What Neil Armstrong Biopic First Man Gets Right and Wrong About the Moon Landing
There are two ways of talking about the historical accuracy of First Man, the Damien Chazelle biopic of Apollo 11 commander Neil Armstrong, starring Ryan Gosling: the easy way and the hard way. The hard way is to explore all of the things the movie got right — which is a very, very long list. The easy way is to discuss the things it got wrong, which you could count on one hand — literally. It is one of the many triumphs of First Man that it tells an exceedingly complicated story of an exceedingly complicated man — a story populated by dozens of other important figures — and does so almost entirely w...
Source: TIME: Science - October 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized movies onetime space Source Type: news

What Made Neil Armstrong the Right Man to Be First on the Moon, as Told in 1969
Neil Armstrong’s stoic nature and personal challenges are at the center of Damien Chazelle’s new film First Man, in which Ryan Gosling portrays the legendary moon walker. As Armstrong, Gosling brings out the astronaut’s quiet side — one that his contemporaries couldn’t help but notice. A 1969 profile of the Apollo 11 crew in TIME calls Armstrong “tight-lipped and phlegmatic” as well as “an inscrutable loner.” His wife Janet told LIFE at the time: “Silence is a Neil Armstrong answer. The word no is an argument.” But beneath the quiet surface, Armstrong had a ...
Source: TIME: Science - October 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized movies neil armstrong onetime space Source Type: news

How Neil Armstrong ’s Moon Spacesuit Was Preserved for Centuries to Come
What might be the most celebrated suit of clothing ever made cost an awful lot for the exceedingly short time it was used. The price tag: $670,000 in 2018 dollars. The useful life: about two and a half hours. The clothing in question: the spacesuit Neil Armstrong wore when he stepped on the moon 50 years ago next July. On Earth, the suit—complete with its life-supporting backpack—weighed about 180 pounds, but fortunately it wasn’t intended to be used principally on Earth. It was meant for the one-sixth gravity of the moon, where it would tip the scales at only 30 pounds. Marco Grob for TIMENearly 50 yea...
Source: TIME: Science - October 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

The Good News Buried in Thursday ’s Soyuz Rocket Failure
One of the most technologically beautiful things you’ll ever see is a Soyuz rocket screwing up. Soyuz rockets don’t screw up often — another beautiful thing — but one did Thursday at 2:40 PM local time, over the steppes of Kazakhstan. What unfolded was a master class in how things go right when things go wrong. The rocket was intended to carry veteran Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin and rookie NASA astronaut Tyler “Nick” Hague up to low-Earth orbit for a six month stay aboard the International Space Station (ISS), joining a crew of two astronauts and one cosmonaut already aboard. Two a...
Source: TIME: Science - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

U.S. and Russian Astronauts Safe After Making Emergency Landing When Booster Rocket Failed on Launch
(BAIKONUR, Kazakhstan) — Two astronauts from the U.S. and Russia were safe after an emergency landing Thursday in the steppes of Kazakhstan following the failure of a Russian booster rocket carrying them to the International Space Station. NASA astronaut Nick Hague and Roscosmos’ Alexei Ovchinin lifted off as scheduled at 2:40 p.m. (0840 GMT; 4:40 a.m. EDT) Thursday from the Russia-leased Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan atop a Soyuz booster rocket. Roscosmos and NASA said the three-stage Soyuz booster suffered an emergency shutdown of its second stage. The capsule jettisoned from the booster and went into ...
Source: TIME: Science - October 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Dmitry Lovetsky / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space Source Type: news

Hurricane Michael Is the Third Most Powerful Storm to Ever Hit the U.S. Mainland
Hurricane Michael made landfall in Mexico Beach, Fla. on Wednesday with sustained winds of 155 miles per hour. That put it just shy of a Category 5 hurricane, which would require wind speeds of 157 mph, but Michael is nevertheless one of the strongest storms to ever strike the American mainland. Michael was continuing to intensify even as it made landfall Wednesday, an unusual phenomenon that surprised some experts. Hurricanes typically lose power as they move inland away from the warm waters that fuel them and encounter less favorable wind conditions. “I think that if people are comparing storms, what was really fas...
Source: TIME: Science - October 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gina Martinez Tags: Uncategorized hurricane michael onetime weather Source Type: news

