Give One Minute to Add Healing into Healthcare
By LISE ALSCHULER, ND, FABNO I am a naturopathic doctor, and because I operate outside of insurance-based medicine, I have, what most healthcare providers would consider, lots of time with my patients. My typical first patient appointment is 90 minutes long and my follow-up visits are 30 minutes long.  What, you may ask, do I do with all this time? I get to know my patients by listening to their stories, their concerns and their hopes. We delve into their health concerns, we review their medical records, and we explore lifestyle-based strategies to optimize their healing and wellbeing.  In short, I ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Patients Physicians Lise Alschuler naturopathic medicine The OpEd Project Wellness Source Type: blogs

Greater Waist Circumference, Greater Risk of Dementia
In recent years, epidemiologists have found that waist circumference is a better measure of the burden of excess visceral fat tissue than body mass index (BMI). Progress towards making better use of this information has been slow, as is usually the case in the world of epidemiology. Visceral fat tissue generates chronic inflammation through a variety of mechanisms, from DNA debris activating the immune system to inappropriate signaling by fat cells to an accelerated pace of generation of senescent cells. Chronic inflammation disrupts function and accelerates the progression of all of the common age-related conditions. Peop...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 12, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Cardiovascular Aging Contributes to Brain Aging
The brain is an energy-hungry organ, and is sensitive to reductions in the blood supply of oxygen and nutrients. Cardiovascular aging can reduce that supply, whether through conditions such as heart failure, or the progressive loss of density in capillary networks that occurs throughout the body with advancing age, or an accelerated pace of rupture of tiny vessels in the brain, or disruption of the blood-brain barrier, allowing unwanted molecules and cells to enter the brain. Thus, as researchers here note, we would expect to see correlations between cardiovascular disease, or risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and d...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 11, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 11th 2019
In conclusion, high-dose NR induces the onset of WAT dysfunction, which may in part explain the deterioration of metabolic health. Towards a Rigorous Definition of Cellular Senescence https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/11/towards-a-rigorous-definition-of-cellular-senescence/ The accumulation of lingering senescent cells is a significant cause of aging, disrupting tissue function and generating chronic inflammation throughout the body. Even while the first senolytic drugs capable of selectively destroying these cells already exist, and while a number of biotech companies are working on the productio...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 10, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Assessing Gene Therapy to Upregulate Three Longevity-Associated Genes in Mice
In this study, we developed gene therapies based on 3 longevity associated genes: fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), αKlotho, soluble form of mouse transforming growth factor-β receptor 2 (sTGFβR2). The gene therapies were delivered using adeno-associated viruses, and we explored their ability to mitigate 4 age-related diseases: obesity, type II diabetes, heart failure, and renal failure. Individually and combinatorially, we applied these therapies to disease-specific mouse models and found that this set of diverse pathologies could be effectively treated and in some cases, even reversed with a sin...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 5, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Improving cancer screening: what does the latest review recommend?
Related items fromOnMedica Obesity as cause of cancer set to overtake smoking NHS must improve access to screening to save lives UK cancer survival improved, but lags behind similar nations Better cancer treatment remains a ‘major’ public ‘priority’ Cancer strategies failed to improve one-year survival (Source: OnMedica Blogs)
Source: OnMedica Blogs - November 4, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: blogs

The Common Drink That Doubles Weight Loss
Many overweight people are deficient in critical vitamins and minerals. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - November 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Lifestyle changes to lower heart disease risk
Nearly half of all premature deaths may be due to unhealthy lifestyle choices, such as insufficient exercise, poor diet, and smoking. These risk factors increase the risk of high blood pressure, diabetes, heart attack, and stroke. The good news is that lifestyle changes can make a difference. In a study analyzing over 55,000 people, those with favorable lifestyle habits such as not smoking, not being obese, engaging in regular physical activity, and eating a healthy diet lowered their heart disease risk by nearly 50%. The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) recently published guide...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: James Yeh, MD, MPH Tags: Alcohol Diabetes Exercise and Fitness Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Smoking cessation Source Type: blogs

