Could Olive Oil Help Keep Stroke at Bay for Obese Americans?
New research found that healthy but severely obese patients who ate olive oil at least once a week had less platelet activation, which means their blood is less likely to clot -- which might help lower their risk of heart attack or stroke. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - March 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Drizzling olive oil on your food at least once a week lowers your risk of blood clots, study finds 
It's long been known that the Mediterranean diet - of which olive oil is a key component - is associated with good heart health. But now researchers at NYU School of Medicine have shown why and how. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could Olive Oil Help Keep Stroke at Bay for Obese Americans?
THURSDAY, March 7, 2019 -- If you ' re obese and you want to do your heart a favor, try adding some olive oil to your diet. So suggests new research, which found that healthy but severely obese patients who ate olive oil at least once a week had lower... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 7, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

NHS doctor says food can be part of the solution to a low mood, as he shares his recipes 
DR RUPY AUJLA: Research suggests omega-3 fatty acids can improve mental health, and that’s why I’m a big fan of recipes including nuts, seeds and extra-virgin olive oil. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Featured Review: Mediterranean-style diet for the prevention of cardiovascular disease
In this Q&A we asked the lead author Professor Saverio Stranges from Western University Canada to explain more about the mediterranean diet and its role in preventing cardiovascular disease following the publication of aCochrane Review on this topic. What makes a diet ‘Mediterranean’?Scientific interest in the traditional Mediterranean dietary pattern originated in the 1960s because of the observation that populations in countries of the Mediterranean region, such as Greece and Italy, had lower mortality from cardiovascular disease compared with northern European populations or the US, probably as a result of diff...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - February 27, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Katie Abbotts Source Type: news

Spain Tops Italy as World ’s Healthiest Country While U.S. Falls: Report
Maybe it’s something in the gazpacho or paella, as Spain just surpassed Italy to become the world’s healthiest country. That’s according to the 2019 edition of the Bloomberg Healthiest Country Index, which ranks 169 economies according to factors that contribute to overall health. Spain placed sixth in the previous gauge, published in 2017. Four additional European nations were among the top 10 in 2019: Iceland (third place), Switzerland (fifth), Sweden (sixth) and Norway (ninth). Japan was the healthiest Asian nation, jumping three places from the 2017 survey into fourth and replacing Singapore, which dr...
Source: TIME: Health - February 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lee Miller and Wei Lu / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized onetime Spain Source Type: news

Why Food Could Be the Best Medicine of All
When Tom Shicowich’s toe started feeling numb in 2010, he brushed it off as a temporary ache. At the time, he didn’t have health insurance, so he put off going to the doctor. The toe became infected, and he got so sick that he stayed in bed for two days with what he assumed was the flu. When he finally saw a doctor, the physician immediately sent Shicowich to the emergency room. Several days later, surgeons amputated his toe, and he ended up spending a month in the hospital to recover. Shicowich lost his toe because of complications of Type 2 diabetes as he struggled to keep his blood sugar under control. He wa...
Source: TIME: Health - February 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized health Nutrition Source Type: news

Antioxidants for Pediatric NAFLD Antioxidants for Pediatric NAFLD
Can a simple phenol of extra virgin olive oil given with vitamin E improve NAFLD in children?Medscape Pediatrics (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics Article Source Type: news

DR MICHAEL MOSELY: Down in the dumps? I've a gut feeling your tummy is to blame...  
Eating a Mediterranean-style diet, rich in vegetables, oily fish, full-fat yogurt, olive oil, wholegrains, nuts and legumes could help improve gut bacteria, writes DR MICHAEL MOSLEY. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

DR MICHAEL MOSELY: Down in the dumps? I've a gut feeling your tummy is to blame...   
Eating a Mediterranean-style diet, rich in vegetables, oily fish, full-fat yogurt, olive oil, wholegrains, nuts and legumes could help improve gut bacteria, writes DR MICHAEL MOSLEY. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Are Mushrooms Healthy? Here ’s What Experts Say
The versatile mushroom comes in all different shapes, sizes and colors; it stands up as a side and can replace meat as a main. The fungus is a favorite of nutrition professionals — packed with vitamins, minerals and other nutrients. Here’s what mushrooms can do for your health, and how to work them into your diet. What are the nutritional benefits of mushrooms? Mushrooms are a low-carb, practically no-fat food with some protein. One serving is about a cup raw (a fist-sized amount) or 1/2 cup cooked. Though they’re small and light in calories—one serving only has about 15—they’re mighty i...
Source: TIME: Health - January 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cassie Shortsleeve  Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Why Do You Get Sleepy After Eating? These Are the Top Theories
If eating makes you tired, you’ve got something in common with most people—and, for that matter, with most living things. Researchers have turned up evidence of “postprandial sleepiness,” also known as a food coma, in insects, snakes, worms and rats. “The conservation of this behavior across species suggests that it’s really important for something,” says William Ja, an associate professor of neuroscience at the Scripps Research Institute in Florida who has studied this food coma phenomenon. Some experts have hypothesized that animals—humans included—have built-in &ldqu...
Source: TIME: Health - January 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Fried Foods Linked To Higher Risk Of Death In Women 50+
By Nina Avramova, CNN (CNN) — A regular serving of fried chicken or fish is associated with a higher risk of death from any cause except cancer, according to a new study done in postmenopausal women in the United States. Women who enjoyed fried chicken once or more per day had a 13% higher risk of death from any cause compared with women who did not eat any fried food, according to the study, published Wednesday in the medical journal BMJ. Women eating a daily portion of fried fish or shellfish saw a 7% greater risk of death. The authors highlight that limiting the consumption of fried foods, in particular fried chi...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Heart Disease Source Type: news

Fried Food May Be Killing You, a New Study Says. Here Are the Worst Offenders
It’s no secret that fried food isn’t good for you. But a new study published in The BMJ details exactly how eating these foods may affect your health over time — and spells out which kinds may be the worst for you. “People know fried food may have adverse health outcomes, but there is very little scientific evidence to demonstrate what the long-term adverse outcomes are for eating fried foods,” says Dr. Wei Bao, an assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa College of Public Health and a co-author of the study. “In general, we found that fried food consumption is assoc...
Source: TIME: Health - January 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Are Sweet Potatoes Healthy? Here ’s What Experts Say
Sweet potatoes pack the unique health benefits of regular potatoes with a little something extra. “In general, the more color you can add into your diet coming from fruits and vegetables, the better,” says Yasi Ansari, a sports dietitian in Los Angeles and San Francisco. Still, the many nutritional benefits are no excuse to spring for sweet potato fries at every chance. Here’s what you need to know about how healthy sweet potatoes are, plus the best ways to incorporate them into any diet. What are the nutritional benefits of sweet potatoes? “All potatoes are nutrient-dense and healthy for you,&rdquo...
Source: TIME: Health - January 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cassie Shortsleeve  Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news