Alex Huang, M.D., Ph.D., awarded $1.35 million to conduct lifesaving childhood cancer research
(Case Western Reserve University) Leading cancer researcher, Alex Huang M.D., Ph.D., has been awarded a three-year, $1.35 million grant from the St. Baldrick's Foundation and the Osteosarcoma Collaborative to develop new ways to treat osteosarcoma, a rare cancer that begins in the bone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New clinical trials seek treatments for canine cancers, may offer clues on human cancers
(Tufts University) Two studies into deadly cancers in dogs are now underway, offered through the newly formed Clinical Trials Office at Cummings Veterinary Medical Center at Tufts University. Dogs with spontaneous osteosarcoma, as well as dogs with mast cell tumors and solid tumors, may be eligible for enrollment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Dancer, 12, who lost leg to rare bone cancer undergoes operation to turn her ankle into a KNEE
Delaney Unger, 12, from Selden, New York, was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a type of bone cancer, in December 2016 and was told that part of her leg would need to be amputated. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Modeling chemotherapy-induced stress to identify rational combination therapies in the DNA damage response pathway
Cells respond to DNA damage by activating complex signaling networks that decide cell fate, promoting not only DNA damage repair and survival but also cell death. We have developed a multiscale computational model that quantitatively links chemotherapy-induced DNA damage response signaling to cell fate. The computational model was trained and calibrated on extensive data from U2OS osteosarcoma cells, including the cell cycle distribution of the initial cell population, signaling data measured by Western blotting, and cell fate data in response to chemotherapy treatment measured by time-lapse microscopy. The resulting mecha...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - July 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alkan, O., Schoeberl, B., Shah, M., Koshkaryev, A., Heinemann, T., Drummond, D. C., Yaffe, M. B., Raue, A. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What is osteosarcoma?
Osteosarcoma is a type of bone cancer that often affects the shinbone, thighbone, or upper arm. Doctors are currently unsure of the causes, but genetics may play a role. Treatment includes chemotherapy and surgery. The outlook depends on if and how far cancerous cells have spread. Learn more about osteosarcoma here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Emma Neagu had her foot fitted backwards after having bone cancer
Emma Neagu, now 14, from Toronto, was diagnosed with a form of bone cancer known as osteosarcoma in 2016. The teen endured nine months of grueling chemotherapy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gymnast, 14, chose to have her foot removed and refitted backwards after developing bone cancer
Emma Neagu, now 14, from Toronto, was diagnosed with a form of bone cancer known as osteosarcoma in 2016. The teen endured nine months of grueling chemotherapy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Products of omega-3 fatty acid metabolism may have anticancer effects, study shows
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A class of molecules formed when the body metabolizes omega-3 fatty acids could inhibit cancer's growth and spread, University of Illinois researchers report in a new study in mice. In mice with tumors of osteosarcoma - a bone cancer that is notoriously painful and difficult to treat -- endocannabinoids slowed the growth of tumors and blood vessels, inhibited the cancer cells from migrating and caused cancer cell death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Olathe biotech moves dog cancer treatment closer to market
A Kansas City-area animal health company is ramping up its efforts to take its cancer immunotherapy treatment to market. Elias Animal Health, a subsidiary of Olathe-based TVAX Biomedical Inc., applied for a conditional licensure of its treatment for dogs with bone cancer through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Center for Veterinary Biologics. Elias recently completed preliminary studies of its osteosarcoma treatment and will enroll for a pivotal study as the next step. On Thursday, the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - June 14, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Elise Reuter Source Type: news

Genetic discovery will help clinicians identify aggressive versus benign bone tumors
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) The first genetic marker for the bone tumor, osteoblastoma, has been discovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. Whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing of human bone tumors revealed that a genetic change that affects the transcription factor, FOS, is a hallmark mutation of osteoblastoma. The results, published in Nature Communications, will help clinicians correctly distinguish benign osteoblastoma tumors from aggressive osteosarcoma tumors and direct the correct treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Innovative vaccine offers canine cancer patients a shot at a longer, happier life
(University of Pennsylvania) Nicola Mason of the School of Veterinary Medicine is leading a multi-institutional clinical trial evaluating an immunotherapy approach to treat dogs with osteosarcoma, a cancer of the bone. A new $775,000 grant from the Morris Animal Foundation will help her build on her past successes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 1, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Morris Animal Foundation awards $775K to test osteosarcoma immunotherapy vaccine in dogs
(Morris Animal Foundation) Morris Animal Foundation has awarded a $775,000 grant to the University of Pennsylvania to test a vaccine that could improve longevity and quality of life for dogs with the deadly bone tumor, osteosarcoma. The research team will conduct clinical trials to evaluate a novel immunotherapy treatment which combines a molecule expressed by cancer cells with a modified live form of the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