Hurricane Michael Strengthens Into Category 2 As it Barrels Towards Florida
MIAMI — Hurricane Michael swiftly intensified into a Category 2 over warm Gulf of Mexico waters Tuesday amid fears it would strike Florida on Wednesday as a major hurricane. Mandatory evacuations were issued as beach dwellers rushed to board up homes just ahead of what could be a devastating hit. A hurricane hunter plane that bounced into the swirling eye off the western tip of Cuba found wind speeds rising. By 8 a.m. Tuesday, top winds had reached 100 mph (155 kph), and it was forecast to strengthen more, with winds topping 111 mph (179 kph), capable of causing devastating damage. Gov. Rick Scott warned people acro...
Source: TIME: Science - October 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

The Entire Florida Panhandle Is Now Under a Hurricane Warning As Michael Approaches
The entire Florida Panhandle is under a hurricane warning Tuesday as Hurricane Michael moves north across the Gulf of Mexico, according to the National Hurricane Center. As of 5 a.m. ET, the center of the storm, which became a hurricane on Monday, was located around 390 miles south of Apalachicola, Fl. A Hurricane Warning is in effect from the Alabalma-Florida border down to the Suwanee River. Hurricane conditions are expected along the Gulf Coast by Wednesday, with tropical storm conditions arriving as early as Tuesday night. The southeastern coast, from Fernandina Beach, Fl. to Santee River, S.C. is also under a tropical...
Source: TIME: Science - October 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

Here ’s What Humanity Must Do Immediately to Prevent Catastrophic Climate Change, According to the New U.N. Report
A landmark United Nations report on Monday warned that sufficiently limiting man-made global warming will “require rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society” in order to avoid dramatic global consequences, including rising sea levels, dying coral reefs and human casualties due to extreme heat. The special report — published Monday by the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change — assessed what it will take to limit global temperature increase to no more than 2.7º F (1.5º C) above preindustrial levels, in accordance with the 2015 Paris Ag...
Source: TIME: Science - October 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Katie Reilly Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime Source Type: news

Why We Keep Ignoring Even the Most Dire Climate Change Warnings
You’d think the end of the world would be enough to get us scared. Humans have always been an exceedingly risk-averse species—which is how we came to survive as a species at all. If there are lions on one part of the savannah, we go to another. If crocodiles keep coming out of the river, we fish somewhere else. So when it comes to the loss of the entire planet, well, we ought to take action. And yet we don’t; we never do. That odd contradiction is on display again, in the wake of an announcement by the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change that a catastrophe is nigh—that th...
Source: TIME: Science - October 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized climate change Environment onetime Source Type: news

See Tropical Storm Michael From Space as It Becomes a Hurricane
Hurricane Michael is bringing heavy rain and strong winds to parts of Cuba and the threat of storm surge to Florida as it moves northeast toward the Gulf Coast, the National Hurricane Center said Monday. The storm is about 50 miles south of the western tip of Cuba. It’s moving north at about 7 miles per hour, with maximum sustained winds at 75 mph. The storm is expected to pass between Mexico and Cuba before heading toward Florida. Satellite imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) shows Michael moving toward Florida and the southeastern United States. NOAA After NOAA released the imag...
Source: TIME: Science - October 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

The U.N. ’s Climate Report Exposes How Badly Wrong Leaders Like Trump Have Got Climate Change
Climate change is a global challenge demanding global solutions. No one country can face it alone, no matter that nation’s political, economic or military might. From the richest to the poorest, we all share one planet, and we all have a stake in its survival. This is why the latest report from the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) makes for such alarming reading and demands immediate, concerted action from everyone — particularly our leaders. The report sets out starkly that, without a rapid change of course, global temperatures will rise above the 1.5°C level that scie...
Source: TIME: Science - October 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ban Ki-moon Tags: Uncategorized climate change paris agreement Source Type: news

