Malignant cancer diagnosed in a dinosaur for the first time
(Royal Ontario Museum) A collaboration led by the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) and McMaster University has led to the discovery and diagnosis of an aggressive malignant bone cancer -- an osteosarcoma -- for the first time ever in a dinosaur. No malignant cancers (tumours that can spread throughout the body and have severe health implications) have ever been documented in dinosaurs previously. The paper was published in The Lancet Oncology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 3, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

MU advances chemotherapy-free treatment for cancer in animals and humans
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Osteosarcoma, a common bone cancer in dogs, affects more than 10,000 dogs in the US each year. While chemotherapy is generally effective at killing some of the cancer cells, the numerous side effects can be painful and often a subset of cancer cells exist that are resistant to chemotherapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 17, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Journal of Dental Research study: Fluoridation is not associated with increase in osteosarcoma
(International& American Associations for Dental Research) The Journal of Dental Research published today the results of a study that demonstrated that community water fluoridation is not associated with increased risk of osteosarcoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH study provides genetic insights into osteosarcoma in children
Osteosarcoma is the most common cancerous bone tumor of children and adolescents. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - March 19, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH study provides genetic insights into osteosarcoma in children
(NIH/National Cancer Institute) A study by researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, offers new insight into genetic alterations associated with osteosarcoma, the most common cancerous bone tumor of children and adolescents. The researchers found that more people with osteosarcoma carry harmful, or likely harmful, variants in known cancer-susceptibility genes than people without osteosarcoma. This finding has implications for genetic testing of children with osteosarcoma, as well as their families. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 19, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Tumor Profiling Yields Insights Into Poor Osteosarcoma Response to Immunotherapy Tumor Profiling Yields Insights Into Poor Osteosarcoma Response to Immunotherapy
Multiple genetic and cellular factors contribute to osteosarcoma's poor response to immunotherapy, researchers say.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Profiling of Osteosarcoma Demonstrates Why Immunotherapy is Ineffective
Researchers found that poor infiltration of the tumor by immune cells, low activity from available T-cells, a lack of immune-stimulating neoantigens, and multiple immune-suppressing pathways all combine to dampen responses to immunotherapy in this disease landscape. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - February 25, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Hannah Slater Source Type: news

