Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 3rd 2020
In this study, we examined the effects of oxytocin on the Aβ-induced impairment of synaptic plasticity in mice. To investigate the effect of oxytocin on synaptic plasticity, we prepared acute hippocampal slices for extracellular recording and assessed long-term potentiation (LTP) with perfusion of the Aβ active fragment (Aβ25-35) in the absence and presence of oxytocin. We found that oxytocin reversed the impairment of LTP induced by Aβ25-35 perfusion in the mouse hippocampus. These effects were blocked by pretreatment with the selective oxytocin receptor antagonist L-368,899. Furthermore, the tr...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 2, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Lifestyle changes are important for managing atrial fibrillation
Atrial fibrillation (afib) is a common heart rhythm disorder in which the upper chambers of the heart (the atria) beat fast and irregularly. Afib commonly causes recurrent symptoms, usually palpitations and shortness of breath, and can negatively affect quality of life. Afib also substantially increases the risk of stroke, and is also associated with heart failure, high blood pressure, and diabetes. People with afib routinely require lifelong treatment with blood thinners, to prevent blood clots that can lead to strokes. Doctors are only recently understanding the importance of lifestyle factors in treating afib. Modifiabl...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alyson Kelley-Hedgepeth, MD Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Exercise and Fitness Healthy Eating Heart Health Sleep Source Type: blogs

Health in 2 Point 00, Episode 139 | More Funding Deals & Livongo ’ s Diabetes Prevention Program
Health tech deals are just back to back this week! On Episode 139 of Health In 2 Point 00, Jess asks me about Withings getting $60M in a new round to develop their connected devices & apps products, Neurovalens raising €5.5M to grow their headset technology that helps with obesity, insomnia, diabetes, & more, Pocket Health raising $6.5M to build out their image sharing platform within in EHRs, and Sidecar Health raises $20M for their price transparency direct pay option. I also talks about Livongo’s new DPP program which provides users with diet tips & coaching sessions to offset diabetes in high-ris...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Zoya Khan Tags: Health in 2 Point 00 Health Tech Jessica DaMassa Matthew Holt Livongo neurovalens pocket health sidecar health Withings Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Your Gut Instinct is Bad For Your Relationships
While caring for his wife as she struggled with a severe nervous breakdown, Dr. Gleb Tsipursky put the cognitive strategies he’d long been teaching others to work on his strained relationship. After seeing the incredible impact it had on his marriage as a whole, he decided to write a book to share these relationship-changing communication strategies. Join us as Dr. Tsipursky explains why going with your “gut” can actually backfire and shares 12 practical mental habits you can begin using today for excellent communication. We want to hear from you — Please fill out our listener survey by clicking t...
Source: World of Psychology - July 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Communication General Habits Interview LifeHelper Marriage and Divorce Podcast Relationships The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Eating Ourselves into Shorter, Less Healthy Lives
We humans have not evolved for optimal function given a continually high calorie intake. We, and all other species, evolved in an environment characterized by periods of feast and famine: we desire food constantly, but nonetheless need some amount of hunger in order to be healthy. Periods of low calorie intake spur increased activity of tissue maintenance mechanisms throughout the body. A lower overall calorie intake minimizes excess visceral fat tissue that causes chronic inflammation and metabolic disease. In this modern society of comfort and cheap calories, all too many people are eating themselves into shorter, less h...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 30, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Long Term Low Dose Ethanol Intake Modestly Extends Life in Mice
In this study, we use ethanol, the common substance in all kinds of alcoholic beverages, as a single variable to explore its effects in vivo. Our data showed that the long-term 3.5% ethanol substitution for drinking water had beneficial effects in mice, the daily performance of ethanol-fed mice was enhanced, the athletic ability and healthspan of ethanol-fed mice drastically improved. Furthermore, the ethanol-fed mice showed the resistance to high-fat diet (HFD). When supplemented with 3.5% ethanol, the HFD mice showed reduced multiple organ pathogenicity, increased insulin sensitivity, and decreased NF-kB activation and i...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 29, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Cognitive Decline is Accelerated by Hypertension, Diabetes, and Smoking
The raised blood pressure of hypertension can be minimized with age by staying thin and active, type 2 diabetes is near entirely avoidable via much the same strategy, and smoking is just a bad idea. There is a mountain of evidence in each case for these outcomes to negatively impact health and lead to an earlier death. The work here is a reminder that if you want your mind to corrode somewhat more rapidly than would otherwise be the case, there exists a range of bad lifestyle choices that can achieve that goal. A recent study involved 2,675 people with an average age of 50 who did not have dementia. Researchers me...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 29, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Vets Show “Weight Bias” Against Obese Dogs And Their Owners
By guest blogger Ananya Ak The concept of weight bias or “fatphobia”, the social stigma around obesity, has been around for quite a while. Studies have shown that such stigma is present even among medical professionals, which negatively impacts quality of care for patients with obesity. Over the years, there have been several instances of doctors attributing medical symptoms to obesity when the symptoms were actually caused by something more serious, like a tumour. But what about social stigma towards obese pets? Over 50% of cats and dogs in the USA are obese and, like humans, pets with obesity have a higher ri...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - July 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Comparative guest blogger Health Source Type: blogs

