Boomer and Bust: Millennials and Their Younger Siblings Now the New U.S. Majority
(ORLANDO, Fla.) — Sorry, boomers. Millennials and their younger siblings and children now make up a majority of the U.S. population. A new analysis by the Brookings Institution shows that 50.7% of U.S. residents were under age 40, as of July 2019. The Brookings’ analysis of population estimates released this summer by the U.S. Census Bureau shows that the combined millennial, Generation Z and younger generations numbered 166 million people. The combined Generation X, baby boomer, and older cohorts represented 162 million U.S. residents. “To many Americans—especially baby boomers themselves—thi...
Source: TIME: Science - August 3, 2020 Category: Science Authors: MIKE SCHNEIDER / AP Tags: Uncategorized News Desk Research wire Source Type: news

SpaceX Dragon Capsule With NASA Astronauts Makes Successful Splashdown
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — Two NASA astronauts returned to Earth on Sunday in a dramatic, retro-style splashdown, their capsule parachuting into the Gulf of Mexico to close out an unprecedented test flight by Elon Musk’s SpaceX company. It was the first splashdown by U.S. astronauts in 45 years, with the first commercially built and operated spacecraft to carry people to and from orbit. The return clears the way for another SpaceX crew launch as early as next month and possible tourist flights next year. Test pilots Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken rode the SpaceX Dragon capsule back to Earth less than a day after dep...
Source: TIME: Science - August 2, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized News Desk Space wire Source Type: news

NASA ’s Perseverance Rover Embarks on the Agency’s Most Ambitious Mars Mission Yet
If there were any intelligent beings on Mars, they’d likely be confused by a little plaque recently added to the side of the SUV-sized Perseverance Mars rover, which lifted off at 7:50 AM local time on Thursday morning from Cape Canaveral in Florida and is set to reach Mars in February. Nobody had planned any late additions to the rover—but no one had planned on a lot of things this year, least of all the COVID-19 pandemic which continues to burn across the world. As it did with pretty much everyone else in the United States, the pandemic forced the Perseverance team to work from home if they could, social dist...
Source: TIME: Science - July 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

NASA Launches Mars Rover to Look For Signs of Ancient Life
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — The biggest, most sophisticated Mars rover ever built — a car-size vehicle bristling with cameras, microphones, drills and lasers — blasted off for the red planet Thursday as part of an ambitious, long-range project to bring the first Martian rock samples back to Earth to be analyzed for evidence of ancient life. NASA’s Perseverance rode a mighty Atlas V rocket into a clear morning sky in the world’s third and final Mars launch of the summer. China and the United Arab Emirates got a head start last week, but all three missions should reach their destination in February...
Source: TIME: Science - July 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: MARCIA DUNN /AP Tags: Uncategorized News News Desk wire Source Type: news

U.S. Eyes Building Nuclear Power Plants on the Moon, Mars
(BOISE, Idaho) — The U.S. wants to build nuclear power plants that will work on the moon and Mars, and on Friday put out a request for ideas from the private sector on how to do that. The U.S. Department of Energy put out the formal request to build what it calls a fission surface power system that could allow humans to live for long periods in harsh space environments. The Idaho National Laboratory, a nuclear research facility in eastern Idaho, the Energy Department and NASA will evaluate the ideas for developing the reactor. Read more: America Really Does Have a Space Force. We Went Inside to See What It Does The ...
Source: TIME: Science - July 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: KEITH RIDLER / AP Tags: Uncategorized News Desk Space wire Source Type: news

What Modern Sustainability Could Learn From a 200-Year-Old American Tradition
This article is excerpted from TIME: SUSTAINABILITY, available at retailers and on Amazon. In his book Walden, the American essayist Henry David Thoreau famously documented his attempts to live simply and “deliberately” on the edge of a lake in the woods of Massachusetts. While many today think of Thoreau’s memoir as a paean to a solitary existence, those who study and teach Thoreau say this is a misconception. “The message of Walden is not about withdrawing from society,” says Aaron Sachs, a professor of history at Cornell University who studies American culture and its engagement with natur...
Source: TIME: Science - July 24, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Wildfires Rage in Arctic Circle and Sea Ice Melts Amid Siberian Heatwave
(GENEVA) — The U.N. weather agency warned Friday that average temperatures in Siberia were 10 degrees Celsius (18 Fahrenheit) above average last month, a spate of exceptional heat that has fanned devastating fires in the Arctic Circle and contributed to a rapid depletion in ice sea off Russia’s Arctic coast. “The Arctic is heating more than twice as fast as the global average, impacting local populations and ecosystems and with global repercussions,” World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General Petteri Taalas said in a statement Friday. He noted that Earth’s poles influence weather cond...
Source: TIME: Science - July 24, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized climate change News Desk wire Source Type: news