Osteosarcoma profiling reveals why immunotherapy remains ineffective
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Comprehensive profiling of tumor samples taken from patients with osteosarcoma shows that multiple factors contribute to the traditionally poor responses observed from treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors, according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 21, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Schoolgirl, nine, beat bone cancer after doctors amputated and reattached her leg BACKWARDS
Amelia Eldred, nine, from Tamworth, Staffordshire, was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a common type of bone cancer, in August 2017. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Jack Savoretti messages cancer girl Anna Drysdale
Anna Drysdale, 8, contracted osteosarcoma at five and says getting the singer's message was "amazing". (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - December 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Boy, seven, who lost his leg due to cancer gets knee made using his FOOT
Austin Degnan, of Illinois, was diagnosed with osteosarcoma earlier this year, after complaining of a severe pain in his left leg. He underwent a surgical procedure called a rotationplasty. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Toddler with cancerous tumour in his knee has leg amputated and reattached BACKWARDS
Maxi Richards, three, of Tasmania, suddenly lost the ability to walk at 15 months old due to osteosarcoma. An operation, called a rotationplasty, removed the cancerous knee. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Unique hybrid implant first installed to a cat
(National University of Science and Technology MISIS) Scientific team of a small innovative enterprise Biomimetix, based on the National University of Science and Technology MISIS together with their colleagues from the N.N. Blokhin National Medical Research Centre of oncology developed a unique implant to replace the damaged bone fragment. The implant, which imitates real bone structure, was installed to a domestic cat with osteosarcoma by surgeons of the veterinary clinic 'Biocontrol'. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study reveals genetic similarities of osteosarcoma between dogs and children
(The Translational Genomics Research Institute) A bone cancer known as osteosarcoma is genetically similar in dogs and human children, according to the results of a study published today by Tufts University and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope. The findings could help break the logjam in the treatment of this deadly disease, which hasn't seen a significant medical breakthrough in nearly three decades. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boy, 6, whose 'growing pains' were revealed to be cancerous leg tumors dies 
Nixon Whatcott, seven, from Bluffdale, Utah, was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a bone cancer, in February 2018. His parents announced that he passed away on June 25. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can ancient herbs really treat cancer?
Karen Kwai-Ching Li, known as KC, has lived in fear of her osteosarcoma, a cancer of the bone, for almost 28 years. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Devastated mum loses leg after being diagnosed with rare cancer
Dionne Brown, of Devon, began experiencing leg pain in November 2016. A year later, and when her twins were four months old, a tumour was found due to rare bone cancer osteosarcoma. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NaF-PET/CT rarely finds prostate cancer metastases
Sodium fluoride (NaF) PET/CT rarely adds value for detecting bone metastases...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Could Ga-68 PSMA PET become essential for prostate cancer? Delayed NaF-PET enhances coronary plaque detection Can deep learning monitor lesions on F-18 NaF PET/CT? CMS again declines coverage for NaF-PET scans NaF-PET could be valuable for osteosarcoma assessment (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 3, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Gotta love the love apple: It prevents osteosarcoma from spreading
(Natural News) Paris polyphylla, also known as love apple, is a perennial herb that can be found mostly in South East Asia. This medicinal plant is a member of the Melanthiaceae family and it has found wide usage in traditional Chinese medicine. According to studies, P. polyphylla possesses antimicrobial, anti-tumor, and anticancer properties. To determine its... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Boy, 5, diagnosed with hard-to-spot cancer after falling over and breaking his arm at school
Derrick 'DJ' Schott, five, from Hillview, Kentucky, was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a type of bone cancer, in December 2018 after he fell and broke his arm, which revealed a tumor. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Teenage rugby player loses his leg to cancer six years after his mother's death
Olly Liddle, from Whitley Bay near Newcastle, had to have his right leg cut off above the knee because of osteosarcoma, a rare type of cancer in the bone. His mother, Kerrie, died of breast cancer in 2012. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Duke doctor's search for cancer cure lands in unlikely place – studying dogs
Dr. Will Eward spends the first three days of his week treating patients at Duke Cancer Institute, including those facing a rare cancer that starts in the bones called osteosarcoma. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 23, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Dane Huffman Source Type: news

Duke doctor's search for cancer cure lands in unlikely place – studying dogs
Dr. Will Eward spends the first three days of his week treating patients at Duke Cancer Institute, including those facing a rare cancer that starts in the bones called osteosarcoma. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 23, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Dane Huffman Source Type: news

Duke doctor's search for cancer cure lands in unlikely place
Dr. Will Eward spends the first three days of his week treating patients at Duke Cancer Institute, including those facing a rare cancer that starts in the bones called osteosarcoma. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 21, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Dane Huffman Source Type: news