PET imaging could help personalize cancer treatment
Researchers have developed a same-day, noninvasive PET imaging approach to...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: FDG-PET/CT predicts outcomes in pediatric osteosarcoma Artificial intelligence guides lower PET tracer dose PET tracer could better assess lung ailments SNMMI posts criteria for somatostatin receptor PET Deep learning analyzes PET for signs of dementia (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - March 2, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Gemcitabine Plus Sirolimus for Osteosarcoma Gemcitabine Plus Sirolimus for Osteosarcoma
The combination of gemcitabine and sirolimus may be a safe and effective option for patients with relapsed unresectable osteosarcoma.Annals of Oncology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Journal Article Source Type: news

Alex Huang, M.D., Ph.D., receives $450,000 from Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation
(Case Western Reserve University) Leading cancer researcher, Alex Huang M.D., Ph.D., has received a $450,000 Basic Science grant from Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation to study targeted approaches for effectively eliminating metastatic osteosarcoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FDG-PET/CT predicts outcomes in pediatric osteosarcoma
The best way to predict a good outcome for pediatric patients with osteosarcoma...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: UC Davis group reports progress on total-body PET/CT FDA issues guidance on lowering pediatric x-ray dose FDG-PET, DWI-MRI help predict osteosarcoma chemo response FDG-PET/CT a good option for imaging pediatric osteosarcoma (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 19, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Molecular imaging technique identifies lung nodules for resection in osteosarcoma patient
(SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics) Utility of near-infrared molecular imaging in a patient undergoing pulmonary metastasectomy for osteosarcoma has been reported by researchers from Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Purdue University. The work is reported in an article in the Journal of Biomedical Optics published this week by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

HKBU Chinese medicine scholars develop HKBU Chinese medicine scholars develop
(Hong Kong Baptist University) Chinese Medicine scholars at Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have succeeded in developing a novel targeted delivery system for CRISPR/Cas9 to achieve therapeutic genome editing of VEGFA in osteosarcoma (OS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

With three products out, Aratana chases its fourth: a canine cancer drug
With its third FDA-approved drug on the market, Aratana Therapeutics is hunting its next product, a canine cancer immunotherapy treatment. The treatment, called AT-014, would be used to treat bone cancer, or osteosarcoma, in dogs. After a tumor is removed, a vaccine is used to prime the dog’s immune system to target any remaining cancer. Aratana (Nasdaq: PETX) expects to obtain conditional licensure for the treatment from the U.S . Department of Agriculture before the end of 2017, which would… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - November 7, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elise Reuter Source Type: news

Osteosarcoma and Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma
of Bone (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - July 31, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

On The Horizon: How dogs may help fight bone cancer
Veterinarians team up with cancer doctors in the field of comparative oncology to find a cure for osteosarcoma (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - July 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tumor-targeting drug shows potential for treating bone cancer patients
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) The treatment of osteosarcoma, the most common tumor of bone, is challenging. A study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found a drug known as bone metastasis-targeting peptidomimetic (BMTP-11) has potential as a new therapeutic strategy for this devastating illness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Guildford teen discovers 'pulled muscle' was bone cancer
Faye Lucas, 19, from Guildford, put off going to the doctors  for more than 12 months as she put her difficulty bending her leg down to a strain. Doctors discovered she had a form of osteosarcoma. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Brisbane boy with an upside down foot
Jonty Oddy, from Brisbane, Australia, was an active four-year-old, when he suddenly started limping as he walked. Doctors discovered his pained stemmed from an osteosarcoma. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Existing drugs could benefit patients with bone cancer, genetic study suggests
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) A subgroup of patients with osteosarcoma -- a form of bone cancer -- could be helped by an existing drug, suggest scientists from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators. In the largest genetic sequencing study of osteosarcoma to date, scientists discovered that 10 percent of patients with a genetic mutation in particular growth factor signalling genes may benefit from existing drugs, known as IGF1R inhibitors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Tumor Lysis Syndrome in an Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma Tumor Lysis Syndrome in an Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma
Tumor lysis syndrome is a major oncological emergency, usually associated with treatment of hematological tumors. What precipitated it in this patient, and how was it treated?Journal of Medical Case Reports (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Journal Article Source Type: news

