Mars Was Always Destined to Die
Mars is the solar system’s near-miss world. Earth may have gotten everything right when it came to sustaining life—atmosphere, water, proximity to the sun. Mercury, Venus and the outer planets, with their extreme temperatures and inhospitable chemistry, may have gotten everything wrong. Mars, on the other hand, came so close, yet fell short. Thanks to data from rovers and other spacecraft, we know that the Red Planet once fairly sloshed with water—with dry deltas, riverbeds, and sea basins stamped into its surface. But 4 billion years ago, the Martian core cooled, shutting down the dynamo that sustained i...
Source: TIME: Science - September 21, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Space Source Type: news

7 Questions With Record-Setting Italian Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti
Odds are you can’t account for where you were on every one of the 200 days that elapsed from November 23, 2014 to June 11, 2015. But Samantha Cristoforetti can, since she spent them all aboard the International Space Station. Cristoforetti, Italy’s first female astronaut, set what was then a record for single-mission duration by a woman in space—and that achievement was just one in a lifetime of them. A former captain in the Italian Air Force, Cristoforetti won her fighter pilot’s wings in 2006, after earning a Master’s degree in mechanical engineering. She has been awarded the Order of Merit...
Source: TIME: Science - September 20, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Thinking of Investing in a Green Fund? Many Don ’t Live Up to Their Promises, a New Report Claims
The number of green investment funds is skyrocketing, but many are investing in companies that aren’t aligned with the goals of the Paris Agreement. That’s according to a report published on Aug. 27 by InfluenceMap. The London-based climate change think tank accused the majority of green funds of falling short. InfluenceMap assessed 723 equity funds—with over $330 billion in total net assets—marketed using environmental, social and governance (ESG) claims and climate-related key words. It concluded that more than half of the climate-themed funds, which describe themselves with phrases like “lo...
Source: TIME: Science - September 20, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Amy Gunia Tags: Uncategorized biztech2030 climate change Climate Is Everything Explainer overnight Source Type: news

Rich Nations to Miss Climate Fund Goal Even by 2025
Developed countries’ pledges to provide $100 billion of annual financing, made over a decade ago and seen as key to unlocking upcoming climate talks, are unlikely to be met even five years after the target, according to a new report. That not only threatens the success at the United Nations climate talks in Glasgow starting in weeks, but also the aim of limiting global warming to 1.5 degree Celsius as part of the Paris Agreement, Oxfam International said in a study. “Wealthy nations must live up to their promise made 12 years ago and put their money where their mouths are,” said Nafkote Dabi, global clima...
Source: TIME: Science - September 20, 2021 Category: Science Authors: John Ainger / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized biztech2030 bloomberg wire climate change Londontime Source Type: news

Inspiration4 Crew Safely Splashes Down Off Florida Coast
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Four space tourists safely ended their trailblazing trip to orbit Saturday with a splashdown in the Atlantic off the Florida coast. Their SpaceX capsule parachuted into the ocean just before sunset, not far from where their chartered flight began three days earlier. The all-amateur crew was the first to circle the world without a professional astronaut. The billionaire who paid undisclosed millions for the trip and his three guests wanted to show that ordinary people could blast into orbit by themselves, and SpaceX founder Elon Musk took them on as the company’s first rocket-riding touris...
Source: TIME: Science - September 19, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Space wire Source Type: news

Prince William Unveils Finalists for Environmental Prize
Prince William announced 15 inaugural finalists Friday for the Earthshot Prize, his ambitious global environmental award that aims to find new ideas and technologies to tackle climate change, air pollution and the Earth’s most pressing challenges. The finalists include a 14-year-old student who proposes using solar energy to replace charcoal to power millions of roadside ironing carts in India; a land-based coral farm in the Bahamas to restore dying coral reefs; a community project in Congo devoted to protecting gorillas; and a Kenyan enterprise that turns organic waste into fertilizer and insect protein for farmers....
Source: TIME: Science - September 17, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sylvia Hui / Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized climate change Londontime royals Sustainability United Kingdom wire Source Type: news

