A Discovery in China Suggests That Human-Like Species Left Africa 250,000 Years Earlier Than Believed
(NEW YORK) — Stone tools recovered from an excavation in China suggest that our evolutionary forerunners trekked out of Africa earlier than we thought. Until now, the oldest evidence of human-like creatures outside Africa came from 1.8 million-year-old artifacts and skulls found in the Georgian town of Dmanisi. But the new find pushes that back by at least 250,000 years. “It’s absolutely a new story,” said archaeologist Michael Petraglia of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena, Germany, who did not participate in the study. “It means that early humans were getting ...
Source: TIME: Science - July 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Emiliano Rodriguez Mega / AP Tags: Uncategorized Archaeology onetime overnight Source Type: news

A Partial Solar Eclipse Is Coming on Friday the 13th. That Hasn ’t Happened in 40 Years
While it won’t be anything like the 2017 total solar eclipse, there is a partial solar eclipse coming up this week. The July 13 eclipse is particularly rare because it will occur on Friday the 13th, a date that has long been considered a harbinger of bad luck by popular culture. There has not been a solar eclipse on Friday the 13th since December 13, 1974, according to NASA. And the next partial eclipse to occur on Friday the 13th will be on September 13, 2080. Unlike the 2017 total solar eclipse, this week’s partial solar eclipse won’t be visible to Americans — or most of the world for that matter...
Source: TIME: Science - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gabby Raymond Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

These Are the Best Places to See the Lunar Eclipse on July 27
The longest total lunar eclipse of the 21st century is about to happen on Friday, July 27. While the 2018 lunar eclipse won’t be visible from the U.S., places all around the world — including the Middle East and Greece — will be in prime locations to see the celestial event. After searching for areas that are projected to have the clearest skies and longest window of time to see the entire four-hour eclipse, TIME compiled a list of the best places to see the July 27 total lunar eclipse. Cairo, Egypt People in Cairo will be able to see the entire lunar eclipse — and it’s likely that there won&r...
Source: TIME: Science - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gabby Raymond Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

This Is Hurricane Chris ’ Path and Forecast
Tropical Storm Chris officially became a hurricane Tuesday as it continues to move away from the Carolina coast and head northeast towards Canada at 10 mph, the National Hurricane Center says. Hurricane Chris is currently about 205 miles off the coast of Cape Hatteras, with sustained maximum wind speeds of 85 mph extending at least 15 miles from the center. It’s expected to remain “well offshore” of the U.S. coast, forecasters say, instead steadily heading for Newfoundland while picking up forward speed through Thursday night. Chris is forecast to gather strength through Wednesday, but should start weaken...
Source: TIME: Science - July 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gina Martinez and Alix Langone Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

This Is Tropical Storm Chris ’ Path and Forecast
Tropical Storm Chris is expected to reach hurricane status within the next 24 hours as it slowly moves to the northeast off the Carolina coast, the National Hurricane Center says. Chris is currently about 160 miles off the coast of Cape Hatteras. It has been a mostly stationary storm so far, with sustained maximum wind speeds close to 45 mph extending at least 60 miles from the center. It’s expected to remain “well offshore” of the U.S. coast, forecasters say, instead heading for Newfoundland, Canada. Chris is unlikely to strike land as a hurricane, though NHC forecasters say it will become a “power...
Source: TIME: Science - July 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gina Martinez Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

