Carbon Dioxide Concentration in the Earth ’s Atmosphere Has Hit Levels Unseen for 3 Million Years
The concentration of carbon dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere has reached levels not seen for 3 million years, scientists at Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii said Monday – offering a dire warning about the impact of human activity on the planet. The observatory’s sensors registered carbon dioxide levels of 415 parts per million (ppm) on Saturday, meaning CO2 made up 415 of ever 1 million molecules of gas in the atmosphere. CO2 – which is emitted when we burn fossil fuels like coal, oil and natural gas – is a greenhouse gas which traps heat in the earth’s atmosphere, contributing to the gl...
Source: TIME: Science - May 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent Tags: Uncategorized climate change earth onetime Source Type: news

The Moon Is Shrinking, and It ’s Causing Powerful ‘Moonquakes’
The moon is getting smaller, which causes wrinkles in its surface and moonquakes, according to a new study. As the moon’s interior cools, it shrinks, which causes its hard surface to crack and form fault lines, according to research sponsored by NASA. The moon has gotten about 150 feet skinnier over the last few hundred million years. NASA posted a video on Twitter showing fault lines on the moon’s surface. You've heard of earthquakes. But what about moonquakes? Like a wrinkled grape drying out to a raisin, the Moon is shrinking as its interior cools causing wrinkles or faults to form on its brittle surf...
Source: TIME: Science - May 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Amy Gunia Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space Source Type: news

An Explorer Just Made the Deepest Ever Manned Sea Dive — and He Found a Plastic Bag
An American explorer who set a new record for the deepest ever manned sea dive says he saw a plastic bag and candy wrappers at the bottom of the ocean. Victor Vescovo, 53, visited Challenger Deep, which is the deepest known point in the ocean in the Mariana Trench in the Pacific Ocean on May 1, according to CNN. Details of his trip were released on Monday. His team said he set a new record for the deepest solo dive in history, venturing to depths of 35,853 feet. Titanic director James Cameron held the record before Vescovo’s recent journey. Aside from plastic trash, he discovered four new species, reports CNN. The te...
Source: TIME: Science - May 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Amy Gunia Tags: Uncategorized Environment onetime overnight Source Type: news

Jeff Bezos Is Promising the Moon — But There Are Plenty of Reasons to Doubt Him
You may not have given a lot of thought to your plans for 2024, but more and more people in the space business have. For reasons not entirely clear, 2024 has become the big year for big promises. The trend started in 2017 with SpaceX founder Elon Musk, who stunned an international astronomy conference in Adelaide, Australia with his announcement that a new mega-rocket he was building could have human beings on Mars within seven years. Skeptics questioning how he arrived at that date speculated that it might have been a simple matter of subtraction. NASA had recently revealed that it was looking at 2034 for its own first Ma...
Source: TIME: Science - May 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Jeff Bezos Mars moon onetime space Source Type: news

Google Celebrates Lucy Wills, Who Found a Simple Solution to Improve the Health of Pregnant Women Everywhere
The pioneering English hematologist Lucy Wills, whose research into women’s health during pregnancy changed the lives of millions around the globe, was celebrated in Friday’s Google Doodle. Wills conducted research into prenatal macrocytic anaemia in India in the 1920s and 1930s, where pregnant textile workers in Bombay were suffering from the condition. She hypothesized that the condition, which causes red blood cells to become enlarged and can be life-threatening, was related to the diets of those affected. After feeding monkeys with the condition the popular yeasty breakfast spread Marmite, she observed tha...
Source: TIME: Science - May 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized Google onetime Source Type: news

‘It’s Time to Go Back to the Moon.’ Jeff Bezos Unveils Blue Origin’s Lunar Mission
(WASHINGTON) — Amazon tycoon Jeff Bezos says he’s going to send a spaceship to the moon, joining a resurgence of lunar interest half a century after people first set foot there. Bezos says his space company Blue Origin will land a robotic ship the size of a small house, capable of carrying four rovers and using a newly designed rocket engine and souped-up rockets. It would be followed by a version that could bring people to the moon along the same timeframe as NASA’s proposed 2024 return. Bezos, who was dwarfed by his mock-up of the Blue Moon vehicle at his presentation Thursday, says, “This is an i...
Source: TIME: Science - May 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: SETH BORENSTEIN / AP Tags: Uncategorized Blue Origin onetime Source Type: news