Excess weight and Covid-19: insights from new evidence
This report brings together findings from UK and international studies published during the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic. It offers information about excess weight and its association with Covid-19 for the following outcomes: laboratory confirmation; hospitalisation; admission to intensive or critical care and treatment; and risk of mortality. The report offers some important insights into the prevalence, causes and risks of being overweight and also includes information regarding food and drink purchases and physical activity during the lockdown. It is intended to provide insights for policymakers and those in health m...
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - July 27, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Library Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

Tackling obesity: empowering adults and children to live healthier lives
Department of Health and Social Care - It has been known for decades that living with obesity reduces life expectancy and increases the chance of serious diseases such as cancer, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. In the last few months it has been seen that excess weight puts individuals at risk of worse outcomes from coronavirus (Covid-19). This policy paper outlines actions the government will take to tackle obesity and help adults and children to live healthier lives.Policy paperPress release  (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - July 27, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Library Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 27th 2020
In this study, we applied a well studied prediction model developed on data from five CpG sites, to increase the practicability of these tests. We have determined the biological age of the heart, specifically of the right atrium (RA) and left atrium (LA), and of peripheral blood leucocytes, by measuring the mitotic telomere length (TL) and the non-mitotic epigenetic age (DNAmAge). We found that DNAmAge, of both atrial tissues (RA and LA), was younger in respect to the chronological age (-12 years). Furthermore, no significant difference existed between RA and LA, suggesting that, although anatomically diverse and ex...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 26, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Stop honoring health care workers with sugary treats
I’m an obesity medicine specialist who is frustrated. I keep running into the same issue, and it’s time we start discussing the elephant in the room: the need we all have to show love and appreciation with food, especially sugar. It’s never been more problematic than it is right now. As our patients with obesity […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 24, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/susan-wolver" rel="tag" > Susan Wolver, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Obesity Source Type: blogs

The OneSkin Technologies DNA Methylation Clock for Assessment of Skin Aging
OneSkin Technologies is one of the first generation of startup biotech companies in the longevity industry; you'll find an overview of their programs and technology in an interview with founder Carolina Reis last year. In summary, OneSkin works on both improved models of aging skin, and topical senolytic compounds capable of selectively destroying the senescent cells thought to be responsible for a sizable fraction of skin aging in later life. Unlike other companies in the longevity industry, the OneSkin staff is focused on the cosmetics regulatory path to market. This is in some ways more limited, and in other ways much c...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 22, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Obesity and the diet-microbiome connection: a conversation with a gastroenterologist [PODCAST]
What should patients know about diet and its effects on the microbiome? How should primary care clinicians address diet and its effects on the microbiome? What are your tips to address obesity? What are the gastroenterological manifestations of COVID-19? Supriya Rao is a gastroenterologist. She shares her story and her expertise in obesity and the […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 22, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/the-podcast-by-kevinmd" rel="tag" > The Podcast by KevinMD < /a > < /span > Tags: Podcast Gastroenterology Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Life with Binge Eating Disorder
  At one point, Gabe weighed more than 550 pounds. Today, he and Lisa remember and discuss the extreme pain and slow healing process of living with binge-eating disorder. Gabe shares his shame in being so overweight, his intense relationship with food, the story of his gastric bypass and the difficult process of learning new coping mechanisms. How did Gabe’s bipolar and panic attacks tie in with his binge eating? And, importantly, how is he managing the illness today? Join us for an open and honest discussion on living with an eating disorder. (Transcript Available Below) Please Subscribe to Our Show: And We...
Source: World of Psychology - July 21, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: Binge Eating Disorders Eating Disorders General Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs

Fight Loneliness by Expanding Your Circle of Concern
You never know what you might find at a rummage sale. Last year, I found a lonely soul. I was one of the vendors at a rummage sale hosted by our local community center. It was the end of the day, and I was already packing up my leftover items when Eva, a potential buyer, asked about a coffee maker I had for sale. “I live alone,” she said, “but I make six cups of coffee every morning. I drink just one or two cups, but I make more hoping someone might stop by. Never one ever does.” I sensed a sadness and loneliness in her voice. Since that incident, I read reports about a loneliness epidemic in our c...
Source: World of Psychology - July 19, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Publishers Spirituality & Health loneliness epidemic Lonely Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 20th 2020
This study was the first to demonstrate a causal relationship between glial senescence and neurodegeneration. In this study, accumulations of senescent astrocytes and microglia were found in tau-associated neurodegenerative disease model mice. Elimination of these senescent cells via a genetic approach can reduce tau deposition and prevent the degeneration of cortical and hippocampal neurons. Most recently, it was shown that clearance of senescent oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in AD model mice with senolytic agents could lessen the Aβ plaque load, reduce neuroinflammation, and ameliorate cognitive deficits. ...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 19, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Metabolic syndrome is on the rise: What it is and why it matters
Metabolic syndrome may be the most common and serious condition you’ve never heard of. (At least that’s what I found out when I asked friends and relatives about it.) Worse, a study published recently in JAMA shows that it’s on the rise. Let’s start with the name, according to Merriam-Webster: Metabolic: Relating to the chemical changes in living cells by which energy is provided for vital processes and activities and new material is assimilated Syndrome: A group of signs and symptoms that occur together and characterize a particular abnormality or condition. So now you know what metabolic syndrome ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Coronavirus and COVID-19 Diabetes Health Health care disparities Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Source Type: blogs

A social worker ’s sickest patient
Mary is a woman of sixty years.   She is obese.  Originally from rural Alabama, she told me her aunt and uncle raised her, and they were bootleggers, making their own liquor.  By age fifteen, she was drinking this homemade hooch.   She never told me how she made her way to New York and New Jersey, […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 16, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/raymond-abbott" rel="tag" > Raymond Abbott < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Diabetes Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Envisioning food security: Steps we take now can help
Before the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, food insecurity (lack of reliable access to nutritious food) was a considerable problem, affecting 11% of the country, with higher rates among low-income and racial and ethnic minorities. The shutdown of businesses to slow the spread of COVID-19 has led to historically high levels of unemployment, most recently reported at 11% in June. That translates to more than 40 million people losing their jobs. Like food insecurity, jobless claims also disproportionately harm Black and Hispanic populations. However, it is possible to envision different paths, and even a path that leads to fo...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sara N. Bleich, PhD Tags: Children's Health Health care disparities Healthy Eating Nutrition Source Type: blogs

Lipocalin 2 as a Link Between Metabolic Syndrome and Neuroinflammation
Obesity and its immediate consequences, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes, are associated with greater neuroinflammation and risk of dementia. Excess visceral fat tissue does its part to produce chronic inflammation throughout the body, but here researchers focus on a specific metabolic dysregulation in the liver that produces inflammation in the brain. That inflammation in turn drives a faster progression towards neurodegenerative conditions. The lesson here, as in so much of this research: don't get fat, don't stay fat. You won't like the consequences. Researchers have revealed the ca...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 14, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Reversing the Age-Related Loss of Eosinophils in Visceral Fat Reduces Chronic Inflammation and its Consequences
It is well known that visceral fat tissue is an important source of the chronic inflammation that drives the onset and progress of all of the common age-related diseases. This is normally discussed in the context of excess visceral fat, given the high prevalence of overweight individuals in our modern society of cheap calories and too little exercise. Visceral fat encourages the creation of senescent cells and their inflammatory secretions, but also rouses the immune system to inflammation via a range of other mechanisms. Overweight individuals have a shorter, less healthy life with higher lifetime medical expenses as a re...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 13, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

The COVID effect on this physician
COVID. What is it to me? A sense of growing dread for primary care providers everywhere, whose patient panels read like a list of future dead. Diabetes, obesity, heart disease, emphysema. The reality is most people have no idea how close to devastation our medical system is at most times. How many times was the […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 12, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/m-michelle-mcclelland" rel="tag" > M. Michelle McClelland, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 13th 2020
In conclusion, sitting for prolonged periods of time without interruption is unfavorably associated with DBP and HDL cholesterol. Exercise Slows Inappropriate Growth of Blood Vessels in a Mouse Model of Macular Degeneration https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/07/exercise-slows-inappropriate-growth-of-blood-vessels-in-a-mouse-model-of-macular-degeneration/ Excessive growth of blood vessels beneath the retina is a proximate cause of blindness in conditions such as macular degeneration. Researchers here provide evidence for physical activity to be influential in the pace at which this process of tissue...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 12, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