The Mars Opportunity Rover Has Defied All Odds for 15 Years. But Now, It Could Be in Danger
NASA’s Opportunity Rover has defied all the odds and is celebrating her 15-year anniversary Saturday — but it’s unclear how much longer it will last amid the dust storm that has taken over a quarter of Mars. On July 7, 2003, NASA launched Opportunity to Mars, the second of the two rovers launched that year to explore the red planet in search of signs of past life. Opportunity was initially meant to be on a 90-day mission, but is still exploring Mars and sending back extraordinary images and intel on Mars. Since arriving on Mars in January 2004, the 384-pound rover has made crucial discoveries that have sh...
Source: TIME: Science - July 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gina Martinez Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Here ’s What Hurricane Beryl Looks Like From Space
Hurricane Beryl became the first such storm of the 2018 Atlantic season early Friday as it strengthened while moving westward. Beryl is an unusually small hurricane, a characteristic that forecasters at the National Hurricane Center say make it difficult to measure and predict. “Due to its very small size, there is greater-than-usual uncertainty in the analysis of Beryl’s current intensity,” the NHC forecaster’s discussion of the storm said. “Confidence in the official intensity forecast is also much lower than normal.” Still, the NHC said Hurricane Beryl will likely lose steam before hi...
Source: TIME: Science - July 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alex Fitzpatrick Tags: Uncategorized onetime space weather Source Type: news

Hurricane Beryl Has Been Downgraded to a Tropical Storm. Here ’s Where it’s Headed
Hurricane Beryl was downgraded to a tropical storm Saturday morning, after being named the first hurricane of this year’s Atlantic hurricane season on Friday. The path of the relatively tiny Tropical Storm Beryl is currently tracking westwards through the Atlantic in the general direction of Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and Haiti. It is expected to reach the Lesser Antilles by Sunday night or Monday, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHS). Here are the 11 AM AST July 7 Key Messages for Tropical Storm #Beryl. More information at https://t.co/RX183IoxPZ pic.twitter.com/TyhnkH3s1x — NHC Atlanti...
Source: TIME: Science - July 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized 2018 hurricane season onetime weather Source Type: news

Hurricane Beryl Is Officially the First Atlantic Hurricane of the Year. Here ’s Where it’s Headed
Hurricane Beryl became the first hurricane of this year’s Atlantic hurricane season Friday morning after gaining strength overnight. The path of the relatively tiny Hurricane Beryl is currently tracking westwards through the Atlantic in the general direction of Puerto Rico. Hurricane #Beryl Advisory 4: Tiny Beryl Becomes the First Hurricane of the 2018 Atlantic Hurricane Season. https://t.co/VqHn0uj6EM — NHC Atlantic Ops (@NHC_Atlantic) July 6, 2018 The National Hurricane Center said Friday that Beryl “is still forecast to weaken or dissipate as a tropical cyclone before reaching the Lesser Antilles,...
Source: TIME: Science - July 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized 2018 hurricane season onetime weather Source Type: news

In a Race to Save the Northern White Rhino, Scientists Have Succeeded in Creating Hybrid Embryos
(BERLIN) — Scientists say they’re several steps closer to perfecting a method that could prevent the extinction of northern white rhinos, of which only two animals are known still to be alive. According to a paper published Wednesday in the journal Nature Communications, researchers have succeeded in creating embryos using frozen northern white rhino sperm and eggs from a southern white rhino, a closely related sub-species. It’s the first time such hybrid embryos have been created and the scientists from Germany, Italy and the Czech Republic say it could provide a pathway to saving the critically endanger...
Source: TIME: Science - July 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Frank Jordans / AP Tags: Uncategorized animals onetime overnight Source Type: news

Practically Everyone in the World Will See the Longest Eclipse of the Century on July 27. Here ’s What to Know
The longest total lunar eclipse of the century is set to dazzle most of the world, except the U.S., just shy of a year after the 2017 solar eclipse created a path of totality across America. The July 2018 eclipse — which will happen on Friday, July 27 — will last about four hours and be visible across wide swaths of the world including Europe, Asia, Australia, Africa, South America and the Middle East. The totality, or when the earth’s shadow covers the moon and creates complete darkness, will last one hour and 43 minutes. While many people will be able to see partial views of the eclipse, areas in easter...
Source: TIME: Science - July 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Time Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