Moderna ’s Case for a COVID-19 Booster Shot: Its Vaccine Protection Wanes by 36% After 12 Months, According to a New Study
Studies from COVID-19 vaccine makers and public health officials have been suggesting for a while that protection provided by the vaccines wanes over time. In a new study published on Sept. 15 to a preprint server—the study is not yet peer-reviewed—researchers at Moderna, which makes one of the two mRNA COVID-19 vaccines (the other is from Pfizer-BioNTech), report that people vaccinated within the last eight months had 36% fewer breakthrough infections than those who were vaccinated a year ago. That suggests vaccine-induced immunity is likely highest shortly after people get their recommended two doses of the v...
Source: TIME: Science - September 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Inspiration4 Makes Space History With First-Ever All-Civilian Orbital Launch
In the end, the camping trip up the flank of Mt. Rainier that the Inspiration4 crew made back in April may have done more than anything else to prepare them for tonight’s successful launch into Earth orbit, at 8:02 p.m. ET from pad 39A at Cape Canaveral, Florida. Even the day before the launch, at a T-minus-27-hour press conference, they were still talking about the experience and what it taught them. Hayley Arceneaux, 29, a physician assistant at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and who tonight became the first person to fly in space with a prosthetic—a rod in place of her left femur, which she lost...
Source: TIME: Science - September 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Space Source Type: news

Watch Live as the Inspiration4 Crew Launches to Space for the First All-Civilian Orbital Mission
Are you ready to go to space? Join TIME and Netflix as we bring you the launch of Inspiration4—the first-ever all-civilian orbital mission—live. The Inspiration4 crew, including mission commander Jared Issacman, mission pilot and geoscience professor Dr. Sian Proctor, payload specialist and Lockheed Martin aerospace engineer Chris Sembroski, and medical officer and St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital physician assistant Hayley Arceneaux, has been training for the mission for months. The team has spent hours upon hours in simulators and classrooms, and now they’re ready for the real deal, launchin...
Source: TIME: Science - September 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: TIME Staff Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Why a Warming Arctic Has the U.S. Coast Guard Worried About the Rest of the Country
One of the perks of going out on a U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker in the Arctic is something called Ice Liberty. Ports are few and far between when you’re north of the Arctic Circle, so instead of shore leave, Coastguardsmen and women will locate a large slab of floating ice, cordon off a safe area, put up a watch for polar bears, and throw a football around. It’s cold, but worth it, says electrician master chief Mark Hulen, who, over the past two decades, has gone out for Ice Liberty on every one of his last six Arctic missions with the Coast Guard. But this year, as the Coast Guard cutter Healy —one of two...
Source: TIME: Science - September 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Aryn Baker Tags: Uncategorized climate change healthscienceclimate Londontime overnight Source Type: news

Cities Have Firefighters and Trash Collectors. As the Climate Breaks Down, Do They Also Need Resilience Corps?
When Hurricane Ida hit New Orleans in early September, Tonya Freeman-Brown made the difficult decision to stay in the city. The 53 year-old and her family sheltered in an old brick hotel in the downtown area, watching fierce winds of up to 150 mph pelt rainwater at the windows, and remembering the destruction wrought by Hurricane Katrina, 16 years earlier to the day. It was stressful, but Freeman-Brown had a job to do, she says. “We’re no match for nature, but this is what we’ve trained for. This is what the Resilience Corps was built for.” Like firefighters put out fires, and waste collectors keep ...
Source: TIME: Science - September 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent Tags: Uncategorized climate change feature healthscienceclimate Londontime Source Type: news

A Climate Change-Induced Landslide Is Wreaking Havoc on Denali National Park
For decades, the rangers at Denali National Park in Alaska were easily winning their battle against a slow-moving landslide underneath the park’s only road. Now, due in part to the effects of climate change, they are losing very badly. This summer, the National Parks Service has been frantically dropping 100 dump-trucks-worth of gravel every week on the top of the Pretty Rocks Landslide in an effort to keep up with its accelerating pace, which is the result of rapidly thawing permafrost in the country’s fastest-warming state. Two weeks ago, as the landslide hit unprecedented speed, causing the ground around it ...
Source: TIME: Science - September 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Andrew R. Chow / Denali, Alaska Tags: Uncategorized climate change Source Type: news