Bariatric surgery . . . . for kids?!
  That’s precisely what the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is recommending: more weight loss surgery for overweight kids. This sort of perverted advice reflects the deep and widespread failure of the healthcare system to address nutrition and health, resorting instead to an awful surgical “solution” that, contrary to the AAP’s declaration that it is a proven safe option, is filled with complications, nutritional deficiencies, dysbiotic alterations in bowel flora, hormonal disruptions, and—not all that rarely—death. (Granted that it was over 10 years ago, but the first patient ...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 31, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Open bariatric surgery gastric bypass lap bad Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Plant-based diets are best … or are they?
This study is also a reminder that the health impact of a particular intervention (such as diet) may not be easy to predict or explain. In most cases, the risk of stroke and heart disease tend to rise or fall together, but that wasn’t the case in this research. Beware the study’s limitations This study linking a vegetarian diet with a higher risk of hemorrhagic stroke has a number of important limitations that should temper the concerns of vegetarians. The study was observational. That means it simply observed what happened among different people who followed different diets over time, without being able to ac...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Healthy Eating Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Source Type: blogs

Bisexuality and health: The cost of invisibility
On September 23, 2019, the 20th anniversary of Bi Visibility Day, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) held its first-ever bisexual health research workshop. As an invited panelist at this event, sponsored by the NIH’s Sexual and Gender Minority Research Office, I joined 19 other researchers to discuss key findings, gaps in knowledge, and future directions. You may be asking yourself: Is there really a need for this workshop? How is bisexual health different from the health of other groups? How many people even identify as bisexual? What is bisexuality? Robyn Ochs, a prominent bisexual activist and writer, defines...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sabra Katz-Wise, PhD Tags: Adolescent health Relationships Sex Stress Source Type: blogs

Here ’s Why We Eat More When We’re With Friends And Family
By Emily Reynolds Going home from dinner out with a friend or a Sunday family lunch, you may notice you feel slightly more full than you normally do after eating. And while some of this may have to do with how many potatoes your mum insists you eat, new research seems to suggest that there could be something else going on. Researchers analysing dozens of past studies on the “social facilitation” of eating have confirmed that people do tend to eat more when eating in groups than alone — and have come up with several social and psychological mechanisms that could explain our increase in consumption in ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - October 28, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Eating evolutionary psych Social Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 28th 2019
In this study, the enhanced mice live somewhat longer than their unmodified peers, though not as much longer as is the case for the application of telomerase gene therapy. The mice do also exhibit reduced cancer risk, however. The scientists here class telomere shortening as a cause of aging, which is not a point universally agreed upon. Reductions in average telomere length in tissues looks much more like a downstream consequence of reduced stem cell activity than an independent mechanism. Researchers obtain the first mice born with hyper-long telomeres and show that it is possible to extend life without any geneti...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 27, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Vitamin That Quadruples Weight Loss
Almost 40 percent of obese people are deficient in this vitamin. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - October 26, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Weight Loss: This Technique Boosts Exercise Motivation
The technique could help overweight people lose weight and keep it off. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - October 24, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