How a Drug For Pets May Help Prevent Zika and Malaria
Diseases spread by pests like mosquitoes and fleas remain global health problems. To prevent transmission, public health strategy has largely focused on using insecticides or bed nets. Vaccines are also under development for diseases like Zika, but few are approved for use. Now, a new study suggests that medicines already used for pets to protect against fleas and ticks could offer similar protection for humans. In the report, published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the nonprofit drug discovery institute Calibr and TropIQ Health Sciences report that drugs called isoxa...
Source: TIME: Science - July 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Innovation Health public health Source Type: news

Women Are Spending Up to $20,000 to Freeze Their Eggs. Is It Worth It?
When Meg He froze her eggs last year as a 29th birthday present to herself, she snapped a selfie for posterity. Wearing a surgical cap and gown, the startup cofounder posted the photo on Instagram from her hospital bed, looking elated, proud, and above all, confident in the decision she was making. Her caption was even more enthusiastic: “After 25 injections in 12 days, 10 blood tests, 6 ultrasounds…these MEGglets are so ready to come out today!” she wrote. Looking back, Meg calls the experience “one of the most empowering things” she’s ever done. The popularity of genetic testing servi...
Source: TIME: Science - June 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kristen Bahler Tags: fertility looking forward Source Type: news

The Real Scientific History Behind the Jurassic Park Dinosaurs
The Jurassic Park franchise — including Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, in theaters Friday, almost exactly 25 years after the first movie came out in 1993 — is obviously entirely fictional, so you don’t have to worry that the dinos are coming to get you. But that doesn’t mean there’s not something real at its heart: the story was in fact inspired by important changes in the scientific world. And, over the course of the franchise, though they might not get everything right, the filmmakers have incorporated some expert advice on how to make the dinosaurs in the movie the most realistic depiction...
Source: TIME: Science - June 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Olivia B. Waxman Tags: Uncategorized Science Source Type: news

An Ancient Chinese Tomb Reveals an Extinct Species of Gibbon, and a Warning
An ancient Chinese royal tomb may contain more surprising discoveries than anyone expected, including what appears to be a previously unknown species of gibbon that has since been driven to extinction. A new analysis revealed that the interred primate, whose skull and jawbone was exhumed in 2004, may not just represent a new species, Junzi imperialis, but an entirely new genus, the Washington Post reports. The tomb, which is estimated at 2,300 or 2,200 years old, is located in the ancient Chinese capital of Chang’an, in modern-day Xi’an province. The specimen is “significantly different from living gibbo...
Source: TIME: Science - June 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Eli Meixler Tags: Uncategorized animals onetime overnight Source Type: news

Koko the Gorilla Wasn ’t Human, But She Taught Us So Much About Ourselves
Koko the gorilla earned her pronouns a long, long time ago. It is one of humanity’s great vanities that we withhold pronouns from most animals — or at least we withhold the good ones. Homo sapiens get the dignity of a “he” or a “she.” We fob off other species with an “it.” We speak of the woman who walked down the street, and the dog that accompanied her. It was never that way with Koko, the celebrated western lowland gorilla who died peacefully in her sleep on June 19, at age 46 — a bit longer than the 30 to 40 years her species typically lives in the wild. From the ti...
Source: TIME: Science - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized animals onetime Source Type: news

Yet Another Study Says Jurassic Park Was Very Wrong About T. Rex
Most dinosaurs including T. Rex could not stick out their tongues, according to a new study. The report, which comes ahead of a new Jurassic Park movie, upends the popular depictions of dinosaurs that show them with mouths open wide and tongues hanging out. According to the study, published in PLOS One on Wednesday, most dinosaur’s tongues were anchored to the bottom of the mouth, much like alligators. Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin and the Chinese Academy of Sciences discovered the tongues were most likely unable to extend out by comparing hyoid bones, which are the bones that support and anchor...
Source: TIME: Science - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized dinosaurs onetime Source Type: news

