Perfect Piece to the Puzzle
Every year more and more families are getting the news that a loved one is on the autism spectrum. While at first, the news can be overwhelming, scary, and send you on an emotional rollercoaster, over time families learn the best ways to proceed and provide the best care. April is the national month for autism awareness, blue has become the main color associated with the awareness, along with the beloved puzzle piece. I wanted to write this piece because autism has been a very big part of my family. I have seen firsthand what this disorder can do to families and all of those affected. My younger brother is on the spe...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

North Arkansas Regional Medical Center Adds Rick Heiser to Staff (Movers & Shakers)
Rick Heiser, an occupational therapist, has joined North Arkansas Regional Medical Center in Harrison as director of outpatient rehabilitation and sports medicine. Heiser, who is certified in lymphedema therapy, manual lymph drainage and hand therapy, earned a doctorate in occupational therapy from Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions in Provo, Utah. See more of this week's Movers & Shakers, and submit your own announcement at ArkansasBusiness.com/Movers. (Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care)
Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care - April 11, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: news

‘Art is a great distraction.’
(Katherine C. Cohen/Boston Children’s Hospital) Phyllis Beinart Artist-in-Residence I love my art cart. It’s filled with wonderful things and I just keep adding more. I wear this apron so patients know that I’m an artist and not here to poke or prod or ask medical questions. No matter a patient’s age or ability or language, I can find an art project we can do together. When I first go into a room, I try to quickly size up what’s going on and then offer a few different things that might work. With some of the older kids, I’ll suggest cartooning or making flip-books. No one said ‘no’ to art today! Ar...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - March 24, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: Care Team Creative Arts Program Source Type: news

“Art is a great distraction.”
(Katherine C. Cohen/Boston Children’s Hospital) Phyllis Beinart Artist-in-Residence I love my art cart. It’s filled with wonderful things and I just keep adding more. I wear this apron so patients know that I’m an artist and not here to poke or prod or ask medical questions. No matter a patient’s age or ability or language, I can find an art project we can do together. When I first go into a room, I try to quickly size up what’s going on and then offer a few different things that might work. With some of the older kids, I’ll suggest cartooning or making flip-books. No one said ‘no’ to art today! Ar...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - March 24, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: Care Team Creative Arts Program Source Type: news

Microcephaly: Alainah’s story
Sixteen-month-old Alainah Therrien of Cape Cod was probably never exposed to the Zika virus. But she has a smaller-than-normal head and was diagnosed with microcephaly even before she was born. “I was told when I was 24 weeks pregnant that we would have a daughter who was mentally retarded,” recounts her mother Melissa. Melissa’s labor was induced at 36 weeks because Alainah had stopped growing. After Alainah was born, a tiny 5 pounds, Melissa saw the word microcephaly for the first time on the bottom of a medical form. The pediatrician didn’t know what microcephaly was, but thought perhaps the bones of Alainah’s...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - March 21, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Nancy Fliesler Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Research Brain Development and Genetics Clinic Dr. Ganeshwaran Mochida Dr. Jeffrey Neil microcephaly Source Type: news

Rehabilitation utilization following a work-related traumatic brain injury: a sex-based examination of workers' compensation claims in Victoria, Australia - Guerriero EN, Smith PM, Stergiou-Kita M, Colantonio A.
OBJECTIVES: To report on and examine differences in the use of four types of rehabilitation services (occupational therapy, physiotherapy, psychology, and speech therapy) by men and women following a work-related traumatic brain injury in Victoria, Austral... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 19, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

How to Pay for Physical or Occupational Therapy
WebMD explains how insurance companies and Medicare cover physical and occupational therapy. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - March 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High Point Regional, HPU to partner on physical therapy education
High Point Regional Health and High Point University announced Wednesday a new partnership centered around training physical therapists and expanding access to physical therapy services. The partnership includes the creation of a physical therapy clinic slated to open in May within High Point University's Human Biomechanics & Physiology Laboratory on Mall Loop Road in High Point that will include state-of-the-art equipment and physical and occupational therapy services. Ernie Bovio, president and… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 24, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Owen Covington Source Type: news

UTHSC opens pro bono clinic in memory of student
The University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) has opened a pro bono pediatric occupational therapy center in honor of a student who died in 2015. UTHSC student Rachel Kay Stevens died suddenly in January 2015, just after starting occupational therapy school. She was 21 years old. Her parents, Randy and Katrina Stevens of Batesville, Arkansas, approached her instructors about starting a scholarship in their daughter’s name. The idea grew and on Tuesday, Feb. 9, the doors of the new… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 10, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Michelle Corbet Source Type: news

Stroke Rounds: No Advantage for Intense Rehab for Motor Function (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Standard occupational therapy may work just fine for upper extremity impairment (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - February 9, 2016 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Better Together: Creating a Longitudinal Interprofessional Team-Based Curriculum (Sarah Coles MD)
Fragmented education within a single professional silo is no longer appropriate to meet the needs of graduating medical students. Interprofessional collaboration, continuity of care, and a focus on population and social determinants of health are the foundation of patient-centered, value-driven care. To meet this need, the Community Health Mentor Program (CHMP) and Longitudinal Patient Care Course (LPC) were designed in collaboration between the University of Arizona College of Medicine in Phoenix, Northern Arizona University College of Health and Human Services, and Arizona State University. Students from schools of me...
Source: Family Medicine Digital Resources Library (FMDRL) Recently Uploaded - January 28, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Multiple Sclerosis, Jamie-Lynn Sigler's Autoimmune Disease, Explained
In a People magazine interview on this week, Jamie-Lynn Sigler revealed that she has had multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disease, for the past 15 years.  "You'd think that after all these years, somebody would be settled with something like this." Sigler told People. "It's still hard to accept." What is multiple sclerosis? MS is a degenerative nervous system disease, in which the immune system attacks it's own nerve cells, slowing down messages between the brain and the rest of the body. No one knows what causes MS, but symptoms -- which differ from person to person, but typically include muscle weakness, coordinati...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Current therapy for patients with Parkinson’s disease shown to be ineffective
Parkinson’s disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, affecting approximately seven million people across the globe and 4% of those aged over 80.New research from the University of Birmingham has shown that physiotherapy and occupational therapy do not produce improvements in quality of life for patients with mild to moderate Parkinson’s disease.Findings... (Source: NIHR Evaluation, Trials and Studies News)
Source: NIHR Evaluation, Trials and Studies News - January 20, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Physical and Occupational Therapy Don't Seem to Improve Function in Parkinson's Patients (FREE)
By Kelly Young Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Lorenzo Di Francesco, MD, FACP, FHM In patients with Parkinson disease, a combination of physical and occupational therapy appears to offer no benefit … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - January 20, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Physical, Occupational Therapy Ineffective in Parkinson'sPhysical, Occupational Therapy Ineffective in Parkinson's
The intervention studied may not have been intensive enough or lasted long enough in patients with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease, researchers speculate. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - January 19, 2016 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news