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On The Horizon: How dogs may help fight bone cancer
Veterinarians team up with cancer doctors in the field of comparative oncology to find a cure for osteosarcoma (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - July 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tumor-targeting drug shows potential for treating bone cancer patients
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) The treatment of osteosarcoma, the most common tumor of bone, is challenging. A study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found a drug known as bone metastasis-targeting peptidomimetic (BMTP-11) has potential as a new therapeutic strategy for this devastating illness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Guildford teen discovers 'pulled muscle' was bone cancer
Faye Lucas, 19, from Guildford, put off going to the doctors  for more than 12 months as she put her difficulty bending her leg down to a strain. Doctors discovered she had a form of osteosarcoma. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Brisbane boy with an upside down foot
Jonty Oddy, from Brisbane, Australia, was an active four-year-old, when he suddenly started limping as he walked. Doctors discovered his pained stemmed from an osteosarcoma. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Existing drugs could benefit patients with bone cancer, genetic study suggests
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) A subgroup of patients with osteosarcoma -- a form of bone cancer -- could be helped by an existing drug, suggest scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators. In the largest genetic sequencing study of osteosarcoma to date, scientists discovered that 10 percent of patients with a genetic mutation in particular growth factor signalling genes may benefit from existing drugs, known as IGF1R inhibitors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Tumor Lysis Syndrome in an Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma Tumor Lysis Syndrome in an Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma
Tumor lysis syndrome is a major oncological emergency, usually associated with treatment of hematological tumors. What precipitated it in this patient, and how was it treated?Journal of Medical Case Reports (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Journal Article Source Type: news

On The Horizon: How dogs may help fight bone cancer
Veterinarians team up with cancer doctors in the field of comparative oncology to find a cure for osteosarcoma (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - March 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

London schoolgirl discovers GROWING PAINS were cancer
Ashleigh Massey, from Chessington, struggled with the discomfort in her right leg when it first began in September. But after going to hospital a month later, she was found to have osteosarcoma. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cancer Facts and Figures: Death Rate Down 25% Since 1991
By Stacy Simon The death rate from cancer in the US has declined steadily over the past 2 decades, according to annual statistics reporting from the American Cancer Society. The cancer death rate for men and women combined fell 25% from its peak in 1991 to 2014, the most recent year for which data are available. This decline translates to more than 2.1 million deaths averted during this time period. “Cancer Statistics, 2017,” published in the American Cancer Society’s journal CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths expected in the US this year. The estimat...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - January 5, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: General Information Source Type: news

Cancer treatment for pooch could help people, too
Cancer treatments for Smokey, a rescue dog with osteosarcoma, may help similar dogs in the future — but they could also help kids who have osteosarcoma as well, veterinary researchers hope. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Edinburgh teen 'sympathy pains' while his twin battled bone cancer
Pat and Al Dawson, both from Edinburgh, had knee pains in sync with each other. Tests found Al had osteosarcoma - a rare form of bone cancer that eventually took his life just two years later. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Top Sarcoma News in 2016
In this slide show we highlight some of the top news on sarcoma in 2016, including the first frontline FDA approval in 40 years, and studies on imaging in Ewing sarcoma, maintenance chemotherapy in osteosarcoma, and more. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - December 14, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Cancer Network Editors Tags: Conferences/Sarcoma Year In Review 2016 Source Type: news

Post cancer, post rotationplasty, teen athlete continues to excel
The ball leaps off the metal bat with an unmistakable “ping” that denotes good contact. Miles Goldberg runs to first base, from which the 13-year-old will soon contemplate – and safely execute – a steal of second. Miles is used to transitioning naturally with the seasons from football to hockey to baseball. This year, however, has been different. Every hit, catch, and glide across the ice has had far more meaning to the eighth-grader, who recently completed osteosarcoma treatment at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. His treatment included a wide resecti...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 6, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Saul Wisnia Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center osteosarcoma rotationplasty Source Type: news

Maintenance Chemo Fails to Improve Localized Osteosarcoma Outcomes
The use of a metronomic chemotherapy approach did not improve over standard chemotherapy in patients with high-grade, non-metastatic, operable osteosarcoma of the extremities. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - November 22, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dave Levitan Tags: News Sarcoma Source Type: news

Cancer in Cavemen?
In this Medical News Minute, developed exclusively for Cancer Network, Dr. Bobby Lazzara discusses a recent case report of a 1.7-million-year-old osteosarcoma found in an extinct human lineage. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - October 6, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Bobby Lazzara, MD Tags: Sarcoma Source Type: news