It is Challenging to Find Support for Evolutionary Trade-offs Between Reproduction and Aging in Human Data
The disposibility theory of aging is one of numerous evolutionary theories of aging that seek to explain why aging exists and is near universal across species. In this case, aging is viewed as the inevitable result of trade-offs between resources allocated to reproduction versus resources allocated to tissue maintenance. Like near all evolutionary theories, and particularly those relating to aging, the models and the science are much debated. Since there is some variation between individuals within a species, one should expect to find a distribution of outcomes for any given trade-off when comparing large numbers of...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 10, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Front-of-Pack Labelling and International Trade Law: Revisiting the Health Star Rating System
Jessica C. Lai (Victoria University of Wellington), Shmuel I. Becher (Victoria University of Wellington), Front-of-Pack Labelling and International Trade Law: Revisiting the Health Star Rating System, 21 Melb. J. Int ’l. L. (2020): The Western world is suffering from an ‘obesity... (Source: HealthLawProf Blog)
Source: HealthLawProf Blog - July 9, 2020 Category: Medical Law Authors: Katharine Van Tassel Source Type: blogs

COVID-19:  Too Much Time to Think
Slights, mistakes, embarrassments, accidents, catastrophes. Are these things flooding your mind? Is your self-esteem in the toilet? Have you stopped to ask yourself why? Here’s the reason — COVID-19 is doing a number on our brain. Pre-COVID, we had a million distractions. It was safe to roam the earth. You could go to a store for a little shopping without fearing for your life. You could venture out to a restaurant and have a meal cooked for you. Heck, you could even take your kid to a drama class, which is now being taught via ZOOM meetings. Since March of 2020, there are just fewer things to do to take out mi...
Source: World of Psychology - July 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Laura Yeager Tags: Personal Self-Esteem Self-Help Boredom coronavirus COVID-19 Embarrassment Memory pandemic quarantine Shame social distancing Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 6th 2020
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 5, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Obesity Correlates with Higher Dementia Risk
Excess visceral fat tissue generates chronic inflammation via a range of mechanisms, including an accelerated creation of senescent cells. Most of the commmon age-related conditions have an inflammatory component, and thus people who are overweight or obese suffer a raised risk of age-related disease, higher lifetime medical costs, and a shorter life expectancy. This is illustrated here in yet another study showing that greater BMI and waist circumference (the latter a better measure of visceral fat burden) correlate with greater risk of dementia. Researchers collected data from 6,582 people in a nationally repres...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 2, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Why Deep Breathing Helps Calm Anxiety
As someone whose friends and family know I’ve endured a number of heartbreaking challenges and physical and emotional difficulties, I’m often asked how I cope with anxiety. They see my eternal optimism as at odds with the turmoil I’ve gone through in life and wonder what my secret is for dealing with a magnitude of life’s ups and downs. I tell them, quite simply, that it isn’t a secret, yet the most effective technique I’ve discovered to calm anxiety is deep breathing. How and why does deep breathing work in calming anxiety? The Anxiety and Depression Association of America states that a...
Source: World of Psychology - June 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Anxiety and Panic Mindfulness Self-Help Breathing Exercise Calm stress reduction Source Type: blogs

What ’s to blame for the obesity epidemic? [PODCAST]
“Obesity is a topic that literally hits home for me.   For the past two years, the website WalletHub has voted the McAllen-Edinburg-Mission TX metroplex as the‘fattest city in America.’   As a health care provider, this is deeply disturbing because it puts my community at high risk for a wide variety of health problems, including but […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 29, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/the-podcast-by-kevinmd" rel="tag" > The Podcast by KevinMD < /a > < /span > Tags: Podcast Gastroenterology Obesity Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 29th 2020
In conclusion, metabolomics is a promising approach for the assessment of biological age and appears complementary to established epigenetic clocks. Sedentary Behavior Raises the Risk of Cancer Mortality https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/06/sedentary-behavior-raises-the-risk-of-cancer-mortality/ Living a sedentary lifestyle is known to be harmful to long term health, raising the risk of age-related disease and mortality. Researchers here show that a sedentary life specifically increases cancer mortality, and does so independently of other factors. This is one of many, many reasons to maintain a re...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 28, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