A Smackdown in the Kennedy Clan Summons Up the History of Presidents and Vaccines
Family quarrels are usually private things—unless of course, the family is famous. A public spat among boldface names broke out on May 8, when three members of the Kennedy clan published a piece on Politico declaring that Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.—son of Bobby Kennedy—has been “tragically wrong” in his years-long crusade against vaccines, a crusade that seems especially irresponsible now as the country suffers through its worst measles outbreak since 1994. Kennedy has become a hero of the anti-vax crowd with his persistent claims that vaccines contain deadly ingredients, particularly a mercury-ba...
Source: TIME: Science - May 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized History onetime Source Type: news

The U.S. Wanted to Hide Nukes in Arctic Ice Tunnels. The Plan Blew Up in Their Faces
As far as these things go, Camp Century was a pretty good cover. It was nominally designed as an underground military research station, located about 150 miles east of the American air base at Thule, Greenland. The stated purpose of Camp Century was to improve the American defense capability in the Arctic — to develop better survival and transportation techniques, and to obtain more useful knowledge about the harsh climate and the physical properties of the region. In essence, we covered up for a super-secret operation using a kinda-secret one. The United States had been operating in the area since 1951, when the Thu...
Source: TIME: Science - May 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Vince Houghton Tags: Uncategorized Books Military Science Source Type: news

The U.N. Reports That 1 Million Species Could Go Extinct. It Shows How Hard It Will Be to Heal the Planet
There’s an awful lot of awful in the just-released summary of a new U.N. report on biodiversity and ecosystem. There’s the tenfold increase in plastic pollution since 1980, for example. There’s the 400 million tons of heavy metals, toxic sludge and fertilizer runoff poured into the world’s water each year too. There’s the doubling of greenhouse gas emissions since 1980; the growth of industrial fishing, now sprawling across 55% of the world’s oceans, the 85% loss of the wetlands since the dawn of the industrial era, and the 70% increase in invasive species in 21 countries. And then, fina...
Source: TIME: Science - May 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Environment onetime Source Type: news

SpaceX Dragon Safely Reaches ISS After Weekend Launch
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — A SpaceX shipment arrived at the International Space Station on Monday with a “cosmic catch” by a pair of Canadians. The Dragon capsule delivered 5,500 pounds (2,500 kilograms) of equipment and experiments. Canadian astronaut David Saint-Jacques used the station’s big robot arm — also made in Canada — to capture the Dragon approximately 250 miles (400 kilometers) above the North Atlantic Ocean. An external cable that normally comes off during launch dangled from the capsule, but it did not interfere with the grappling. “Welcome on board, Dragon,” Sain...
Source: TIME: Science - May 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MARCIA DUNN / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

One of the Most Visible Meteor Showers of 2019 Is Happening This Weekend. Here Is How to Watch It
The peak of the Eta Aquariid meteor shower will coincide with a new moon this weekend, meaning the conditions will be ideal to view the annual flurry of burning space debris. Here is what you need to know to catch a glimpse. What is a meteor shower? A meteor shower occurs when the Earth passes through a cloud of space debris, often left behind by a comet. When the debris vaporizes in the Earth’s atmosphere, it results in streaks of light across the sky. From earth’s perspective, a meteor shower will always appear to originate from a specific point in the sky, known as the radiant, and showers are named after t...
Source: TIME: Science - May 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Wilder Davies Tags: Uncategorized meteor onetime space Source Type: news

‘Not Great News.’ SpaceX Confirms Its Crew Capsule Was Destroyed in Ground Testing
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — SpaceX finally confirmed Thursday its crew capsule was destroyed in ground testing two weeks ago and conceded that the accident is “not great news” for the company’s effort to launch astronauts this year. Hans Koenigsmann, a company vice president, told reporters it’s too soon to know what went wrong during the April 20 test or whether the crew Dragon capsule’s test flight in March — minus astronauts — contributed to the failure. Flames engulfed the capsule a half-second before the launch-abort thrusters were to fire. SpaceX still cannot access the te...
Source: TIME: Science - May 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MARCIA DUNN / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Wealthy, Male American Students Are More Likely to BS, Study Says
Students who are wealthier and male are more likely than others to claim that they know more than they actually do, says a new study. The study, which reviewed surveys of 40,000 15-year-old students from across nine English-speaking countries, found that boys and people from wealthier families are more likely to be “bullshitters,” which it defines as “individuals who claim knowledge or expertise in an area where they actually have little experience at all.” The study, which was published by the IZA Institute of Labor Economics, looked at survey data attached to the Programme for International Studen...
Source: TIME: Science - April 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized onetime psychology Source Type: news