China Launches an Ambitious Attempt to Land a Rover on Mars
(BEIJING) — China launched its most ambitious Mars mission yet on Thursday in a bold attempt to join the United States in successfully landing a spacecraft on the red planet. Engines blazing orange, a Long March-5 carrier rocket took off under clear skies around 12:40 p.m. from Hainan Island, south of China’s mainland. Hundreds of space enthusiasts cried out excitedly on a beach across the bay from the launch site. Launch commander Zhang Xueyu announced to cheers in the control room that the rocket was flying normally about 45 minutes later. “The Mars rover has accurately entered the scheduled orbit,&rdqu...
Source: TIME: Science - July 23, 2020 Category: Science Authors: SAMUEL McNEIL and ANIRUDDHA GHOSAL / AP Tags: Uncategorized News Desk overnight Space wire Source Type: news

NASA Astronauts Take One Last Spacewalk Before End of SpaceX ’s First Crew Flight
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — Astronauts squeezed in one last spacewalk Tuesday before turning their attention to the all-important end to SpaceX’s first crew flight. NASA’s Bob Behnken and Chris Cassidy floated out of the International Space Station on their fourth and final spacewalk in under a month. Instead of swapping batteries, they had to route cables, hook up a tool storage chest and perform other maintenance. It was the 10th spacewalk in each of their careers, tying the U.S. record set by previous space station residents. In less than two weeks, Behnken and Doug Hurley, who monitored the spacewalk fro...
Source: TIME: Science - July 21, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized News Desk Space wire Source Type: news

Climate Change Pushes Polar Bears Towards Extinction, Study Finds
The majority of polar bears will likely disappear by the end of the century if greenhouse gas emissions are not curbed, according to a new study published Monday. While scientists have long known polar bears are threatened by global heating, this latest study published in Nature Climate Change is the first to identify when and where the bears will disappear. Polar bears rely on sea ice to hunt for seals. But as temperatures rise and sea ice disappears, so do hunting opportunities for polar bears. “The dire predictions in our study result from polar bear’s dependence on sea ice and the projected rapid loss of th...
Source: TIME: Science - July 21, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Mélissa Godin Tags: Uncategorized Londontime photography Source Type: news

UAE ’s Mission to Mars Launches Successfully—a First for the Arab World
(TOKYO) — A United Arab Emirates spacecraft rocketed away Monday on a seven-month journey to Mars, kicking off the Arab world’s first interplanetary mission. The liftoff of the Mars orbiter named Amal, or Hope, from Japan marked the start of a rush to fly to Earth’s neighbor that includes attempts by China and the United States. The UAE said its Amal was functioning after launch as it heads toward Mars. Omran Sharaf, the project director of Emirates Mars Mission, told journalists in Dubai about an hour and a half after the liftoff that the probe was sending signals. Sharaf said his team now would examine ...
Source: TIME: Science - July 19, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Mari Yamaguchi and Victoria Milko / AP Tags: Uncategorized News Desk overnight Space wire Source Type: news

How a New Effort to Trace Emissions, Led by Al Gore, Could Reshape Climate Talks
As countries entered the final months of talks ahead of the Paris Agreement in 2015, China offered a big revelation: the country had burned substantially more coal than it had previously acknowledged in the preceding years. Many diplomats took the voluntary acknowledgment as a sign of good faith. Nonetheless, the update underscored the broader challenges that climate change activists face when it comes to data collection. Historically, there’s been no way for third parties to directly gather data on the greenhouse gas emissions of both public and private entities, and so any concerted effort to reduce emissions has r...
Source: TIME: Science - July 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

