Data on the Effects of Fecal Microbiota Transplant Between Genders and Ages in Mice
The gut microbiome changes with age, losing populations that produce beneficial metabolites, and gaining populations that produce chronic inflammation and other harms. There are many possible contributions to this process of aging, but it is unclear as to which of them are important. It has been shown in animal studies that performing fecal microbiota transplantation from young to old individuals restores a more youthful gut microbiome for an extended period of time, improving health and extending life span. Researchers here add more data for the short term outcomes of fecal microbial transplantation in mice. Alte...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 23, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 22nd 2021
In conclusion, long term LRIC could decrease blood pressure and ameliorate vascular remodeling via inflammation regulation. The Damage of a Heart Attack Causes the Immune System to Overreact https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2021/02/the-damage-of-a-heart-attack-causes-the-immune-system-to-overreact/ Researchers here note a mechanism that causes T cells of the adaptive immune system to spur chronic inflammation and tissue damage following a heart attack. As the researchers note, not all inflammation is the same. Some is maladaptive, and this is particularly the case in older individuals. The aged immune...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 21, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The link between abdominal fat and death: What is the shape of health?
Body mass index, or BMI, has long been the standard tool for assessing weight status and health risk. A calculation of your size that takes into account your height and weight, BMI is frequently used because it’s a quick, easy, and inexpensive measurement tool. Yet, it lacks any assessment of how much fat a person has or how it’s distributed throughout the body, both of which are key indicators of metabolic health. A recent study published in The BMJ analyzed different measures of body shape — more specifically, of central or abdominal fat — to determine which measures were most predictive of premat...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Chika Anekwe, MD, MPH Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

The Habit Change Provider? Newtopia & the Case for a New Category of Healthcare Provider
By JESSICA DaMASSA, WTF HEALTH Chronic disease prevention is often lumped into chronic disease management – but should it be? Aren’t there different nuances to preventing diseases than to treat them? Making the case that healthcare’s “primary prevention” businesses deserve their own category is the CEO of Newtopia, Jeff Ruby. Newtopia’s just announced the creation of a new category of healthcare provider, the Habit Change Provider, in effort to more accurately describe the role of companies working to change the way people behave in their everyday lives. What they eat, whether or not ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Tech Jessica DaMassa WTF Health habit change Newtopia Source Type: blogs

Immunosenescence and COVID-19
It is very clear from the data, as is the case for influenza, the mortality of the COVID-19 pandemic is suffered near entirely by the old. This is because the aged immune system is less capable of fighting off pathogens, but also because the state of chronic inflammation and other dysfunctions resulting from immune system aging makes the cytokine storm of a severe SARS-Cov-2 viral infection that much more likely and that much more severe. Patients with inflammatory age-related conditions, or conditions associated with obesity, a prominent cause of chronic inflammation, are much more likely to die from SARS-Cov-2 infection....
Source: Fight Aging! - February 15, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 15th 2021
This study assessed cancer risk associations for 3 recently developed methylation-based biomarkers of aging: PhenoAge, GrimAge, and predicted telomere length. We observed relatively strong associations of age-adjusted PhenoAge with risk of colorectal, kidney, lung, mature B-cell, and urothelial cancers. Similar findings were obtained for age-adjusted GrimAge, but the association with lung cancer risk was much larger, after adjustment for smoking status, pack-years, starting age, time since quitting, and other cancer risk factors. Most associations appeared linear, larger than for the first-generation measures, and w...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 14, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A primer on the evaluation of therapeutics
I'm actually going to talk here mostly about how we decide that medications are effective, but the basic principles apply to other kinds of interventions such as surgery, physical therapy, or devices. However, those do present some additional difficulties, which I won't go into right now. Conventionally, we speak of a hierarchy of evidence, from least to most persuasive. The weakest form of evidence is anecdote. Dr. Fell says he gave eye of newt to several of his patients with crotch rot and they got better. (This is essentially what started the hydroxychloroquine madness.)  There are many reasons why doctor...
Source: Stayin' Alive - February 13, 2021 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