It ’s Not Your Imagination: That Toddler is Judging You
There are few things as irresistible as the face of a toddler: the tiny nose, the ingenuous eyes, the utter scrumptiousness of the cheeks. Well, guess what. They don’t think nearly as highly of your face. Kids may not say it, but by the time they’re as young as three, they give you a good hard look the moment they meet you—and they judge a lot by what they see. It may be no surprise that young humans—like all humans—look to the face first for clues about the kindness, approachability and even competence of new people. But according to a new study conducted by a group of researchers from Harvar...
Source: TIME: Science - April 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

Emperor Penguin Population Sees Steep Decline in Antarctica ’s Second-Largest Breeding Ground
(WASHINGTON) — For the past three years, virtually nothing has hatched at Antarctica’s second biggest breeding grounds for emperor penguins and the start of this year is looking just as bleak, a new study found. Usually 15,000 to 24,000 breeding pairs of emperor penguins flock yearly to a breeding site at Halley Bay , considered a safe place that should stay cold this century despite global warming. But almost none have been there since 2016, according to a study in Wednesday’s Antarctic Science. The breeding pair population has increased significantly at a nearby breeding ground, but the study’s au...
Source: TIME: Science - April 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized animals onetime overnight Source Type: news

There ’s a Real-Life Inspiration for Game of Thrones’ Valyrian Steel. Here’s How Its Long-Lost Secrets Were Revealed
Warning: This post contains spoilers for Game of Thrones. As the Game of Thrones saga winds down, Valyrian steel has never been more important. It’s one of the few substances known to kill White Walkers, but only about a half-dozen known characters currently wield weapons made from the magical material — and it’s not possible to make more. That’s because, according to the lore of the show and A Song of Ice and Fire books, the secret for forging the metal was lost long before the Game of Thrones story starts. Valyrian steel is also one more way in which Game of Thrones, fantastical though it is, has ...
Source: TIME: Science - April 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Lily Rothman Tags: Uncategorized onetime Television Source Type: news

Climate Change Has Already Increased Global Inequality. It Will Only Get Worse
Scientists have long predicted that warmer temperatures caused by climate change will have the biggest impact on the world’s poorest, most vulnerable people. New research now indicates that’s already happened over the last several decades. A study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science found that in most poor countries, higher temperatures are more than 90% likely to have resulted in decreased economic output, compared to a world without global warming. Meanwhile, the effect has been less dramatic in wealthier nations—with some even potentially benefiting from higher temper...
Source: TIME: Science - April 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized climate change Source Type: news

Google ’s Earth Day 2019 Doodle Celebrates Nature’s Diversity
To celebrate Earth Day 2019, Google has created a Doodle featuring fun facts about six fascinating creatures. When you click on Sunday’s Earth Day Google Doodle, it zooms in to show some of the creatures that dwell on the Earth’s many different environments. As the doodle zooms in from space, the first animal you see is a wandering albatross, which has the widest wingspan of any living bird. Next, the doodle shows coastal redwoods- the tallest tree in the world. The doodle also zooms past the Paedophryne amauensis, the smallest frog and vertebrate, as well as the Amazon water lily, one of the biggest aquatic pl...
Source: TIME: Science - April 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized Earth Day Google onetime Source Type: news

Meet ‘Mr. Earth Day,’ the Man Who Helped Organize the Annual Observance
Nearly 50 years after 20 million Americans participated in the first Earth Day on April 22, 1970, more than 190 countries mark the annual day for raising awareness of environmental causes. And the stakes only grow as the years go by. Though Earth Day has been dogged by rumors that it was founded by a murderer and as communist propaganda, the truth is much more straightforward — but no less fascinating. TIME spoke to Denis Hayes, a real organizer of the first Earth Day, dubbed “Mr. Earth Day” by the magazine in 1999. Hayes is now the president of the Bullitt Foundation, which doles out grants to environmen...
Source: TIME: Science - April 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Olivia B. Waxman Tags: Uncategorized Environment Holidays Source Type: news

