Will We Ever Find Dark Matter in the Universe?
The science of cosmology has had a spectacular run. Over the past few decades, cosmologists have carried out measurements and observations that have enabled us to reconstruct our universe’s past in incredible detail. We can now say with great confidence that we understand how and why our universe evolved over the vast majority of its history. From this perspective, our universe looks more comprehensible than ever before. And yet, not all is understood. Despite our considerable efforts, there remain essential facets of our universe that we simply do not know how to explain. Perhaps the most famous of these mysteries i...
Source: TIME: Science - December 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Dan Hooper Tags: Uncategorized Books ideas Science Source Type: news

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Need to Fall Over 7% Each Year. We Must Stop Procrastinating
We are doing nowhere near enough to limit climate change. Greenhouse gas emissions are rising when they should be falling. Countries need to urgently increase action or we will face a future of rising seas, extreme weather events and increased human misery. Sound familiar? Of course it does. Scientists, the United Nations (UN) and activists have been delivering variations of this message for more years than most of us care to remember, and their voices have only grown louder. Still, the world has not heeded their warnings. We have procrastinated, thinking we can catch up later. But now the hard deadline for serious action ...
Source: TIME: Science - December 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Inger Andersen Tags: Uncategorized climate change Source Type: news

World Remains Sharply Divided on Climate Change Targets Ahead of ‘Crucial 12 Months’
When it comes to preventing the worst of climate change, “the point of no return is no longer over the horizon,” United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres warned Sunday on the eve of a crucial round of intergovernmental talks at the UN’s annual climate summit. Representatives of more than 200 countries have gathered in Madrid for COP25, where they will attempt to strike key agreements on international climate action. One challenge is the wild variance in the impact of their domestic goals to cut greenhouse gas emissions. A growing crowd of large economies, including Spain, France and the U.K., hav...
Source: TIME: Science - December 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent/ Madrid Tags: Uncategorized climate change Source Type: news

How Rising Temperatures Due to Climate Change are Shortening Pregnancies
It’s bad enough that adults have made a climatological mess of the world. It’s worse that the mess is having a disproportionate impact on kids—who did nothing to create the problem, but are more susceptible to health issues caused by rising temperatures than adults are. Now, it appears, global warming is doing its damage even further down the human age spectrum. According to a new study published in Nature Climate Change, rising temperatures may have a direct impact on human gestational time, increasing the risk of early delivery. Babies are considered premature when they are born at 37 weeks or earlier. ...
Source: TIME: Science - December 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized birth climate change Environment gestation health Labor Pregnancy Source Type: news

Russian Scientists Show Off 18,000-Year-Old Prehistoric Puppy Perfectly Preserved in Permafrost
(YAKUTSK, Russia) — Russian scientists on Monday showed off a prehistoric puppy, believed to be 18,000 years old, found in permafrost in the country’s Far East. Discovered last year in a lump of frozen mud near the city of Yakutsk, the puppy is unusually well-preserved, with its hair, teeth, whiskers and eyelashes still intact. “This puppy has all its limbs, pelage – fur, even whiskers. The nose is visible. There are teeth. We can determine due to some data that it is a male,” Nikolai Androsov, director of the Northern World private museum where the remains are stored, said at the presentation...
Source: TIME: Science - December 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: DARIA LITVINOVA and ROMAN KUTUKOV / AP Tags: Uncategorized animals onetime russia Source Type: news

One Year Later, Mystery Surrounds China ’s Gene-Edited Babies
Chinese scientist He Jiankui shocked the world by claiming he had helped make the first gene-edited babies. One year later, mystery surrounds his fate as well as theirs. He has not been seen publicly since January, his work has not been published and nothing is known about the health of the babies. “That’s the story — it’s all cloaked in secrecy, which is not productive for the advance of understanding,” said Stanford bioethicist Dr. William Hurlbut. He talked with Hurlbut many times before He revealed at a Hong Kong science conference that he had used a tool called CRISPR to alter a gene in e...
Source: TIME: Science - November 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MARILYNN MARCHIONE / AP Tags: Uncategorized China gene editing onetime Science Source Type: news

