NASA Satellites Paint Grim Picture For The Future of Antarctica ’ s Ice Shelves
For the entire 64 years NASA has been around, agency administrators have been forced to answer the dreaded what’s-the-point? question. What’s the point, legislators and taxpayers ask, of spending so much money in space when there are so many problems on Earth? NASA has always had a ready answer, pointing to the generations of Earth-observing satellites it has launched, which have kept a space-based eye on weather, climate, land erosion, and more. What the agency has never promised was that we’d like what the satellites tell us. This week, as NASA reports, the findings from space on the condition of the E...
Source: TIME: Science - August 12, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized climate change Climate Is Everything healthscienceclimate Space Source Type: news

The Year ’ s Final Supermoon Reminds Us Why We Love the Night Sky
There is both very big moon news and very small moon news breaking this week—but the one that’s making the headlines is not necessarily the one you would expect. The very big moon news is a paper published today in the journal Science Advances, titled “Indigenous noble gasses in the moon’s interior.” It’s a Swiss-led study of lunar meteorites showing that “unbrecciated lunar mare basalts” reveal traces of “indigenous noble gasses” helium and neon, which they inherited from the Earth’s mantle, adding to the “already strong constraints” showing tha...
Source: TIME: Science - August 10, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Space Source Type: news

Falling Space Debris is a Bigger Menace Than Ever
History remembers October 4, 1957, a lot better than it remembers January 4, 1958—though in recent weeks, the second date is coming to loom larger than the first. October 4, 1957, was the day the Soviet Union Launched Sputnik—the world’s first satellite—an achievement that heralded the start of the space age. “RUSS SATELLITE CIRCLING EARTH,” shouted the Los Angeles Times in a banner headline. “REDS FIRE ‘MOON’ INTO SKY,” answered the Chicago Daily Tribune. There was no such hyperventilating, however, three months later to the day, when the little 84 kg (184 lb.), ...
Source: TIME: Science - August 5, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Space Source Type: news

The U.S Will Soon Have Space Force Ambassadors Around the World
First come the warriors, then come the diplomats. It was on December 20, 2019, that the National Defense Authorization Act was signed, creating the U.S. Space Force, the first new branch of the military to come into being in the 72 years since the Air Force was established. The Space Force’s remit was not just to protect U.S. assets, like spy satellites, from attacks by hostile nations; it was also to prepare the nation for the possibility that space might one day become a war-fighting domain. The Space Force’s motto? “Semper Supra,” or “Always Above.” [time-brightcove not-tgx=”tru...
Source: TIME: Science - August 4, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Space Source Type: news

Scientists Learn More About the History of Stars in Latest Webb Telescope Images
The world was gobsmacked last month when the James Webb Space Telescope released its first clutch of images, showing nebulae, galactic clusters, binary stars, and more. Things have quieted down a bit since, as the telescope team begins to set about the 25 or so years of work the Webb is thought to have ahead of it. But, as Space.com reports, the telescope made news again this week, when astronomers announced that it had spotted the farthest individual star ever seen. Named Earendel, after a character in Lord of the Rings, the star is located 12.9 billion light years from Earth, which means that Webb saw it as it looked 12....
Source: TIME: Science - August 4, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Space Source Type: news

Chinese Space Rocket Debris Crashes Back to Earth Over Indian Ocean
Remnants from a massive Chinese rocket booster crashed back to Earth on Saturday over the Indian Ocean, space officials from the US and China confirmed. It remains unclear what path the debris from the booster might take, US Space Command said on Twitter on Saturday, referring questions to the Chinese government. China’s spaceflight agency said wreckage of the 23-metric-ton (25.4 tons) Long March 5B hit Earth over the sea in the southwestern Philippines with the “vast majority” of the debris burning up upon reentry, according to a brief statement that was criticized by a US official. [time-brightcove not-...
Source: TIME: Science - July 30, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Victoria Cavaliere / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized Space wire Source Type: news

South Korea ’ s Lunar Probe Will Soon Join the U.S. in Studying the Moon ’ s Many Scientific Mysteries
The lunar club is an elite one. Since the dawn of the space age, only the U.S., Russia, China, Japan, India, Israel, and the European Space Agency have sent spacecraft to land on or orbit the moon. On August 2, as Nature reports, that rarefied group will add a new member, when South Korea’s Danuri (which means “enjoy the moon”) probe is launched from the Kennedy Space Center aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. Danuri will make a long, looping moonward journey, settling into lunar orbit by mid-December. The 678 kg (1,495 lb) probe is relatively small as these things go, but it’s packed with five scienti...
Source: TIME: Science - July 29, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Space Source Type: news

Russia ’ s Threat to Quit the Space Station Looks Hollow
You can tell you’ve left the American segment of the International Space Station (ISS) and entered the Russian segment when the walls go from white to salmon-colored. It’s a singularly unlovely salmon, and if Russian designers had to do it over again perhaps they’d have picked up a different can of paint. Either way, the color had a meaning: the U.S. and Russia—old Cold War rivals—might be cooperating in space, but this part of the giant station was still Russian soil. This week, that fact took on more than just symbolic meaning, when Yuri Borisov, the newly appointed head of Roscosmos, the Ru...
Source: TIME: Science - July 29, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Space Source Type: news