Scientists Restore Some Brain Activity in Recently Slaughtered Pigs
(NEW YORK) — Scientists restored some activity within the brains of pigs that had been slaughtered hours before, raising hopes for some medical advances and questions about the definition of death. The brains could not think or sense anything, researchers stressed. By medical standards “this is not a living brain,” said Nenad Sestan of the Yale School of Medicine, one of the researchers reporting the results Wednesday in the journal Nature. But the work revealed a surprising degree of resilience among cells within a brain that has lost its supply of blood and oxygen, he said. “Cell death in the brai...
Source: TIME: Science - April 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MALCOLM RITTER / AP Tags: Uncategorized Brain Activity onetime Source Type: news

Black Hole Given the Hawaiian Name ‘Powehi.’ Here’s What That Means
The black hole that was captured in a first-ever picture this week has been named “Powehi,” courtesy of a language professor at the University of Hawaii-Hilo. Powehi means “embellished dark source of unending creation”, according to a university press release. The cosmic object’s new moniker comes from the Kumulipo, an 18th century chant describing the creation of the Hawaiian universe. “To have the privilege of giving a Hawaiian name to the very first scientific confirmation of a black hole is very meaningful to me,” said professor Larry Kimura. The world’s first image of a ...
Source: TIME: Science - April 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hillary Leung Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space Source Type: news

SpaceX Launches a Mega Rocket and Successfully Lands All Three Boosters for the First Time
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — SpaceX launched its second supersized rocket and for the first time landed all three boosters Thursday, a year after sending up a sports car on the initial test flight. The new and improved Falcon Heavy thundered into the early evening sky with a communication satellite called Arabsat, the rocket’s first paying customer. The Falcon Heavy is the most powerful rocket in use today, with 27 engines firing at liftoff — nine per booster. Eight minutes after liftoff, SpaceX landed two of the first-stage boosters back at Cape Canaveral, side by side, just like it did for the rocket’...
Source: TIME: Science - April 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MARCIA DUNN / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space Source Type: news

Israeli Spacecraft Fails to Make Historic Privately Funded Moon Landing
(YEHUD, Israel) — An Israeli spacecraft lost contact with Earth and crashed just moments before it was to land on the moon late Thursday, failing in an ambitious attempt to make history as the first privately funded lunar mission. The spacecraft lost communication with ground control as it was making its final descent to the moon. Moments later, the mission was declared a failure. “We definitely crashed on surface of moon,” said Opher Doron, general manager of the space division of Israel Aerospace Industries. He said the spacecraft was in pieces scattered at the planned landing site. Doron said that the ...
Source: TIME: Science - April 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: ISABEL DEBRE / AP Tags: Uncategorized Israel onetime space Source Type: news

We Finally Learned What a Year in Space Did to Astronaut Scott Kelly ’s Body
Traveling in space looks like all kinds of fun, and in a lot of respects, it is—provided you can overlook a few downsides. There’s the loss of muscle mass, for one thing. Then there’s the decalcification of bones and the stress on the heart and the damage to the eyes and the changes in the immune system and the disruption of the genome and an actual shortening of your overall life expectancy. It was, in part, to study all of those biological problems that astronaut Scott Kelly spent 340 days in space from 2015 to 2016 (chronicled in TIME’s Emmy-nominated series A Year in Space). Now, just over three...
Source: TIME: Science - April 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Year in Space Source Type: news

Meet Katie Bouman, One Woman Who Helped Make the World ’s First Image of a Black Hole
The space was tiny and hot. On a fateful day last summer, Katie Bouman and three fellow researchers filed into a small room at Harvard University, safe from prying eyes, in order to see an image that had been years in the making. Researchers from all over the world had combined forces to gather masses of astronomical data — enough to fill a half ton of hard drives — that they hoped to turn into the world’s first image of a black hole. In order to do that, the team needed algorithms that could distill all that noisy, messy information into one comprehensible picture. And Bouman, whose expertise is not in a...
Source: TIME: Science - April 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Katy Steinmetz Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

The Eye of Sauron? A Blurry Bagel? The Internet ’s Black Hole Memes Are Out of This World
The first picture of a black hole was released Wednesday, marking a giant feat for science — and, because this is the internet, paving the way for a slew of memes. The photo — a blurry shot that shows a black hole at the center of the Messier 87 galaxy — quickly became meme fodder as people drew comparisons between the fiery orange circle and other famous round objects. The Eye of Sauron, the flaming eye featured in The Lord of the Rings, immediately jumped to mind for many: NSF: Amazing first photo of black hole! This changes everything! Sauron: Mother? pic.twitter.com/4ML5ytcZuX — Sarah Parcak ...
Source: TIME: Science - April 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized Internet onetime space Source Type: news

Reagan Administration Officials at First Dismissed the Ozone Hole. Here ’s What Changed
The May 1985 paper, published in top scientific journal Nature, rocked the world: British scientists, backed up by harrowing images, revealed that, over Antarctica, a hole had formed in the ozone layer, the component of the atmosphere that is key in shielding humans from the sun’s cancer-causing ultraviolet rays. At the time, President Ronald Reagan was in the White House. Environmental policy hadn’t been a priority for him and his advisers, who were more focused on fighting the creep of Cold War communism or federal involvement in issues they believed the states should handle. Even the revelation of the ozone ...
Source: TIME: Science - April 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Olivia B. Waxman Tags: Uncategorized Science Source Type: news

This Is the First Picture of a Black Hole — And That’s a Big, Even Supermassive, Deal
A picture of a black hole is one of those great, self-negating concepts, like the sound of silence, the presence of absence or the lives of the dead. The nature of one refutes the other. But a picture of a black hole has arrived nonetheless — revealed Wednesday morning in simultaneous press conferences held in six different locations around the world. At those events — in Washington, Brussels, Santiago, Shanghai, Taipei and Tokyo — astronomers gave humanity its first look at the black hole at the heart of the Messier 87 (M87) galaxy, nearly 54 million light years from Earth. With that, astrophysics opened...
Source: TIME: Science - April 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

We ’re About to See the First Picture of a Black Hole. That’s a Big — Even Supermassive — Deal
A picture of a black hole is one of those great, self-negating concepts, like the sound of silence, the presence of absence or the lives of the dead. The nature of one refutes the other. But a picture of a black hole is set to arrive nonetheless — two pictures of two black holes, actually, on April 10, in simultaneous press conferences to be held at 9:00 AM EDT, in six different locations around the world. At those events—planned for Washington, Brussels, Santiago, Shanghai, Taipei and Tokyo—astronomers will give humanity its first look at the black hole that sits at the center of our own Milky Way galaxy...
Source: TIME: Science - April 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Global Warming Is Shrinking Glaciers Much Faster Than Scientists Thought, Study Finds
This study, “is telling us there’s much more to the story,” said Mark Serreze, director of the National Snow and Ice Data Center in Boulder, Colorado, who wasn’t part of the study. “The influence of glaciers on sea level is bigger than we thought.” A number of factors are making sea levels rise. The biggest cause is that oceans are getting warmer, which makes water expand. The new figures show glacier melt is a bigger contributor than thought, responsible for about 25% to 30% of the yearly rise in oceans, Zemp said. Rising seas threaten coastal cities around the world and put more people...
Source: TIME: Science - April 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: SETH BORENSTEIN / AP Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime overnight Source Type: news

‘The City I Love Is Making People Sick.’ London Mayor Sadiq Khan on Making Polluters Pay
Two years before he became mayor of London in 2016, Sadiq Khan ran the capital’s famous marathon. He’d been healthy his whole life, but while training for the race, he found he had trouble breathing. He went to the doctor, who diagnosed him with adult onset asthma. It was bad news in a city like London, he says, where air pollution has been known to trigger or worsen the disease, sending four people to hospital everyday. Though you might not think of toxic air while walking down London’s tree-lined streets on a clear spring day, the capital has breached the legal annual air pollution limit every year sinc...
Source: TIME: Science - April 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent Tags: Uncategorized Environment Source Type: news