A Mouse Lineage with Very Long Telomeres Exhibits Longer Life Span
In this study, the enhanced mice live somewhat longer than their unmodified peers, though not as much longer as is the case for the application of telomerase gene therapy. The mice do also exhibit reduced cancer risk, however. The scientists here class telomere shortening as a cause of aging, which is not a point universally agreed upon. Reductions in average telomere length in tissues looks much more like a downstream consequence of reduced stem cell activity than an independent mechanism. Researchers obtain the first mice born with hyper-long telomeres and show that it is possible to extend life without any geneti...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 23, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Processing Epidemiological Data to Show that Obesity and High Blood Pressure Cause Shorter Life Spans
Researchers here demonstrate an approach that can be used with large human epidemiological databases to demonstrate that, as expected, both greater amounts of visceral fat tissue and raised blood pressure cause reductions in life span. The underlying mechanisms have been explored at length by the research community. Visceral fat tissue produces chronic inflammation through a variety of mechanisms, including a raised burden of cellular senescence, while raised blood pressure produces damage to fragile tissues in the brain, kidney, and other organs, and accelerates the progression of atherosclerosis. Researchers are...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 23, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Is it time to stop skimming over full-fat dairy?
Americans consume about 150 pounds of milk and eat nearly 40 pounds of cheese and 20 pounds of ice cream per person per year, according to data from the Department of Agriculture. Yogurt and butter intakes are lower, but growing. But should the dairy we’re consuming be low-fat or full-fat? That debate has become increasingly divisive, and for good reason: not all dairy is created equal. Dairy fat and cardiovascular disease Some of the most substantial dairy research has been done in the context of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, which has been shown, among other benefits, to reduce blood pres...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Gelsomin, MLA, RD, LDN Tags: Cancer Diet and Weight Loss Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 21st 2019
In this study, AT1-AAs were detected in the sera of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and the positive rate was 44.44% vs. 17.46% in non-PAD volunteers. In addition, analysis showed that AT1-AAs level was positively correlated with PAD. To reveal the causal relationship between AT1-AAs and vascular aging, an AT1-AAs-positive rat model was established by active immunization. The carotid pulse wave velocity was higher, and the aortic endothelium-dependent vasodilatation was attenuated significantly in the immunized rats. Morphological staining showed thickening of the aortic wall. Histological examination showe...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 20, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Why Does Reduced Grip Strength Correlate with Chronic Lung Disease in Aging?
In this open access paper, researchers speculate on the common mechanisms underlying the correlation between reduced grip strength and chronic lung disease in old age. The many, complex, and diverse manifestations of aging emerge from a much smaller, simpler set of root causes. Simple forms of damage applied to a very complex system necessarily produce very complex outcomes. Nonetheless, the incidence of many of those outcomes, even when very different from one another, will correlate because they depend to a sizable degree on the same forms of underlying damage. The term "sarcopenia" was first introduce...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 17, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The Best Weight Loss Technique
Almost half the people around the world are overweight. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - October 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Becoming Overweight Raises the Risk of Many Cancers
In conclusion, adult weight gain was associated with increased risk of several major cancers. The degree, timing, and duration of overweight and obesity also seemed to be important. Preventing weight gain may reduce the cancer risk. Link: https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyz188 (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - October 16, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

2 Supplements That Double Weight Loss
Many overweight people are deficient in this essential nutrients. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - October 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Healthcare Solutions Gone Wrong – Fun Friday
We love a good laugh here at Healthcare IT Today and some of the best laughs come from really creative “approaches” to really serious challenges. In today’s edition of “Fun Friday” we’re talking about Fall Prevention and Obesity. Both of these are major challenges that are costing the healthcare system a lot of money. So, […] (Source: EMR and HIPAA)
Source: EMR and HIPAA - October 11, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: John Lynn Tags: Healthcare IT Fall Risk Fun Friday Healthcare Cartoons Healthcare Humor obesity Source Type: blogs

Click and Exercise! Amazon, Netflix, Hulu —Are You Listening?
By DEBORAH A. COHEN Physical inactivity is a mounting challenge for America. In reviewing the 2013-2015 American time use survey, we found that most Americans report spending their daily leisure time watching screens, and devote only a small fraction of leisure time—24 minutes for men and 14 minutes for women—to physical activity. A recent longitudinal examination of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey showed that sitting time increased by an hour a day between 2007 and 2016, with the largest increases among adolescents ages 12-19 and adults, 20 years and older. As m...
Source: The Health Care Blog - October 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Patients Amazon Deborah Cohen health and wellness hulu Netflix physical activity Rand Source Type: blogs

It ’s World Mental Health Day today: Let’s review how a healthy diet can promote mental well-being
_______________ Should you eat an apple—or a bag of Oreos? Go to McDonald’s—or the vegetarian restaurant on the corner? When we make these everyday food choices, many of us think first of our physical health and appearance. But there’s another factor we may want to consider in picking foods: their impact on our mental health. A growing body of research is discovering that food doesn’t just affect our waistline but also our moods, emotions, and even longer-term conditions like depression. Which makes sense, after all. Our brains are physical entities, running on the energy that we put into our ...
Source: SharpBrains - October 10, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Magazine Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness evidence mental health Nutrition well-being Source Type: blogs

Time to solve childhood obesity: an independent report by the Chief Medical Officer, Professor Dame Sally Davies
This report calls for action across industry and the public sector to help the government reach its target of halving childhood obesity by 2030. It sets out a range of recommendations for the government, which are supported by ten principles, and builds on the work the government has already done.ReportDepartment of Health and Social Care - publications (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - October 10, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