Scientists Just Laid Out Paths to Solve Climate Change. We Aren ’t on Track to Do Any of Them
Climate scientists have understood for decades that unchecked, man-made global warming will wreak havoc on human civilization. The challenge has only grown more urgent as the scientific understanding expands and the world begins to feel the impacts. Now, a landmark U.N. report offers both a glimmer of hope and a giant warning. Scientists and policymakers have the knowhow to address climate change and stave off some of the worst effects of the phenomenon, but political leaders are nowhere close to fully undertaking any of these steps, the report shows. Scientists on the Nobel Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate...
Source: TIME: Science - October 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime Source Type: news

Man Uses Meteorite Worth $100,000 As Doorstop for 30 Years Before Finding Out It ’s a Very Big Deal
A meteorite in Michigan worth $100,000 has been holding open a door at a Michigan farm for the past 30 years. According to Central Michigan University, the 22-pound meteorite rock was brought in to be examined by an unnamed man who said he had been using it as a doorstop for several decades. CMU geology professor Mona Sirbescu said that this is the first time in her time at the university that a rock she has been asked to test actually turned out to be a meteorite. “For 18 years, the answer has been categorically ‘no’—meteor wrongs, not meteorites,” Sibescu said in a statement from CMU on Thur...
Source: TIME: Science - October 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Megan McCluskey Tags: Uncategorized space Source Type: news

Climate Change Could Destroy This Peruvian Farmer ’s Home. Now He’s Suing a European Energy Company for Damages
Climbing a snowcapped mountain in the predawn light, Saúl Luciano Lliuya says he could sense something changing. All his life, pristine glaciers have nestled between the peaks surrounding his hometown in the Cordillera Blanca region of the Peruvian Andes, providing water, work and beauty. “Now you can see it,” he says. “They’re disappearing.” The region’s glaciers are receding rapidly; as temperatures rise, thanks to greenhouse gases trapping heat in the earth’s atmosphere, ice accumulated over thousands of years has melted away in a single generation. Between 30% and 50% of...
Source: TIME: Science - October 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent / Hamburg Tags: Uncategorized Germany Source Type: news

This 8-Year-Old Girl Pulled a Pre-Viking-Era Sword From a Lake in Sweden
While swimming on her summer vacation, an eight-year-old girl wrested what she thought was a stick from a lake in Sweden. Instead, it turned out she had discovered a pre-Viking-era sword that archaeologists believe is over 1,000 years old. “It’s not every day that one steps on a sword in the lake!” Mikael Nordström from the Jönköpings Läns Museum told Swedish outlet The Local. According to the arts and cultural museum, the sword, which has preserved metal and wood around it, is about 33 inches long and believed to date back to the 5th or 6th century AD. “We are very keen to see ...
Source: TIME: Science - October 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Casey Quackenbush Tags: Uncategorized Archaeology onetime overnight Source Type: news

Capsule Carrying 3 Space Station Crew Members Lands Safely on Earth
(MOSCOW) — A Russian space capsule with three men onboard has safely landed in a barren steppe in Kazakhstan after a six-month mission aboard the International Space Station. The Soyuz MS-08 carrying Russia’s Oleg Artemyev and NASA’s Drew Feustel and Ricky Arnold touched down at 5.44 p.m. Kazakh time (1144 GMT). The two Americans performed three space walks to carry out maintenance during their 197-day stay at the orbiting lab. Artemyev conducted one spacewalk together with a fellow Russian. A NASA astronaut and a Russian cosmonaut are due to launch next week to join three astronauts who remain in the orb...
Source: TIME: Science - October 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

How Scientists Are Treating Breast Cancer Using the Immune System
As a pharmacist, Kathy James considers herself well educated about the importance of getting regular cancer screenings. Even though the 55-year-old had no history of cancer in her family, she never skipped her regular mammograms, and she gave herself regular breast exams. So she was dumbfounded when, during one of those self-exams in May 2017, she felt a marble-size lump in her left breast. A visit to the doctor confirmed it. “The radiologist came in with his hands in his pockets and looked down and said, ‘It doesn’t look good,'” James says. After a biopsy, James and her husband learned she had meta...
Source: TIME: Science - October 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized breast cancer news Frontiers of Medicine Source Type: news