A Climate Solution Lies Deep Under the Ocean —But Accessing It Could Have Huge Environmental Costs
Scattered three miles deep along the floor of the central Pacific are trillions of black, misshapen nuggets that may just be the solution to an impending energy crisis. Similar in size and appearance to partially burned charcoal briquettes, the nuggets are called polymetallic nodules, and are an amalgamation of nickel, cobalt, manganese and other rare earth metals, formed through a complex biochemical process in which shark teeth and fish bones are encased by minerals accreted out of ocean waters over millions of years. Marine biologists say they are part of one of the least-understood environments on earth, holding, if no...
Source: TIME: Science - September 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Aryn Baker Tags: Uncategorized climate change Environment feature healthscienceclimate Magazine Source Type: news

Hurricane Ida Raises the Question: How Can Cities Keep Subways Safe in an Era of Climate Crisis Flooding?
As the remnants of Hurricane Ida passed over the northeast Wednesday night, dumping a record-shattering 3.15 inches of rain on New York City in a single hour, water began to pour into the city’s subways. The system flooded in 46 locations and the MTA cut service across all lines overnight. Rescue operations had to be carried out to reach those unlucky enough to be caught in at least 15 subway cars stranded by flood waters and hundreds more people were rescued by police from stations. No one was injured, the MTA said. The worst of the storm, which prompted city authorities to issue New York’s first ever flash fl...
Source: TIME: Science - September 3, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent Tags: Uncategorized climate change healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Nursing Home COVID-19 Vaccine Mandates Protect The Most Vulnerable, But Pose a Hidden Threat to Residents
Some two weeks before U.S. President Joe Biden announced on Aug. 18 that nursing homes must require their staff to get vaccinated or risk losing their Medicare and Medicaid funding, Genesis HealthCare, which manages about 250 facilities nationwide that offer long-term care and other services, had said its workers would need to be vaccinated. “The growing spread of the Delta variant makes clear that we need to increase our vaccination rates substantially to better protect our patients, residents and employees,” read an Aug. 2 memo to employees, noting that 65% of staffers were vaccinated at that point; employees...
Source: TIME: Science - September 2, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Can Hurricane Ida Move Public Opinion on Climate Change?
A version of this story first appeared in the Climate is Everything newsletter. If you’d like sign up to receive this free once-a-week email, click here. For many climate reporters, myself included, the arrival of Hurricane Ida brought a recognizable pit to the stomach. The details of the stories emerging as the storm barreled toward the Gulf Coast were new—of course—but they all had a familiar ring to them from the storms I’ve covered in the past decade. Ida offered an example of how climate change is making hurricanes stronger. The storm demonstrated the bigger trend of extreme weather harming th...
Source: TIME: Science - September 2, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

U.S. Civil Engineers Bent the Rules to Give New Orleans Extra Protection from Hurricanes. Those Adjustments Might Have Saved the City During Ida
In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, which hit New Orleans in late August 2005, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers was tasked with building a new flood-defense network. Congress allocated billions of dollars to build pumps, dikes and floodwalls for a system meant to withstand a so-called “100-year storm.” That’s typical. In building flood protection, engineers can’t guarantee their designs can survive every possible weather event. Instead, they often build to a standard based on the 100-year storm, an extreme weather event with a 1% probability of occurring in any given year, calculated statisticall...
Source: TIME: Science - September 2, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized climate change healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Rising Heat Is Making It Harder to Work in the U.S., and the Costs to the Economy Will Soar With Climate Change
Rising extreme heat will make it increasingly hard for workers to do their jobs, shaving hundreds of billions of dollars off the U.S. economy each year. That’s according to a report published Tuesday by the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht-Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center, a Washington D.C.-based think tank focused on climate adaptation. It’s a stark warning about the costs of failing to act on climate change. Productivity losses due to heat currently cost the U.S. an estimated $100 billion a year, the report claims. As days of extreme heat become more frequent in the years ahead, that figure is ...
Source: TIME: Science - August 31, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent Tags: Uncategorized climate change Londontime Source Type: news