5 myths about endometriosis
While endometriosis is a common condition, affecting as many as one in every 10 American women, it is complex and often misunderstood. Endometriosis occurs when tissue much like the tissue that normally lines the uterus — called the endometrium — starts to grow elsewhere in the body. These growths may cause pain, scarring, and, in some instances, infertility. One study shows it can take up to seven years for a woman to get a diagnosis of endometriosis because symptoms may mimic other common conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome or pelvic inflammatory disease. And misconceptions about the disease, includi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kelly Bilodeau Tags: Adolescent health Pain Management Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Inhibition of GLS1 Selectively Destroys Senescent Cells
Senescent cells accumulate with age, and this accumulation is an important cause of age-related dysfunction and disease. Clearing senescent cells from old animals produces rejuvenation, and human trials of first generation senolytic drugs capable of selectively destroying senescent cells are underway for a number of age-related conditions. Meanwhile, an ever increasing number of research groups are delving deeper into the biochemistry of cellular senescence, in search of novel differences between senescent and non-senescent cells that can be exploited in order to selectively destroy senescent cells in new and hopefully bet...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 12, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

5 myths about endometriosis
While endometriosis is a common condition, affecting as many as one in every 10 American women, it is complex and often misunderstood. Endometriosis occurs when tissue much like the tissue that normally lines the uterus — called the endometrium — starts to grow elsewhere in the body. These growths may cause pain, scarring, and, in some instances, infertility. One study shows it can take up to seven years for a woman to get a diagnosis of endometriosis because symptoms may mimic other common conditions, such as irritable bowel syndrome or pelvic inflammatory disease. And misconceptions about the disease, includi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kelly Bilodeau Tags: Adolescent health Pain Management Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Let Your Freak Flag Fly
 John Halamka, M.D., president, Mayo Clinic Platform, and Paul Cerrato, senior research analyst and communications specialist, Mayo Clinic Platform, wrote this article.If Mary Putnam Jacobi were alive today, she would probably embrace artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, and data analytics. Dr. Jacobi might best be described as the mother of modern scientific medicine — or at the very least one of its founding parents. In 1868, she was the first woman to enroll in the University of Paris School of Medicine. After graduating in 1871, this unconventional thinker arrived in the U.S., where she ...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - February 10, 2021 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs

We can ’t prevent childhood obesity by education alone: lessons from the evidence base
University of Bristol -This briefing examines randomised control trials across a range of countries and settings. It analyses the focus of the trials through a wider determinants of health lens, and compares the focus of interventions against previously-mapped causes of obesity - which show that approximately 60 per cent of the causes come from living and working conditions, such as housing or transport, or wider conditions, such as income equality or land-use.Policy briefingUniversity of Bristol - policy briefings (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - February 10, 2021 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Library Tags: Public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

Jahi McMath – Role of Race & Obesity
Yolonda Yvette Wilson discusses the role that race played in the Jahi McMath case. She recently presented "Death, Pandemic, and Intersectionality: What the Failures in an End-of-Life Case Can Teach About Structural Justice and COVID-19" for the Univers... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 9, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 8th 2021
This study was divided in two phases: CALERIE-1 and CALERIE-2. CALERIE-1 study was performed to assess the possible effects induced by a reduction of 10-30% of caloric intake on body composition parameters and lipid profile after 6 and 12 months in a population of middle-aged non-obese subjects. CALERIE-1 results showed an improvement in lipid and glycemic profile and a reduction in body weight (BW) and fat mass. CALERIE-2 was the largest multi-center study on CRD. A total of 220 subjects were enrolled randomly with a 2:1 allocation into two subgroups: 145 in the CRD group and 75 in the ad libitum group. The CRD gro...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 7, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Practice of Calorie Restriction Reduces Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Risk
This study was divided in two phases: CALERIE-1 and CALERIE-2. CALERIE-1 study was performed to assess the possible effects induced by a reduction of 10-30% of caloric intake on body composition parameters and lipid profile after 6 and 12 months in a population of middle-aged non-obese subjects. CALERIE-1 results showed an improvement in lipid and glycemic profile and a reduction in body weight (BW) and fat mass. CALERIE-2 was the largest multi-center study on CRD. A total of 220 subjects were enrolled randomly with a 2:1 allocation into two subgroups: 145 in the CRD group and 75 in the ad libitum group. The CRD gro...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 5, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