Trump ’s Attack Against Christine Blasey Ford Mischaracterizes How Memory Works, Experts Say
President Donald Trump on Tuesday attacked Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when they were teenagers, for not remembering certain details about the alleged incident. “How did you get home? ‘I don’t remember,'” Trump said, imitating Ford. “How did you get there? ‘I don’t remember.'” Blasey Ford accused Kavanaugh of groping her and pinning her down on a bed during a gathering in Maryland in the 1980s, a charge Kavanaugh has denied. During her testimony in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee last week...
Source: TIME: Science - October 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Samantha Cooney Tags: Uncategorized memory onetime Source Type: news

3 Evolutionary Scientists Win Nobel Chemistry Prize
(STOCKHOLM) — Three researchers who “harnessed the power of evolution” to produce enzymes and antibodies that have led to a new best-selling drug and biofuels won the Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday. Frances Arnold of the California Institute of Technology was awarded half of the 9-million-kronor ($1.01 million) prize, while the other half will be shared by George Smith of the University of Missouri and Gregory Winter of the MRC molecular biology lab in Cambridge, England. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, which chose the winners, said Arnold, 62, conducted the first directed evolution of enzym...
Source: TIME: Science - October 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: JIM HEINTZ and DAVID KEYTON / AP Tags: Uncategorized nobel prize onetime Source Type: news

Physicist Donna Strickland on Her ‘Surreal’ Nobel Prize Win and the Challenges for Women in Science
Physicist Donna Strickland, a self-described “laser jock” who prefers to keep a low profile, won the Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday, becoming the third woman ever to do so — an achievement she described as “surreal.” “It’s hard for me to take it in right now,” Strickland tells TIME. “But I’m trying to enjoy it.” An associate professor at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, she spent the morning fielding emails from around the world, visiting with students who showed up at her door with congratulations, and discussing the Nobel Prize-winning resear...
Source: TIME: Science - October 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Katie Reilly Tags: Uncategorized Canada nobel prize onetime Science Source Type: news

Your Dog Is Probably Dumber Than You Think, a New Study Says
Your dog may be a good boy—but he’s not as smart as you think, a new research article suggests. Dogs have a unique set of cognitive abilities, but they’re not inherently smarter than other animals, says the new paper, which was published in the journal Learning & Behavior. “Dogs are special, but they’re not exceptional,” says co-author Britta Osthaus, a senior lecturer in psychology at Christ Church University in the UK. “They’re smart, but they’re not stand-out smart.” The research was inspired by lead author Stephen Lea’s prior role as editor of the jo...
Source: TIME: Science - October 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news

Nobel Prize in Physics Goes To U.S., Canadian and French Scientists for Laser Breakthrough
(STOCKHOLM) — Three scientists from the United States, Canada and France won the Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday for work with lasers described as revolutionary and bringing science fiction into reality. The American, Arthur Ashkin, entered the record books of the Nobel Prizes by becoming the oldest laureate at age 96. Donna Strickland, of the University of Waterloo in Canada, became the first woman to win a Nobel in three years and is only the third to have won the prize for physics. Frenchman Gerard Mourou of the Ecole Polytechnique and University of Michigan will share half of the 9 million kronor ($1.01 million) t...
Source: TIME: Science - October 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Keyton and Jim Heintz / AP Tags: Uncategorized nobel prize onetime Source Type: news

Physicist Suspended After Saying ‘Physics Invented and Built by Men’ in Presentation
(GENEVA) — Officials at the world’s largest particle accelerator have suspended an Italian physicist pending an investigation of his “highly offensive” presentation on gender issues that raised new concerns about sexism in science. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, said Monday that Alessandro Strumia of the University of Pisa was out of line in his talk Friday for a seminar on “High Energy Theory and Gender.” The Geneva-area center said it had no prior knowledge of the content of the presentation and cited its “attacks on individuals” as “unacceptabl...
Source: TIME: Science - October 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime Physics Source Type: news