Today Is the Longest Day of the Year. Here ’s What to Know About the 2018 Summer Solstice
While it’s already been hot for weeks, summer doesn’t officially start until the summer solstice, which falls on Thursday, June 21 this year. The summer solstice, which is the longest day of the year, officially starts Thursday morning in the Northern Hemisphere. During the summer solstice, the sun appears to stand still as it reaches its highest point, before moving off toward the horizon. Here’s everything you need to know about the 2018 summer solstice, including what it means and how Stonehenge is connected to the annual event. What is the summer solstice? While the calendar may say June 1 was the fir...
Source: TIME: Science - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gina Martinez Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Source Type: news

A Giant Plant That Can Cause Blindness Was Spotted for the First Time in a New State
The presence of a hazardous invasive plant that can cause burns and blindness has been confirmed for the first time in Virginia, authorities said. The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services confirmed on Tuesday that giant hogweed, a toxic weed that can grow up to 15 feet tall and resembles the less dangerous cow parsnip, was identified at a private home in Clarke County. Earlier this month, Virginia Department of Transportation employees who remembered hearing about the species years earlier reported a bunch growing in Frederick County, the Washington Post reports. Exposure to sap produced by the giant h...
Source: TIME: Science - June 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime plants Source Type: news

Why Trump ’s ‘Space Force’ Won’t — and Shouldn’t — Happen
Good government is often unglamorous stuff—fixing pot holes, plowing snow, collecting trash. At a White House event on June 18, President Trump was supposed to deliver a brief address on the trash-collecting part. Yes, the junk in question is in space—the growing belt of debris that has been accumulating in Earth orbit since the very beginning of the space age and poses an increasing risk to satellites and other spacecraft. But it’s still just trash, and managing it was the focus of Trump’s latest Space Policy Directive—the third he has signed since taking office. As Trump has been known to do...
Source: TIME: Science - June 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

President Trump Calls on Pentagon to Create New Military Branch: A ‘Space Force’
President Donald Trump called for a new “Space Force” to be added to the U.S. military as an armed service separate from the Pentagon’s five traditional uniformed branches. “When it comes to defending America, it is not enough to merely have an American presence in space,” Trump said Monday at a White House event on space policy. “We must have American dominance in space.” Trump has been considering creation of a Space Force for months over resistance from the Air Force, which currently oversees military space programs. He announced his support for the idea at a White House meeting...
Source: TIME: Science - June 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Terrence Dopp / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized Bloomberg Donald Trump onetime Pentagon space Source Type: news

Mars Is About to Be the Closest it ’s Been to Earth in 15 Years. Here’s How and When to See it
July is set to be a good month for stargazers, as Mars will get closer to Earth than it has been in 15 years, making it appear larger and brighter than usual. The event, known as Mars Close Approach, is thanks to Mars’ and Earth’s orbits around the Sun, which on July 31 will line up so that the Red Planet is 35.8 million away, according to NASA. For much of that night it will be visible to the naked eye. It will appear low in the sky, reaching its highest point of 35 degrees above the southern horizon around midnight. In the days before Mars Close Approach, between July 27 and 30, the planet will be in opposit...
Source: TIME: Science - June 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ciara Nugent Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

NASA ’s Opportunity Rover Has Been Knocked Out as a Giant Dust Storm Envelops Mars
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — NASA’s seemingly unstoppable Mars rover Opportunity has been knocked out by a gigantic dust storm that is enveloping the red planet and blotting out the sun. Officials said Wednesday they’re hopeful the rover will survive the storm, which already covers one-quarter of Mars and is expected to encircle the planet in another few days. It could be weeks or even months, though, until the sky clears enough for sunlight to reach the Martian surface and recharge Opportunity’s batteries through its solar panels. For now, Mars’ oldest working rover is stuck in the middle of the ...
Source: TIME: Science - June 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space Source Type: news