A New Era in Research into Aging, Focused on Intervention and Treatment
Past research into aging was characterized by a driving philosophy of "look but don't touch". Intervention in the aging process was presented as exclusively the domain of fraud, lies, and marketing, exemplified by the activities of anti-aging marketplace, all hope and non-functional potions. To treat aging was an aspiration that every scientist was strongly encouraged to avoid by those who controlled the research agenda and its funding. This was the case from at least the 1970s until comparatively recently. Only in the past decade or so has the scientific community come around to accept the treatment of aging as ...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 4, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Longevity Gene INDY is Involved in Blood Pressure Control
The INDY gene has been known to affect longevity in a range of species for quite some time, as I noted at length back in 2015. It is more than 20 years now since INDY was first discovered to affect fly aging, and work continues to link the outcomes on life span to specific effects on aging and cell function. INDY has effects on metabolism that look a lot like those connected to calorie restriction. A such, it tends to improve every aspect of aging, making it challenging to sort out what is cause, what is consequence, what is important, and what is a side-effect. The research noted here is a representative example of increm...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 2, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 1st 2021
In this study, we characterize age-related phenotypes of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We report increased frequencies of HSC, hematopoetic progenitor cells (HPC), and lineage negative cells in the elderly but a decreased frequency of multi-lymphoid progenitors. Aged human HSCs further exhibited a delay in initiating division ex vivo though without changes in their division kinetics. The activity of the small RhoGTPase Cdc42 was elevated in aged human hematopoietic cells and we identified a positive correlation between Cdc42 activity and the frequency of HSCs upon aging. The frequency of human HSCs polar fo...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 31, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

One Cannot be " Fat But Healthy "
Extensive human evidence strongly supports the conjecture that excess fat tissue is simply harmful. That harm cannot be evaded by exercise: one cannot be "fat but healthy". Visceral fat packed around the abdominal organs generates chronic inflammation, a raised burden of senescent cells, and all sorts of other issues. It pushes fat into the organs themselves; in the case of the pancreas that excess fat is the primary cause of type 2 diabetes. In the liver, it leads to fatty liver disease. Even modest amounts of excess fat tissue raise mortality rates and shorten life expectancy. A large study finds that ...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 29, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

New dietary guidelines: Any changes for infants, children, and teens?
The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has published new dietary guidelines to help Americans get and stay healthier across all parts of the lifespan. Babies and toddlers are included for the first time, because the recommendations cover our full lifespan. The guidelines are called “Make Every Bite Count.” If we want to get and stay healthy, we shouldn’t be eating foods that are basically empty calories — or worse, foods that actually do us harm. Because foods can do us harm. Eating an unhealthy diet can lead to obesity, with the cardiovascular disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Adolescent health Children's Health Healthy Eating Parenting Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 25th 2021
In conclusion, our studies highlight the important role of the tyrosine degradation pathway and position TAT as a link between neuromediator production, dysfunctional mitochondria, and aging. (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - January 24, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Conceptual Shift to (Finally) Seeing Aging as the Cause of Age-Related Disease
The mainstream of the scientific community has for decade after decade followed an entirely incorrect strategy in the matter of aging, and it was only comparatively recently that this state of affairs was changed for the better by the advocacy of groups like the SENS Research Foundation, Methuselah Foundation, and their allies, alongside advances in the science of slowing and reversing aging that couldn't be easily dismissed, much of that funded by philanthropy rather than established institutions. Given a poor strategy, in which age-related diseases were studied separately from aging, and in their end stages, and without ...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 21, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Hinge Health ’ s CEO on $3B Valuation, Stretch Toward 2022 IPO
By JESSICA DaMASSA, WTF HEALTH Hinge Health kicked off 2021 with a massive $300M Series D, driving the digital health musculoskeletal care company to a $3B valuation that, normally, would have sent health tech pundits into full-on IPO rumor mode…except that Hinge Health’s co-founder & CEO Daniel Perez beat them to it! We get into the details behind those comments (from what shall now be known as “the chatty Reuters interview”) where he not only revealed the company’s IPO plans, but also talked about how Hinge is well on it’s way to hit $200M in revenue. If 2021 is a year that Dan...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Tech Health Technology Jessica DaMassa WTF Health Daniel Perez Hinge Health musculoskeletal care Source Type: blogs