Nobel Prize in Medicine Awarded for Immune System Cancer Research
STOCKHOLM — The Nobel Prize in medicine was awarded Monday to two researchers from the United States and Japan for advances in discovering how the body’s immune system can fight off the scourge of cancer. The 9-million-kronor ($1.01 million) prize will be shared by James Allison of the University of Texas Austin and Tasuku Honjo of Kyoto University. Their parallel work concerned proteins that act as brakes on the body’s immune system and it constitutes “a landmark in our fight against cancer,” said a statement from the Nobel Assembly of Sweden’s Karolinska Institute, which selects winner...
Source: TIME: Science - October 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized medicine onetime Source Type: news

We ’ve Been Drilling Into the Ocean Floor for 50 Years. Here’s What We’ve Learned So Far
This article is republished from The Conversation. Read the original article. (Source: TIME: Science)
Source: TIME: Science - September 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Suzanne O'Connell, Wesleyan University / The Conversation Tags: Uncategorized Oceans Source Type: news

It ’s Officially the First Day of Fall. Here Are 4 Things You Should Know About Autumn
Though Starbucks has been selling its famous pumpkin spice lattes for weeks, fall wasn’t here — until now. The fall equinox, sometimes called the September equinox, is on Saturday, Sept. 22 this year and will mark the first day of fall for the Northern Hemisphere. Just in time for the foliage to appear, here’s everything you need to know about the first day of fall, what happens when the season changes and what kind of weather we can expect this year. When is the first day of fall? The first day of fall is on Saturday, Sept. 22. Beginning at 9:54 p.m. (E.S.T.), it will officially be autumn for the Norther...
Source: TIME: Science - September 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rachel E. Greenspan Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

Here ’s What’s So Worrying About Elon Musk’s Latest Moon Plans
Things are going to get awfully busy for Elon Musk in 2023. That’s the year that Japanese entrepreneur and paying passenger Yusaku Maezawa will set off on his just-announced one-week mission around the moon aboard Musk’s waggishly named BFR—which nominally stands for “Big Falcon Rocket” but, this being Musk, stands for something else, too. Maezawa has booked all seven seats aboard the spacecraft and intends to fill them with artists, hoping to capture the wonder of the lunar experience and, in the process, spur the creation of great art. Musk may be one of the only people on the planet who doe...
Source: TIME: Science - September 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Meet the Japanese Billionaire Who ’s Paying Elon Musk for a Trip Around the Moon
Elon Musk’s SpaceX introduced the world to the company’s first space tourist Monday night, announcing that Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa is set to embark on a voyage around the moon. “Finally, I can tell you that I choose to go to the moon!” said Maezawa at a press conference at the aerospace company’s headquarters on the outskirts of Los Angeles. Maezawa’s journey will not take place until at least 2023 on a yet-to-be-built rocket. The mission could be delayed for a number of reasons, including production delays and more. Here’s what to know about Yusaku Maezawa. Who is Yu...
Source: TIME: Science - September 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent Tags: Uncategorized onetime space SpaceX Source Type: news

SpaceX Introduces Japanese Billionaire as First Private Passenger to Fly Around the Moon
SpaceX announced Monday that billionaire Japanese entrepreneur Yusaku Maezawa will become the aerospace company’s first private passenger on a voyage around the moon, taking another major step in the race to commercialize space travel. Maezawa, who founded Japan’s largest online fashion retailer Zozotown, hopes to venture to the moon and back aboard the Big Falcon Rocket as early as 2023 on a mission he said is meant to inspire artists. “Finally, I can tell you that I choose to go to the Moon! I choose to go to the moon with artists!” Maezawa said at the company’s headquarters and rocket facto...
Source: TIME: Science - September 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Casey Quackenbush Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space travel Source Type: news

Hurricane Florence Is Exposing Major Problems With How We Categorize Storms
Hurricane Florence, once a Category 4 storm, was downgraded to Category 1 before it made landfall near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina early Friday morning. But experts say that despite the apparent demotion, Hurricane Florence still stands to be a destructive and deadly storm for those in its path. “Just because the wind speeds came down … please do not let your guard down,” Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Administrator Brock Long said at a press conference Thursday, during which he highlighted dangers like flooding from storm surge. “This is a very dangerous storm. Storm surge is wh...
Source: TIME: Science - September 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