On The Horizon: How dogs may help fight bone cancer
Veterinarians team up with cancer doctors in the field of comparative oncology to find a cure for osteosarcoma (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - March 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

London schoolgirl discovers GROWING PAINS were cancer
Ashleigh Massey, from Chessington, struggled with the discomfort in her right leg when it first began in September. But after going to hospital a month later, she was found to have osteosarcoma. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cancer Facts and Figures: Death Rate Down 25% Since 1991
By Stacy Simon The death rate from cancer in the US has declined steadily over the past 2 decades, according to annual statistics reporting from the American Cancer Society. The cancer death rate for men and women combined fell 25% from its peak in 1991 to 2014, the most recent year for which data are available. This decline translates to more than 2.1 million deaths averted during this time period. “Cancer Statistics, 2017,” published in the American Cancer Society’s journal CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths expected in the US this year. The estimat...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - January 5, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: General Information Source Type: news

Cancer treatment for pooch could help people, too
Cancer treatments for Smokey, a rescue dog with osteosarcoma, may help similar dogs in the future — but they could also help kids who have osteosarcoma as well, veterinary researchers hope. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Edinburgh teen 'sympathy pains' while his twin battled bone cancer
Pat and Al Dawson, both from Edinburgh, had knee pains in sync with each other. Tests found Al had osteosarcoma - a rare form of bone cancer that eventually took his life just two years later. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Top Sarcoma News in 2016
In this slide show we highlight some of the top news on sarcoma in 2016, including the first frontline FDA approval in 40 years, and studies on imaging in Ewing sarcoma, maintenance chemotherapy in osteosarcoma, and more. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - December 14, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Cancer Network Editors Tags: Conferences/Sarcoma Year In Review 2016 Source Type: news

Post cancer, post rotationplasty, teen athlete continues to excel
The ball leaps off the metal bat with an unmistakable “ping” that denotes good contact. Miles Goldberg runs to first base, from which the 13-year-old will soon contemplate – and safely execute – a steal of second. Miles is used to transitioning naturally with the seasons from football to hockey to baseball. This year, however, has been different. Every hit, catch, and glide across the ice has had far more meaning to the eighth-grader, who recently completed osteosarcoma treatment at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. His treatment included a wide resecti...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 6, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Saul Wisnia Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center osteosarcoma rotationplasty Source Type: news

Maintenance Chemo Fails to Improve Localized Osteosarcoma Outcomes
The use of a metronomic chemotherapy approach did not improve over standard chemotherapy in patients with high-grade, non-metastatic, operable osteosarcoma of the extremities. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - November 22, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dave Levitan Tags: News Sarcoma Source Type: news

Cancer in Cavemen?
In this Medical News Minute, developed exclusively for Cancer Network, Dr. Bobby Lazzara discusses a recent case report of a 1.7-million-year-old osteosarcoma found in an extinct human lineage. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - October 6, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Bobby Lazzara, MD Tags: Sarcoma Source Type: news

Sarah Dransfield has leg AMPUTATED after leg sprain turned out to be bone cancer
Sarah Dransfield, from Holmfirth, West Yorkshire, was just 16 when she was diagnosed with osteosarcoma. After chemotherapy didn't work, doctors revealed she needed an amputation. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

' Until 20,' A Film About A Young Cancer Patient's End-Of-Life Decisions
At one level, this is a true story about a brave young man with osteosarcoma. But it ’s more than that. This is a documentary about end-of-life decisions, and how a family copes. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - September 30, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elaine Schattner Source Type: news

Carter is more than you see
More than 50 feet above ground, a wire rope extends from one tree to another. High in the trees, seven-year-old Carter Mock fearlessly steps off a platform and places first one foot, then the other, onto the wire. Holding tight to hanging ropes for balance, he navigates across the wire to the next tree. It’s an impressive feat for anyone, but for Carter it’s extra special. Just weeks earlier, he completed treatment for osteosarcoma (a bone cancer), and he now has a prosthetic bottom left leg and foot. Carter says navigating the wire rope is tricky, because he can’t feel the pressure of the rope below his ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 15, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Linda Watts Tags: Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Mark Gephardt osteosarcoma rotationplasty Source Type: news