This is Not Health Care
By HANS DUVEFELT We use the word health rather loosely in America today. Especially the expression health care, whether you spell that as one word or two, is almost an oxymoron. Health is not simply the absence of disease, even less the pharmaceutical management of disease. The healthcare “industry” is not the major portion of our GNP that it is because there is a lot of health out there, but the opposite. What consumes so much money and generates so much profit is, of course, sick care. The sicker people are, the more money is spent and earned in this market segment. It is a spiral, and a vicious one...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Patients Physicians functional medicine Hans Duvefelt integrative health Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 18th 2021
In this study, Desferal, deferoxamine mesylate for injection, which is approved for the treatment of acute iron intoxication and chronic iron overload, was used to explore the beneficial effects on preventing aging-induced bone loss and mitigating dysfunction of aged BMSCs. High-dose Desferal significantly prevented bone loss in aged rats. Compared with controls, the ex vivo experiments showed that short-term Desferal administration could promote the potential of BMSC growth and improve the rebalance of osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation, as well as rejuvenate senescent BMSCs and revise the expression of stemness/se...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 17, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Continued Focus on Metformin, a Demonstrably Poor Approach to Treating Aging
Metformin is a poster child for the way in which much of the aging research community is focused on approaches to aging that cannot possibly achieve more than a very modest slowing of degeneration, and where the existing evidence strongly suggests that those tiny positive outcomes will be unreliable at best. Metformin is a way to tinker with the operation of a damaged metabolism, not a way to repair that damage. As a calorie restriction mimetic, the animal data shows that it compares very poorly to calorie restriction itself. We know that calorie restriction doesn't do anywhere near enough for human longevity. This is not ...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 14, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Effects of Calorie Restriction on Cognitive Decline
The practice of calorie restriction slows aging and extends healthy life, quite dramatically so in short-lived species, and far more modestly in long-lived species. All of the mechanisms of aging, the forms of damage that accumulate in old tissues and the outcomes of that damage, are affected. Some are affected more than others, however. So it is possible to see some aspects of aging that are less robustly responsive to calorie restriction, such as loss of cognitive function, as noted here. It is interesting to speculate on the specific mechanisms involved in an age-related decline that responds well to life-long ca...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 11, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 11th 2021
This study demonstrates the potential of a natural (o-Vanillin) and a synthetic (RG-7112) senolytic compounds to remove senescent IVD cells, decrease SASP factors release, reduce the inflammatory environment and enhance the IVD matrix production. Removal of senescent cells, using senolytics drugs, could lead to improved therapeutic interventions and ultimately decrease pain and a provide a better quality of life of patients living with intervertebral disc degeneration and low back pain. From Ying Ann Chiao of Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation: Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in aging and cardiovasc...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 10, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The synergy in obesity and cancer
Over two-thirds of adults in the United States are overweight or obese, and approximately 88 million American adults have pre-diabetes. More than 84 percent of those with pre-diabetes are not even aware that they have it. Both obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with an increased risk of cancer development. The risk of type […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 8, 2021 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/zelda-okia" rel="tag" > Zelda Okia, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Obesity Source Type: blogs

Can gout be prevented?
To many people, gout seems like a disease of the past. Cartoons from 200 years ago depicted it as a condition afflicting the wealthy (“the disease of kings”), whose gluttonous consumption of food and drink was thought to bring on the attacks of debilitating arthritis. All these years later, much about gout is still misunderstood. Shame, derision, and the belief that the gout sufferer deserves the condition linger. And rather than being a disease of the past, gout is quite common — and rates are rising. Estimates suggest gout affects nearly 4% of the adult population in the US, an increase from prior decad...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Arthritis Bones and joints Health Men's Health Source Type: blogs

Wondering about COVID-19 vaccines if you ’re pregnant or breastfeeding?
Now that COVID-19 vaccines are rolling out, pregnant and breastfeeding people have many questions around risks and benefits. At first, many of those receiving vaccines in US will be healthcare workers, although the circles for vaccine eligibility are widening. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG), and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine agree that the new mRNA COVID-19 vaccines should be offered to pregnant and breastfeeding individuals who are eligible for vaccination. Here are answers to some basic questions you may have about getting a COVID-1...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ilona T. Goldfarb, MD, MPH Tags: Coronavirus and COVID-19 Health Parenting Pregnancy Prevention Vaccines Source Type: blogs

COVID-19 and the heart: What have we learned?
Early in the pandemic, epidemiologists made a striking observation. Compared to the general population, people with cardiovascular disease (CVD) were more than twice as likely to contract severe forms of COVID-19. In the last six months, death rates from COVID-19 have dropped significantly, but CVD remains a major predictor of poor outcome. What have we learned about heart disease and COVID-19 in that time? Pre-existing heart conditions and poor metabolic health increase risk of severe COVID-19 As I described in a blog post back in April, some health conditions, like diabetes, increase risk of severe COVID-19 by suppressin...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dara K. Lee Lewis, MD Tags: Coronavirus and COVID-19 Heart Health Source Type: blogs

Exercise as a Mild Senotherapeutic
Exercise is known to improve health and extend the healthy portion of life span, but not extend life span itself in mice. This is a much lesser effect than that of calorie restriction, which does extend maximum life span in addition to improving health. From a very high level view, both exercise and calorie restriction are similar, in that they trigger many of the same stress response mechanisms, making those mechanisms work harder to maintain cell function than they would otherwise have done. Evidently exercise and calorie restriction achieve this goal in quite different ways at the detail level, given the quite different...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 5, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

A Subset of Fat Tissue Cells is Largely Responsible for the Inflammation Generated by Excess Visceral Fat Tissue
Scientists here suggest that the chronic inflammation generated by visceral fat tissue, an important form of metabolic disarray that drives age-related disease and dysfunction, is not produced by all fat cells. Indeed, it may be primarily produced by a specific type of progenitor cell lining blood vessels in fat tissue. This is an interesting demonstration, but it remains the case that the best solution to excess visceral fat is never to obtain it in the first place. The effects of visceral fat on metabolism quite literally accelerate the progression of degenerative aging. When a person consumes more calories than...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 5, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 4th 2021
The objective of this study is to quantify the overall and cancer type-specific risks of subsequent primary cancers (SPCs) among adult-onset cancer survivors by first primary cancer (FPC) types and sex. Among 1,537,101 survivors (mean age, 60.4 years; 48.8% women), 156,442 SPC cases and 88,818 SPC deaths occurred during 11,197,890 person-years of follow-up (mean, 7.3 years). Among men, the overall risk of developing any SPCs was statistically significantly higher for 18 of the 30 FPC types, and risk of dying from any SPCs was statistically significantly higher for 27 of 30 FPC types as compared with risks in the general po...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 3, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Look Back at 2020: Progress Towards the Treatment of Aging as a Medical Condition
While I suspect that COVID-19 will feature prominently in most retrospectives on 2020, I'll say only a little on it. The data on mortality by year end, if taken at face value, continues to suggest that the outcome will fall at the higher end of the early estimates of a pandemic three to six times worse than a bad influenza year, ten times worse than a normal influenza year. The people who die are near entirely the old, the co-morbid, and the immunocompromised. They die because they are suffering the damage and dysfunction of aging. Yet the societal conversation and the actions of policy makers ignore this. There is ...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 31, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs

Cancer Survivors Exhibit Greater Risk of New Cancers and Higher Mortality Due to those Cancers
The objective of this study is to quantify the overall and cancer type-specific risks of subsequent primary cancers (SPCs) among adult-onset cancer survivors by first primary cancer (FPC) types and sex. Among 1,537,101 survivors (mean age, 60.4 years; 48.8% women), 156,442 SPC cases and 88,818 SPC deaths occurred during 11,197,890 person-years of follow-up (mean, 7.3 years). Among men, the overall risk of developing any SPCs was statistically significantly higher for 18 of the 30 FPC types, and risk of dying from any SPCs was statistically significantly higher for 27 of 30 FPC types as compared with risks in the general po...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 29, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

This Antioxidant Supplement Leads To Weight Loss
Overweight people who took this antioxidant supplement managed to slim down without diet or exercise. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - December 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mina Dean Tags: Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 28th 2020
In conclusion, our study demonstrated that the molecular processes of aging are relatively subtle in their progress, and the aging process of every tissue depends on the tissue's specialized function and environment. Hence, individual gene or process alone cannot be described as the key of aging in the whole organism. Mouse Age Matters: How Age Affects the Murine Plasma Metabolome A large part of metabolomics research relies on experiments involving mouse models, which are usually 6 to 20 weeks of age. However, in this age range mice undergo dramatic developmental changes. Even small age differences may l...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 27, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Do pro-inflammatory diets harm our health? And can anti-inflammatory diets help?
This study also showed that pro-inflammatory diets were associated with a poor cholesterol profile. This finding was also seen in other another study, also published in JACC, which found that pro-inflammatory foods had a harmful effect on cholesterol levels while some anti-inflammatory foods had favorable effects. What foods are pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory? Foods with a higher pro-inflammatory potential are red meat, processed meat, and organ meat; refined carbohydrates such as white bread, white rice, and many desserts; and sweetened beverages including colas and sports drinks. Foods that have a higher anti-inf...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Food as medicine Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

DICER is Necessary for the Metabolic Benefits of Exercise
Exercise beneficially influences fat tissue metabolism, and researchers here find that the protein DICER is necessary for these benefits to take place. Expression of DICER declines with age, but is increased by structured exercise programs - though to a very variable degree. This variability suggests that a great deal more exploration is needed in order to understand this portion of the diverse set of mechanisms by which exercise improves health. DICER is just one part of a network of signals and regulators, and much is yet to be cataloged of their interactions. Adipose tissue is not just a simple reservoir of ene...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 23, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The health effects of too much gaming
It is estimated that 164 million Americans — half of our population — play video games, also known as gaming. Contrary to popular belief, it isn’t just teens who play games. According to a recent survey, only 21% of gamers were under 18 years old. While gaming can be a fun distraction or hobby (and is even becoming a competitive sport on many college campuses), there are health risks that come from too much gaming. What are these harms, and what can be done about them? Is there anything good about gaming? Before discussing the harms of gaming, it is only fair to mention the benefits. Aside from being ente...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Peter Grinspoon, MD Tags: Addiction Adolescent health Back Pain Behavioral Health Eye Health Mental Health Safety Source Type: blogs

Buyer beware: The story of a pricey and “credentialled” program to end Alzheimer’s Disease
When her husband was diagnosed with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease in 2015, Elizabeth Pan was devastated by the lack of options to slow his inevitable decline. But she was encouraged when she discovered the work of a UCLA neurologist, Dr. Dale Bredesen, who offered a comprehensive lifestyle management program to halt or even reverse cognitive decline in patients like her husband. After decades of research, Bredesen had concluded that more than 36 drivers of Alzheimer’s cumulatively contribute to the loss of mental acuity. They range from chronic conditions like heart disease and diabetes to vitamin and hormo...
Source: SharpBrains - December 22, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Kaiser Health News Tags: Brain/ Mental Health aging Alzheimer’s Disease cognitive decline Dale Bredesen dementia end Alzheimer's Disease nutritional supplements Source Type: blogs