Yes, We Can Grow 1 Trillion Trees to Help Fight Climate Change
We are in a planetary emergency. Horrific heat waves and fires blaze across North America, Turkey and Russia. Extreme floods wreak destruction and cause death from Europe to Africa to Asia. Ocean temperatures and the amount of carbon in our atmosphere have reached unprecedented highs. July was the hottest month in recorded history. Our planet, as the United Nations recently warned, is flashing a “code red for humanity.” There is no single solution to a crisis this large. Nations must fulfill the commitments they made under the Paris Agreement. Industries need to decarbonize, and businesses—especially the ...
Source: TIME: Science - August 27, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jad Daley and Marc Benioff Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

California ’s Wildfire Problem Could Be Solved by a Few Legal Changes
A version of this story first appeared in the Climate is Everything newsletter. If you’d like sign up to receive this free once-a-week email, click here. It’ll take billions of dollars, tens of thousands of new forestry workers, and a systematic rethink of the way we build homes and manage the land to solve some parts of California’s wildfire crisis. Other aspects might be fixed with a paper and pen. As a series of conflagrations burn through much of California, displacing thousands and filling skies with smoke, it might seem strange to say that changes to a few statutes could make a difference. Indeed, ...
Source: TIME: Science - August 26, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized climate change healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Villagers in Siberia, Facing Wildfires and a Warming Climate, Battle to Protect their Homes
This summer, as a haze of wildfire smoke descended on the village of Magaras in the East Siberian region of Yakutia, crews of local residents set out into the taiga forest to defend their land from the encroaching flames. There was little in the way of protective clothing to go around, and no radios or GPS transponders, let alone firefighting aircraft to stop the blazes around this settlement of around 1,000 people. Locals made do with shovels, axes, and small fire-fighting pumps that they carried on their backs, along with their tractors, some dating back to the Soviet era, which they used to cut ditches into the vegetati...
Source: TIME: Science - August 26, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized climate change healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

I ’m Supposed To Be in a Wedding. Will I Risk Bringing COVID-19 Home to My Kids?
Welcome to COVID Questions, TIME’s advice column. We’re trying to make living through the pandemic a little easier, with expert-backed answers to your toughest coronavirus-related dilemmas. While we can’t and don’t offer medical advice—those questions should go to your doctor—we hope this column will help you sort through this stressful and confusing time. Got a question? Write to us at covidquestions@time.com. Today, A.S. in Wisconsin asks: My best friend is getting married in September and I’m in the wedding. I just found out at least one of the groomsmen has refused to be vaccin...
Source: TIME: Science - August 24, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID Questions COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

UAE Unlikely to Set Net-Zero Emissions Target Before COP26
The United Arab Emirates is unlikely to set a net-zero emissions target before the COP26 talks starting in October, dealing a potential blow to the climate event. While the country is considering such a goal, its extreme heat and dry conditions make reducing greenhouse gas emissions difficult because plenty of energy is needed for cooling and desalination, according to a senior Ministry of Climate Change and Environment official. “Don’t expect us to announce anything by the COP26, but we are considering a net-zero target like any other part of the world,” Qais Al Suwaidi, head of the ministry’s clim...
Source: TIME: Science - August 24, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Verity Ratcliffe / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized bloomberg wire climate change Londontime Source Type: news

In the Face of Climate Change, We Must Act So That We Can Feel Hopeful —Not the Other Way Around
In the 1850s, an American scientist named Eunice Foote deduced, based on experiments she’d conducted, that if carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere were higher, the planet would be warmer. And in the 1890s, a Swedish chemist named Svante Arrhenius calculated, by hand, exactly how much the earth would warm as carbon dioxide levels. By the 1990s, the influence of human activities on the planet was obvious. The first United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assessment report not only tracked the observed increase in carbon dioxide and its impact on global temperatures, melting ice and sea...
Source: TIME: Science - August 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Katharine Hayhoe Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The Auto Industry Is Going Green. Will Workers Go Along for the Ride?
Wandering around the sprawling 6.2 million-sq.-ft. Lordstown Motors assembly plant in Ohio, it’s tempting to imagine a green future that is full of jobs. The company’s signature product is a high-performing electric pickup truck, and around the facility workers are buzzing about, getting ready to bring it into production. In one corner, according to company officials giving TIME a rare tour, the firm will build its cutting-edge motors, which will be located in each wheel. A short golf-cart ride away, engineers explain how the company will assemble the lithium-ion battery packs that will power the trucks instead...
Source: TIME: Science - August 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized Davos Davos 2021 feature Labor Magazine Special Project Sustainability Source Type: news