Heads of Russian Space Agency and NASA Agree Not to Speculate on Cause of Mysterious Space Station Leak
(MOSCOW) — The Russian space agency’s chief has talked to his NASA counterpart about a mysterious leak at the International Space Station, Roscosmos said Thursday. The agency said that its director Dmitry Rogozin informed NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine about the Russian probe into the leak that was spotted last month in the Russian Soyuz spacecraft docked at the station. The crew of three Americans, two Russians and a German quickly located and sealed the tiny hole that created a slight loss of pressure. Roscosmos added that Rogozin and Bridenstine agreed Wednesday to refrain from any preliminary statements...
Source: TIME: Science - September 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Scientists Are Developing New Ways to Treat Disease With Cells, Not Drugs
When Nichelle Obar learned she was pregnant with her second child last year, she never expected that her pregnancy, or her baby, would make history. But when the 40-year-old food-and-beverage coordinator from Hawaii and her fiancé Christopher Constantino went to their 18-week ultrasound, they learned something was wrong. The heart was larger than it should have been, and there was evidence that fluid was starting to build up around the organ as well. Both were signs that the fetus was working extra hard to pump blood to its fast-growing body and that its heart was starting to fail. Obar’s doctor knew what coul...
Source: TIME: Science - September 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized medicine Source Type: news

Here ’s What it Looks Like to Fly Directly Into the Eye of Hurricane Florence
Depending on who you ask, so-called “Hurricane Hunters” are either some of the bravest or craziest aircrews around. After all, in no other line of work do you purposefully fly directly into one of mother nature’s fiercest phenomena. But their work is more than mere aeronautical bravado — these Air Force Reserve and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) missions collect valuable data about hurricanes as they fly through them, helping meteorologists better predict each storm’s path and hopefully save lives in the process. Still, don’t let the important work done by the Hur...
Source: TIME: Science - September 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alex Fitzpatrick Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

The Costs of Human Spaceflight Are High. History Shows the Benefits Are Too
Almost from the time the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) opened its doors for business 60 years ago on Oct. 1, 1958, it has had to be ready to provide an answer to one question: “Why send people into space, given the costs and risks associated with human spaceflight?” In its six decades, NASA launched just over 400 different people, many for more than one mission. Of that number, only 24 journeyed beyond Earth orbit to the Moon and back; three made that trip twice. The rest stayed close to their home planet. Although privately-funded space flights, both suborbital and into orbit and beyond,...
Source: TIME: Science - September 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: John Logsdon Tags: Uncategorized Opinion space Source Type: news

Astronauts Took This Incredible Picture of Hurricane Florence From the Space Station
Astronaut Ricky Arnold captured the massive Hurricane Florence from aboard the International Space Station this week as it rapidly strengthens on its way to the U.S. east coast. Preparations for Florence are well underway on the East Coast, with more than 1 million ordered to evacuate. The Category four hurricane is expected to hit the mainland on Thursday night into Friday morning, according to the National Hurricane Center. Hurricane Florence’s center is currently about 950 miles east-southeast of Cape Fear in North Carolina and about 405 miles south of Bermuda. The storm is producing sustained winds of 130 mph. T...
Source: TIME: Science - September 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

Russian Cosmonaut Allays Concern About Hole in International Space Station
(MOSCOW) — A Russian crewmember on the International Space Station has recorded a video message to assuage concerns about an air leak on the orbiting outpost. In the video released Monday by Russian space agency Roscosmos, Sergei Prokopyev explained how the crew last week located and sealed the tiny hole that created a slight loss of pressure. Speaking from the Russian Soyuz spacecraft docked at the station, where the leak was spotted, Prokopyev said it was quickly patched, adding with a smile “we aren’t trying to cover it with our fingers.” Roscosmos director Dmitry Rogozin has said that the hole c...
Source: TIME: Science - September 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

The ‘Extremely Dangerous’ Hurricane Florence Looks Absolutely Massive From Space
As Hurricane Florence bears down on the U.S. east coast, weather satellites are monitoring its strength and speed, as well as recording some incredible images of the massive storm. A satellite image released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) shows Florence still some distance away from the U.S. east coast. However, the National Hurricane Center says Hurricane Florence is on track to hit the area around North and South Carolina by Friday, and forecasters warned the storm could be “life threatening” by the time it strikes. Hurricane #Florence this morning as seen from @Space_Station...
Source: TIME: Science - September 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