Alex Huang, M.D., Ph.D., awarded $1.35 million to conduct lifesaving childhood cancer research
(Case Western Reserve University) Leading cancer researcher, Alex Huang M.D., Ph.D., has been awarded a three-year, $1.35 million grant from the St. Baldrick's Foundation and the Osteosarcoma Collaborative to develop new ways to treat osteosarcoma, a rare cancer that begins in the bone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New clinical trials seek treatments for canine cancers, may offer clues on human cancers
(Tufts University) Two studies into deadly cancers in dogs are now underway, offered through the newly formed Clinical Trials Office at Cummings Veterinary Medical Center at Tufts University. Dogs with spontaneous osteosarcoma, as well as dogs with mast cell tumors and solid tumors, may be eligible for enrollment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Dancer, 12, who lost leg to rare bone cancer undergoes operation to turn her ankle into a KNEE
Delaney Unger, 12, from Selden, New York, was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a type of bone cancer, in December 2016 and was told that part of her leg would need to be amputated. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Modeling chemotherapy-induced stress to identify rational combination therapies in the DNA damage response pathway
Cells respond to DNA damage by activating complex signaling networks that decide cell fate, promoting not only DNA damage repair and survival but also cell death. We have developed a multiscale computational model that quantitatively links chemotherapy-induced DNA damage response signaling to cell fate. The computational model was trained and calibrated on extensive data from U2OS osteosarcoma cells, including the cell cycle distribution of the initial cell population, signaling data measured by Western blotting, and cell fate data in response to chemotherapy treatment measured by time-lapse microscopy. The resulting mecha...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - July 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alkan, O., Schoeberl, B., Shah, M., Koshkaryev, A., Heinemann, T., Drummond, D. C., Yaffe, M. B., Raue, A. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What is osteosarcoma?
Osteosarcoma is a type of bone cancer that often affects the shinbone, thighbone, or upper arm. Doctors are currently unsure of the causes, but genetics may play a role. Treatment includes chemotherapy and surgery. The outlook depends on if and how far cancerous cells have spread. Learn more about osteosarcoma here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Emma Neagu had her foot fitted backwards after having bone cancer
Emma Neagu, now 14, from Toronto, was diagnosed with a form of bone cancer known as osteosarcoma in 2016. The teen endured nine months of grueling chemotherapy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gymnast, 14, chose to have her foot removed and refitted backwards after developing bone cancer
Emma Neagu, now 14, from Toronto, was diagnosed with a form of bone cancer known as osteosarcoma in 2016. The teen endured nine months of grueling chemotherapy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Products of omega-3 fatty acid metabolism may have anticancer effects, study shows
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A class of molecules formed when the body metabolizes omega-3 fatty acids could inhibit cancer's growth and spread, University of Illinois researchers report in a new study in mice. In mice with tumors of osteosarcoma - a bone cancer that is notoriously painful and difficult to treat -- endocannabinoids slowed the growth of tumors and blood vessels, inhibited the cancer cells from migrating and caused cancer cell death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Olathe biotech moves dog cancer treatment closer to market
A Kansas City-area animal health company is ramping up its efforts to take its cancer immunotherapy treatment to market. Elias Animal Health, a subsidiary of Olathe-based TVAX Biomedical Inc., applied for a conditional licensure of its treatment for dogs with bone cancer through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Center for Veterinary Biologics. Elias recently completed preliminary studies of its osteosarcoma treatment and will enroll for a pivotal study as the next step. On Thursday, the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - June 14, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Elise Reuter Source Type: news

Genetic discovery will help clinicians identify aggressive versus benign bone tumors
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) The first genetic marker for the bone tumor, osteoblastoma, has been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. Whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing of human bone tumors revealed that a genetic change that affects the transcription factor, FOS, is a hallmark mutation of osteoblastoma. The results, published in Nature Communications, will help clinicians correctly distinguish benign osteoblastoma tumors from aggressive osteosarcoma tumors and direct the correct treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Innovative vaccine offers canine cancer patients a shot at a longer, happier life
(University of Pennsylvania) Nicola Mason of the School of Veterinary Medicine is leading a multi-institutional clinical trial evaluating an immunotherapy approach to treat dogs with osteosarcoma, a cancer of the bone. A new $775,000 grant from the Morris Animal Foundation will help her build on her past successes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 1, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Morris Animal Foundation awards $775K to test osteosarcoma immunotherapy vaccine in dogs
(Morris Animal Foundation) Morris Animal Foundation has awarded a $775,000 grant to the University of Pennsylvania to test a vaccine that could improve longevity and quality of life for dogs with the deadly bone tumor, osteosarcoma. The research team will conduct clinical trials to evaluate a novel immunotherapy treatment which combines a molecule expressed by cancer cells with a modified live form of the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