How risky is a hug right now?
“Can I get a hug?” It’s a simple question for a simple act that’s been especially missed because of COVID-19 distancing. “Human beings need social contact,” says Dr. Eugene Beresin, executive director of The Clay Center for Young Healthy Minds at Massachusetts General Hospital, and professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. “We are not hermits. We are not solo pilots. We are pack animals.” Not that it needs more promotion, but along with feeling connected, a hug has been shown to help fight off a cold and help your mood when dealing with conflict. But even as restrict...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Steve Calechman Tags: Cold and Flu Coronavirus and COVID-19 Health Risks and Prevention Safety Source Type: blogs

Using the Metabolome to Produce an Aging Clock
In conclusion, metabolomics is a promising approach for the assessment of biological age and appears complementary to established epigenetic clocks. Link: https://doi.org/10.1111/acel.13149 (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - June 24, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

6 Simple Ways to Combat Stress
No doubt we live in stressful times. Political and social unrest and a pandemic are piling on top of the normal stresses of daily life. Undue stress can lead to insomnia, fatigue, headaches, depression, and serious medical conditions. If you feel severely overwhelmed, it might be wise to consult a doctor. But there are six simple ways to combat stress on your own. 1. Go Outside and Take a Breath Researchers know a breath of fresh air cleanses contaminants from your lungs. They also know your brain uses about 20% of the oxygen you take in, so the more air you get, the better your mind functions – and that mak...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - June 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Erin Falconer Tags: featured productivity tips psychology self-improvement motivation pickthebrain stress stress management Source Type: blogs

Cyclic Peptides to Remodel the Gut Microbiome by Suppressing Growth of Harmful Bacteria
Research into the effects of the gut microbiome on health and aging is presently flourishing. Scientists are identifying meaningful changes in microbial populations that take place with age, as well as metabolites generated by gut microbes that favorably influence health, such as indoles, butyrate, propionate, and so forth. With advancing age, the balance of microbial populations shifts from beneficial to harmful. The production of beneficial metabolites decreases. Microbes invade gut tissue to produce a state of chronic inflammation that spreads to accelerate the onset and progression of age-related disease throughout the...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 23, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Lifestyle Medicine Could Be The Key For Digital Health Adoption
I’ve been wearing my Fitbit for a couple of years and only remove it when I shower. I use it to track my sleep and its smart alarm wakes me up at the optimal time every morning. With the pocketable Kardia, I regularly check my ECG at home to detect any anomalies. For an in-depth analysis of what my genetic makeup predisposes me to, I had my whole genome sequenced. And I bring relevant data to my general practitioner during my checkups so that we can decide on preventive measures. In short, I’m trying to live like the patient of the future. However, posing as such a patient is not feasible for many among us. ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - June 23, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Lifestyle medicine E-Patients Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design Medical Education Personalized Medicine sleep stress food scanner sleep apnea Apple Watch Dr. Vernes Baylor ACLM Source Type: blogs

Towards the Use of Epigenetic Clocks in Clinical Trials
Despite the challenges inherent in the practical use of epigenetic clocks based on age-related changes in DNA methylation, clinical trials are forging ahead in the employment of these clocks. The assays are cheap enough that there is a sense of "why not?" and, considered over patient populations rather than in individuals, an epigenetic age higher than chronological age correlates well with risk and progression of age-related disease. It remains problematic for any given individual to extract meaning from an epigenetic clock assay, however. It is unclear as to what exactly the measured age-related changes in DNA ...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 22, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 22nd 2020
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 21, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 17th June 2020
Some recent things you may need to know...Current news‘Black mothers were already scared’: coronavirus home births (Guardian video, about experiences in Pennsylvania)Global healthMonitoring intrapartum fetal heart rates by mothers in labour in two public hospitals: an initiative to improve maternal and neonatal healthcare in LiberiaRelated blog postClinical effectivenessLabor dystocia (AHRQ)ResearchDoes low-dose aspirin initiated before 11 weeks'gestation reduce the rate of preeclampsia? (AJOG)Early amniotomy after cervical ripening for induction of labor: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized con...
Source: Browsing - June 17, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Threonine Restriction Promotes Health in Mice
Calorie restriction, eating up to 40% fewer calories while maintaining optimal micronutrient intake, improves health and reliably extends life in most species. In humans it produces robust improvements in health, but we experience a much lesser degree of life extension than short-lived species such as mice. Calorie restriction research has given rise to a number of lines of work in which specific dietary components (such as individual essential amino acids) are restricted, to try to identify which of these components are responsible for the benefits. A sizable fraction of the calorie restriction response is thought to be t...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 16, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