Why Some People Love Black Friday —and Others Hate It, According to Psychologists
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. (Source: TIME: Science)
Source: TIME: Science - November 27, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Michael Breazeale, Mississippi State University / The Conversation Tags: Uncategorized onetime psychology syndication Source Type: news

Koalas Were Already on the Brink in Australia. Bushfires Have Killed 1,000 in 2 Months, Experts Say
A koala that had received global attention after dramatic video footage emerged of its rescue from Australia’s bushfires by a woman who wrapped it in her shirt has died after suffering extensive burns. Video footage released on Nov. 19 showed the koala, later named Ellenborough Lewis, as it was rescued by Toni Doherty who plucked him from a tree in New South Wales. Doherty took the koala to the Koala Hospital in Port Macquarie but the hospital were unable to save him and put him to sleep today as a result of his severe burns. “In Ellenborough Lewis’s case, the burns did get worse, and unfortunately woul...
Source: TIME: Science - November 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rachael Bunyan Tags: Uncategorized Australia Bushfire onetime Source Type: news

How Climate Change Exacerbates Gender Inequality Across the Globe
Among the lesser studied effects of climate change are the social and economic impacts on women. Nitya Rao, professor of gender and development at University of East Anglia has been studying gender and development for decades; with the recent attention on the profound impact that global temperature changes are having on local and national economies, she decided to analyze the impact of climate change on women specifically. She and her team studied data collected from 25 case studies in 11 hot spot countries in Asia and Africa to document how climate change is influencing women’s status—measured by their ability...
Source: TIME: Science - November 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized climate change climate change and women Source Type: news

Current Plans to Stem Climate Change Will Still Lead to Catastrophe, U.N. Warns
As the world has reeled from crisis after crisis in recent years, world leaders have, with only a few exceptions, repeatedly insisted that they remain committed to tackling climate change. But they are failing to keep that promise, says a bleak new United Nations report, and the globe may soon feel the dire effects of inaction—including temperatures that rise to double the target set in the Paris Agreement—without “rapid and transformational action.” The report, from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), points directly at most of the world’s largest economies as the chief culprits ...
Source: TIME: Science - November 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized climate change Source Type: news

Dark Waters Tells the True Story of the Lawyer Who Took DuPont to Court and Won. But Rob Bilott ’s Fight Is Far From Over
Rob Bilott, a corporate lawyer-turned-environmental crusader, doesn’t much care if he’s made enemies over the years. “I’ve been dealing with this for almost three decades,” he says. “I can’t really worry about if the people on the other side like me or not.” Bilott used to be on the other side. The Todd Haynes-directed movie Dark Waters, now playing in theaters, tells the story of how the lawyer, played by Mark Ruffalo, switched allegiances. As happened in real life, the movie depicts Ruffalo’s Bilott as a lawyer who defends large chemical companies before he is approac...
Source: TIME: Science - November 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized movies onetime Source Type: news

It ’s Not Just Flooding in Venice. Here’s How Climate Change Threatens World Heritage Sites Everywhere
Venice is reeling from the worst flooding the city has experienced in 50 years, the city is “on its knees,” Venetian Mayor Luigi Brugnaro tweeted as water submerged much of the the famous historical city. The floods penetrated Saint Mark’s Basilica, a 1,000 year old church that is considered to be one of the finest examples of Byzantine architecture in the world and one of the city’s most famous landmarks. While floods are a normal part of life in Venice, which is famously built on a lagoon at the edge of the Adriatic Sea, they have never happened with such frequency before. Experts say that climate...
Source: TIME: Science - November 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime Science Source Type: news

How to Keep Alzheimer ’s From Bringing About the Zombie Apocalypse
I tried to kill my father for years. To be fair, I was following his wishes. He’d made it clear that when he no longer recognized me, when he could no longer talk, when the nurses started treating him like a toddler, he didn’t want to live any longer. My father was 58 years old when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. He took the diagnosis with the self-deprecating humor he’d spent a lifetime cultivating, constantly cracking jokes about how he would one day turn into a zombie, a walking corpse. We had a good 10 years with him after the diagnosis. Eventually, his jokes came true. Seven years ...
Source: TIME: Science - November 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jay Newton-Small Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Disease Source Type: news

