Effects of Oxycontin's Introduction on Crime, SSRN (2021): Since the late 1990s, the U.S. has experienced a substantial rise in drug overdose and overdose deaths due to the increased use of opioid drugs. This... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - November 3, 2021 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

Roger Chou ’s Undisclosed Conflicts of Interest: How the CDC’s 2016 Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain Lost Its Clinical and Professional Integrity
by Chad D. Kollas MD, Terri A. Lewis PhD, Beverly Schechtman and Carrie Judy“I ' m present. Uh … I do have a conflict. I receive funding to conduct reviews on opioids, and I ' ll be recusing myself after the um, director ' s, uh, um, um, uh … update.”- Dr. Roger Chou, Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC) Meeting Friday, July 16, 2021.IntroductionFor those familiar with the controversial relationship between the anti-opioid advocacy group, Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing (PROP, recently renamed, He...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - September 17, 2021 Category: Palliative Care Tags: CDC judy kollas lewis opioid pain schechtman Source Type: blogs

Roger Chou s Undisclosed Conflicts of Interest: How the CDCs 2016 Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain Lost Its Clinical and Professional Integrity
by Chad D. Kollas MD, Terri A. Lewis PhD, Beverly Schechtman and Carrie JudyI ' m present. Uh I do have a conflict. I receive funding to conduct reviews on opioids, and I ' ll be recusing myself after the um, director ' s, uh, um, um, uh update.- Dr. Roger Chou, Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC) Board of Scientific Counselors (BSC) Meeting Friday, July 16, 2021.IntroductionFor those familiar with the controversial relationship between the anti-opioid advocacy group, Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing (PROP, recently renamed, Health Pro...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - September 17, 2021 Category: Palliative Care Tags: CDC judy kollas lewis opioid pain schechtman Source Type: blogs

Opioid Settlement Will Do Nothing to Change The Trajectory of The Overdose Rate
Jeffrey A. SingerYesterday a settlement wasannounced between several states and the pharmaceutical distributors McKesson, Cardinal Health, and Amerisource Bergen, along with drug maker Johnson and Johnson, who were accused of contributing to the opioid overdose crisis. The three distributors agreed to pay the states $21 billion over 18 years and Johnson and Johnson agreed to pay $5 billion over 5 years, ostensibly to go towards drug treatment and education programs. Johnson and Johnson and the three distributors continue to dispute the allegations while agreeing to the settlement.Some, like the editors of th...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 22, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

US Senator Joe Manchin calls for a new FDA Commissioner to replace current (acting) one who “has repeatedly ignored public health concerns and shown a dereliction of duty” over opioids and aducanumab
Key Democrat Manchin Bashes FDA Leader on Alzheimer’s Approval (Bloomberg): Senator Joe Manchin, a moderate Democrat considered a crucial vote within the party’s slim Senate majority, said Janet Woodcock, the temporary head of the Food and Drug Administration, should be quickly replaced with a permanent leader. Manchin blasted an FDA decision to approve the controversial Alzheimer’s therapy Aduhelm despite conflicting evidence that the Biogen Inc. drug works and an overwhelmingly negative vote against the therapy by agency advisers. The FDA ruling led three members of that panel to quit in protest… Manchin urged U....
Source: SharpBrains - June 18, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health aducanumab Aduhelm Alzheimer's treatments Alzheimer’s therapy Alzheimers-disease Biogen FDA Food and Drug Administration Joe Manchin opioids OxyContin public-health Source Type: blogs

The Real Reason Fentanyl is So Dangerous
Fentanyl plays a role in more and more opioid overdose deaths. Most fentanyl used ‘on the streets’ starts in China, with precursors shipped to California or Mexico before distribution throughout the US. Fentanyl acts very potently at the same receptors as heroin, morphine, and oxycodone. Reports of overdose deaths caused by fentanyl usually blame potency, but the real reason for fentanyl’s outsized role in overdose is rarely mentioned – at least outside operating rooms. Fentanyl is as ubiquitous in the medical industry as it is on the street, in 50 microgram per cc, sterile vials rather than the ...
Source: Suboxone Talk Zone - June 16, 2021 Category: Addiction Authors: admin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Growing backlash against the FDA approval of unproven Alzheimer ’s treatment Aduhelm, by Biogen
ICER Issues Statement on the FDA’s Approval of Aducanumab for Alzheimer’s Disease (Institute for Clinical and Economic Review): The Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) believes that the FDA, in approving aducanumab (Aduhelm™, Biogen) for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, has failed in its responsibility to protect patients and families from unproven treatments with known harms. Our review of the evidence was concordant with that of many independent experts: current evidence is insufficient to demonstrate that aducanumab benefits patients. The avenue forward has seemed clear: another study would be...
Source: SharpBrains - June 14, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health aducanumab Aduhelm Alzheimer’s Disease Alzheimer’s disease treatment amyloid amyloid plaques amyloid-related imaging abnormalities ARIA Biogen brain swelling clinical benefit FDA ICER Janet Woodcock N Source Type: blogs

If Lawmakers Really Want to “Follow the Science” They Will Repeal Codified Opioid Guidelines
This study documents a relationship between opioid prescribing and opioid overdose in a large, national, prospective cohort of individuals receiving opioid therapy for a variety of medical conditions. The risk of opioid overdose should continue to be evaluated relative to the need to reduce pain and suffering and be considered along with other risk factors.University of Alabama Professor of Medicine Stefan Kerteszpointed out thatfollow up research led by Bohnert found the median overdose dosage was 60 MMEs and 86 percent occurred under 90 MMEs. Yet he cautioned policymakers:Reliance on a simple binary dose metric is an ext...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 24, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

The complications of drug regulation
When the“opioid crisis” is mentioned, most people think of heroin, prescription pills like oxycodone, or — more recently — the powerful synthetic opioid fentanyl. Fewer people would think of novel opioids like tianeptine, although an increasing number of Americans have taken this substance in the form of over-the-counter supplements like ZaZaRed or Tianna–Read more …Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 19, 2021 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/julie-craig" rel="tag" > Julie Craig, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Meds Medications Source Type: blogs

In Massachusetts, as Elsewhere, It ’s The Prohibition, Not The Prescriptions
Jeffrey A. SingerEarlier this month, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health releasedData Brief: Opioid ‐​Related Overdose Deaths Among Massachusetts Residents. The report found that opioid ‐​related overdose deaths remained essentially unchanged at roughly 2,000 per year since 2016. From 2001 thru 2010 the annual overdose rate was relatively stable and then began to accelerate in 2011. (Figure 1 and Figure 2 of the Data Brief).While the overdose rate was 1 percent less in 2019 than in 2016, and 1 percent greater in 2020 than in 2019, neither change was statistically significant.As with ot...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 16, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

The Pain Is In Your Brain: Your Knees Know Next to Nothing
By HANS DUVEFELT A “frozen shoulder” can be manipulated to move freely again under general anesthesia. The medications we use to put patients to sleep for such procedures work on the brain and don’t concentrate in the shoulder joints at all. An ingrown toenail can be removed or an arthritic knee can be replaced by injecting a local anesthetic – at the base of the toe or into the spine – interrupting the connection between the body and the brain. An arthritic knuckle can stop hurting and move more freely after a steroid injection that dramatically reduces inflammation, giving lasting relief long after any...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Patients Physicians Primary Care Hans Duvefelt Pain Management Source Type: blogs