As the Auto Industry Shifts Green, Will Its Workers Be Left Behind?
Wandering around the sprawling 6.2 million-sq.-ft. Lordstown Motors assembly plant in Ohio, it’s tempting to imagine a green future that is full of jobs. The company’s signature product is a high-performing electric pickup truck, and around the facility workers are buzzing about, getting ready to bring it into production. In one corner, according to company officials giving TIME a rare tour, the firm will build its cutting-edge motors, which will be located in each wheel. A short golf-cart ride away, engineers explain how the company will assemble the lithium-ion battery packs that will power the trucks instead...
Source: TIME: Science - August 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized Davos feature Labor Magazine Special Project Sustainability Source Type: news

Four Civilian Astronauts. Three Days in Orbit. One Giant Leap. Meet the Inspiration4 Crew
TIME Studios is producing the Netflix documentary series Countdown: Inspiration 4 Mission to Space, starting Sept. 6. Jared Isaacman is not likely to forget the day he almost died at 10,000 ft., back in 2011. He was flying closely alongside three others, all in L-39 fighter jets, tearing along at 460 m.p.h. over the desert southwest of Las Vegas. The group, part of Isaacman’s Black Diamonds aerobatic team, was rehearsing for an air show and trying to come up with a flashy new finish. What they decided on called for flying in a square formation and then suddenly veering toward one another, before pulling back at the l...
Source: TIME: Science - August 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Magazine Space Special Project Source Type: news

Four Civilian Astronauts. Three Days in Orbit. One Giant Leap. Meet the Inspiration4 Crew
Jared Isaacman is not likely to forget the day he almost died at 10,000 ft., back in 2011. He was flying closely alongside three others, all in F-14 Tomcats, tearing along at 460 m.p.h. over the desert southwest of Las Vegas. The group, part of Isaacman’s Black Diamonds aerobatic team, was rehearsing for an air show and trying to come up with a flashy new finish. What they decided on called for flying in a square formation and then suddenly veering toward one another, before pulling back at the last second. It would be a nifty thing to watch go right—and a terrible thing to watch go wrong. [time-brightcove not-...
Source: TIME: Science - August 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Magazine Space Special Project Source Type: news

Meet the All-Civilian Crew of Inspiration4, From a St. Jude ’s Physician Assistant to a Lockheed Martin Engineer
Astronauts are accustomed to celebrity status, and Jared Isaacman, 41, is learning that truth first-hand. Isaacman is the billionaire CEO of Shift4 Payments, an online payment company, who bought all four seats aboard a SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft and, come September, will command Inspiration4, the first orbital space mission crewed entirely by non-professional astronauts. But if Isaacman’s name is becoming increasingly well-known in space circles, those of the other crew members are less so. Here’s a look at who they are, how they were selected to make their improbable journey, and what they hope to accompli...
Source: TIME: Science - August 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Magazine Space Special Project Source Type: news

St. Jude ’s Fundraising Chief on Space Missions, ‘Pushing Boundaries’ and a Record-Setting Year
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, which looks after children with cancer while also researching how to eliminate the pediatric form of the disease, raised $2 billion in donations in its last fiscal year. It’s a record for an independent charity, and an impressive feat in a year when donors had more causes than ever vying for their attention and money. Richard Shadyac, the CEO of the American Lebanese Syrian Associated Charities (St. Jude’s fundraising organization), attributes that success to a nimble pivot to different fundraising strategies—one of which was a collaboration with Inspiration4,...
Source: TIME: Science - August 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Belinda Luscombe Tags: Uncategorized Magazine Space Special Project Source Type: news

The Latest IPCC Report Says We ’re Probably Going to Pass the 1.5°C Climate Threshold. What’s Next?
Three years ago the United Nations climate science body issued a landmark report warning that the planet was on track to blow past efforts to limit global warming to 1.5°C above preindustrial levels, a threshold that it warned would bring catastrophic and irreversible effects of climate change. But in that same report, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) emphasized that many paths remained open for us to limit that damage—so long as we acted immediately. On Monday, the IPCC published a new document with a far less optimistic frame. In it, the group says that the pathway to limit warming to the 1....
Source: TIME: Science - August 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized climate change healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