What We Can Learn From the Near-Death of the Banana
The banana has been the subject of Andy Warhol’s cover art for the Velvet Underground’s debut album, can arguably be the most devastating item in the Mario Kart video game franchise and is one of the world’s most consumed fruits. And humanity’s love of bananas may still be on the rise, according to data from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. On average, says Chris Barrett, a professor of agriculture at Cornell University, citing that U.N. data, every person on earth chows down on 130 bananas a year, at a rate of nearly three a week. But the banana as we know it may also b...
Source: TIME: Science - November 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Anna Purna Kambhampaty Tags: Uncategorized Agriculture Source Type: news

When it Comes to Climate-Change Adaptation, As Goes California, So Goes …the World
It’s almost biblical: Apocalyptic images of fires sweeping through communities. The worst droughts in recorded history, followed by floods overwhelming dams and levees. Homeless encampments. Power outages for millions of people. Is this the “end of California as we know it” and the result of a “failure to live sustainably” as New York Times opinion writer Farhad Manjoo suggested? Is the state “ungovernable” (the Economist) and a failed, “collapsing” experiment (Forbes)? Are we suffering the inevitable consequence, as some right-wing pundits have gloated, of a “ser...
Source: TIME: Science - November 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Peter H. Gleick Tags: Uncategorized climate change Source Type: news

Astronauts Begin ‘Heart Surgery’ Spacewalks to Fix ISS Cosmic Ray Detector
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — Astronauts launched an extraordinarily complicated series of spacewalks Friday to fix a cosmic ray detector at the International Space Station. Armed with dozens of dissecting tools, Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano removed two protective covers to gain access to the inside of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer. He handed them to his U.S. spacewalking partner, American Andrew Morgan, for tossing overboard. “OK, 3-2-1, release,” Morgan said as he let go of the 4-foot-long (127-centimeter) shield high above the Pacific. Later, over the South Atlantic, Morgan ditched the second, smaller...
Source: TIME: Science - November 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MARCIA DUNN / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime Space Source Type: news

‘It’s Like a Clark Kent Hair Swoosh.’ Here’s What We Know About the Extra Tail on Narwhal the ‘Unicorn’ Puppy’s Head
Turns out the “tail” on Narwhal the “unicorn” puppy’s head is basically just there so we can all fawn over it. If you haven’t yet had the privilege of seeing the photos and videos of Narwhal making their way around the web, then allow us to introduce you to the now-internet famous pup. Narwhal became a near instant viral star this week after the Twitter account WeRateDogs tweeted out a series of pictures showcasing the extra appendage growing out of his forehead. The Wednesday tweet has since garnered over 603,000 likes and nearly 129,000 retweets, and soon after its posting, celebrities...
Source: TIME: Science - November 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Megan McCluskey Tags: Uncategorized animals Dogs onetime viral Source Type: news

‘He Was Definitely Ahead of His Time.’ Robert Irwin Speaks About Climate Change And His Father’s Legacy
The 15-year-old Robert Irwin, the son of late conservationist Steve Irwin, spoke about the danger of climate change and his father’s legacy. “The amazing thing with our dad was that he was talking about climate change and the effects that it had kind of before it was as popular as it is now,” Irwin told TIME on Thursday at the 2019 TIME 100 Next event. “He was definitely ahead of his time.” Irwin says the threat of climate change will only grow large as time goes on. “Right now is what’s going to affect the generations’ to come,” he explains. “We see in Australia ...
Source: TIME: Science - November 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Madeleine Carlisle Tags: Uncategorized Environment TIME 100 Next TIME100NEXT19 Source Type: news

How Climate Change is Clobbering Kids ’ Health
Let’s pretend the 195 nations that signed the 2016 Paris Climate Accord really do take all of the steps necessary to reach the agreement’s key goal: limiting the increase in global temperature to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels. In that world, any children born today would grow up to witness some happy milestones. If they lived in the United Kingdom, they’d see their country phase out the use of coal by the time they turned six. If they lived in France, they would see gasoline-powered cars eliminated by their 21st birthday. And, as all of the 195 countries similarly reached their individual targets,...
Source: TIME: Science - November 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Children climate change embargoed study Environment global warming health Source Type: news