Watch SpaceX Launch a Satellite Into Orbit Before Landing Its Falcon 9 Rocket on a Drone Ship
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket successfully launched a communications satellite into orbit Monday before completing a drone ship landing in the Atlantic Ocean. Following a 77-minute weather delay, the Falcon 9 Rocket took off from Florida’s Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 12:45 a.m. EDT, and then sent the satellite into orbit 32 minutes later. About 8 minutes after the separation, the first stage of the Falcon 9 landed on a drone ship called “Of Course I Still Love You.” The satellite, known as the Telstar 18 Vantage, is the third high throughput satellite (HTS) in the Canadian company’s global fleet ...
Source: TIME: Science - September 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Casey Quackenbush Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space Source Type: news

Tropical Storm Florence Is Expected to Become a Hurricane Again as It Hurls Toward the U.S. Here ’s Where Its Path Is Headed
Hurricane Florence has downgraded to a tropical storm but is expected to regain hurricane status as its path hurls towards the U.S. East Coast in the next week. Florence’s wind speed have decreased and as of Friday the tropical storm has had a maximum sustained winds of 65 mph, down from 140 mph, but is expected to strengthen in the next coming days. Florence is currently 1,600 miles from the East Coast and moving toward Bermuda, the National Hurricane Center said. As Florence’s path moves closer to the U.S. coastline in the next week Florence is expected to regain category three hurricane status. It is not yet...
Source: TIME: Science - September 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gina Martinez Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

Air Pressure Has Been Restored on International Space Station After Leak, Russian Space Agency Says
(MOSCOW) — Russia’s space agency says air pressure on the International Space Station has been restored to proper levels after a leak was repaired. Roscosmos said in a statement Friday that “the safety and health of the crew are not threatened.” The leak, which was discovered Thursday, was traced to a small hole in one of the Russian Soyuz capsules docked at the station. All members of the space station crew arrive and depart on Soyuz capsules. Russia’s manned space program director, Sergei Krikalev, told state news agency Tass on Friday that the leak was patched with a sealant that is &ldq...
Source: TIME: Science - August 31, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

NASA Detects Small Leak on the ISS – and the Russian Crew Is Fixing It With Rags and Junk
The crew of the International Space Station is scrambling to fix a small hole that is causing air to slowly leak into space, NASA said Thursday. Flight controllers for the station saw signs of the pressure leak on Wednesday evening. They allowed the crew of the ISS, Expedition 56, to sleep since they were not in immediate danger, according to NASA. After the crew woke up, the flight controllers started the process to find the leak’s location. The station is regularly hit by micrometeorite debris; spacewalking astronauts report that after nearly 20 years aloft, the exterior hull looks as if it was hit by birdshot. T...
Source: TIME: Science - August 30, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger and Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Astronaut-in-Training Becomes the 1st in 50 Years to Quit NASA
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — For the first time in 50 years, an astronaut-in-training is quitting NASA. Astronaut candidate Robb Kulin has resigned halfway through his two years of training at Johnson Space Center in Houston. NASA spokeswoman Brandi Dean said his departure is effective Friday and that he is leaving for personal reasons that the space agency cannot discuss due to privacy laws. Kulin was among 12 new astronauts chosen last summer from a record 18,300 applicants. Kulin, 34, was working as a senior manager at SpaceX when selected and said at the time he was hoping to fly on a vehicle he helped design. SpaceX...
Source: TIME: Science - August 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized NASA onetime Source Type: news