Sarah Dransfield has leg AMPUTATED after leg sprain turned out to be bone cancer
Sarah Dransfield, from Holmfirth, West Yorkshire, was just 16 when she was diagnosed with osteosarcoma. After chemotherapy didn't work, doctors revealed she needed an amputation. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

' Until 20,' A Film About A Young Cancer Patient's End-Of-Life Decisions
At one level, this is a true story about a brave young man with osteosarcoma. But it ’s more than that. This is a documentary about end-of-life decisions, and how a family copes. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - September 30, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elaine Schattner Source Type: news

Carter is more than you see
More than 50 feet above ground, a wire rope extends from one tree to another. High in the trees, seven-year-old Carter Mock fearlessly steps off a platform and places first one foot, then the other, onto the wire. Holding tight to hanging ropes for balance, he navigates across the wire to the next tree. It’s an impressive feat for anyone, but for Carter it’s extra special. Just weeks earlier, he completed treatment for osteosarcoma (a bone cancer), and he now has a prosthetic bottom left leg and foot. Carter says navigating the wire rope is tricky, because he can’t feel the pressure of the rope below his ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 15, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Linda Watts Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Mark Gephardt osteosarcoma rotationplasty Source Type: news

Earliest Human Cancer Found in 1.7-Million-Year-Old Bone
This post originally appeared on National Geographic. In the fossil-rich region of South Africa known as the Cradle of Humankind, scientists have discovered the earliest known case of one of the world’s most deadly diseases. Using 3-D imaging, the researchers have diagnosed an aggressive type of cancer called osteosarcoma in a foot bone belonging to a human relative who died in Swartkrans Cave between 1.6 and 1.8 million years ago.   The discovery—which has just been published in the South African Journal of Science—suggests that, while modern lifestyles have increased the incidences of cancer,...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 31, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Earliest Human Cancer Found in 1.7-Million-Year-Old Bone
This post originally appeared on National Geographic. In the fossil-rich region of South Africa known as the Cradle of Humankind, scientists have discovered the earliest known case of one of the world’s most deadly diseases. Using 3-D imaging, the researchers have diagnosed an aggressive type of cancer called osteosarcoma in a foot bone belonging to a human relative who died in Swartkrans Cave between 1.6 and 1.8 million years ago.   The discovery—which has just been published in the South African Journal of Science—suggests that, while modern lifestyles have increased the incidences of cancer,...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 31, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hopes Dashed for Rare Bone Cancer Treatment
Extra chemo drugs failed to change course of osteosarcoma, researchers saySource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Bone Cancer, Cancer Chemotherapy (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - August 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hopes Dashed for Rare Bone Cancer Treatment
FRIDAY, Aug. 26, 2016 -- Adding extra drugs to chemotherapy doesn't benefit patients with a rare type of bone cancer, according to a new study. Osteosarcoma is diagnosed in about 600 people in the United States each year, mostly teenagers. With... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 26, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Hopes Dashed for Rare Bone Cancer Treatment
Extra chemo drugs failed to change course of osteosarcoma, researchers say (Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer - August 26, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Hopes Dashed for Rare Bone Cancer Treatment
Extra chemo drugs failed to change course of osteosarcoma, researchers say (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - August 25, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Nursing, Oncology, Pharmacy, News, Source Type: news

CT separates bone mets from benign lesions
Researchers in Boston say that CT attenuation measurements can be used to distinguish...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: FDG-PET/MRI shows advantages with malignant bone lesions FDG-PET, DWI-MRI help predict osteosarcoma chemo response ASTRO: DCE-MRI predicts spine tumor recurrence (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - August 22, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Scientists test nanoparticle drug delivery in dogs with osteosarcoma
( University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ) An engineer teamed up with a veterinarian to test a bone cancer drug delivery system in animals bigger than the standard animal model, the mouse. They chose dogs -- mammals closer in size and biology to humans -- with naturally occurring bone cancers, which also are a lot like human bone tumors. The researchers report their results in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 25, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists Trace Origin Cell of Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors, Test Drug Target
Contact: Samiha Khanna Phone: 919-419-5069 Email: samiha.khanna@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 12 p.m. (ET) on Thursday, July 14, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Scientists at Duke Health are part of a team that has discovered a type of cell surrounding blood vessels can also serve as a starting point for sarcoma, a form of cancer that occurs in bones and connective tissues. The findings, made through studies of mice, offer insights that could aid in the development of potential new treatments for the rare but devastating cancer, which has 15,000 new diagnoses annually in the U.S. In an article to be ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - July 14, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