The One Silver Lining in the Bleak IPCC Report
Discussion of such advancements may be mostly confined to an academic realm, but their overarching conclusions carry deep importance. To combat decades of disinformation and deep-pocketed PR machines of corporate players with a short-term interest in burning more fossil fuels, advocates and politicians need clear, unimpeachable scientific statements on which to base their policy proposals and arguments. That’s why the prominent inclusion of the new science of extreme event attribution in the new IPCC report is so important. Such definitive assessments of the role of climate change in creating wildfire conditions, for...
Source: TIME: Science - August 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized climate change healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

How the Inspiration4 Mission Fits Into the Long History of Civilian Space Travel
It’s been 52 years since the artist Jeff Gates made a reservation to go to the Moon. Like many who gathered around their TV sets to watch the first lunar landing on July 20, 1969, Gates—then a 20-year-old college student home for summer vacation—walked outside immediately afterward and looked skyward. “I kept saying, ‘there are human beings on that Moon!,’ says Gates, now 72. “It was unbelievable, and I wasn’t quite sure what to do with that feeling. But I wanted to be a part of that shared moment of exhilaration and amazement … It’s just human nature to want to...
Source: TIME: Science - August 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Olivia B. Waxman Tags: Uncategorized Space Special Project Source Type: news

The Language Of Climate Change Just Changed in a Major Way
In so many ways, not much has changed since the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)—perhaps the premiere climate science-and-policy organization in the world—published its last major report in 2014. Just as it was seven years ago, the latest edition, published on Aug. 8, is largely gloomy in outlook, with grim warnings of what the future looks like given the self-destructive trajectory to which humanity seems to have committed itself. However, there are some subtle differences that, on deeper investigation, are truly incredible, indicating just how far down the nightmarish path we ac...
Source: TIME: Science - August 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Elijah Wolfson Tags: Uncategorized climate change healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

‘Widespread and Severe.’ The Climate Crisis Is Here, But There’s Still Time to Limit the Damage
“Widespread and severe”—that’s how climate scientists from around the world have described the impacts of climate change in a new United Nations report published today. The report’s findings further affirm warnings scientists like me have been sharing for decades. More than three decades ago, during a congressional hearing on a hot July 1988 afternoon in Washington, D.C., Dr. James E. Hansen told our elected officials that it was already possible to detect a warming of the planet due primarily to an increase in carbon dioxide concentrations from fossil fuel burning. Hansen was prescient. It wo...
Source: TIME: Science - August 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Michael E. Mann Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The Bipartisan Infrastructure Deal Is a Return to the Old Way of Politics. That ’s A Problem for the Climate
The bipartisan infrastructure package being negotiated in the Senate promises to fund some important climate programs, with sizable expenditures for cleaning up abandoned oil wells, replacing lead pipes and repairing roads and bridges. The $50 billion in climate resilience funding will protect people from the storms, droughts, floods and other extreme weather events made worse by climate change. Unfortunately, it will do little to address the coal, oil and gas use that is driving climate change. Even worse, many sections, if not removed, will actively make it worse. The looming bipartisan infrastructure deal, if it passes,...
Source: TIME: Science - August 6, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Michael E. Mann Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Inside the SpaceX Crew Dragon: Here ’s How the Inspiration4 Crew Will Fly to Space
Here’s how you fly a SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft: Climb aboard; strap yourself in; close the hatch; fly to space. The Dragon takes care of everything, so relax and enjoy the ride—unless, of course, something goes wrong, and in space, something can always go wrong. So here’s how you prepare for that possibility: Spend months of 60-hour weeks in classrooms and simulators; master hundreds of pages of technical specs and procedures; learn the workings of dozens of systems and subsystems aboard the spacecraft; train for emergencies ranging from communications blackouts to navigation failures to on-board fir...
Source: TIME: Science - August 6, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Space Special Project Source Type: news