Google Honors Pioneering Physicist Hedwig Kohn Who Fled Nazi Germany
Step inside the science lab of the pioneering physicist Hedwig Kohn with a Google Doodle that celebrates her birthday, 132 years later. Hamburg-based artist Carolin Löbbert pays tribute to the life and accomplishments of the scientist through sketches that gradually become more detailed and colorful, reflecting the progression of Kohn’s exceptional career. Born in Breslau, which is now Wrocław, Poland on April 5, 1887, Kohn became one of only three women certified to teach physics at a German university before World War II. As a Jewish woman, Kohn was barred from her teaching position in 1933 when Germany&rsqu...
Source: TIME: Science - April 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Madeline Roache Tags: Uncategorized Google onetime Source Type: news

Cats Respond to the Sound of Their Names, Study Says. Whether They Care Is Another Question
(NEW YORK) — Hey Kitty! Yes, you. A new study suggests household cats can respond to the sound of their own names. No surprise to you or most cat owners, right? But Japanese scientists said Thursday that they’ve provided the first experimental evidence that cats can distinguish between words that we people say. So you’re kind of like dogs, whose communication with people has been studied a lot more, and who’ve been shown to recognize hundreds of words if they’re highly trained. Sorry if the comparison offends you, Kitty. Atsuko Saito of Sophia University in Tokyo says there’s no evidence...
Source: TIME: Science - April 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MALCOLM RITTER / AP Tags: Uncategorized animals onetime Source Type: news

Israeli Spacecraft Enters Lunar Orbit Ahead of Moon Landing Attempt
(YEHUD, Israel) — The first Israeli spacecraft to journey to the moon has passed its most crucial test yet: dropping into lunar orbit one week ahead of landing. After traveling over 5.5 million kilometers (3.4 million miles) around the Earth and drawing ever closer to the moon, the small spacecraft on Thursday finally swung into the moon’s elliptical orbit — keeping it on track for touchdown April 11. Opher Doron, space division general manager at Israel Aerospace Industries, which worked with non-profit SpaceIL to build the spacecraft, hailed “the most significant maneuver we’ve made” o...
Source: TIME: Science - April 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Israel onetime space Source Type: news

26-Foot Sperm Whale Found Dead With Nearly 50 Pounds of Plastic in Stomach
(MILAN) — An 8-meter (26-foot) sperm whale was found dead off Sardinia with 22 kilograms (48.5 pounds) of plastic in its belly, prompting the World Wildlife Foundation to sound an alarm Monday over the dangers of plastic waste in the Mediterranean Sea. The environmental group said the garbage recovered from the sperm whale’s stomach included a corrugated tube for electrical works, plastic plates, shopping bags, tangled fishing lines and a washing detergent package with its bar code still legible. The female whale beached off the northern coast of Sardinia last week, within the vast Pelagos marine sanctuary that...
Source: TIME: Science - April 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: COLLEEN BARRY / AP Tags: Uncategorized Environment onetime Source Type: news

Watch a Piece of Glacier the Size of a Skyscraper Crash Into the Ocean in This Clip From Netflix ’s Our Planet
Among the many wonders in Netflix’s new wildlife documentary series Our Planet, arguably the most awe-inspiring is a scene where almost no animals appear at all. In this exclusive clip from the show, which premieres April 5, cameras catch the moment when a chunk of ice the size of a skyscraper breaks off the Store Glacier in Greenland and tumbles into the ocean. As seabirds circle in the foreground, 75 million tons of crystalline ice cascade into the water below. “Glaciers have always released ice into the ocean,” says narrator David Attenborough. “But now this is happening nearly twice as fast as i...
Source: TIME: Science - March 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Dan Stewart Tags: Uncategorized climate change david attenborough Environment Netflix Science Source Type: news

David Attenborough Isn ’t Sure We Can Save the Natural World. But at 92, He’s Not Giving Up Trying
It’s the voice you notice first. In person, David Attenborough speaks in the same awestruck hush he has used in dozens of nature documentaries, a crisp half whisper that is often mimicked but seldom matched. Ninety-two years of use may have softened its edges, but still it carries the command of authority. Sitting in his home in the Richmond neighborhood of west London for one in a series of conversations, I feel compelled to drink a second cup of tea when he offers. It somehow seems wrong to say no. In his native U.K., Attenborough is held in the kind of esteem usually reserved for royalty. Over decades–first ...
Source: TIME: Science - March 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Dan Stewart Tags: Uncategorized Environment Source Type: news