Resveratrol is Not an Effective Calorie Restriction Mimetic
Resveratrol and derived molecules were for a time excessively hyped as a means to trigger some of the beneficial metabolic response produced by calorie restriction, by acting on sirtuins, and thus have a positive impact on aging. The company Sirtris was founded to develop this area of research into a therapeutic, its backers did a great deal to promote the aforementioned excessive hype, the company sold to Big Pharma for a sizable sum, and then the program was later dropped because the effect sizes were small and unreliable. The years following this sort of hype cycle tend to see a great deal of independent investigation o...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 21, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 21st 2020
In this study, we have found that administration of a specific Sgk1 inhibitor significantly reduces the dysregulated form of tau protein that is a pathological hallmark of AD, restores prefrontal cortical synaptic function, and mitigates memory deficits in an AD model. These results have identified Sgk1 as a potential key target for therapeutic intervention of AD, which may have specific and precise effects." Targeting histone K4 trimethylation for treatment of cognitive and synaptic deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease Epigenetic aberration is implicated in aging and neurodegeneration. Us...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 20, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

When it comes to weight stigma in children and teens, let ’s meet in the middle
The divisive reaction to the recent New York Times’ opinion piece by Aubrey Gordon titled, “Leave Fat Kids Alone: The ‘war on childhood obesity’ has only caused shame,” highlights the two extremes in our society’s current approach to addressing the childhood obesity epidemic. While I applaud Aubrey Gordon and her courage to speak her truth, […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 17, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/karla-lester-and-katherine-lester" rel="tag" > Karla Lester, MD and Katherine Lester < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Obesity Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Network medicine offers new insights into susceptibility to diseases such as COVID-19
In the past year, we've become familiar with the factors that can make a person more vulnerable to COVID-19 infection. The elderly are more at risk, as are those who smoke and are already dealing with other diseases, such as cancer and Type 2 diabetes.At a deeper level, though, there are dozens of other factors that may come into play and influence a person's susceptibility to disease. A recent analysis of hospitalized COVID-19 patients in 14 states found that among patients ages 50-64 that obesity was the most prevalent underlying medical condition. Similarly, there's growing evidence to suggest that vitamin D deficiency ...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - December 17, 2020 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs

Would You Let A Robot Take Your Blood Sample?
A few years ago we wrote about Veebot when we collected the most exciting tasks robots could do in hospitals. Veebot created a robot that could draw blood – in difficult cases faster and even more effectively than a human. Tests showed that it can correctly identify the most accessible vein with an 83% accuracy. This is about as good as an experienced human phlebotomist. Moreover, with this technology, the blood-drawing process takes only about a minute. Veebot’s video was hugely popular because they wanted to robotise a process known to and disliked by everyone. It turned out that everyone wanted the r...
Source: The Medical Futurist - December 17, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Judit Kuszkó Tags: Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Healthcare Design Healthcare Policy Robotics blood test nurse blood draw nurses robotics in healthcare covid covid19 Veebot Rutgers Source Type: blogs

Sleep Apnea Testing at Home: Interview with Laurent Martinot, CEO of Sunrise
Obstructive sleep apnea is very common and is associated with a variety of serious health issues, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Getting a proper diagnosis is hampered by the need for patients to visit a sleep clinic and undergo a polysomnography. This gold-standard test is complicated and requires specialized staff to interpret the results. To address these issues, a company called Sunrise has developed an at-home sleep apnea test that relies on a small wearable device. The device consists of a small sensor that a user can attach to their chin when they are about to go to sleep. The sensor records move...
Source: Medgadget - December 16, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Cardiology Diagnostics Exclusive Medicine Source Type: blogs