Try These 6 Vegetables for Ultimate Body & Mind Health
It seems unlikely that our digestive tracts would be a major intersection of body and mind—but recent research has shown that they are. The makeup of the microbiome in your gut—all the bacterial flora in your digestive tract—turns out to be a major player in overall health. And when we say health, we mean everything, from cognition and emotional wellbeing to cardiovascular fitness and the prevention or reduction of chronic disease. It’s thought that your body’s microbiome is largely established in the first thousand days of life. But because this system gets so much input every day from you&m...
Source: World of Psychology - October 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Health-related Publishers Spirituality & Health Cognition digestive tract Emotional Wellbeing gut bacteria Inflammation microbiome Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 7th 2019
In conclusion, our findings link the calcification of the vascular tissue with the expression of FGF23 in the vessels and with the elevation of circulating levels this hormone. Permanently Boosting Levels of Natural Killer Cells in Mice to Increase Cancer Resistance https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/permanently-boosting-levels-of-natural-killer-cells-in-mice-to-increase-cancer-resistance/ Researchers here demonstrate a very interesting approach to immunotherapy: they introduce engineered stem cells in mice that will give rise to additional natural killer T cells, boosting the capability of the ...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 6, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Top Health Wearables For A Healthy Lifestyle
Fitbit or Apple Watch for running? Garmin or Misfit for swimming? Sleep Cycle or Sleep as Android for sleep tracking? What about measuring heart rate, blood pressure, or tracking how to cut out stress from your life? Dozens of gadgets on the healthcare wearable market promise you a healthier lifestyle, but it’s easy to go astray in the jungle of digital health gadgets. Let me show you my top choices when it comes to health wearables and trackers. Guidance in the health wearable universe By now, I have tested and used more than a hundred devices and gadgets that measure health parameters or vital signs. Thus,...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 5, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Portable Diagnostics activity fitness fitness trackers Health 2.0 Healthcare Innovation meditation mental health Personalized medicine sleep sleep optimization sleep tracking stress technology wear Source Type: blogs

The Most Effective Weight Loss Technique
Over two-thirds of US adults are overweight or obese. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - October 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Leptin as the Link Between Obesity and Hypertension
Hypertension, chronically raised blood pressure, is very damaging. It is an important mechanism by which low-level molecular damage and disarray in aging is converted into structural damage to important tissues in the brain, kidneys, and other organs. It is so influential in aging that lowering of raised blood pressure reduces mortality and disease risk even without addressing the underlying causes of the condition. Obesity is well known to cause raised blood pressure, and researchers here identify a novel mechanism for this effect involving leptin signaling. Since leptin signaling does change with age, it will be interest...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 4, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The physician ’s role in the fat-shaming epidemic
Fat shaming has come back into the collective consciousness in a big way, following James Corden ’s rebuke of Bill Maher’s comments that “some amount of shame is good.” Corden, as many have pointed out, is spot-on in his assessment: No amount of fat-shaming is going to help solve the current obesity epidemic. It will, in […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 2, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/rami-bailony" rel="tag" > Rami Bailony, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Obesity Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Beefy Arguments for Libertarianism
This report has layers of flaws and is the most egregious abuse of evidence that I have ever seen,"said Walter Willett of Harvard. "Their recommendations are really irresponsible,"said Frank Hu of Harvard. A contrarian would immediately assume, therefore, that the study in question must be marvelous. Is it?Well, it represents part of a new wave in nutrition, in which a group of scientists who have no financial ties to the food industry set themselves up, like the justices of the Supreme Court, to adjudicate as a panel  on a field of research. And, again like the justices of the Supreme Court, they are n...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 1, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Terence Kealey Source Type: blogs

Measuring up: how does the UK compare internationally on cancer survival?
Related items fromOnMedica UK cancer survival improved, but lags behind similar nations Obesity as cause of cancer set to overtake smoking Cancer strategies failed to improve one-year survival Better cancer treatment remains a ‘major’ public ‘priority’ CCGs struggling to meet cancer targets (Source: OnMedica Blogs)
Source: OnMedica Blogs - October 1, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: blogs