A Newly Discovered Comet Is Currently Passing By Earth — Here’s How to Catch a Glimpse
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — A newly discovered comet is streaking past Earth, providing a stunning nighttime show after buzzing the sun and expanding its tail. NASA’s Neowise infrared space telescope discovered the comet in March. Comet Neowise — the brightest comet visible from the Northern Hemisphere in a quarter-century — swept within Mercury’s orbit a week ago. Its close proximity to the sun caused dust and gas to burn off its surface and create an even bigger debris tail. Now the comet is headed our way, with closest approach in two weeks. Scientists involved in the mission said the comet is...
Source: TIME: Science - July 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized News Desk Space wire Source Type: news

A Revolution ’s Evolution: Inside Extinction Rebellion’s Attempt to Reform its Climate Activism
The honeymoon for Extinction Rebellion, the hugely influential climate activist group, ended on Oct. 17, 2019. From its launch, a year earlier, until that day, it seemed like the group might have cracked the formula for saving the planet: its strategy of shutting down city centers with disruptive, nonviolent civil disobedience had drawn ordinary people onto the streets to demand action on the climate crisis. It had also made the group, now present in 75 countries, the most radical of a wave of climate activist groups sweeping the world in recent years, including the youth-focused Sunrise Movement in the U.S. and the school...
Source: TIME: Science - July 9, 2020 Category: Science Tags: Uncategorized climate change feature Londontime Magazine Source Type: news

Gilead ’s $2,340 Price for Coronavirus Drug Remdesivir Draws Criticism
The maker of a drug shown to shorten recovery time for severely ill COVID-19 patients says it will charge $2,340 for a typical treatment course for people covered by government health programs in the United States and other developed countries. Gilead Sciences announced the price Monday for remdesivir, and said the price would be $3,120 for patients with private insurance. The amount that patients pay out of pocket depends on insurance, income and other factors. “We’re in uncharted territory with pricing a new medicine, a novel medicine, in a pandemic,” Gilead’s chief executive, Dan O’Day, tol...
Source: TIME: Science - June 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: MARILYNN MARCHIONE / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News News Desk Source Type: news

U.K. Researchers Say They Have Found First Drug that Improves COVID-19 Survival
Researchers in England say they have the first evidence that a drug can improve COVID-19 survival: A steroid called dexamethasone reduced deaths by up to one third in severely ill hospitalized patients. Results were announced Tuesday and researchers said they would publish them soon. The study is a large, strict test that randomly assigned 2,104 patients to get the drug and compared them with 4,321 patients getting only usual care. The drug was given either orally or through an IV. It reduced deaths by 35% in patients who needed treatment with breathing machines and by 20% in those only needing supplemental oxygen. It did ...
Source: TIME: Science - June 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: MARILYNN MARCHIONE /AP Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

‘Superforecasters’ Are Making Eerily Accurate Predictions About COVID-19. Our Leaders Could Learn From Their Approach
When Dr. Anthony Facui said in late May that there’s a “good chance” a COVID-19 vaccine will be ready by the end of this year, Steve Roth badly wanted to believe him. Roth, a 74-year-old New Yorker who endured fever, pneumonia and anxiety while fighting the virus, wants life to go back to normal as much as anyone. And he respects Fauci, the longtime head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), ”an awful lot,” he says. But he just doesn’t think Facui’s timeline is realistic. Instead, he’s putting his proverbial money on mid 2021. “Like every...
Source: TIME: Science - June 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Clean Energy Capacity Grew at a Record Pace in 2019, U.N. Report Finds. But it Needs to Grow Even Faster
The world’s renewable power capacity grew at a faster rate last year than ever before, while the cost of adding new capacity fell to a record low, says a U.N. Environment Program report released June 10. Researchers found that in 2019, governments and companies created 184 gigawatts (GW) of new renewable power capacity —12% more than was added in 2018. That increase came despite investment in the sector rising by just 1%, to $282.2 billion, meaning clean power capacity was cheaper to create per watt. (The report does not include the older technology of large hydropower dams because such projects are not subject...
Source: TIME: Science - June 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent Tags: Uncategorized climate change Londontime Source Type: news