What Are The Most Common Pediatric Cancers?
Discussion Cancer occurs in all ages including children. Fortunately cancer is much less common in the pediatric age group accounting for
Source: PediatricEducation.org - July 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

UCLA-led team develops new method to study mitochondrial DNA diseases
Alexander Patananan The process of transferring mitochondria between cells using the nanoblade technology.   A UCLA-led team of researchers has demonstrated a new method to conduct research on mitochondrial DNA diseases — a broad group of debilitating genetic disorders that can affect the brain, heart and muscles. The new method, which utilizes a technology developed by UCLA researchers that opens holes in the cell membrane, is described in a study published today in Cell Metabolism. The researchers say that it could pave the way for specific research on how and why these diseases occur, and point to pathways t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 10, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists may be able force cancer into dormant state
Stephen FellerTEL AVIV, Israel, Feb. 23 (UPI) -- A proof-of-concept drug that can "turn off" osteosarcoma cells may prevent cancer relapse, according to researchers in Tel Aviv. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New therapeutic pathway may keep cancer cells turned 'off'
A new study offers tangible evidence that it is possible to keep osteosarcoma lesions dormant using novel nanomedicines. Osteosarcoma is a cancer that develops in the bones of children and adolescents. It is one of the most aggressive cancers, with only a 15 per cent, five-year survival rate when diagnosed in an advanced metastatic stage. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 23, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

New therapeutic pathway may keep cancer cells turned 'off'
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) A new Tel Aviv University study offers tangible evidence that it is possible to keep osteosarcoma lesions dormant using novel nanomedicines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 23, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

DNA imprinting defects associated with childhood osteosarcoma development and progression
(University of Minnesota Academic Health Center) Children diagnosed with osteosarcoma may be impacted by a DNA imprinting defect also found in parents, according to new research from the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota. DNA imprinting is a phenomenon in which just one of the two inherited genes is active while the other is present but inactive.The study is published now in the journal Oncotarget. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 26, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Catching up with Caitlynne: Climb every mountain
College student Caitlynne McGaff bounces from one adventure to the next. One weekend, she might be on stage, performing in the Complete Works of Willliam Shakespeare, (abridged) a rapid-fire tromp through the bard’s best works. The next she could be scaling mountains in Maine or jumping into the icy waters of the Atlantic. In December, she spent three weeks in South Africa on a service trip, teaching life skills to disadvantaged high school students. She’s leading the life she and her parents envisioned in 2001, when Caitlynne, then 8, underwent a rotationplasty. After she was diagnosed with osteosarcoma at age...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - January 25, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Mark Gebhardt osteosarcoma rotationplasty Source Type: news

Bang! Zap! Pow!
Graphic Novels Tackle Cancer Topics By Stacy Simon Understanding cancer can be tough for anyone, but this complicated disease can be even harder to explain to children and teenagers. The American Cancer Society Medikidz series of graphic novels uses superhero medical experts and cartoon cancer cells to help young readers understand what causes cancer and how it is diagnosed and treated. RESOURCES: ¡Pum! ¡Zas! ¡Uf!Medikidz Book SeriesSerie de libros infantiles MedikidzAmerican Cancer Society Bookstore For example, in one of the books in the series, What’s Up with Tiffany’s Dad? Medikidz E...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - December 16, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: ACS Programs and Services Skin Cancer - Melanoma Cancer in the Family Source Type: news