Using FibroScan in The Clinic: Interview with Dr. Stephen A. Harrison
EchoSens creates non-invasive liver diagnosis medical devices. The company’s line of products, called FibroScan, work by measuring the speed of ultrasound waves as they move through liver tissue. This measurement can tell us about the state of the liver. For example, ultrasound waves move faster through fibrotic/scarred livers. EchoSens recently appointed Dominique Legros as their new global CEO, and we recently spoke about his plans for growth in a Medgadget exclusive.  To learn more about how a clinician would use the FibroScan, we spoke with Dr. Stephen A. Harrison, Medical Director of Pinnacle Clinical Re...
Source: Medgadget - September 30, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Ben Ouyang Tags: Diagnostics Exclusive GI Medicine Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Policing Language in Mental Health Communities
 In the first full episode of Not Crazy, we learn a little more about the new co-host, Jackie, and her history with chronic illness and depression. Gabe rants about person-first language and how nitpicking verbiage is distracting from more pressing matters in the lives of those living with mental illness.  Overall, we decide that “crazy” is not a dirty word and there are other, more time-sensitive, things we should be focusing on that can benefit the mental health community.  SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW About The Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorde...
Source: World of Psychology - September 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: General Not Crazy Podcast Self-Help Stigma Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 30th 2019
In conclusion, older adults exhibited decreased markers of UPR activation and reduced coordination with autophagy and SC-associated gene transcripts following a single bout of unaccustomed resistance exercise. In contrast, young adults demonstrated strong coordination between UPR genes and key regulatory gene transcripts associated with autophagy and SC differentiation in skeletal muscle post-exercise. Taken together, the present findings suggest a potential age-related impairment in the post-exercise transcriptional response that supports activation of the UPR and coordination with other exercise responsive pathways (i.e....
Source: Fight Aging! - September 29, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Risk Factors versus Lifestyle Choices in the Mortality of Old Age
Environmental and lifestyle choices, as numerous epidemiological studies have demonstrated, have considerable influence over health and mortality in late life. This open access paper balances lifestyle choices against a range of environmental factors and measures of the progression of aging. The authors find that a healthy lifestyle can only partially offset the effects of having a greater burden of age-related damage and its consequences, or, separately, the impact of low socioeconomic status. The former makes a great deal of sense, given the inevitability of aging as matters currently stand, with even the healthiest succ...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 25, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

RAGE and Chronic Inflammation in Aging
Chronic inflammation is a very important downstream consequence of molecular damage in the progression of aging, arising from numerous causes. The past decade of work on the presence of lingering senescent cells in old tissues indicates that their signaling is significant cause. In animal studies, removing senescent cells can reverse the course of many age-related and other conditions that are primarily inflammatory in nature. Visceral fat tissue in excess amounts can accelerate the production of senescent cells, but it also generates inflammation through other mechanisms, such as debris from dead cells, signaling by non-s...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 24, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Weekend catch-up sleep won ’t fix the effects of sleep deprivation on your waistline
Sleeping in late on a Saturday sounds delicious, right? However, as with many delicious things, there may be a cost to your health and waistline. Catching up on sleep on the weekend can almost feel like the norm these days. With increasingly full schedules and competing demands, sleep is often sacrificed during the busy workweek. As the week comes to an end, many people look to the less structured weekend to cram in what couldn’t be done during the week, including sleep. In sleep clinic, I now ask “When do you get up on work (or school) days?” and “What about bedtime and wakeup time on days off?&rdq...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine Dudley, MD, MPH Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Fatigue Sleep Source Type: blogs

Appearance-Based Discrimination in GME Resident Selection
Societal awareness of racial, gender, and ethnic bias has increased, but other stigmatized groups remain at risk for exclusion. It is important to consider lesser known forms of bias and their potential for influencing behavior. To this end, in our recent Academic Medicine article, we used the application photograph to study the impact of applicants’ physical appearance on the selection of radiology residents, and found that the applicant’s obesity and facial attractiveness strongly influenced decisions to grant residency interviews. We found this unfortunate pattern of appearance-based discrimination acros...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - September 24, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured Guest Perspective appearance-based bias graduate medical education resident selection Source Type: blogs