The World Has Been On Fire For the Past Month. Here ’s What It Looks Like
Flames light up hillsides in British Columbia. Smoke swells over highways into Athens. A swimming pool in California is surrounded by charred rubble. Thick forests in Siberia lie shriveled and brown. Countries across the northern hemisphere this summer are experiencing the worst wildfires in years of recorded history, with large swaths of land and entire towns in Europe, North America and Russia consumed by flames since the start of July. Though many of these countries are used to summer fire seasons, climate change is making the hot, dry conditions that allow fires to catch and spread more common and more intense. [time-b...
Source: TIME: Science - August 5, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent Tags: Uncategorized climate change healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

From Civilians to Astronauts: How the Inspiration4 Crew Trained to Go to Space
If you want to go to space, Inspiration4 commander Jared Issacman believes, it helps to climb a mountain first, in order to bond as a group over a shared physical struggle. Any mountain will do, really, but for the crew of Inspiration4—the first all-civilian team bound for orbital space, set to fly aboard a SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft next month—it was Mt. Rainier, the 14,100-ft. volcanic peak in western Washington State. “I wanted them to get comfortable with being uncomfortable,” says Isaacman, 39, “because not everything about space will be comfortable.” If that’s what he wan...
Source: TIME: Science - August 5, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Space Special Project Source Type: news

Populations are Booming in Flood-Prone Areas —Especially in Developing Countries
The number of people living in flood-prone areas is growing faster than in other places, and at a much faster rate than scientists had previously expected, a study published Aug. 4 in the journal Nature finds. It’s a worrying sign that human settlements are not prepared for increased flood risks in the climate crisis. Researchers at Cloud to Street, a flood-tracking platform, used satellite images to estimate the scale of 913 large flood events across 119 countries, and the number of people exposed to them. They found that between 2000 and 2015, the total population living in areas exposed to flooding grew by between...
Source: TIME: Science - August 4, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent Tags: Uncategorized climate change healthscienceclimate Londontime Source Type: news

With Private Space Flight On the Rise, Who Gets to Be Called ‘Astronaut?’
On Sept. 15, if all goes according to plan, Jared Isaacman—the billionaire CEO of Shift4 Payments—and three other private citizens will strap into a SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft—all four seats paid for by Isaacman—and blast off for orbit on the mission dubbed Inspiration4. Three days later they will return to Earth. Unlike most of the rest of us, they will have spent time off of the planet. But will that earn them the label of “astronaut?” Time was, it was easy to recognize an astronaut. They were all test pilots, they wore silvery space suits and signature buzz cuts and they had perfec...
Source: TIME: Science - August 4, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Space Special Project Source Type: news

The First All-Civilian Team of Astronauts Is Headed to Orbit. Here ’s What to Know About the Inspiration4 Mission
The prospect of space travel will feel much different after the Inspiration4 mission—the first orbital mission with an all-civilian crew—launches this fall. Once that happens, the history of human spaceflight will instantly be divided into two eras. There will have been the six decades after the first human circled above the Earth in 1961, when orbital space was mostly a realm solely for nation-states and their hand-picked astronauts. And then there will be the post-2021 era following Inspiration4, when space travel will come definitively within the grasp of private corporations and citizens—an era in whi...
Source: TIME: Science - August 4, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized Space Special Project Source Type: news

MRNA ’s Next Chapter Has Nothing to Do With COVID-19 Vaccines
It’s safe to say that before the development of the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, most people hadn’t thought about messenger RNA, or mRNA, since high school science class—if ever. The molecule plays a pivotal role in the body, carrying the recipes for making various proteins to the parts of cells that produce them. But “mRNA” wasn’t exactly a common phrase until Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna harnessed the genetic material’s power to teach the body to make a piece of a protein found on the COVID-19 virus’ surface, thus training it to fight the real thing, were i...
Source: TIME: Science - August 2, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate medicine Source Type: news

Now Is Our Chance to Rebuild U.S. Public Schools To Address Both Climate Change and Racial Inequality
When school facilities closed for in-person learning in early March 2020, the assumption was that the shutdown and pandemic would be temporary blips in the memory of our students. Some 16 months later, school facilities are finally preparing to re-open for in-person learning. We could go about business as usual, but after the devastation of the pandemic, and the increasingly widespread climate-change-linked weather disasters, it’s obvious we should not. Emerging from the crisis of COVID-19 gives us an opportunity to rethink our public schools, to simultaneously the structural inequalities that pervade the system, and...
Source: TIME: Science - July 30, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Akira Drake Rodriguez, Erika Kitzmiller and Daniel Aldana Cohen Tags: Uncategorized climate change COVID-19 Source Type: news