Google ’s AI Lab, DeepMind, Offers ‘Gift to Humanity’ with Protein Structure Solution
Matt Higgins and his team of researchers at the University of Oxford had a problem. For years, they had been studying the parasite that spreads malaria, a disease that still kills hundreds of thousands of people every year. They had identified an important protein on the surface of the parasite as a focal point for a potential future vaccine. They knew its underlying chemical code. But the protein’s all-important 3D structure was eluding them. That shape was the key to developing the right vaccine to slide in and block the parasite from infecting human cells. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] The team&rsqu...
Source: TIME: Science - July 28, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized Artificial Intelligence biztech2030 Source Type: news

James Lovelock, Scientific Mind Behind the Gaia Living Earth Theory, Has Died at 103
(LONDON, England) — James Lovelock, the British environmental scientist whose influential Gaia theory sees the Earth as a living organism gravely imperiled by human activity, has died on his 103rd birthday. Lovelock’s family said Wednesday that he died the previous evening at his home in southwest England “surrounded by his family.” The family said his health had deteriorated after a bad fall but that until six months ago Lovelock “was still able to walk along the coast near his home in Dorset and take part in interviews.” Born in 1919 and raised in London, Lovelock studied chemistry, me...
Source: TIME: Science - July 27, 2022 Category: Science Authors: JILL LAWLESS/AP Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Debris From a Chinese Space Rocket Is Crashing Toward Earth
Debris from a Chinese rocket is set to crash to Earth some time over the next few days, with the potential for wreckage to land across a wide swathe of the globe. Part of a Long March 5B rocket China launched on July 24 will make an uncontrolled reentry around July 31, according to the Aerospace Corp., a nonprofit based in El Segundo, California, that receives U.S. funding. The possible debris field includes much of the US, as well as Africa, Australia, Brazil, India and Southeast Asia, according to Aerospace’s predictions. Concern over the reentry and the impact it could have is being dismissed by China, however, wi...
Source: TIME: Science - July 27, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Bruce Einhorn and Shirley Zhao/Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized overnight Space wire Source Type: news

Russia to Drop Out of International Space Station After 2024
(MOSCOW, Russia) — Russia will pull out of the International Space Station after 2024 and focus on building its own orbiting outpost, the country’s new space chief said Tuesday amid high tensions between Moscow and the West over the fighting in Ukraine. Yuri Borisov, appointed this month to lead the state space agency, Roscosmos, said during a meeting with President Vladimir Putin that Russia will fulfill its obligations to its partners before it leaves. “The decision to leave the station after 2024 has been made,” Borisov said, adding: “I think that by that time we will start forming a Russia...
Source: TIME: Science - July 26, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Vladimir Isachenkov/AP Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate russia Space wire Source Type: news

The James Webb Telescope Has Already Made Its First Scientific Discovery
First comes the art, them comes the science. Just over a week after NASA dazzled the world with the first clutch of images from the James Webb Space Telescope, astronomers working with one of the pictures believe they have found the oldest galaxy ever imaged—one dating back 13.5 billion years, or just 300 million years after the Big Bang, report Space.com and others. The age of a galaxy is measured by what is known as its red shift: as the universe expands, the wavelength of light is stretched into the red spectrum. The redder the image, the greater the stretching and the farther—and older—the object in t...
Source: TIME: Science - July 22, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Space Source Type: news

NASA ’ s Giant Moon Rocket Set to Fly Soon
You could go your entire life without thinking about a collet. Indeed, you could go your entire life without even knowing what a collet is, and if we stopped right here you’d be no worse off. For the record, though, a collet is a small ring of metal, about the size of a fist, and, as NASA announced at a July 20 press conference, at the moment, it’s the biggest thing standing in the way of the U.S. having humans back on the surface of the moon sometime in the middle of this decade. [time-brightcove not-tgx=”true”] The collet in question is attached to the hydrogen fuel line of the main stage of NASA&...
Source: TIME: Science - July 22, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Space Source Type: news

The Next Hottest Alternative Milk Comes from Microbes
Milk is an extraordinary substance, packed with all the proteins, sugars, fats, minerals, and vitamins a young mammal needs to flourish until it can eat on its own. Co-opted by humans, cow milk—and to a lesser extent, sheep, goat, buffalo, and camel milk—is a founding food for much of the world, drunk straight, poured over cereal, used to lighten coffee, churned into butter, frozen into ice cream, and baked into desserts. Dosed with rennet—an enzyme produced in a calf’s stomach—it separates into the curds and whey beloved by Miss Muffet, ready to be drained, molded, and fermented into cheese. ...
Source: TIME: Science - July 22, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Aryn Baker Tags: Uncategorized climate climate change Climate Innovators Climate Is Everything feature Food & Agriculture healthscienceclimate Londontime overnight Source Type: news