Fitter, Thinner Older Adults Have a Measurably Different Gut Microbiome
In recent years, researchers have demonstrated that the microbiome of the gut is influential over the pace of aging. Dietary changes, immune system changes, tissue changes, and microbiome population changes all take place and interact with one another with advancing age. There is evidence for changes in the microbiome to aggravate the immune system into chronic inflammation, and evidence for declining immune function to lead to unhelpful changes in the balance of microbes. Some people have better microbiomes, such as athletes tending to have microbes that secrete compounds such as proprionate that can incrementally improve...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 24, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Psychological perspectives on obesity: addressing policy, practice and research priorities
This report calls for government to ensure every initiative aimed at promoting a healthy weight is informed by psychological evidence. It says weight management services are best delivered by multidisciplinary teams that include psychologists. All health professionals working in obesity services should be trained in the psychological understanding of obesity so they understand the factors that can contribute to the condition and to the success or failure of treatment.ReportPress release (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - September 24, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 23rd 2019
Discussion of Developmental Effects on Aging Microtubule Function and Longevity in Nematodes Quantifying the Correlation Between Poverty and Faster Pace of Aging Matthew O'Connor Presenting on Underdog Pharmaceuticals at Undoing Aging 2019 https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/matthew-oconnor-presenting-on-underdog-pharmaceuticals-at-undoing-aging-2019/ Here Matthew O'Connor of the SENS Research Foundation talks about the research that led to founding of Underdog Pharmaceuticals, a biotech startup incubated by the foundation to commercialize a means of targeting 7-ketocholesterol in atheroscleros...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 22, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Discussion of Developmental Effects on Aging
To what degree does early life development impact the trajectory of late life aging? Plenty of evidence suggests a connection, much of it from epidemiological studies that, unfortunately, given little insight into possible mechanisms. Of other work, applying reliability theory to aging can only fit the observed mortality data if we are born with a non-zero level of damage. Further, early exposure to cytomegalovirus, a persistent infection that is corrosive of immune function over the long term, may explain links between socioeconomic status in childhood and pace of late life aging. These are two of many studies to provide ...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 19, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Senolytic Treatment with Dasatinib and Quercetin Confirmed to Reduce the Burden of Senescent Cells in Human Patients
Setting aside the mice genetically engineered to destroy senescent cells, the combination of dasatinib and quercetin is the oldest of the senolytic treatments used in animal studies. Senolytic therapies are those that selectively destroy senescent cells in old tissues in order to produce rejuvenation, turning back the progression of numerous age-related conditions. Unusually for early stage research, these initial senolytics are actually quite effective, considered in the grand scheme of things. Thus they have moved directly to human trials in some cases. The first data on their ability to produce the same outcomes in huma...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 18, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Lipid Turnover in Fat Tissue Decreases with Age
Researchers here show that lipid turnover in fat tissue decreases with age, and suggest that this mechanism explains some fraction of the tendency to gain weight with age. Everyone of a certain age recognizes that it takes ever more effort to evade or get rid of excess fat tissue. It remains an open question as to which underlying mechanisms cause this change in lipid turnover, though given progress in rejuvenation research we are at the point of being able to test hypotheses such as chronic inflammation resulting from senescent cells, or mitochondrial dysfunction. We shall see what new data on this topic emerges in the ye...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 17, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Cardiorespiratory fitness predicts AF recurrence – CARDIO-FIT Study
Cardiorespiratory fitness predicts AF recurrence – CARDIO-FIT Study Obesity is an important risk factor for atrial fibrillation (AF) and lack of physical activity is an important risk factor for the development obesity. Weight loss has been shown to reduce the burden of AF [5]. Long-Term Effect of Goal-Directed Weight Management in an Atrial Fibrillation Cohort: A Long-Term Follow-Up Study (LEGACY) showed that progressive weight loss had a quantitative relationship with the reduction AF burden [2]. CARDIOrespiratory FITness on Arrhythmia Recurrence in Obese Individuals With Atrial Fibrillation (CARDIO-FIT Study) [3]...
Source: Cardiophile MD - September 11, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Why are diabetes-related complications on the rise?
Diabetes has grown to become one of the most important public health concerns of our time. A review by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health has shown that the number of affected people has quadrupled in the last three decades. Type 2 diabetes (T2D), a type of diabetes traditionally occurring in adults and associated with obesity and a sedentary lifestyle, is now the ninth leading cause of death worldwide. It therefore comes as no surprise that this rapidly emerging epidemic is giving rise to a profusion of diabetes-related complications. What are the usual diabetes-related complications? As diabetes is a systemic ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: George King, MD Tags: Diabetes Health Source Type: blogs