Earliest Human Cancer Found in 1.7-Million-Year-Old Bone
This post originally appeared on National Geographic. In the fossil-rich region of South Africa known as the Cradle of Humankind, scientists have discovered the earliest known case of one of the world’s most deadly diseases. Using 3-D imaging, the researchers have diagnosed an aggressive type of cancer called osteosarcoma in a foot bone belonging to a human relative who died in Swartkrans Cave between 1.6 and 1.8 million years ago.   The discovery—which has just been published in the South African Journal of Science—suggests that, while modern lifestyles have increased the incidences of cancer,...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 31, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Earliest Human Cancer Found in 1.7-Million-Year-Old Bone
This post originally appeared on National Geographic. In the fossil-rich region of South Africa known as the Cradle of Humankind, scientists have discovered the earliest known case of one of the world’s most deadly diseases. Using 3-D imaging, the researchers have diagnosed an aggressive type of cancer called osteosarcoma in a foot bone belonging to a human relative who died in Swartkrans Cave between 1.6 and 1.8 million years ago.   The discovery—which has just been published in the South African Journal of Science—suggests that, while modern lifestyles have increased the incidences of cancer,...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 31, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hopes Dashed for Rare Bone Cancer Treatment
Extra chemo drugs failed to change course of osteosarcoma, researchers saySource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Bone Cancer, Cancer Chemotherapy (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - August 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hopes Dashed for Rare Bone Cancer Treatment
FRIDAY, Aug. 26, 2016 -- Adding extra drugs to chemotherapy doesn't benefit patients with a rare type of bone cancer, according to a new study. Osteosarcoma is diagnosed in about 600 people in the United States each year, mostly teenagers. With... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 26, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Hopes Dashed for Rare Bone Cancer Treatment
Extra chemo drugs failed to change course of osteosarcoma, researchers say (Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer - August 26, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Hopes Dashed for Rare Bone Cancer Treatment
Extra chemo drugs failed to change course of osteosarcoma, researchers say (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - August 25, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Nursing, Oncology, Pharmacy, News, Source Type: news

CT separates bone mets from benign lesions
Researchers in Boston say that CT attenuation measurements can be used to distinguish...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: FDG-PET/MRI shows advantages with malignant bone lesions FDG-PET, DWI-MRI help predict osteosarcoma chemo response ASTRO: DCE-MRI predicts spine tumor recurrence (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - August 22, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Scientists test nanoparticle drug delivery in dogs with osteosarcoma
( University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ) An engineer teamed up with a veterinarian to test a bone cancer drug delivery system in animals bigger than the standard animal model, the mouse. They chose dogs -- mammals closer in size and biology to humans -- with naturally occurring bone cancers, which also are a lot like human bone tumors. The researchers report their results in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 25, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists Trace Origin Cell of Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors, Test Drug Target
Contact: Samiha Khanna Phone: 919-419-5069 Email: samiha.khanna@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 12 p.m. (ET) on Thursday, July 14, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Scientists at Duke Health are part of a team that has discovered a type of cell surrounding blood vessels can also serve as a starting point for sarcoma, a form of cancer that occurs in bones and connective tissues. The findings, made through studies of mice, offer insights that could aid in the development of potential new treatments for the rare but devastating cancer, which has 15,000 new diagnoses annually in the U.S. In an article to be ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - July 14, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

What Are The Most Common Pediatric Cancers?
Discussion Cancer occurs in all ages including children. Fortunately cancer is much less common in the pediatric age group accounting for
Source: PediatricEducation.org - July 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

UCLA-led team develops new method to study mitochondrial DNA diseases
Alexander Patananan The process of transferring mitochondria between cells using the nanoblade technology.   A UCLA-led team of researchers has demonstrated a new method to conduct research on mitochondrial DNA diseases — a broad group of debilitating genetic disorders that can affect the brain, heart and muscles. The new method, which utilizes a technology developed by UCLA researchers that opens holes in the cell membrane, is described in a study published today in Cell Metabolism. The researchers say that it could pave the way for specific research on how and why these diseases occur, and point to pathways t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 10, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists may be able force cancer into dormant state
Stephen FellerTEL AVIV, Israel, Feb. 23 (UPI) -- A proof-of-concept drug that can "turn off" osteosarcoma cells may prevent cancer relapse, according to researchers in Tel Aviv. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news