You Can See a Full Moon Tonight. Here ’s Why It Has 4 Nicknames
United States residents who missed the partial solar eclipse on Aug. 11 have another chance to see something wild in the sky this month. The August full moon — dubbed the “green corn moon,” the “grain moon,” the “red moon” and the “sturgeon moon” — will be visible in the sky soon. The full moon reached its full phase on Sunday morning, according to space.com, which means the full moon will be visible about 24 minutes after sunset on Sunday, Aug. 26. A full moon is often visible 24 hours before and after its peak, so stargazers may be able to catch a glimpse on Mon...
Source: TIME: Science - August 26, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rachel E. Greenspan Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Scientists Identify the First-Known Offspring of Two Different Groups of Early Humans, Study Says
(BERLIN) — Scientists say they’ve found the remains of a prehistoric female whose mother was a Neanderthal and whose father belonged to another extinct group of human relatives known as Denisovans. The 90,000-year-old bone fragment found in southern Siberia marks the first time a direct offspring of these two groups has been discovered, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature. Both groups disappeared by about 40,000 years ago. Neanderthals lived in Europe and Asia, while fossils of Denisovans are known only from the cave where the fragment was found. Past genetic studies have shown interb...
Source: TIME: Science - August 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: FRANK JORDANS / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight Research Source Type: news

Hurricane Lane Looks Absolutely Massive From Space
As Hurricane Lane hurtles toward Hawaii, images captured from space show the full extent of the massive storm. Images captured by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration show the Category 4 storm swirling towards Hawaii with sustained winds around 155 mph that could cause catastrophic damage. Hurricane Lane was briefly upgraded to a Category 5 storm Tuesday night into Wednesday morning when winds topped 160 mph — just hours before its expected landfall in Hawaii. Max sustained winds in #HurricaneLane have increased to 160 MPH, making this a very dangerous Category 5 hurricane. Storm motion has...
Source: TIME: Science - August 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized hawaii onetime space Source Type: news

Red Tide Is Killing Marine Life and Scaring Away Tourists in Florida. Here ’s What to Know About It
Tourists and residents alike have been chased away from Florida’s famous beaches by an ominous-sounding ecological occurrence: red tide. Florida sees red tide — an algae outbreak that can kill marine life and sicken humans — nearly every year, but the current flare-up has become severe enough to warrant a state of emergency declaration from Florida Gov. Rick Scott. Here’s what to know about red tide in Florida. What is red tide? The naturally and frequently occurring marine phenomenon is caused by an influx of microscopic algae called Karenia brevis, which give water a namesake reddish hue. The orga...
Source: TIME: Science - August 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Environment onetime Source Type: news

Killer Whale Finally Lets Go of Her Dead Calf After Carrying it For 17 Days
(FRIDAY HARBOR, Wash.) — Researchers say an endangered killer whale that drew international attention as she carried her dead calf on her head for more than two weeks is finally back to feeding and frolicking with her pod. The Center for Whale Research in Washington state says it watched the orca, known as J35, chase a school of salmon in Haro Strait west of San Juan Island on Saturday afternoon. The whales have been struggling because of a lack of salmon, and J35′s calf died soon after birth on July 24. The mother carried the baby on her head for at least 17 days, in an image of grief that struck an emotional ...
Source: TIME: Science - August 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized animals onetime overnight Source Type: news

NASA ’s Flight to Sun Delayed After Last-Minute Technical Problem
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — A last-minute technical problem Saturday delayed NASA’s unprecedented flight to the sun. The early morning launch countdown was halted with just one-minute, 55 seconds remaining, keeping the Delta IV rocket on its pad with the Parker Solar Probe. Rocket maker United Launch Alliance said it would try again Sunday, provided the helium-pressure issue can be resolved quickly. As soon as the red pressure alarm for the gaseous helium system went off, a launch controller ordered, “Hold, hold, hold.” Once on its way, the Parker probe will venture closer to our star than any other sp...
Source: TIME: Science - August 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

‘She’s Clearly Reacting to a Loss’: Experts Say Killer Whale Carrying Her Dead Calf for 17 Days May Actually Be Grieving
A mother orca whale is still carrying the body of her calf 17 days after it died, in what some experts say may be an unprecedented testament to the strength of the species’ familial bonds. The whale, known as Tahlequah or J35, is one of just 75 Southern Resident killer whales left in the ocean, and her calf — which died minutes after it was born last month — was the group’s first live birth since 2015. Tahlequah has been spotted in waters off the Pacific Northwest multiple times over the past two weeks, often pushing her calf’s corpse through the water or swimming with it balancing on her fore...
Source: TIME: Science - August 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime Wildlife Source Type: news