The ‘Overview Effect’ Forever Changes Some Astronauts’ Attitudes Towards Earth—But You Don’t Need to Go to Space to Experience It
The best way to appreciate the planet fully is to leave the planet entirely. To inhabit a world is to get awfully used to it. The sky is up there—big as ever. The ground is down there—solid as ever. The ocean is over that way. Canada is up the other way. There are happy places—Paris, Bora Bora. There are parts of the world—North Korea, Afghanistan—where people suffer tremendously. Our own place in all of that determines who we become. We’re like wine grapes; we have a terroir, a home soil that flavors us and changes us, and once we’ve become one thing it’s hard to become&mdas...
Source: TIME: Science - July 30, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Climate Disasters Are Making It Hard to Enjoy the Olympics. And I ’m Not Sure I Want to, Anyway
A version of this story first appeared in the Climate is Everything newsletter. If you’d like sign up to receive this free once-a-week email, click here. As the U.S. approached a coronavirus peak last July, a noticeably eerie Disney World reopening advertisement began making the rounds online. Cases were rising, driven by a false sense of security in much of the country and bad faith arguments around masking and social distancing. But at Disney World, the sun was shining, and rides were open. Low-paid service workers waved while wearing surgical masks, apparently thrilled (or at least willing) to come in contact wit...
Source: TIME: Science - July 29, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized climate change healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

We ’re in a Water Crisis. We Need to Act Like It
One of the greatest lessons of the pandemic is that we can meet the challenges of existential threats when we combine the collective power of our creativity, innovation and industry. As the climate crisis worsens, we need to address protecting and preserving water with the same urgency that we put into creating vaccines. We need to act like lives are hanging in the balance—because they are. Water is already shaping our politics, our economy and our national security too. Whether it’s floods or droughts, storms or wildfires—too much water, or too little—water shapes lives in the United States and aro...
Source: TIME: Science - July 27, 2021 Category: Science Authors: José Andrés and Caryl Stern Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

This Vermont Utility Is Revolutionizing Its Power Grid to Fight Climate Change. Will the Rest of the Country Follow Suit?
Visitors entering a code-locked central control room at Green Mountain Power (GMP)’s Colchester, Vt., headquarters instinctively lower their voices, whispering in deference to operators relaying orders from behind semicircular clusters of screens. It’s an intimidating space; one side of the black-walled room is taken up by a display showing a sprawling, yellow-lit maze of connections and symbols: a map of electricity flowing across the local grid. Technicians here have the daunting job of managing that vast, interconnected network; controlling hundreds of breaker switches; monitoring solar and hydroelectric ele...
Source: TIME: Science - July 26, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza/Panton, Vt. Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

What Your Body Odor Says About You
When Annlyse Retiveau leaned in to sniff my armpits, I held my own breath as she inhaled. I’ve spent a vast majority of my life using products to avoid this precise critique—another human intentionally evaluating my armpit aroma. Yet, whether we like it or not, humans do smell each other, and we can glean useful social cues and health information from the body odor of others, albeit sometimes unconsciously. There’s nothing unconscious about Retiveau’s sniffing. As a professional nose at the New Jersey-based company Sensory Spectrum, she smells things for a living, to help companies assess the aromas...
Source: TIME: Science - July 21, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Everts Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Jeff Bezos Blasts Himself Off-Planet, Helping to Usher In a New Era of Space Tourism
Give Jeff Bezos this: When he builds a rocket, he rides the rocket, strapping his own mortal hide into a seat and test-flying what he’s developed before inviting paying passengers aboard to make the same journey. “If it’s not safe for me, it’s not safe for anyone,” Bezos said in a video segment released by Blue Origin, his private rocket company, before Tuesday morning’s first crewed launch of its New Shepard rocket on a suborbital lob shot that soared to an altitude of 106 km (66 mi.). Today, the rocket—which had previously flown 15 uncrewed missions to suborbital space—inde...
Source: TIME: Science - July 20, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news