Why NASA ’s Planned All-Female Spacewalk Really Fell Apart
NASA has long had a gender problem. The space agency that launched its first man into space in 1961 did not fly the first woman — astronaut Sally Ride — until 1983. Since then, more than 40 other American women have followed. It’s a figure that still compares poorly with the 300-some men who have earned their space wings, but the astronaut corps is at least sufficiently co-ed that the term “manned spaceflight” has finally been replaced with the gender-neutral “crewed.” One gender barrier that hasn’t been broken, however, is the all-female spacewalk, or “extravehicular a...
Source: TIME: Science - March 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized NASA onetime space Source Type: news

So Here ’s What NASA Has to Say About the Reaction to Cancelling the All-Female Spacewalk
NASA has cancelled its plans for an all-female spacewalk due to a lack of spacesuits that fit women astronauts. While Friday’s much-anticipated spacewalk will still take place, one of the two women scheduled for the journey, Anne C. McClain, will have to stay back. A man will accompany astronaut Christina H. Koch in her place. Both McClain and Koch required medium spacesuit torso sections, and there is currently only one that is properly configured at the International Space Station, NASA said in a statement on Monday. Hillary Clinton was one of many people who had been looking forward to the historic mission and too...
Source: TIME: Science - March 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rachel E. Greenspan Tags: Uncategorized onetime space viral Source Type: news

NASA Nixes the Upcoming All-Women Spacewalk
Astronauts Christina Koch and Anne McClain were set to exit the International Space Station and make history together on March 29 with the first all-female spacewalk. But NASA has had to reshuffle the personnel partially because of a lack of correctly sized spacesuits, the agency said Tuesday. “Mission managers decided to adjust the assignments, due in part to spacesuit availability on the station,” NASA said in a statement. McClain, who went on a spacewalk on March 22, discovered that a medium-size spacesuit fits her best. Koch needs the same size spacesuit, but there’s only one currently available on th...
Source: TIME: Science - March 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hillary Leung Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space Source Type: news

U.S. Astronauts Take Multi-Hour Spacewalk to Replace Batteries on ISS
Two American astronauts took a spacewalk Friday to replace aging batteries on the International Space Station. NASA’s Anne McClain and Nick Hague are scheduled to work in space for several hours to swap out three old nickel-hydrogen batteries with more powerful lithium-ion batteries. The duo overcame minor struggles in their first task, which involved attaching a tool bag on one of the station’s trusses for possible future use. The station’s robotic arm did much of the heavy work already, but the astronauts still have to lug 300-pound adaptors the size of a large coffee table and reconnect attachments. Ev...
Source: TIME: Science - March 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: SETH BORENSTEIN / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

A 30-Million-Page Library Has Blast Off to the Moon as a ‘Civilization Backup’
An Israeli spacecraft currently on its way to the the moon is toting a 30-million-page “civilization backup,” according to NBC News. The ‘Lunar Library’ started its journey to outer space late February on a robotic lunar lander called Beresheet launched by SpaceX. The archive, which is housed on a metal disc about the size of a DVD, was created by the Arch Mission Foundation, a Los Angeles-based non-profit. The archive is intended to preserve records of human civilization for at least 6 billion years. The 200GB of data contained on the archive includes tens of thousands of fiction and non-fiction bo...
Source: TIME: Science - March 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Amy Gunia Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space Source Type: news

The USDA Forced Kittens to Become Cannibals for Research, Watchdog Report Says
A shocking watchdog report alleges that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) spent $22.5 million conducting “unnecessary and unjustifiable” research that involved killing cats and forcing “kitten cannibalism,” among other unsavory practices. The report — from the non-profit White Coat Waste Project, which opposes animal testing by the government, and former USDA scientist Jim Keen — says a large chunk of this research relates to toxoplasmosis, an illness spread by exposure to the Toxoplasma gondii parasite. As recently as 2015, the report says, the USDA purchased and killed cats and...
Source: TIME: Science - March 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research Source Type: news

There Will Be a Super Worm Moon on the Spring Equinox. Here ’s How to See It
Another month, another “supermoon”. On Wednesday, the “super worm moon”—the third supermoon of 2019 to be exact— will light up the sky in all its slightly-larger-than-usual glory. What makes this full moon extra special is that it is coinciding with the Spring Equinox, or the first day of spring in the northern hemisphere, a rare astronomical coincidence. For those who are exhausted by all the recents supermoons, the “super worm moon” will be the last supermoon of the year. However, for those who couldn’t get enough of February’s “super snow moon” or J...
Source: TIME: Science - March 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Wilder Davies Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