Countries Are Falling Far Short on Action to Tackle Climate Change as Fossil Fuel Use Increases, Says Energy Report
Countries’ plans to tackle climate change fall far short of what’s necessary to prevent temperatures from rising to an unsafe level that governments have vowed to prevent, according to a new report from the International Energy Agency (IEA). The use of fossil fuels, in particular is continuing to expand globally, putting the world on a dangerous track for increased emissions. At the heart of the IEA’s annual outlook is energy demand: a measure of how much energy we use to heat our homes, drive our cars and power our factories and, by extension, a measure of our emissions of climate-change causing pollutan...
Source: TIME: Science - November 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized climate change energy onetime Source Type: news

This Is the Name Scientists Have Given to the Most Distant World Ever Explored
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — The most distant world ever explored 4 billion miles away finally has an official name: Arrokoth. That means “sky” in the language of the Native American Powhatan people, NASA said Tuesday. NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft flew past the snowman-shaped Arrokoth on New Year’s Day, 3 ½ years after exploring Pluto. At the time, this small icy world 1 billion miles (1.6 billion kilometers) beyond Pluto was nicknamed Ultima Thule given its vast distance from us. “The name ‘Arrokoth’ reflects the inspiration of looking to the skies,” lead scientis...
Source: TIME: Science - November 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MARCIA DUNN / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight Space Exploration Source Type: news

That Tiny Black Dot on the Sun Today? It Was Mercury, in a Rare Celestial Crossing
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — Mini Mercury skipped across the vast, glaring face of the sun Monday in a rare celestial transit. Stargazers used solar-filtered binoculars and telescopes to spot Mercury — a tiny black dot — as it passed directly between Earth and the sun on Monday. The eastern U.S. and Canada got the whole 5 ½-hour show, weather permitting, along with Central and South America. The rest of the world, except for Asia and Australia, got just a sampling. Mercury is the solar system’s smallest, innermost planet. The next transit isn’t until 2032, and North America won’t get ...
Source: TIME: Science - November 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MARCIA DUNN / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime Space Source Type: news

SpaceX Just Put 60 More Broadband Internet Satellites Into Space
(Bloomberg) — Space Exploration Technologies Corp. launched its second batch of 60 Starlink satellites on Monday, taking another step toward Elon Musk’s vision to create a network for space-based broadband internet service around the world. One of SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rockets rumbled aloft at 9:56 a.m. local time from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The satellites deployed a little over an hour after the launch. Liftoff! pic.twitter.com/Rz6Y4EnEnM — SpaceX (@SpaceX) November 11, 2019 A space-based internet service will be an important source of funding for the closely held company, ac...
Source: TIME: Science - November 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Dana Hull / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized onetime Space Source Type: news

Scientists Have Found the Oldest Example of an Upright Ape
BERLIN (AP) — The remains of an ancient ape found in a Bavarian clay pit suggest that humans’ ancestors began standing upright millions of years earlier than previously thought, scientists said Wednesday. An international team of researchers says the fossilized partial skeleton of a male ape that lived almost 12 million years ago in the humid forests of what is now southern Germany bears a striking resemblance to modern human bones. In a paper published by the journal Nature, they concluded that the previously unknown species — named Danuvius guggenmosi — could walk on two legs but also climb like a...
Source: TIME: Science - November 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: FRANK JORDANS / AP Tags: Uncategorized Paleontology Source Type: news

How One Commonly Used Asthma Inhaler is Damaging the Planet
If there is any field of science that understands the doctrine of unintended consequences, it’s medicine. We rely on antibiotics to wipe out infections, and in the process breed a class of superbugs resistant to the drugs. We develop powerful medications that can control chronic pain, and in the U.S., have a nationwide addiction crisis to show for that breakthrough. Now, it appears, we can add asthma control to the list pharmaceutical blowbacks we didn’t see coming. According to a new study published in BMJ Open, the familiar lightweight, pocket-sized aerosolized inhalers that make breathing easier for so many ...
Source: TIME: Science - November 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Asthma Carbon Dioxide climate change Environment greenhouse gasses MDI methane Source Type: news