IQ Scores Are Falling Due to Environmental Factors, Study Finds
IQ scores are on a decline, reversing a trend that saw scores rising at a steady rate during the 20th century, according to a new study. Researchers from the Ragnar Frisch Centre for Economic Research in Norway studied the IQ scores of about 730,000 Norwegian men born between 1962 and 1991. They found that scores grew by nearly three percentage points every decade for people born between 1962 and 1975. But among those born after 1975, scores fell. The cause of the IQ decline is due to environmental factors, and not genetics, said Ole Rogeburg, a senior research fellow at Ragnar Frisch Centre and co-author of the study on I...
Source: TIME: Science - June 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Antarctica ’s Ice Is Melting Even Faster, and Scientists Are Deeply Worried
WASHINGTON — The melting of Antarctica is accelerating at an alarming rate, with about 3 trillion tons of ice disappearing since 1992, an international team of ice experts said in a new study. In the last quarter century, the southern-most continent’s ice sheet — a key indicator of climate change — melted into enough water to cover Texas to a depth of nearly 13 feet (4 meters), scientists calculated. All that water made global oceans rise about three-tenths of an inch (7.6 millimeters). From 1992 to 2011, Antarctica lost nearly 84 billion tons of ice a year (76 billion metric tons). From 2012 to 201...
Source: TIME: Science - June 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime Source Type: news

New Discoveries on Mars Are Advancing the Case for Life on the Red Planet
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — New Mars discoveries are advancing the case for possible life on the red planet, past or even present. Scientists reported Thursday that NASA’s Curiosity rover has found potential building blocks of life in an ancient Martian lakebed. Hints have been found before, but this is the best evidence yet. The organic molecules preserved in 3.5 billion-year-old bedrock in Gale Crater — believed to once contain a shallow lake the size of Florida’s Lake Okeechobee — suggest conditions back then may have been conducive to life. That leaves open the possibility that microorganisms...
Source: TIME: Science - June 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

This Guy Snapped Some Spectacular Pictures of a Tornado in Wyoming (With His Phone!)
A Wyoming resident captured some amazing images of a tornado touching down in the plains Wednesday. The National Weather Service office in Cheyenne tweeted out a warning to residents asking them to take shelter. “Tornado north of Laramie is still on the ground. As picturesque as it may look, we ask that you take shelter now. No picture is worth getting hurt.” the tweet read. But that’s didn’t stop Aaron Voos from shooting breathtaking photos of the tornado on his phone, a Kyocera E6810 Duraforce Pro, as he was driving home. “I am not normally a storm chaser,” Voos told TIME. “We li...
Source: TIME: Science - June 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gina Martinez Tags: Uncategorized onetime weather Wyoming Source Type: news

These Before and After Satellite Images Show the Scale of the Destruction From the Guatemala Volcano
Before and after satellite images show the horrifying scale of the destruction left in the wake of the Guatemala volcano eruption. The pictures, from satellite imagery company Digital Globe, show the world-famous La Reunion Golf Resort on April 7, 2017 and on Wednesday – days after the eruption of Volcan de Fuego, Spanish for “volcano of fire.” The once lush, green resort appears completely blanketed by lava and grey ash. The golf course, which is four miles from the volcano, was the host of the Latinoamerica PGA tour since 2014 and kicked off the 2018 Guatemala Stella Artois Open in March. The resort was...
Source: TIME: Science - June 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gina Martinez Tags: Uncategorized Guatemala onetime Volcano Source Type: news

Meet Sabrina Gonzalez Pasterski, a Physics Whiz So Talented That Stephen Hawking Cited Her
This article originally appeared on InStyle.com (Source: TIME: Science)
Source: TIME: Science - June 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Shalayne Pulia / InStyle Tags: Uncategorized Aviation onetime Science Source Type: news