COVID-19 Is a Symptom of a Bigger Problem: Our Planet ’s Ailing Health
The COVID-19 outbreak is a global tragedy. Hundreds of thousands have died, healthcare systems are buckling, and the future is uncertain for millions of people whose livelihoods are collapsing. It is absolutely right that the focus today is on saving lives here and now. In the same spirit of doing what we can to safeguard people’s wellbeing, we must not content ourselves with containing the acute crisis. We must also look ahead to what we can learn from this crisis to prevent future risks. COVID-19 is a reminder of how vulnerable even our modern, technologically advanced societies are. The biggest lesson is that COVI...
Source: TIME: Science - June 5, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Inger Andersen and Johan Rockström Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

U.K. Records Sunniest Spring Ever Amid Worrying Climate Change Trends
The U.K. has recorded its sunniest spring, with May being its sunniest calendar month, since records began over 90 years ago, according to data published by the Met Office—the U.K.’s national weather service—on June 1. For many people in the U.K, it has meant long days of soaking up the sun as lockdown restrictions eased from May 13. However, experts say that this record, along with other extreme weather trends globally appears to be consistent with what they expect from climate change. There were more than 626 hours of sunshine between March 1 and June 1, surpassing the previous record of 555.3 hours in ...
Source: TIME: Science - June 2, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Madeline Roache Tags: Uncategorized climate change Londontime News News Desk Source Type: news

The U.K. Records Its Sunniest Spring Ever Amid Worrying Climate Change Trends
The U.K. has recorded its sunniest spring, with May being its sunniest calendar month, since records began over 90 years ago, according to data published by the Met Office—the U.K.’s national weather service—on June 1. For many people in the U.K, it has meant long days of soaking up the sun as lockdown restrictions eased from May 13. However, experts say that this record, along with other extreme weather trends globally appears to be consistent with what they expect from climate change. There were more than 626 hours of sunshine between March 1 and June 1, surpassing the previous record of 555.3 hours in ...
Source: TIME: Science - June 2, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Madeline Roache Tags: Uncategorized climate change Londontime News News Desk Source Type: news

SpaceX ’s Dragon, Carrying 2 Astronauts, Docks at International Space Station
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — SpaceX delivered two astronauts to the International Space Station for NASA on Sunday, following up a historic liftoff with an equally smooth docking in yet another first for Elon Musk’s company. With test pilots Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken poised to take over manual control if necessary, the SpaceX Dragon capsule pulled up to the station and docked automatically, no assistance needed. The linkup occurred 262 miles (422 kilometers) above the China-Mongolia border. ”Congratulations on a phenomenal accomplishment and welcome to the International Space Station,” SpaceX Mission ...
Source: TIME: Science - May 31, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized News Desk Space wire Source Type: news

SpaceX ’s Crewed Launch Restores America’s Status Among an Elite Group of Spacefaring Nations
You never know what you’ve got til it’s gone. And if you don’t believe that, consider the national jubilation at 3:22 PM EDT Saturday afternoon, when an American rocket carrying an American crew lifted off from American soil for the first time since 2011, carrying astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to the International Space Station (ISS). The successful launch comes just a few days after Wednesday’s initial attempt was scrubbed due to weather. The last time there was this kind of U.S. hoopla for a mere flight to low-Earth orbit might have been the first time, on February 20, 1962, when John Gle...
Source: TIME: Science - May 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Why SpaceX ’s Historic Mission Needs to Wait Until Saturday for a Second Attempt
When you’ve got a 230-ft. tall rocket filled with 76,000 gallons of explosive fuel sitting on the launch pad, the President in the viewing stands and millions worldwide waiting to watch the great machine fly, you’d figure you wouldn’t schedule the event for a spring afternoon in Florida, when bad weather stands to wreck the whole party. Those are exactly the conditions in which the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley tried—and failed—to get off the launch pad on May 27, for the historic first crewed launch from American soil since 2011. The scrubbed flight le...
Source: TIME: Science - May 28, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Explainer Source Type: news

SpaceX ’s First Crewed Launch Was Scrubbed. Here’s the Next Possible Launch Window
(Cape Canaveral, Fla.) — The launch of a SpaceX rocket ship with two NASA astronauts on a history-making flight into orbit has been called off with 16 minutes to go in the countdown because of the danger of lightning. Liftoff is rescheduled for Saturday. The spacecraft was set to blast off Wednesday afternoon for the International Space Station, ushering in a new era in commercial spaceflight and putting NASA back in the business of launching astronauts from U.S. soil for the first time in nearly a decade. Ever since the space shuttle was retired in 2011, NASA has relied on Russian rockets to carry astronauts to and ...
Source: TIME: Science - May 27, 2020 Category: Science Tags: Uncategorized News Desk Space wire Source Type: news