How Asthma Inhalers Are Choking the Planet
If there is any field of science that understands the doctrine of unintended consequences, it’s medicine. We rely on antibiotics to wipe out infections, and in the process breed a class of superbugs resistant to the drugs. We develop powerful medications that can control chronic pain, and in the U.S., have a nationwide addiction crisis to show for that breakthrough. Now, it appears, we can add asthma control to the list pharmaceutical blowbacks we didn’t see coming. According to a new study published in BMJ Open, the familiar lightweight, pocket-sized aerosolized inhalers that make breathing easier for so many ...
Source: TIME: Science - November 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Asthma Carbon Dioxide climate change Environment greenhouse gasses MDI methane Source Type: news

Trump Now Has an Opening to Pull the U.S. out of the Paris Climate Pact
WASHINGTON (AP) — For more than two years President Donald Trump has talked about pulling the United States out of the landmark Paris climate agreement. Starting Monday he finally can do something about it. Even then, though, the withdrawal process takes a year and wouldn’t become official until at least the day after the 2020 presidential election. In the Paris agreement, nearly 200 countries set their own national targets for reducing or controlling pollution of heat-trapping gases. It was negotiated in 2015 with lots of prodding by the United States and China and went into effect Nov. 4, 2016. The terms of ...
Source: TIME: Science - November 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: SETH BORENSTEIN / AP Tags: Uncategorized Environment Source Type: news

Supply Ship Launches Into Space With Cookie Oven and Sports Car Parts as Experiment for Future Journeys
A supply ship rocketed toward the International Space Station on Saturday with sports car parts, an oven for baking cookies and a vest to protect against radiation. Northrop Grumman launched its Cygnus capsule for NASA from Wallops Island, Virginia. The 8,200-pound shipment (3,700 kilograms) should reach the orbiting lab Monday. “Good launch all the way around,” a ground controller observed. The space station’s astronauts will test the oven by baking chocolate chip cookies from scratch and try out the new safety vest to gauge its comfort. Both experiments are seen as precursors to moon and Mars journeys. ...
Source: TIME: Science - November 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime Space Source Type: news

These Researchers Are Using AI Drones to More Safely Track Wildlife
In the late ’90s, wildlife conservationists Zoe Jewell and Sky Alibhai were grappling with a troubling realization. The pair had been studying black rhino populations in Zimbabwe, and they spent a good deal of their time shooting the animals with tranquilizer darts and affixing radio collars around their necks. But after years of work, the researchers realized there was a major problem: Their technique, commonly used by all manner of wildlife scientists, seemed to be causing female rhinos to have fewer offspring. The researchers published their findings in 2001, igniting a controversy in the conservation world. The ...
Source: TIME: Science - November 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized innovations MSFTAI2019 Source Type: news

China Is Bankrolling Green Energy Projects Around the World
Perched on the ochre scrub of Argentina’s sunbaked Puna Jujeña plateau, the $400 million Cauchari power station is the world’s highest-altitude solar farm at 13,000 ft (about 4,000 meters) above sea level. In Kenya’s volcano-strewn Rift Valley, a newly green-lit, super-efficient electrical substation will soon funnel clean power from the nearby Olkaria Geothermal Plant about 50 miles (80 km) to downtown Nairobi. Some 14 miles off blustery northeastern Scotland, Moray East is set to become the world’s largest offshore wind farm, helping to heat and light up to a million homes. Three distinct r...
Source: TIME: Science - November 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Charlie Campbell / Shanghai Tags: Uncategorized China onetime overnight Source Type: news

The Evolutionary Reason We Love Big, Blood-Curdling Screams
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. (Source: TIME: Science)
Source: TIME: Science - October 31, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Frank T. McAndrew, Knox College / The Conversation Tags: Uncategorized human behavior onetime syndication Source Type: news