Hurricanes Are Slowing Down and Leaving More Damage When They Hit Land
Hurricanes are slowing down – and leaving behind a lot more damage when they make landfall, according to a new study. The study, published in the journal Nature, found that since 1949, tropical cyclones have decreased their speed by an average of 10% worldwide. The change is even more dramatic in storms that have made landfall from the North Atlantic – they’re moving 20 percent slower. The result is more rainfall and more damage to buildings as hurricanes hover over population centers for longer periods of time. “The unprecedented rainfall totals associated with the ‘stall’ of Hurricane ...
Source: TIME: Science - June 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gina Martinez Tags: Uncategorized Hurricanes onetime Source Type: news

8 of the World ’s Most Dangerous Volcanoes, According to Experts
Dozens of people have died, hundreds are missing and many more homes were destroyed after separate volcanic eruptions in Hawaii and Guatemala that made headlines worldwide in recent months. And although those volcano eruptions are not part of a trend, experts have said, the volcanoes in question are far from the only dangerous ones in the world. When assessing which volcanoes are the most dangerous in the world, however, several factors come into play, including population density surrounding active volcanoes, the types of magma that emerge during eruptions and each volcano’s eruption history. For example, an explosi...
Source: TIME: Science - June 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mahita Gajanan Tags: Uncategorized onetime Volcanoes Source Type: news

Emotions Expert: It ’s Impossible to be Constantly Positive. Try This Instead
This article was originally published on Undark. Read the original article. (Source: TIME: Science)
Source: TIME: Science - June 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Judith T. Moskowitz, Northwestern University / Undark Tags: Uncategorized human behavior onetime Source Type: news

There ’s a Dark Side to Emotional Intelligence. Here’s How to Protect Yourself
When Daniel Goleman published the book Emotional Intelligence in 1995, few had heard of the term. In academic circles, it was a new concept — a theory formed by two psychologists, John D. Mayer and Peter Salovey, that posited that just as people have a wide range of intellectual abilities, they also have a wide range of emotional skills that profoundly affect their thinking and actions. Fast forward to today. You’ll find references to emotional intelligence just about everywhere, most of them positive: how emotional intelligence can make you a better leader, a better employee or even a better spouse or parent. ...
Source: TIME: Science - June 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Justin Bariso Tags: Uncategorized onetime society Source Type: news

Inside the New Technology That Could Transform the Solar Power Industry
The future of solar power has looked increasingly bright in recent years thanks to the plummeting cost of silicon solar panels and a global push for clean energy sources to address climate change. In the most optimistic scenarios for the power source, solar generation will increase 16-fold between 2016 and 2040, according to data from the International Energy Agency. But now new research into a class of materials known as perovskites underway in U.S. government labs and other facilities around the world promises to accelerate rapidly even the most optimistic projections for solar deployment. If they make it from the lab to...
Source: TIME: Science - June 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland / Golden, Colo. Tags: Uncategorized climate change energy Environment onetime Source Type: news

3 Russian Astronauts Who Spent 168 Days in Space Safely Land Back on Earth
(DZHEZKAZGAN, Kazakhstan) — A Russian Soyuz space capsule carrying three astronauts from the International Space Station has landed safely in the steppes of Kazakhstan. The capsule hit the ground at 6:39 p.m. Sunday without apparent problems, descending under a red-and-white parachute. Aboard were Russian Anton Shkaplerov, American Scott Tingle and Japan’s Norishige Kanai, ending a 168-day mission. All three were extracted from the capsule within 30 minutes. They appeared to be in good condition as they sat in lounge-type chairs near the capsule so they could re-adjust to the pull of gravity. The astronauts wil...
Source: TIME: Science - June 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime russia space Source Type: news

Most Women With Breast Cancer Can Skip Chemo, According to New Study
(CHICAGO) — Most women with the most common form of early-stage breast cancer can safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of beating the disease, doctors are reporting from a landmark study that used genetic testing to gauge each patient’s risk. The study is the largest ever done of breast cancer treatment, and the results are expected to spare up to 70,000 patients a year in the United States and many more elsewhere the ordeal and expense of these drugs. “The impact is tremendous,” said the study leader, Dr. Joseph Sparano of Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Most women in this ...
Source: TIME: Science - June 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Marilynn Marchione / AP Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Women's Health Source Type: news