Antibody prevents degrading of bones in rare cancer
Stephen FellerCOPENHAGEN, Denmark, Dec. 2 (UPI) -- Researchers found an antibody could prevent up to 80 percent of bone degradation caused by osteosarcoma, which could help prevent amputation in young patients. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - December 2, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers develop antibody to save cancerous bones
(University of Copenhagen, Biotech Research & Innovation Centre) Osteosarcoma is a rare cancer most often affecting adolescents and children. While most bone cancers have their origin in other body tissues and spread to the bones through metastases, OS originates in the bone tissue. At the Finsen Laboratory, University of Copenhagen researchers now shows that OS cells degrade the bone tissue through a completely different process than metastasized bone cancer. Through treatment with a specific antibody, the researchers blocked the process and reduced up to 80 percent of bone degradation in a cancer model. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 2, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Childhood Cancer Survivors at Risk for HospitalizationChildhood Cancer Survivors at Risk for Hospitalization
Childhood and young adult cancer survivors have higher rates of hospitalization, and osteosarcoma survivors face a risk for neurocognitive impairment later in life. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Chemo-resistant tumors targeted by BU School of Medicine researcher
(Boston University Medical Center) Rachel Flynn, Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmacology and medicine at Boston University School of Medicine, is the recipient of an Elsa U. Pardee award for approximately $148,000 for 'Targeting the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) Pathway in cancer.' This pathway is frequently reactivated in aggressive cancers such as osteosarcoma and glioblastoma, which are often resistant to standard chemotherapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 2, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Radiological Case: Osteoblastic OsteosarcomaRadiological Case: Osteoblastic Osteosarcoma
While osteosarcoma is usually diagnosed in younger patients, this case of a 43-year-old woman with a forearm mass demonstrates that it can occur at any age, with atypical presentation. Applied Radiology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 7, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Radiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Protein implicated in osteosarcoma's spread acts as air traffic controller
The investigation of a simple protein has uncovered its uniquely complicated role in the spread of the childhood cancer, osteosarcoma. It turns out the protein, called ezrin, acts like an air traffic controller, coordinating multiple functions within a cancer cell and allowing it to endure stress conditions encountered during metastasis. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 6, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Protein implicated in osteosarcoma's spread acts as air traffic controller
(Georgetown University Medical Center) The investigation of a simple protein has uncovered its uniquely complicated role in the spread of the childhood cancer, osteosarcoma. It turns out the protein, called ezrin, acts like an air traffic controller, coordinating multiple functions within a cancer cell and allowing it to endure stress conditions encountered during metastasis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 6, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A fourth opinion saves Mahra’s arm from amputation
Mahra Saeed is at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center for her last checkup before heading home to the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The spunky 8-year-old sports a new dress and cowboy boots, and carries a large stack of thank you cards. She hands them out to oncologist Dr. Carlos Rodriguez-Galindo, nurse practitioner Annette Werger and other staff members, who try to contain their emotion as they read, “Thanks for helping me to fight cancer.” Back up 10 months ago to August 2014, when Mahra fell at the park in her hometown of Al Ain and fractured her right ar...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - June 9, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: All posts Cancer Our patients’ stories Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center osteosarcoma Source Type: news

Potential proteins identified to target in osteosarcoma treatment
The genes and pathways that, when altered, can cause osteosarcoma have been identified by researchers using new models. The information could be used to better target treatments for the often-deadly type of cancer. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 27, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

UMN research identifies potential proteins to target in osteosarcoma treatment
(University of Minnesota Academic Health Center) New models developed at the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota reveal the genes and pathways that, when altered, can cause osteosarcoma. The information could be used to better target treatments for the often-deadly type of cancer.The new research is published in Nature Genetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 27, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Gene signatures predict doxorubicin response in K9 osteosarcoma
(University of Colorado Denver) University of Colorado Cancer Center members at CSU Flint Animal Cancer Center present at AACR 2015, a gene expression model that predicts canine osteosarcoma response to doxorubicin, potentially allowing veterinary oncologists to better choose which drug to use with their patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A novel immunotherapy technique to treat patients with osteosarcoma and neuroblastoma
(Solving Kids' Cancer) A novel phase 1 clinical trial that leverages T-cell immunotherapy is now under way at Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, bringing new hope to children and young adults with osteosarcoma and neuroblastoma. This new clinical trial is being funded by charity partners Solving Kids' Cancer and Fishin' For The Cure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 26, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Cancer drug first tested in pet dogs begins human trials
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A new drug that prompts cancer cells to self-destruct while sparing healthy cells is now entering phase I clinical trials in humans. The drug, called PAC-1, first showed promise in the treatment of pet dogs with spontaneously occurring cancers, and is still in clinical trials in dogs with osteosarcoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 26, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Only 2% Of My Cancer Patients Have Had This Checked
I saw a patient recently who has stage four breast cancer. She’d been to some of the best hospitals and specialists for care. Before she came to me she’d had a mastectomy and chemotherapy. Then the cancer spread to her backbone and she had radiation treatment. Yet still, after all that time and until she came to my clinic, no one had mentioned a possible estrogen problem. No one ever bothered to measure her estrogen. They never looked at whether her breast cancer was estrogen positive or progesterone positive. The rates of most cancers have stabilized. Most cancers aren’t a death sentence the way they use...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - January 23, 2015 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Jeff Brodsky Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news

Notch1 and osteoblasts play role in bone cancer initiation
(Baylor College of Medicine) A new mouse model of osteogenic sarcoma, a potentially deadly form of bone cancer, shows that high levels of Notch1, a gene that helps determine cell fate, can drive osteoblasts, cells that normally lead to bone formation, to become cancerous, said researchers from Baylor College of Medicine in a report in the journal Cancer Cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 8, 2014 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news