A Strong Earthquake Turned a High-Powered Telescope Into a Seismograph
Scientists have gotten awfully good at the business of seismography. At any moment, the Global Seismograph Network (GSM), a web of 150 instruments arrayed around the world, is reliably taking the pulse of the planet. There have been seismographs on the moon — sensitive enough to detect the footsteps of the astronauts who brought them there. A seismograph is currently at work on Mars, as part of the suite of instruments carried by NASA’s InSight lander. Now, science has stumbled across a new — and inadvertent — kind of seismography, with earthquakes recorded not by tracings on a screen or a paper str...
Source: TIME: Science - March 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized atacama desert Chile Earthquake La Silla Observatory satellites space stars Source Type: news

Scientists Threw a Smartphone in a Blender to Reveal the Contents
The latest results in scientific research have come from an unlikely machine: the blender. Scientists at the University of Plymouth in the United Kingdom wanted to investigate what materials were used to create an iPhone, so they turned to the friendly kitchen tool to blend a phone to dust. Then, the researchers added sodium peroxide, an oxidizer, and mixed the combination at nearly 500 degrees celsius — that’s more than 900 degrees fahrenheit. The brainchild of two geologists at the university, the project sought “to demonstrate why we should all take a keener interest in what is contained within everyda...
Source: TIME: Science - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rachel E. Greenspan Tags: Uncategorized Bizarre onetime Science viral Source Type: news

Google Celebrates Pi Day As Employee Calculates New World Record
Emma Haruka Iwao, a Google employee from Japan, calculated pi to new world record. Google announced the milestone on Thursday March 14, also known as Pi Day (3.14). Iwao calculated pi to 31 trillion digits (31,415,926,535,897), far outpacing the previous record of 24.6 trillion, set in 2016 by Peter Trueb. A Google employee broke the world record for calculating pi Google employee Emma Haruka Iwao used Google’s cloud computing service to break the world record for calculating pi, an infinite number vital to engineering. Most people will be familiar with the first few digits … pic.twitter.com/IlSWGnyu8x &mda...
Source: TIME: Science - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Madeline Roache Tags: Uncategorized Google pi space Source Type: news

Swedish Teen Climate Activist Greta Thunberg Has Been Nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize
Swedish environmental activist Greta Thunberg has been nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize in recognition of her work leading a youth campaign to halt climate change. Three Norwegian lawmakers put forth the 16-year-old’s name. “We have nominated Greta because the climate threat may be one of the most important causes of war and conflict,” parliamentary representative Freddy Andre Oevstegaard told Norwegian media outlet VG. “The massive movement Greta has set in motion is a very important peace contribution,” he added. The activist, who was named one of TIME’s Most Influential Teens of 2018...
Source: TIME: Science - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hillary Leung Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime overnight Source Type: news

Historic Undersea Exploration Broadcast Conducted from the Indian Ocean
(ALPHONSE ISLAND, Seychelles) — A British-led scientific mission to document changes taking place beneath the Indian Ocean has broadcast its first live, television-quality video transmission from a two-person submersible. Monsoon storms and fierce underwater currents continued to present a challenge at greater depths as scientific work began in earnest on Tuesday off the Seychelles. The Associated Press has successfully broadcast the first multi-camera live signal in full broadcast quality from manned submersibles using optical video transmission techniques, in which the pictures transmit through the waves using the ...
Source: TIME: Science - March 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: DAVID KEYTON and JERRY HARMER / AP Tags: Uncategorized Indian Ocean ocean exploration onetime Source Type: news

Want to Stop Climate Change? Then It ’s Time to Fall Back in Love With Nuclear Energy
Exactly eight years ago, an earthquake off the east coast of Japan set a massive tsunami on a collision course with the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The wall of water overwhelmed the reactors’ cooling mechanisms and over the next four days the plant suffered three nuclear meltdowns. It became the world’s worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl. In response, Germany, Switzerland and some others around the world accelerated their plans to ditch nuclear power as an energy source. Nuclear power is virtually free of emissions. By contrast, we burn coal and gas at industrial scale to make electricity, pumpin...
Source: TIME: Science - March 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hans Blix Tags: Uncategorized Environment Source Type: news