PET imaging could help personalize cancer treatment
Researchers have developed a same-day, noninvasive PET imaging approach to...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: FDG-PET/CT predicts outcomes in pediatric osteosarcoma Artificial intelligence guides lower PET tracer dose PET tracer could better assess lung ailments SNMMI posts criteria for somatostatin receptor PET Deep learning analyzes PET for signs of dementia (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 2, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Gemcitabine Plus Sirolimus for Osteosarcoma Gemcitabine Plus Sirolimus for Osteosarcoma
The combination of gemcitabine and sirolimus may be a safe and effective option for patients with relapsed unresectable osteosarcoma.Annals of Oncology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Journal Article Source Type: news

Alex Huang, M.D., Ph.D., receives $450,000 from Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation
(Case Western Reserve University) Leading cancer researcher, Alex Huang M.D., Ph.D., has received a $450,000 Basic Science grant from Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation to study targeted approaches for effectively eliminating metastatic osteosarcoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FDG-PET/CT predicts outcomes in pediatric osteosarcoma
The best way to predict a good outcome for pediatric patients with osteosarcoma...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: UC Davis group reports progress on total-body PET/CT FDA issues guidance on lowering pediatric x-ray dose FDG-PET, DWI-MRI help predict osteosarcoma chemo response FDG-PET/CT a good option for imaging pediatric osteosarcoma (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 19, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Molecular imaging technique identifies lung nodules for resection in osteosarcoma patient
(SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics) Utility of near-infrared molecular imaging in a patient undergoing pulmonary metastasectomy for osteosarcoma has been reported by researchers from Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Purdue University. The work is reported in an article in the Journal of Biomedical Optics published this week by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

HKBU Chinese medicine scholars develop HKBU Chinese medicine scholars develop
(Hong Kong Baptist University) Chinese Medicine scholars at Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have succeeded in developing a novel targeted delivery system for CRISPR/Cas9 to achieve therapeutic genome editing of VEGFA in osteosarcoma (OS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

With three products out, Aratana chases its fourth: a canine cancer drug
With its third FDA-approved drug on the market, Aratana Therapeutics is hunting its next product, a canine cancer immunotherapy treatment. The treatment, called AT-014, would be used to treat bone cancer, or osteosarcoma, in dogs. After a tumor is removed, a vaccine is used to prime the dog’s immune system to target any remaining cancer. Aratana (Nasdaq: PETX) expects to obtain conditional licensure for the treatment from the U.S . Department of Agriculture before the end of 2017, which would… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - November 7, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elise Reuter Source Type: news

Osteosarcoma and Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma
of Bone (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - July 31, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

On The Horizon: How dogs may help fight bone cancer
Veterinarians team up with cancer doctors in the field of comparative oncology to find a cure for osteosarcoma (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - July 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tumor-targeting drug shows potential for treating bone cancer patients
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) The treatment of osteosarcoma, the most common tumor of bone, is challenging. A study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found a drug known as bone metastasis-targeting peptidomimetic (BMTP-11) has potential as a new therapeutic strategy for this devastating illness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Guildford teen discovers 'pulled muscle' was bone cancer
Faye Lucas, 19, from Guildford, put off going to the doctors  for more than 12 months as she put her difficulty bending her leg down to a strain. Doctors discovered she had a form of osteosarcoma. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Brisbane boy with an upside down foot
Jonty Oddy, from Brisbane, Australia, was an active four-year-old, when he suddenly started limping as he walked. Doctors discovered his pained stemmed from an osteosarcoma. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Existing drugs could benefit patients with bone cancer, genetic study suggests
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) A subgroup of patients with osteosarcoma -- a form of bone cancer -- could be helped by an existing drug, suggest scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators. In the largest genetic sequencing study of osteosarcoma to date, scientists discovered that 10 percent of patients with a genetic mutation in particular growth factor signalling genes may benefit from existing drugs, known as IGF1R inhibitors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news