Doctors Livestream Brain Surgery on Conscious, Talking Woman
25-year-old Jenna Schardt underwent brain surgery — while awake — in Texas on Tuesday, and the procedure was livestreamed on Facebook. Doctors with the Methodist Dallas Medical Center performed the surgery to remove a mass of tangled blood vessels in Schardt’s brain that had impaired her speech and caused seizures. At the beginning of the operation, Schardt was put under anesthesia so doctors could cut into her skull. Once they reached her brain, Schardt was woken up so she could speak and answer questions, helping doctors map her brain. During the surgery, Schardt was shown an iPad on which she identifie...
Source: TIME: Science - October 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized health onetime Texas Source Type: news

The Air Force ’s Mysterious X-37B Space Plane Lands After 2 Years Doing Classified Space Plane Stuff
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — The Air Force’s mystery space plane is back on Earth, following a record-breaking two-year mission. The X-37B landed at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida early Sunday. The Air Force is mum about what the plane did in orbit after launching aboard a SpaceX rocket in 2017. The 780-day mission sets a new endurance record for the reusable test vehicle. It looks like a space shuttle but is one-fourth the size at 29 feet. Officials say this latest mission successfully completed its objectives. Experiments from the Air Force Research Laboratory were aboard. This was the fifth spacefl...
Source: TIME: Science - October 29, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime Space Source Type: news

How to Help Your Body Adjust to Colder Weather
Fall is here, and the mercury is falling in thermostats across the northern hemisphere. The good news: Not only will your body acclimate to the cooler weather, but you can also hurry this process along. Beginning in the 1960s, U.S. Army researchers found that nude men who spent eight hours a day in a 50°F (10°C) chamber became habituated to the cold and had mostly stopped shivering after two weeks. Later research from Scandinavian and U.K. teams likewise concluded that people can get used to cool environments. And a recent research review from Army researchers concluded that all humans seem to have at least some ab...
Source: TIME: Science - October 29, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized HealthSummit19 Research Source Type: news

Here ’s What California’s Kincade Wildfire Looks Like From Space
Northern California’s Kincade wildfire has grown so large that a satellite was able to record the plumes from 22,300 miles away in space. The fire that began on Oct. 23 has grown to burn more than 66,200 acres of Sonoma county and is so far only 5% contained. As of Monday, three people have died, at least two first responders have been injured, 96 structures like homes and businesses have been destroyed and an additional 16 structures have been damaged. The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) predicts the wildfire will not be fully contained until Nov. 7. Thousands have had to evacuate th...
Source: TIME: Science - October 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jasmine Aguilera Tags: Uncategorized California Natural Disasters Source Type: news

A Dutch Inventor Has Unveiled a Device that Scoops Plastic out of Rivers
ROTTERDAM, Netherlands (AP) — Dutch inventor Boyan Slat is widening his effort to clean up floating plastic from the Pacific Ocean by moving into rivers, too, using a new floating device to catch garbage before it reaches the seas. The 25-year-old university dropout founded The Ocean Cleanup to develop and deploy a system he invented when he was 18 that catches plastic waste floating in the ocean. On Saturday he unveiled the next step in his fight: A floating solar-powered device that he calls the “Interceptor” that scoops plastic out of rivers as it drifts past. “We need to close the tap, which mea...
Source: TIME: Science - October 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MIKE CORDER / AP Tags: Uncategorized Environment Source Type: news

The Real History Behind The Current War
One irony of history is that while Thomas Edison invented the first practical and affordable light bulb, he didn’t invent a practical and affordable system for keeping those lights on nationwide. The distinction for developing the system for transporting electricity that way goes jointly to George Westinghouse, the inventor of the railroad air brake, and to Nikola Tesla, a visionary engineer from the Austrian empire. In the 1880s, the three went to battle over who had the superior technology for electrical transmission. The three-way rivalry between the inventors is the premise of The Current War (a movie that has it...
Source: TIME: Science - October 25, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Olivia B. Waxman Tags: Uncategorized movies Source Type: news