Stormy Weather Threatens to Delay First SpaceX Astronaut Launch
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — Stormy weather is threatening to delay SpaceX’s first astronaut launch. A SpaceX rocket is scheduled to blast off Wednesday afternoon from Kennedy Space Center, carrying a Dragon capsule with NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to the International Space Station. It will be the first time astronauts launch from Florida in nine years and a first for a private company. The manager of NASA’s commercial crew program, Kathy Lueders, said everything was progressing well — at least on the ground. “Now the only thing we need to do is figure out how to control the weath...
Source: TIME: Science - May 26, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized overnight Space wire Source Type: news

Richard Branson ’s Virgin Orbit Fails on First Rocket Launch Attempt
(LOS ANGELES) — Richard Branson’s Virgin Orbit failed Monday on its first attempt to launch a test satellite into space aboard a rocket carried aloft by a Boeing 747 and released over the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Southern California. The inaugural launch had appeared to be going well until moments after the rocket was dropped from beneath the left wing of the jumbo jet dubbed Cosmic Girl. “We’ve confirmed a clean release from the aircraft. However, the mission terminated shortly into the flight. Cosmic Girl and our flight crew are safe and returning to base,” Virgin Orbit said in its off...
Source: TIME: Science - May 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: John Antczak / AP Tags: Uncategorized News Desk Space wire Source Type: news

SpaceX and NASA Are Set for a Historic Crewed Launch Saturday. Here ’s How to Watch
It’s been a long time since the country that once flew nine crewed missions to the moon has been able to launch even a single human being to space aboard its own rockets from its own soil. Ever since the final flight of the space shuttle in July 2011, the U.S. has been dependent on buying rides aboard Russia’s Soyuz spacecraft—at a current $80 million a seat—if it wants to get as far as low-Earth orbit. [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHlQRKGt9zY] All of that is set to change at 3:22 PM EDT on Saturday, May 30, when astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley are scheduled to make their second a...
Source: TIME: Science - May 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Space Space Explorers Source Type: news

SpaceX and NASA Are Set for a Historic Crewed Launch Today. Here ’s How to Watch
It’s been a long time since the country that once flew nine crewed missions to the moon has been able to launch even a single human being to space aboard its own rockets from its own soil. Ever since the final flight of the space shuttle in July 2011, the U.S. has been dependent on buying rides aboard Russia’s Soyuz spacecraft—at a current $80 million a seat—if it wants to get as far as low-Earth orbit. All of that is set to change at 4:33 PM EDT on Wednesday May 27, when astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley are scheduled to take off aboard a SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft atop a Falcon 9 rocket, b...
Source: TIME: Science - May 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Space Space Explorers Source Type: news

SpaceX and NASA Are Set for a Historic Crewed Launch This Week. Here ’s How to Watch
It’s been a long time since the country that once flew nine crewed missions to the moon has been able to launch even a single human being to space aboard its own rockets from its own soil. Ever since the final flight of the space shuttle in July 2011, the U.S. has been dependent on buying rides aboard Russia’s Soyuz spacecraft—at a current $80 million a seat—if it wants to get as far as low-Earth orbit. All of that is set to change at 4:33 PM EDT on Wednesday May 27, when astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley are scheduled to take off aboard a SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft atop a Falcon 9 rocket, b...
Source: TIME: Science - May 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Space Explorers Source Type: news

President Trump Will Attend First NASA Astronaut Launch in More Than a Decade
(Sterling, Va.) — President Donald Trump plans to be on the Florida coast Wednesday to watch American astronauts blast into orbit from the Kennedy Space Center for the first time in more than a decade. It will be the first time since the space shuttle program ended in 2011 that U.S. astronauts will launch into space aboard an American rocket from American soil. Also new Wednesday: a private company — not NASA — is running the show. Elon Musk’s SpaceX is the conductor and NASA the customer as businesses begin chauffeuring astronauts to the International Space Station. The NASA/SpaceX Commercial Crew...
Source: TIME: Science - May 23, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Darlene Superville / AP Tags: Uncategorized News Desk Space White House wire Source Type: news