When Did Humans Discover Fire? The Answer Depends on What You Mean By ‘Discover’
Fire is one of the most important forces on Earth. The use of fire by humans has long been considered as a defining property of intelligence, separating us from other animals. The exact timing of the discovery and use of fire by humans has been a subject of continuing research, yet perhaps two questions have, until now, received little attention: What was fire on Earth like before humans appeared? And what experience of fire could early humans have had? Three main components are needed for fire. First, there must be a fuel to burn. Second, oxygen must be available — after all, combustion is essentially an oxidation p...
Source: TIME: Science - June 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Andrew C. Scott Tags: Uncategorized Books Science Source Type: news

Drones Are Helping Catch Poachers Operating Under Cover of Darkness
Catching a wildlife poacher in the act is a tricky business. Just ask the officials and groups who have spent decades and millions of dollars searching for criminal animal hunters and traders operating covertly from South Africa to China. Their work is complicated by several factors, from government corruption that foils anti-poaching efforts to extreme poverty that draws people into the industry in the first place. But there’s also the simple issue of darkness. Poachers tend to go about their illicit business under cover of night, and it’s hard to find people among millions of square miles of pitch-black fores...
Source: TIME: Science - May 31, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Justin Worland Tags: Uncategorized Drones Source Type: news

How Drones Are Helping Scientists Study and Protect Endangered Whales
The above video was provided by Intel. If you’re a six-foot human standing on a paddleboard, it’s just as well you don’t know that a 60-foot, 40-ton humpback whale with 16-foot flippers is surfacing directly beneath you. The only thing more unsettling would be if there were four 60-ft., 40-ton humpback whales with 16-foot flippers doing the same. Just such a don’t-look-down moment played out off the coast of the Hawaiian island of Kauai in 2016. Ordinarily, it would have been the kind of experience that the paddleboarder—who came through unharmed—would have described to his friends with...
Source: TIME: Science - May 31, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized Drones Source Type: news

Hawaii ’s Erupting Volcano Looks Even Crazier From Space at Night
A stunning image released by NASA shows what Kilauea, the volcano in Hawaii that has been erupting for three weeks, looks like from space. As the photo shows, Kilauea is not only visible from space — you can also see the lava spewing out of the volcano. Seven instruments aboard NASA ‘s International Space Station and partner satellites have been detecting active fissures, fires, ash and sulphur dioxide plume as well as the height and composition of volcanic plumes, a NASA release explains. “One of the first things emergency responders wanted to know was where the lava was coming out, where are all the fis...
Source: TIME: Science - May 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kate Samuelson Tags: Uncategorized hawaii onetime Source Type: news

NOAA ’s 2018 Hurricane Forecast Is Here. There’s a Good Reason to Trust It
The 2018 hurricane season in the Atlantic, which officially kicks off June 1, is expected to be of average to above-average in intensity, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Organization’s annual hurricane forecast released Thursday. The NOAA scientists’ complex model predicts there will be 10 to 16 storms this year that reach wind speeds of at least 39 mph, earning them a climatological name. Of those storms, five to nine are predicted to mature into hurricanes, with winds reaching 74 mph, while one to four of those will graduate to “major” status of at least category 3 on the five-po...
Source: TIME: Science - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Chris Wilson Tags: Uncategorized interactive studios onetime weather Source Type: news

Toxic Lava From Hawaii Volcano Eruption Could Threaten Nearby Power Plant
(PAHOA, Hawaii) — The eruption of Kilauea volcano in Hawaii sparked new safety warnings about toxic gas on the Big Island’s southern coastline after lava began flowing into the ocean and setting off a chemical reaction. The molten rock started pouring into the sea over the weekend. It’s been generating plumes of lava haze or “laze” as it interacts with seawater. It’s just the latest hazard from a weeks-old eruption that has so far generated earthquakes and featured gushing molten rock, giant ash plumes and sulfur dioxide. The eruption has destroyed more than 40 buildings forced more than...
Source: TIME: Science - May 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jae C. Hong and Audrey McAvoy / AP Tags: Uncategorized hawaii onetime Source Type: news