The Director of the NIH Lays Out His Vision of the Future of Medical Science
Our world has never witnessed a time of greater promise for improving human health. Many of today’s health advances have stemmed from a long arc of discovery that begins with strong, steady support for basic science. In large part because of fundamental research funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which traces its roots to 1887, Americans are living longer, healthier lives. Life expectancy for a baby born in the U.S. has risen from 47 years in 1900 to more than 78 years today. Among the advances that have helped to make this possible are a 70% decline in the U.S. death rate from cardiovascular disease ...
Source: TIME: Science - October 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Dr. Francis S. Collins Tags: Uncategorized Healthcare medicine Source Type: news

These U.N. Climate Scientists Think They Can Halt Global Warming for $300 Billion. Here ’s How
$300 billion. That’s the money needed to stop the rise in greenhouse gases and buy up to 20 years of time to fix global warming, according to United Nations climate scientists. It’s the gross domestic product of Chile, or the world’s military spending every 60 days. The sum is not to fund green technologies or finance a moonshot solution to emissions, but to use simple, age-old practices to lock millions of tons of carbon back into an overlooked and over-exploited resource: the soil. “We have lost the biological function of soils. We have got to reverse that,” said Barron J. Orr, lead scientis...
Source: TIME: Science - October 24, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Adam Majendie and Pratik Parija / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized Bloomberg climate change onetime overnight Source Type: news

Google Has Achieved ‘Quantum Supremacy.’ Just What the Heck Is That?
Here’s a quick bit of topical multiple choice: What is “quantum supremacy?” a) The next blockbuster film in the James Bond series, coming to theaters in the summer of 2020. b) The greatest name for an expansion sports team in all of history. c) Something just achieved by a computer built by one of the world’s biggest and post powerful companies (Hint: it starts with a G and ends with an oogle) and you should be very afraid. If you answered c, you’re correct — except for the very afraid part. The fact is, quantum supremacy — a term that is burning down the Internet today — is ...
Source: TIME: Science - October 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research Source Type: news

Do DNA Databases Make Would-Be Criminals Think Twice?
This article was originally published on Undark. Read the original article. (Source: TIME: Science)
Source: TIME: Science - October 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Oscar Schwartz / Undark Tags: Uncategorized Crime onetime syndication Source Type: news

Scientists: Movement Detected Along California Fault That Could Cause an 8-Magnitude Earthquake  
After the biggest earthquake to hit Southern California in 20 years struck in July, a powerful fault line that could cause a magnitude 8 earthquake began moving, scientists say. In a study published Thursday in the journal Science, researchers from the California Institute of Technology along with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory said a part of the Garlock fault slipped after being triggered by the series of earthquakes in the Ridgecrest area. The fault runs 185 miles east to west from the San Andreas Fault to Death Valley. Scientists found that it has slipped 0.8 inch (or about 2 centimeters) near its surface since ...
Source: TIME: Science - October 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized California Natural Disasters onetime Source Type: news

The First All-Women Spacewalk Is Happening Now. Here ’s How to Watch It Live
The first ever spacewalk by an all-women crew is happening today. Coverage began at 6:30 a.m. ET, and the astronauts are scheduled to enter the vacuum of space at 7:50 a.m. Astronaut Christina Koch, who is experienced in extravehicular activity (EVA), will lead the operation. She will be accompanied by astronaut Jessica Meir, who is making her first spacewalk on Friday. Both are American citizens. They will be in the vacuum of space for five and a half hours. You can watch the spacewalk live on TIME, above. Who are the astronauts? Christina Koch, 40, completed her NASA astronaut training in 2015, and has conducted four spa...
Source: TIME: Science - October 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized onetime Space Source Type: news

TIME ’s Award-Winning Year in Space Documentary Is Now Available On Netflix
The women working in the commissary at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on March 27, 2015 barely paid attention as the moment approached when the Soyuz rocket, just visible less than a kilometer away, would lift off. But when the 20 engines at the base of the rocket lit at 12:42 AM local time, turning the deep night to a brilliant white day, they hurried over to the window to watch. Less than 20 seconds later, the rocket disappeared into a low-lying cloud bank. TIME was there for the launch — and with good reason. One of the three men aboard the rocket that night was veteran astronaut Scott Kelly, who was on his...
Source: TIME: Science - October 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime Space Source Type: news

TIME ’s Award-Winning ‘Year in Space’ Documentary Is Now Available On Netflix
The women working in the commissary at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on March 27, 2015 barely paid attention as the moment approached when the Soyuz rocket, just visible less than a kilometer away, would lift off. But when the 20 engines at the base of the rocket lit at 12:42 AM local time, turning the deep night to a brilliant white day, they hurried over to the window to watch. Less than 20 seconds later, the rocket disappeared into a low-lying cloud bank. TIME was there for the launch — and with good reason. One of the three men aboard the rocket that night was veteran astronaut Scott Kelly, who was on his...
Source: TIME: Science - October 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime Space Source Type: news

To Protect the Amazon Rainforest and Beyond, We Must Start in the Andes
If the Amazon rainforest are the lungs of the planet, then the Andes are its lifeblood. The world’s last remaining hotspot for agrobiodiversity, the region is the origin of many nutritionally important crop species and superfoods—grains like amaranth and quinoa; lupine pulses and maca roots—that underpin ecosystems, economies and diets. At the same time, agriculture at the highest altitudes in the world is acutely threatened by climate change, with increasingly extreme droughts, hailstorms and frosts. Home to more than 85 of the planet’s 110 climate zones, the Andes is a living laboratory—for ...
Source: TIME: Science - October 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Stef de Haan Tags: Uncategorized climate change Source Type: news

Alexei Leonov, First Human to Walk in Space, Dies at 85
MOSCOW — Russia’s space agency says Alexei Leonov, the first human to walk in space 54 years ago, has died in Moscow. He was 85. Roscosmos says in a statement on its website that Leonov died on Friday. It did not provide details. Leonov performed his spacewalk on March 18, 1965, when he exited his Voskhod 2 capsule, secured by a tether. Read more: The other giant leap: What happened to the first man to walk in space On his second trip to space ten years later, Leonov commanded the Soviet half of the Apollo-Soyuz 19 mission. It was the first joint space mission between the Soviet Union and the United States, car...
Source: TIME: Science - October 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime Space Source Type: news

Climate Change Is Shaping Up As an Utter Disaster for Much of America ’s Bird Life
Sanderlings, red-headed woodpeckers and great gray owls are just a few of the North American bird species projected to be threatened by climate change in the coming decades, according to the latest assessment depicting an increasingly dire situation for the continent’s avian wildlife. “Two thirds of birds in North America are at risk from climate change, to large range losses, potentially extinction, and this is especially so if we continue on the current trajectory,” says Brooke Bateman, senior climate scientist for the National Audubon Society, which carried out the report. The October 10 report, titled...
Source: TIME: Science - October 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Time Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime Source Type: news

3 Scientists Share Nobel Prize in Chemistry For Their Work With Lithium-Ion Batteries
(STOCKHOLM) — Three scientists won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for their work leading to the development of lithium-ion batteries, which have reshaped energy storage and transformed cars, mobile phones and many other devices — and reduced reliance on fossil fuels that contribute to global warming. The prize went to John B. Goodenough, 97, a German-born engineering professor at the University of Texas; M. Stanley Whittingham, 77, a British-American chemistry professor at the State University of New York at Binghamton; and Japan’s Akira Yoshino, 71, of Asahi Kasei Corporation and Meijo Univers...
Source: TIME: Science - October 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized nobel prize onetime Science Source Type: news

Climate Activists Block Central London Streets as Boris Johnson Derides Them as ‘Uncooperative Crusties’
(LONDON) — Hundreds of climate change activists camped out in central London on Tuesday during a second day of world protests by the Extinction Rebellion movement to demand more urgent actions to counter global warming. Determined activists glued themselves to the British government’s Department of Transport building as police working to keep streets clear appealed to protesters to move to Trafalgar Square. Cities in Australia, elsewhere in Europe and other parts of the world also had climate change protests for a second day. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson appealed Monday to the protesters to stop blockin...
Source: TIME: Science - October 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: DANICA KIRKA and TRISTAN LAVALETTE / AP Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime United Kingdom Source Type: news