Large Study Finds No Benefit — and Potential Harm — in Using Hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19
In the largest observational study thus far investigating the drug hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for COVID-19, researchers found little evidence that it helps, and worrying evidence that the medication may cause harm. In a study published May 22 in the journal Lancet, scientists in the U.S. and Switzerland report on an analysis of more than 96,000 people hospitalized with confirmed COVID-19 in 671 hospitals on six continents. Nearly 15,000 patients were treated with one of the following: chloroquine (which is an older version of hydroxychloroquine), hydroxychloroquine, or either of those drugs in combination with an an...
Source: TIME: Science - May 22, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news

How Remdesivir Works to Fight COVID-19 Inside the Body
On May 1, the U.S Food and Drug Administration issued an emergency-use authorization of remdesivir, an experimental anti-viral drug. With this clearance, doctors in the U.S. are now allowed to use the drug to treat patients with severe cases of COVID-19. Remdesivir isn’t new. It was initially developed to treat Ebola and was also tested in the lab against SARS and MERS—two other coronaviruses that infect humans much like the virus that causes COVID-19. It never made it to the approval stage for those uses, but over the last four months, scientists desperate for options to help mitigate the coronavirus pandemic ...
Source: TIME: Science - May 21, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Emily Barone and Lon Tweeten Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The Scientist Behind Some of the World ’s Best Coronavirus Images
From her laboratory in the far western reaches of Montana, Elizabeth Fischer is trying to help people see what they’re up against in COVID-19. Over the past three decades, Fischer, 58, and her team at the Rocky Mountain Laboratories, part of the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, have captured and created some of the more dramatic images of the world’s most dangerous pathogens. “I like to get images out there to try to convey that this is an entity, to try to demystify it, so this is something more tangible for people,” says Fischer, on...
Source: TIME: Science - May 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Markian Hawryluk / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Annie Glenn, Famed Astronaut ’s Widow, Dies of Coronavirus Complications at Age 100
(COLUMBUS, Ohio) — Annie Glenn, wife of the late astronaut and U.S. Sen. John Glenn who overcame a childhood stutter to become an advocate for others with speech disorders, died Tuesday of complications from COVID-19. She was 100. Glenn died at a nursing home near St. Paul, Minnesota, where she’d moved in recent years to be near her daughter, said Hank Wilson, a spokesman for the Glenn College of Public Affairs at The Ohio State University. NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine also announced Glenn’s death, the latest among centenarians succumbing rapidly to the new coronavirus. John Glenn died in 2016 follo...
Source: TIME: Science - May 19, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Julie Carr Smyth / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk remembrance wire Source Type: news

U.S. Military ’s Mystery Space Plane Rockets Back Into Orbit
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — The U.S. military’s mystery space plane rocketed into orbit again Sunday, this time with an extra load of science experiments. It’s the sixth flight of an X-37B, a solar-powered plane that’s flown by remote control without a crew. Officials aren’t saying how long the spacecraft will remain in orbit this time or the purpose of the mission. But a senior vice president for X-37B developer Boeing, Jim Chilton, noted each mission has been progressively longer. The previous mission lasted a record two years, with a touchdown shrouded in darkness at NASA’s Kennedy Space...
Source: TIME: Science - May 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized News Desk Space wire Source Type: news

Humpback Whales Have Made a Remarkable Recovery, Giving Us Hope for the Planet
In the depths of the ocean, and out of sight for most of us, there’s a quiet miracle happening. Many humpback whale populations, previously devastated by commercial whaling, are making a comeback. And no, before you ask, this has nothing to do with the coronavirus. A recent study on humpbacks that breed off the coast of Brazil and call Antarctic waters home during the summer has shown that these whales can now be found in the sort of numbers seen before the days of whaling. Records suggest that in the 1830s there were around 27,000 whales but, after heavy hunting, by the mid-1950s only 450 remained. It is reassuring...
Source: TIME: Science - May 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Dr. Kirsten Thompson Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

A Vaccine Against COVID-19 Would Be the Latest Success in a Long Scientific History
Here’s betting you wouldn’t want anyone blowing smallpox scabs up your nose. But you might feel differently if you lived in 15th century China. Long ago, the Chinese recognized that people who had contracted smallpox once were immune to reinfection. They came up with the idea of preserving scabs from individuals who had suffered mild cases, drying them out, crushing them to a powder and blowing them up the nostril. For boys it was the right nostril, for girls it was the left because, well, 15th century. That is how the story of vaccines usually begins, though that version is decidedly incomplete. For one thing,...
Source: TIME: Science - May 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Explainer health Source Type: news

The Economic Principle That Tells Us a Lot About Coronavirus and Climate
Report after report has documented the warning President Trump received about the growing threat the new coronavirus posed to the U.S. But Trump remained defiant, reports say, seeking to settle the markets and sustain the three years of economic growth that had underpinned his reelection campaign. Even after recommending social distancing and the closing of the U.S. economy, Trump insisted that the measures to protect human life couldn’t last too long because he did not want to “let the cure be worse than the problem itself.” This phraseology is all too familiar for anyone who has closely followed the las...
Source: TIME: Science - May 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Accidental Poisonings Increased After President Trump ’s Disinfectant Comments
President Trump’s April 23 musing that injections of disinfectant could help defeat the coronavirus did not do much for his reputation as a reliable arbiter of public health. What’s harder to determine is how many people—if any—took his advice and in some way ingested the toxic chemicals. The most recent bulletin from the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC), which aggregates data from its state counterparts, does offer some clues, however. ( function() { var func = function() { var iframe = document.getElementById('wpcom-iframe-fb3956e8555b52a9f378efca562a3451') ...
Source: TIME: Science - May 12, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Human Urine Could Help Make Concrete on the Moon, Says European Space Agency
(Berlin) — The European Space Agency said Friday that human urine could one day become a useful ingredient in making concrete to build on the Moon. The agency said researchers in a recent study it sponsored found that urea, the main organic compound in urine, would make the mixture for a “lunar concrete” more malleable before it hardens into its sturdy final form. It noted that using only materials available on site for a Moon base or other construction would reduce the need to launch supplies from Earth. The main ingredient in “lunar concrete” would be a powdery soil found on the Moon’s...
Source: TIME: Science - May 8, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized News Desk TIME100 Talks wire Source Type: news

Insect Experts Say People Should Calm Down About the Threat of ‘Murder Hornets’
Insect experts say people should calm down about the big bug with the nickname “murder hornet” — unless you are a beekeeper or a honeybee. The Asian giant hornets found in Washington state that grabbed headlines this week aren’t big killers of humans, although it does happen on rare occasions. But the world’s largest hornets do decapitate entire hives of honeybees, and that crucial food pollinator is already in big trouble. Numerous bug experts told The Associated Press that what they call hornet “hype” reminds them of the 1970s public scare when Africanized honeybees, nicknamed &l...
Source: TIME: Science - May 7, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized Environment News Desk wire Source Type: news

Astronomers Identify New Black Hole, Closest Ever to Earth
Meet your new but shy galactic neighbor: A black hole left over from the death of a fleeting young star. European astronomers have found the closest black hole to Earth yet, so near that the two stars dancing with it can be seen by the naked eye. Of course, close is relative on the galactic scale. This black hole is about 1,000 light-years away—and each light-year is 5.9 trillion miles (9.5 trillion kilometers). But in terms of the cosmos and even the galaxy, it is in our neighborhood, said European Southern Observatory astronomer Thomas Rivinius, who led the study published Wednesday in the journal Astronomy & A...
Source: TIME: Science - May 6, 2020 Category: Science Authors: SETH BORENSTEIN / AP Tags: Uncategorized News Desk Space wire Source Type: news

Will Coronavirus Be the Death or Salvation of Big Plastic?
It was supposed to be a blockbuster moment for the U.S. plastic industry. With an abundance of cheap natural gas at hand, thanks to the country’s fracking boom, U.S. energy giants were pouring billions of dollars into building new plants to turn that gas into plastic. As the world was poised to slowly turn away from fossil fuels as an energy source, plastic seemed to be a feasible replacement and possibly even a potential cash cow—overseas, demand for plastic was projected to explode in the coming decades. But the rosy projections may not be panning out. With the oil industry in freefall, and a pandemic grippin...
Source: TIME: Science - May 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Zoë Schlanger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Source Type: news

NASA ’s Biggest Space Launch in Years Is Coming Up — But It Wants You to Stay Home to Watch
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — NASA and SpaceX on Friday urged everyone to stay home for the first home launch of astronauts in nearly a decade because of the coronavirus pandemic. Top officials warned the public against traveling to Florida for the May 27 launch of two NASA astronauts aboard a SpaceX rocket to the International Space Station. It will be the first launch of astronauts from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in nine years — ever since the last space shuttle flight in 2011. It also will be the first attempt by a private company to fly astronauts to orbit. For space space shuttle launches, hundreds of tho...
Source: TIME: Science - May 1, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

NASA Chooses Three Landers to Return Americans to the Moon
It’s been nearly half a century since the U.S. had a spacecraft capable of landing human beings on the moon. As of today, it has not one, but three—if everything goes right. NASA officials announced on April 30, in a teleconference with space-industry leaders, the three finalists it has chosen to build the 21st century version of the Apollo-era’s well loved lunar excursion module (LEM), the four-legged, gold-foil, so-ugly-it-was-beautiful machine that landed six crews on the surface of the moon from 1969 to 1972. Unlike the LEM, which was effectively designed by NASA and then built to order by the Grumman...
Source: TIME: Science - May 1, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Alabama High School Student Names NASA ’s First Mars Helicopter
(NORTHPORT, Ala.) — An Alabama high school student named NASA’s first Mars helicopter that will be deployed to the Red Planet later this summer. Ingenuity, the name submitted by Vaneera Rupani, was selected for the 4 pound (1.8 kilograms) solar-powered helicopter, NASA said in a statement on Wednesday. The name coined by the junior at Tuscaloosa County High School in Northport was just one of the 28,000 names that were submitted during NASA’s “Name the Rover” essay contest for K-12 students across the United States. “The ingenuity and brilliance of people working hard to overcome the cha...
Source: TIME: Science - April 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Time Tags: Uncategorized News Desk overnight Space wire Source Type: news

James Beggs, NASA Administrator Who Resigned After Challenger Disaster, Dies at 94
(BETHESDA, Md.) — Former NASA administrator James M. Beggs, who led the agency during the early years of the space shuttle program and resigned after the Challenger disaster killed seven astronauts in 1986, died Thursday at his home in Bethesda, Maryland. He was 94. Congestive heart failure is suspected to be the cause of his death, according to one of his sons, Charles Beggs. President Ronald Reagan nominated Beggs to become the sixth administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. He served in the agency’s top position from July 1981 to December 1985. Beggs was on a leave of absence from t...
Source: TIME: Science - April 27, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized overnight remembrance wire Source Type: news

Astronomer Files Trademark Lawsuit Against American Girl, Alleging Astronaut Doll Copies Her Likeness
(MADISON, Wis.) — A Chicago astronomer has sued the maker of American Girl dolls, alleging the Wisconsin company stole her likeness and name to create its astronaut doll. The federal trademark lawsuit filed in Madison this week by Lucianne Walkowicz asks American Girl and its parent company, Mattel, to stop selling the Luciana Vega doll, described as “an aspiring astronaut ready to take the next giant leap to Mars,” the Wisconsin State Journal reported. Walkowicz is a TED senior fellow at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago, spent much of her career with NASA and has lectured extensively on Mars exploration....
Source: TIME: Science - April 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized News Desk wire Wisconsin Source Type: news

Meet Violet, the Robot That Can Kill the COVID-19 Virus
In just a few months, the COVID-19 pandemic has crossed borders and oceans, killing thousands, sickening millions, and forcing millions more to reckon with the economic and personal chaos of closures and lockdowns. Yet as the global infection count rises, the crisis has also given rise to acts of ingenuity. The pandemic has set off a global race for both an effective vaccine and for the accurate, rapid-response tests that will be necessary before workplaces can safely reopen. Vaccines and tests are essential, but they’re not the only front on which to combat the virus. In the face of an urgent threat, scientists have...
Source: TIME: Science - April 24, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Corinne Purtill Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news