A Potentially Safe Mitochondrial Uncoupling Drug Candidate
Mitochondrial uncoupling is the mechanism by which cells generate heat. Mitochondria are the power plants of the cell, a herd of bacteria-like structures that conduct energetic processes to generate the chemical energy store molecule adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP is used to power all of the vital biochemical machinery of a cell. Mitochondrial uncoupling is a regulatory mechanism that changes the operation of a mitochondrion such that the energy it accumulates is dissipated as heat rather than powering the chemical reactions needed to generate ATP. This uncoupling is how mammals regulate body temperature. Raised ...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 15, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Treating mild sleep apnea: Should you consider a CPAP device?
This study supports a comprehensive approach to evaluation and treatment of mild OSA. While all people with mild OSA may not need to be treated with CPAP, there are patients who can greatly benefit from it. Treatments may be trial and error until you and your doctor get it right When sleep apnea is mild, treatment recommendations are less clear-cut, and should be determined based on the severity of your symptoms, your preferences, and other co-occurring health problems. Working in conjunction with your doctor, you can try a stepwise approach — if one treatment doesn’t work, you can stop that and try an alternat...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melanie Pogach, MD Tags: Ear, nose, and throat Sleep Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs

Cancer Recovery During a Pandemic
It’s been 18 months since I finished chemo for breast cancer, 15 months since I finished radiation at this writing, June 2020. My hair grew back a year ago. The tingling in my fingers is gone. I used to have heart flutters and some chest congestion; those symptoms have passed.   I had a mammogram recently; it was good. No “signs of malignancy.” That’s how the official language goes. I wasn’t expecting anything bad, but you never know. I saw my oncologist the following week. She felt my scar tissue. I have tenderness under my armpit where four lymph nodes were removed. She said it al...
Source: World of Psychology - June 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Felicia Carparelli Tags: Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Personal Cancer coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic social distancing Source Type: blogs

Body-shaming in the time of COVID
The severity of COVID appears to be increased in people with obesity. This may represent an opportunity to discuss the benefits of lifestyle change with overweight patients. However, if not done appropriately, the opportunity becomes transformed into just one more damaging, body-shaming experience for the patient. There has been much written and little done about […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 13, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/janice-asher" rel="tag" > Janice Asher, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Weight Loss: This Technique Boosts Exercise Motivation
The technique could help overweight people lose weight and keep it off. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - June 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Healthcare ’s Sliding Doors Moment
By LINDA T. HAND Every day, we make thousands of choices. Some of them – even those that seem trivial at the time – will change the course of our lives. This concept was memorably illustrated in the 1998 film Sliding Doors, which imagined two very different paths for Gywneth Paltrow’s character, Helen, based entirely on whether or not she makes or misses the London Tube on her commute home—the film’s eponymous sliding doors.  Helen doesn’t have the luxury of weighing her possible futures and altering her choices accordingly, perhaps quickening her pace or stopping for a la...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Tech Health Technology Linda Hand Prealize Health proactive healthcare Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 8th 2020
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 7, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Lazy, Crazy, and Disgusting – How Stigma is Everywhere
What is stigma? And how does it affect a person’s mental health and quality of life? In today’s Psych Central Podcast, Gabe talks with anthropologists Alex Brewis and Amber Wutich about the deeply dehumanizing impact of stigma in society. Whether it’s your mental health diagnosis, your neighborhood, your race or your inability to meet society’s standards in some way, stigma is alive and well in today’s world. People even tend to stigmatize themselves, intensifying their suffering.  Why are people so quick to stigmatize? And how does stigma affect mental health treatment? Tune into the sh...
Source: World of Psychology - June 4, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: General Interview Mental Health and Wellness Podcast Psychology The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Targeting the Failure of Mitophagy as a Basis for Treating Age-Related Disease
Evidence strongly suggests that the global faltering of mitochondrial function throughout the body with advancing age has a lot to do with a decline in the effectiveness of mitophagy. Mitochondria are the power plants of the cell, a herd of hundreds swarming and replicating like bacteria in every cell to produce the chemical energy store molecule ATP. Mitophagy is the specialized form of autophagy that destroys worn and damaged mitochondria, recycling their component parts. Without it, cells would become overtaken by broken, malfunctioning mitochondria. Mitochondrial dysfunction leads to too little ATP, but also higher lev...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 3, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs