‘Climate Change Is Forever.’ Thousands of British Schoolchildren Walk Out in Environmental Protest
Thousands of schoolchildren descended on central London Friday, walking out of their classrooms to voice their anger at the lack of government action on climate change. Hundreds of banners and placards with messages like “There Is No Plan(et) B” were held high while chants of “Hey, hey, ho, ho, climate change has got to go” rang out across Parliament Square in Westminster. Protesters, some as young as 12, gathered beneath a statue of Mahatma Gandhi before amassing outside Downing Street, the home of the Prime Minister. According to the protests’ organizers, a group known as Youth Strike 4 Clim...
Source: TIME: Science - February 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: George Steer Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime U.K. Source Type: news

A Fresco of Narcissus Has Been Discovered Among the Ruins of Pompeii
Archeologists have made another major artistic discovery amid the ruins of ancient Pompeii, finding a well-preserved fresco depicting the Greek mythological figure of Narcissus. The Guardian reports that the fresco was discovered in the atrium of a house where an earlier excavation yielded another fresco painting portraying the eroticized Greek myth of Leda and the Swan. Narcissus, who according to the myth was so mesmerized by his own beauty that he fell in love with his reflection and died from desire burning inside him, was reportedly a popular subject of art in the first-century Roman city. “The beauty of these r...
Source: TIME: Science - February 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Casey Quackenbush Tags: Uncategorized Archaeology onetime overnight Source Type: news

NASA ’s Opportunity Rover Declared Dead After Record-Breaking 15 Years on Mars
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — NASA’s Opportunity, the Mars rover that was built to operate for just three months but kept going and going, rolling across the rocky red soil, was pronounced dead Wednesday, 15 years after it landed on the planet. The six-wheeled vehicle that helped gather critical evidence that ancient Mars might have been hospitable to life was remarkably spry up until eight months ago, when it was finally doomed by a ferocious dust storm. Flight controllers tried numerous times to make contact, and sent one final series of recovery commands Tuesday night, along with one last wake-up song, Billie Hol...
Source: TIME: Science - February 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MARCIA DUNN / AP Tags: Uncategorized NASA onetime space Source Type: news

Mark Kelly Isn ’t the First Astronaut to Consider a Political Campaign. But Most Didn’t Have the Right Stuff
Most people go through their entire lives without checking any of the major fame boxes. In a nation of 325 million people, there are only so many NFL quarterbacks, Oscar winners and Nobel laureates. There are only so many astronauts and elected officials, too — so it’s especially rare when someone tries to succeed at both gigs. Mark Kelly, onetime NASA astronaut and husband of former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, is going for just that twofer, with his Feb. 12 announcement that he will run for a U.S. Senate seat in Arizona during the 2020 cycle. Kelly, a Democrat, will be seeking to defeat incumbent GOP Sen...
Source: TIME: Science - February 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

The Men Behind GPS Just Won a Prestigious Engineering Prize. Not on the Prize List: a Woman
It’s an innovation that allows you to pinpoint your earthly location with just the phone in your pocket; it helps drivers navigate tricky routes, and it can even direct rescuers to stricken people in disaster zones. But Dr. Bradford Parkinson wasn’t able to use his brainchild, GPS, to stop himself getting lost in London, he quipped on Tuesday, as he and three others were named winners of the £1 million ($1.29m) Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering. The prestigious prize has been awarded every two years since 2013 to engineers responsible for innovations that benefit all of humanity. This year’s cho...
Source: TIME: Science - February 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Billy Perrigo/London Tags: Uncategorized engineering women Source Type: news

Google Doodle Celebrates the Chemist Who Accidentally ‘Discovered’ Caffeine
The name Friedlieb Ferdinand Runge may not mean much to you. But chances are you owe him a huge debt. For it was he who first “discovered” caffeine. Today, Google is celebrating what would have been his 225th birthday. Runge expressed an interest in chemistry from an early age, and began conducting experiments as a teenager. Legend has it that during one of these experiments, Runge noted how belladonna (a poisonous plant sometimes called ‘deadly nightshade’), induced a long-lasting dilation of the pupil of the eye. A decade later, while studying under the chemist and inventor Johann Wolfgang Dö...
Source: TIME: Science - February 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: George Steer Tags: Uncategorized Google onetime Source Type: news

Stanford Is Reviewing Faculty Links to Chinese Scientist Who Claims He Made Gene-Edited Babies
Stanford University has started a review of interactions that some faculty members had with He Jiankui, the Chinese scientist who claims to have helped make gene-edited babies. Several Stanford professors have said they knew or strongly suspected He wanted to try gene editing on embryos intended for pregnancy. The work has been widely criticized since November, when He revealed the births of twins whose DNA he said he altered to try to help them resist possible future infection with the AIDS virus. Most scientists think gene editing for reproductive purposes is too risky to be tried yet because of the danger of harming oth...
Source: TIME: Science - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MARILYNN MARCHIONE / AP Tags: Uncategorized China gene editing onetime Source Type: news

Among the Many Talents of the Humble Honey Bee: Arithmetic
Honey bees are capable of understanding complex arithmetic, according to a new study published Wednesday. Scientists discovered that bees can “learn to use blue and yellow as symbolic representations for addition or subtraction,” according to the report published in the peer-reviewed journal Science Advances. While many animals demonstrate an understanding of basic numbers for tasks such as foraging, shoaling, and resource management, more complex math can be done only by a limited number of nonhuman vertebrates. The findings are significant because honey bees and humans are separated by more than 400 million y...
Source: TIME: Science - February 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Casey Quackenbush Tags: Uncategorized animals onetime overnight Source Type: news

Trump Promised Manned Spaceflights From the U.S. This Year. Will It Actually Happen?
Great news from President Trump’s State of the Union speech: America is back in the space game! As the President honored Apollo 11 moonwalker Buzz Aldrin, who was seated in the visitor’s gallery, he also had this important news to report: “This year, American astronauts will go back to space on American rockets.” It’s pretty hard to find any wiggle room in that promise — except that Presidents could have said the same thing in 2016, 2017 and 2018 too, and it didn’t happen. Don’t rule it out for 2019, but don’t rule it in, either. Especially since, less than 24 hours aft...
Source: TIME: Science - February 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

A Third of the Himalayan Glaciers Will Melt by the End of the Century, a New Report Finds
At least one-third of the Himalayan glaciers, among the world’s most vital water resources, are projected to melt by the end of the century even if the most ambitions steps to halt global warming are achieved, a new report finds. And if nothing is done, with green house gas emissions continuing at pace, that loss could rise to two-thirds by 2100, says the report, “The Hindu Kush Himalaya Assessment.” The 2,000-mile Hindu Kush and Himalaya range stretches from Afghanistan to China and provides a source of water that sustains more than a quarter of the world’s population, according to the report. Know...
Source: TIME: Science - February 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Casey Quackenbush Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime overnight Source Type: news

Earth ’s North Pole Shifts About 34 Miles Per Year, Report Finds
(WASHINGTON) — True north isn’t quite where it used to be. Earth’s north magnetic pole has been drifting so fast in the last few decades that scientists that past estimates are no longer accurate enough for precise navigation. On Monday, they released an update of where true north really was, nearly a year ahead of schedule. The magnetic north pole is wandering about 34 miles (55 kilometers) a year. It crossed the international date line in 2017, and is leaving the Canadian Arctic on its way to Siberia. The constant shift is a problem for compasses in smartphones and some consumer electronics. Airplanes a...
Source: TIME: Science - February 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: SETH BORENSTEIN / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Birders Take Advantage of People Misspelling Super Bowl With ‘Superb Owls’ You’re Seeing Everywhere
Sunday’s football game might have been the lowest scoring Super Bowl of all time, but Superb Owls scored big on social media on Sunday night. Birders and wildlife nonprofits took advantage of a common misspelling on social media today to draw attention to post photos of the birds. The images ranged from the tiny and twee-looking elf owl to the elegant great horned owl. One owl enthusiast, James Duncan, even took over the r/Superbowl thread on Reddit to take questions about the animals. Duncan, who wrote that he is the founder of social enterprise company Discover Owls, explained on Twitter that his mission is to teac...
Source: TIME: Science - February 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized onetime Super Bowl 2019 Source Type: news

The Polar Vortex Is Causing Startling ‘Frost Quakes.’ Here’s the Science Behind Them
Weather that feels like it’s -50° F outside is unnerving enough on its own. But for some midwesterners trapped in an icy polar vortex this week, those bone-chillingly cold temperatures have been accompanied by an unsettling phenomenon: loud and seemingly inexplicable banging sounds. “A huge noise woke me around 2:30 am,” said one Twitter user. “Scared the living daylights out of me. Didn’t know what it was. A few minutes later, it happened again.” In case you missed this yesterday… A huge noise woke me around 2:30 am. Scared the living daylights out of me. Didn’t know...
Source: TIME: Science - January 31, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

Trump Said ‘We Need’ Global Warming to Deal With Record Cold Temperatures. Here’s Why That Doesn’t Make Sense
President Trump has been a longtime opponent of taking action on climate change, as evidenced by everything from his accusation that the phenomenon is a “hoax” created by China to his decision to pull the U.S. out of the Paris Agreement. There are many reasons Trump may be against addressing climate change, but one thing is clear: he doesn’t understand the science behind it. On Monday, the President took to Twitter to repeat a joke he frequently makes during winter weather events — this time the record-breaking, polar vortex-caused cold that’s sweeping the midwest this week — as a reason...
Source: TIME: Science - January 29, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized climate onetime Source Type: news

American Nobel Laureate Knew About Chinese Scientist Gene-Editing Babies, But Did Not Report Him, Emails Show
Long before the claim of the world’s first gene-edited babies became public, Chinese researcher He Jiankui shared the news with a U.S. Nobel laureate who objected to the experiment yet remained an adviser to He’s biotech company. The revelation that another prominent scientist knew of the work, which was widely condemned when it was revealed, comes as scientists debate whether and how to alert troubling research, and the need for clearer guidelines. Emails obtained by The Associated Press under a public records request show that Nobel Prize winner Craig Mello of the University of Massachusetts learned about the...
Source: TIME: Science - January 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: CANDICE CHOI and MARILYNN MARCHIONE / AP Tags: Uncategorized China onetime Source Type: news

A Total Lunar Eclipse Will Coincide With a Supermoon This Sunday
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — Here comes a total lunar eclipse and supermoon, all wrapped into one. The moon, Earth and sun will line up this weekend for the only total lunar eclipse this year and next. At the same time, the moon will be ever so closer to Earth and appear slightly bigger and brighter than usual — a supermoon. “This one is particularly good,” said Rice University astrophysicist Patrick Hartigan. “It not only is a supermoon and it’s a total eclipse, but the total eclipse also lasts pretty long. It’s about an hour.” The whole eclipse starts Sunday night or early Mond...
Source: TIME: Science - January 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized astronomy onetime overnight Source Type: news

Asteroids Are Slamming Into Earth Twice as Much as Before, Scientists Say
(WASHINGTON) — Giant rocks from space are falling from the sky more than they used to, but don’t worry. For the past 290 million years, large asteroids have been crashing into Earth more than twice as often as they did in the previous 700 million years, according to a new study in Thursday’s journal Science. But no need to cast a wary glance up. Asteroids still only smack Earth on average every million or few million years, even with the increased crash rate. NASA’s list of potential big space rock crashes shows no pending major threats. The biggest known risk is a 4,200-ft. (1.3-km) wide asteroid w...
Source: TIME: Science - January 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space Source Type: news

A Bizarre ‘Ice Circle’ Is Turning Heads in Maine. Here’s the Science Behind It
Nature loves to make things round: planets, soap bubbles, oranges, eyeballs, the circular swirl of a spinning hurricane. A lot of forces are at play in favoring natural circles and spheres—the equalizing force of air pressure pushing out or gravity pulling in; the rotation of the Earth, creating vortices in air; the evolutionary imperative of efficient packaging. The power of the round is in the news again, with the appearance of a massive, rotating ice disk in the Presumpscot River in Westbrook, Maine. The disk was first noticed on January 14, spinning in a lazy, counterclockwise direction. On social media, the ice ...
Source: TIME: Science - January 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized nature onetime Source Type: news

China Grows the First Seed on the Moon
The moon is an inhospitable place. In the sunlight, temperatures hit highs of 260 degrees Fahrenheit, in the dark, it can reach a miserable minus 280. Radiation is high and water is scarce. But according to the China National Space Administration, there is now life growing 240,000 miles from the Earth; cotton seeds carried on board the Chang’e-4 lunar lander have just sprouted, making them the first plants to ever germinate on another world. “We have given consideration to future survival in space. Learning about these plants’ growth in a low-gravity environment would allow us to lay the foundation for ou...
Source: TIME: Science - January 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: George Steer Tags: Uncategorized China onetime space Source Type: news

Environmentalists Say Tiny Plastic ‘Nurdles’ Threaten Earth’s Oceans
(Bloomberg) — Environmentalists have identified another threat to the planet. It’s called a nurdle. Nurdles are tiny pellets of plastic resin no bigger than a pencil eraser that manufacturers transform into packaging, plastic straws, water bottles and other typical targets of environmental action. But the nurdles themselves are also a problem. Billions of them are lost from production and supply chains every year, spilling or washing into waterways. A U.K. environmental consultancy estimated last year that preproduction plastic pellets are the second-largest source of micro-plastic pollution in water, after mi...
Source: TIME: Science - January 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Eric Roston / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized Environment onetime Source Type: news

The Oceans Are Warming Faster Than We Thought, a New Study Says
The planet’s oceans are warming a lot quicker than estimated, highlighting the perils of unchecked climate change, according to a new study. New data published by the journal Science on Thursday, indicates that ocean temperatures have consistently risen since the 1950s and are rising 40% faster than calculated by scientists in a 2014 U.N. report. According to Lijing Cheng, one of the study’s authors, temperatures down to 2,000 meters rose about 0.1 degree Celsius (0.18F) between 1971-2010, according to Reuters. The fallout could include rising sea levels, destruction of corals, severe weather systems and a decr...
Source: TIME: Science - January 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Kamakshi Ayyar Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime overnight Source Type: news

The Hubble Space Telescope ’s Main Camera Is Suffering Tech Problems
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — The Hubble Space Telescope’s premier camera has shut down. NASA says the camera suspended operations Tuesday because of a hardware problem. Hubble’s three other science instruments are still working fine, with celestial observations continuing. This third incarnation of the camera was installed by spacewalking shuttle astronauts in 2009. NASA says the camera has backup electronics that could be called into action, if necessary. The camera has captured stunning images of stars, galaxies stretching far back in time and assisted in deep sky surveys. It’s also studied objects in...
Source: TIME: Science - January 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MARCIA DUNN / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

U.S. Carbon Emissions See Second Largest Year-On-Year Increase in 20 Years
(Bloomberg) — In the debate over climate change, the heaviest polluters — think: power plants, trucks and cars — get the most attention from policy makers. New research suggests a broader view might be called for. A pair of often-overlooked sectors posted the largest rises in carbon dioxide pollution in the U.S. in 2018. Emissions generated by industrial manufacturing jumped 5.7 percent, according to research firm Rhodium Group. Commercial and residential buildings generated ten percent more emissions. Those increases drove the 3.4 percent rise in overall pollution, the second-biggest year-over-year incr...
Source: TIME: Science - January 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Eric Roston / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized Environment onetime Pollution Source Type: news

IBM Wants to Use Your Data to Create Hyper-Accurate Weather Forecasts
IBM on Tuesday unveiled a global weather modeling system that will combine data from smartphones and aircraft to produce what it says will be hyper-accurate local forecasts. The system, called the IBM Global High-Resolution Atmospheric Forecasting System, or GRAF, will create a one-day forecast updating every hour at a resolution of 3 kilometers, or about 1.9 miles — a notable upgrade for many parts of the world. The company is pitching GRAF as particularly useful in industries that depend on accurate short-term weather forecasting, like agriculture and transportation, and especially in developing nations with less s...
Source: TIME: Science - January 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alex Fitzpatrick Tags: Uncategorized CES 2018 onetime Source Type: news

Here Are All of the Solar and Lunar Eclipses You Can See in 2019
2019 will have plenty in store for astronomy fans across the world, with a total solar eclipse, an annular solar eclipse, a total lunar eclipse and more. The most exciting such event for U.S.-based stargazers may be the so-called “Super Blood Wolf Moon Eclipse” on Jan. 21, says Christian Veillet, an astronomer at the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory in Arizona. “The January lunar eclipse will be special, at least for the U.S. It’s really seen by the whole of America and South America and nicely centered, so everyone will be able to see all the totality phase of it, so it’s a nice show,&rd...
Source: TIME: Science - January 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Gina Martinez Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Why You Should Be Happy About China ’s Historic Moon Landing
There is a perfectly wonderful map on a playful Facebook cartography page. It shows all of the countries in the world, with a two-color key underneath. Red indicates “countries with moon on the flag.” There are thirteen of them. Blue indicates “countries with flag on the moon.” There is only one: the United States. It’s hard not to get a patriotic thrill from that—even if it was never technically true. The U.S. is certainly the first—and so far the only—country whose flags on the moon were planted by human hands. But the Soviet Union was the first to get its emblem onto the l...
Source: TIME: Science - January 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized China onetime space Source Type: news

‘I Just Have to Sit Here and Twiddle My Thumbs.’ Scientists Face Delays and Uncertainty As Government Shutdown Continues
As far as Douglas Holmes knows, he has to submit a research proposal to the National Science Foundation (NSF) on Monday. But as the partial government shutdown nears its two-week mark, leaving the NSF and other government agencies dark, Holmes, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Boston University who wants to study soft robots that would help surgeons perform minimally invasive procedures, has more on his mind than research. “Time typically spent refining the science of the proposal is now spent wondering about deadlines, submission protocol and technicalities,” Holmes says. “The proposal...
Source: TIME: Science - January 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research Source Type: news

The Shutdown Won ’t Stop Weather Forecasts. But It’s Creating Problems for the Future
Around the country, from flood-prone lowlands to Tornado Alley, weather can be deadly serious. Timely warnings from the National Weather Service (NWS), the federal agency tasked with keeping track of weather across the United States, are key to preserving human life in extreme weather events. Now, as the government shutdown drags into its 13th day, some are wondering if the partially-staffed NWS is still reliable, or if the service is even operating at all. Fortunately, much of the weather forecasting operations of the NWS’ parent agency — the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) — are e...
Source: TIME: Science - January 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized onetime Shutdown weather Source Type: news

How An Oil Boom in West Texas Is Reshaping the World
My view from the window seat of a small regional jet landing in Midland, Texas, is either a testament to the advances of human civilization or a sign of its impending demise, depending on your perspective. Countless oil wells, identified by their glowing red flames, dot the dark landscape. We are descending into the Permian Basin, the heart of American oil country, where the massive oil and gas boom is changing not just Texas but also the nation and the world. This year the region is expected to generate an average of 3.9 million barrels per day, roughly a third of total U.S. oil production, according to the U.S. Departmen...
Source: TIME: Science - January 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized energy Source Type: news

Thousands of Women Are Born Without a Uterus. A New Procedure Offers Them Hope
On an afternoon in November, a couple hosted a birthday party for their 1-year-old son. As family and friends gathered around the child to sing “Happy Birthday,” his parents addressed a milestone that reached well beyond the room. “It was emotional,” recalls the mother. “It took a lot more than a nine-month pregnancy to get him, and we wouldn’t be where we are without everyone’s support.” Many parents will tell you their child is miraculous. But the mere existence of this particular boy, who just a month earlier had taken his first steps, brings the miracle somehow closer to ...
Source: TIME: Science - January 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized fertility Research Source Type: news

The Silent Shame of Male Infertility
Bradley Goldman has filled out a size large T-shirt his whole adult life. As a bodybuilder, he knew that a steady stream of lean, bland proteins, heavy weights and steroids would make his muscles pop. But over the past six months, Goldman, a fitness and nutrition consultant in Los Angeles, has watched his jacked physique soften and shrink. “I cracked a couple of weeks ago, and I had to buy a shirt a whole size smaller,” he says. He tried it on for his wife Brittany, and it hung loose on his frame. “I just kind of shook my head,” he says. He knew she saw the changes too. Goldman, now 30, began takin...
Source: TIME: Science - January 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Mandy Oaklander Tags: Uncategorized fertility Research Source Type: news

An Experimental Procedure Could Help More Families Have Healthy Babies. But It ’s Not Allowed in the U.S.
When Noah Shulman was born a few days after Christmas 2016, his parents Kristelle and Evan had no reason to worry about him. The pregnancy went smoothly, and so did the birth. But within a few days of taking his first breath, Noah began to struggle. He wasn’t feeding, so he started losing weight. He was also lethargic. Several pediatricians reassured the Shulmans that they were probably just overly sensitive to Noah’s symptoms because Kristelle is a nurse and Evan is a physician assistant–a case of first-time-parent-white-coat syndrome. “They kind of dismissed us as neurotic parents,” says Eva...
Source: TIME: Science - January 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized fertility Research Source Type: news

Queen Guitarist (And Astrophysicist) Brian May On His Work With NASA and His New Song About Ultima Thule
It’s the rare person who can call advanced astrophysics and deep space exploration a side hustle. That’s especially so when that person’s main job has been playing lead guitar for one of rock’s most legendary bands. But rare people do exist, and Brian May—that’s Dr. Brian May to you—is one of them. May is best know as part of the foursome that was Queen—whose story is being told in the recently released biopic Bohemian Rhapsody—and as the composer of multiple Queen hits, including “We Will Rock You.” As the movie reveals, however, May was studying astrophysi...
Source: TIME: Science - January 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Music onetime space Source Type: news

A NASA Probe 4 Billion Miles From Earth Took These Pictures of Mysterious Ultima Thule
(LAUREL, Md.) — A NASA spacecraft traveling 4 billion miles from Earth has sent back its first close-up pictures of the most distant celestial object ever explored, and it looks like a reddish snowman. Ultima Thule, as the small, icy object has been dubbed, is an elongated body about 20 miles long, consisting of two fused-together spheres. NASA’s New Horizons, the spacecraft that sent back pictures of Pluto 3½ years ago, swept past the ancient, mysterious object early on New Year’s Day. It is a billion miles past Pluto. The pictures from Ultima Thule were revealed Wednesday. Scientist Jeff Moore sa...
Source: TIME: Science - January 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MARCIA DUNN / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

NASA Spacecraft Opens New Year at Tiny, Icy World Past Pluto
(LAUREL, Md) — NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft has survived humanity’s most distant exploration of another world. Ten hours after the middle-of-the-night encounter 4 billion miles (6.4 billion kilometers) away, flight controllers in Laurel, Maryland, received word from the spacecraft late Tuesday morning. Cheers erupted at Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory, home to Mission Control. “We have a healthy spacecraft. We’ve just accomplished the most distant flyby,” announced Alice Bowman, mission operations manager. An anxious spill-over crowd in a nearby auditorium j...
Source: TIME: Science - January 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MARCIA DUNN/ AP Tags: Uncategorized Science space Source Type: news

A NASA Spacecraft Begins the New Year Observing an Unknown Region Beyond Pluto
(LAUREL, Md.) — The NASA spacecraft that yielded the first close-up views of Pluto opened the new year at an even more distant world, a billion miles beyond. Flight controllers said everything looked good for New Horizons’ flyby of the tiny, icy object at 12:33 a.m. Tuesday. Confirmation was not expected for hours, though, given the vast distance. The mysterious, ancient target nicknamed Ultima Thule is 4 billion miles (6.4 billion kilometers) from Earth. Scientists wanted New Horizons observing Ultima Thule during the encounter, not phoning home. So they had to wait until late morning before learning whether t...
Source: TIME: Science - January 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space Source Type: news

A NASA Spacecraft Has Set Records After Entering Orbit Around an Asteroid
(LAUREL, Md.) — A NASA spacecraft has gone into orbit around an ancient asteroid, setting a pair of records. The Osiris-Rex spacecraft entered orbit Monday around the asteroid Bennu, 70 million miles (110 million kilometers) from Earth. It’s the smallest celestial body ever to be orbited by a spacecraft. Bennu is just 1,600 feet (500 meters) across. The spacecraft’s laps are barely a mile (1.6 kilometers) above the asteroid’s surface, another record. Osiris-Rex arrived at Bennu in early December and flew in formation with it until the latest maneuver. The goal is to grab gravel samples in 2020 for r...
Source: TIME: Science - January 1, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space Source Type: news

A ‘Super Blood Wolf Moon’ Eclipse Is Coming in January 2019. Here’s How to Watch
In January 2019, stargazers in the U.S. and elsewhere will be treated to a lunar eclipse that some are calling the “super blood wolf moon.” A simultaneous total lunar eclipse and a “supermoon” will take place on the night of Jan. 20 into the morning of Jan. 21. During the event, the moon will appear red-colored and slightly larger than usual for about an hour. As the last total lunar eclipse until 2021, the astronomical phenomenon is a can’t-miss event. People in all of North and South America, as well as parts of Asia and Europe, will be able to witness the lunar eclipse. Here’s wha...
Source: TIME: Science - December 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gina Martinez Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

A NASA Probe Launched to Study Pluto Is About to Look at Another Mysterious Object
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — The spacecraft team that brought us close-ups of Pluto will ring in the new year by exploring an even more distant and mysterious world. NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft will zip past the scrawny, icy object nicknamed Ultima Thule soon after the stroke of midnight. One billion miles beyond Pluto and an astounding 4 billion miles from Earth (1.6 billion kilometers and 6.4 billion kilometers), Ultima Thule will be the farthest world ever explored by humankind. That’s what makes this deep-freeze target so enticing; it’s a preserved relic dating all the way back to our solar syste...
Source: TIME: Science - December 27, 2018 Category: Science Authors: MARCIA DUNN / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Apollo 8 ’s ‘Earthrise’ Photo Changed Our Understanding of Our Place in the Universe. Here’s the Story Behind the Picture
It was a bad day for Bill Anders when NASA took away his spacecraft and gave him a camera. The spacecraft was a nifty one: the spindly, four-legged lunar module that would ferry two members of a three-man Apollo crew down to the surface of the moon while the third member minded the Apollo mothership in orbit overhead. Anders was a rookie astronaut, a member of the newest class of recruits, and in the run-up to the Apollo missions he knew it was unlikely he would ever get to command a lunar module; but if he learned every little thing there was to know about the machine — making himself as much of an expert as the peo...
Source: TIME: Science - December 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized 1968 Apollo 8 Earthrise History NASA photography space Source Type: news

SpaceX Launches Most Powerful U.S. Air Force GPS Satellite Ever
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — SpaceX has launched the U.S. Air Force’s most powerful GPS satellite ever built. A Falcon 9 rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on Sunday, hoisting the satellite into orbit. The satellite was supposed to soar Tuesday but rocket concerns and then weather delayed the flight. Heather Wilson, secretary of the Air Force, says this next-generation GPS satellite is three times more accurate than previous versions and eight times better at anti-jamming. It’s the first in a series and nicknamed Vespucci after the 15th-century Italian explorer who calculated Earth’s circu...
Source: TIME: Science - December 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Military onetime space Source Type: news

Uranus Was Likely Hit By a Rock Which Made the Planet Lopsided, Scientists Say
(WASHINGTON) — Uranus is a lopsided oddity, the only planet to spin on its side. Scientists now think they know how it got that way: It was pushed over by a rock at least twice as big as Earth. Detailed computer simulations show that an enormous rock crashed into the seventh planet from the sun, said Durham University astronomy researcher Jacob Kegerreis, who presented his analysis at a large earth and space science conference this month. Uranus is unique in the solar system. The massive planet tilts about 90 degrees on its side, as do its five largest moons. Its magnetic field is also lopsided and doesn’t go o...
Source: TIME: Science - December 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: SETH BORENSTEIN / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime planets Source Type: news

People Are Already Planning on Ice Skating on Mars Thanks to This Stunning Photo
A bracingly stunning new image of a massive icy crater from the Mars Express spacecraft has captured the imagination of the internet. While there is not yet an ice rink open for business on Mars, to forward-thinking Earth-dwellers, it looks like an ideal scenic spot for skating. And they’ve taken to Twitter with unbridled enthusiasm for the idea. The ESA revealed the photo Thursday, and overnight, the astronomical phenomena became the new swinging hot spot for winter 2018. A beautiful #winter wonderland… on #Mars! This ice-filled crater was imaged by our Mars Express spacecraft. Korolev crater is 82 kilometres...
Source: TIME: Science - December 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ashley Hoffman Tags: Uncategorized space Source Type: news

Take a Good Look at Saturn Before it ’s Too Late, Because it’s Losing its Rings
It ain’t St. Louis without the Gateway Arch, it ain’t Mount Rushmore without the Presidents, and it sure ain’t Saturn without the rings. That, at least, is how it’s always seemed—but things are apparently changing. According to a new study published in the journal Icarus, Saturn could be largely ringless in as little as 100 million years. Among astronomers, the smart betting has never been that Saturn’s rings would live forever. The diameter of the ring system is huge: 170,000 miles, or almost three-quarters of the distance from the Earth to the moon. But it’s also as little as 30 ...
Source: TIME: Science - December 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

We ’re About to Launch 4 Different Rockets Into Space On the Same Day
On a historic day of four planned space launches, Lockheed Martin Corp. is betting that the first of its long-delayed, next-generation Global Positioning System satellites can do its job even though congressional investigators say it has suspect capacitors that could undermine its mission. A GPS-III satellite scheduled to be sent into orbit by Elon Musk’s SpaceX on Tuesday morning in Florida is the first of a new wave of spacecraft which promise greater accuracy and stronger signals to help guide everything from ride-sharing services to missiles. But the satellite, launching four years late, contains about 600 suspec...
Source: TIME: Science - December 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized Bloomberg onetime space Source Type: news

The Brightest Comet of the Year Is Visible This Weekend. Here ’s Where to See It
The brightest comet of 2018 will streak past Earth right after the peak of the Geminid meteor shower. Comet 46P/Wirtanen will be closest to Earth on Dec. 16, according to EarthSky, and is currently the brightest comet in the sky. The comet will come within about 7 million miles of Earth, putting it among the 10 comets that have come closest to the planet since 1950, according to the University of Maryland’s astronomy department. Comet 46P/Wirtanen appears in the sky as it orbits the sun about every five years. According the University of Maryland, its brightness varies with each approach—and 2018 is a particula...
Source: TIME: Science - December 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Why Wannabe Astronauts Shouldn ’t Get Too Excited About Virgin Galactic’s Flight to ‘Space’
For the first time in a very long time, Sir Richard Branson has some good news to report from the spaceport he built in the Mojave desert: at 7:11 a.m. Pacific time Thursday, his Virgin Galactic company at last succeeded in launching honest-to-goodness astronauts into honest-to-goodness space. Sort of. Maybe. If you’re grading on a really, really generous curve. But that’s not the breathless way the news is being framed. The bare facts of the flight are not in dispute—and indeed amount to a nifty bit of engineering and flying. Virgin Galactic’s eight-seat VSS Unity spacecraft, with pilots Mark &ldqu...
Source: TIME: Science - December 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Virgin Galactic Says Its Tourism Spaceship Officials Flew into Space
(MOJAVE, Calif.) — Virgin Galactic says its tourism spaceship has climbed more than 50 miles high, which the company considers the boundary of space. Virgin Space Ship Unity was released from a carrier aircraft over California’s Mojave Desert early Thursday and ignited its rocket engine. The spacecraft with two test pilots at the controls quickly hurtled upward and out of sight from viewers on the ground. Mission official Enrico Palermo says it reached an altitude of 51 miles (82 kilometers) before beginning its gliding descent. It landed minutes later. The company plans to eventually take paying passengers on ...
Source: TIME: Science - December 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

The 2018 Geminid Meteor Shower, One of the Year ’s Best, Peaks Thursday. Here’s How to Watch
Stargazers willing to endure December’s chill are in for a treat Thursday night into Friday morning: the 2018 Geminid meteor shower, typically one of the best meteor showers of the year, peaks the evening of Dec. 13 and the morning of Dec. 14. The Geminid meteor shower happens every year, when the Earth flies through debris left behind by an asteroid named 3200 Phaethon. The shooting stars appear to radiate from the constellation Gemini, hence the name. But they can show up anywhere in the sky, often with a stunning brilliance that makes them well worth hanging out in the cold. Heading out to see the Geminid meteor ...
Source: TIME: Science - December 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alex Fitzpatrick Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Watch the Air and Space Museum ’s Apollo 8 Anniversary Celebration Live
The National Air and Space Museum is celebrating the 50th anniversary of NASA’s Apollo 8 lunar mission with an event Tuesday, Dec. 11 at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. Apollo 8 Command Module Pilot Capt. James Lovell will speak at the event, along with Rev. Michael Curry, Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, and more. The Apollo 8 mission, which launched on Dec. 21, 1968, was NASA’s first manned flight to lunar orbit. The astronauts aboard the flight — Lovell as well as Commander Frank Borman and Lunar Module Pilot William Anders — became the firs...
Source: TIME: Science - December 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: TIME Staff Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news