Nurse Dies After Contracting Rare Nipah Virus While Treating Outbreak in India
(NEW DELHI) — The nurse, with two young children and a husband working overseas, scrawled the words in blue pen as she lay dying in an Indian hospital isolation ward, sick with a rare and deadly virus. “I think I am almost on my way. I may not be able to see you again. Sorry,” Lini Puthusheri wrote her husband in a tangle of English and Malayalam, the main language of the south Indian state of Kerala. “Take care of our children,” wrote Puthusheri, who was infected with Nipah virus while caring for sick patients. She signed it “Lots of love.” She died Monday. At least 10 people h...
Source: TIME: Science - May 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized India onetime Source Type: news

Orbital ATK Rocket Launches With Fresh Supplies for International Space Station
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — One of NASA’s prime shippers, Orbital ATK, launched a fresh load of supplies to the International Space Station from Virginia on Monday. The Antares rocket blasted off from Wallops Island before dawn, treating early risers along the East Coast to a cosmic light show, at least where skies were clear. The area of visibility stretched from New England to the Carolinas, and as far inland as Pittsburgh and Charlotte. The 7,400-pound shipment — a third of it research — should reach the orbiting lab Thursday. A flight controller wished the Cygnus capsule “a smooth trip” o...
Source: TIME: Science - May 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

A Pregnant Rhino in San Diego Could Help Save a Related Subspecies
(SAN DIEGO) — A southern white rhino has become pregnant through artificial insemination at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park — giving hope for efforts to save a subspecies of one of the world’s most recognizable animals, researchers announced Thursday. Scientists will be watching closely to see if the rhino named Victoria can carry her calf to term over 16 to 18 months of gestation. If she does, researchers hope someday she could serve as a surrogate mother and could give birth to the related northern white rhino, whose population is down to two females after decades of decimation by poachers. The mother and...
Source: TIME: Science - May 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Julie Watson / AP Tags: Uncategorized animals onetime overnight Source Type: news

Over The ‘Yanny’ Vs. ‘Laurel’ Debate? Here’s Another Way to Trick Your Ears
The great Yanny vs. Laurel debate may have been settled (it’s actually “Laurel,” no matter what you heard), but there are plenty of other ways to trick your ears — and learn a little science in the process. Perhaps the most famous is the McGurk effect, a phenomenon named for Harry McGurk, half of the research duo who first wrote about the auditory illusion back in the 1970s. McGurk and his colleague John MacDonald recorded a voice articulating one consonant, then matched it with a video that showed a person articulating another consonant. Even though the audio file never changed, the researchers obs...
Source: TIME: Science - May 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime sound Source Type: news

An Audiologist Explains Why You Hear ‘Yanny’ or ‘Laurel’ — Or Both
An audiologist has an explanation for why everyone on the internet can’t stop asking: “Yanny” or “Laurel”? “This all comes down to the brain,” says Dr. Kevin Franck, director of audiology at Massachusetts Eye and Ear. “The fact that brains go in one way and some brains go in the other means that we’re all just wired a bit differently based on our experiences.” The viral audio clip — which some listeners interpret as a deep male voice saying, “Yanny,” and others hear as a higher-pitched voiced saying, “Laurel” — popped up on Redd...
Source: TIME: Science - May 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime sound Source Type: news

Emissions of a Banned Ozone-Eating Chemical Are Rising Again and Scientists Don ’t Know Why
(WASHINGTON) — Something strange is happening with a now-banned chemical that eats away at Earth’s protective ozone layer: Scientists say there’s more of it — not less — going into the atmosphere and they don’t know where it is coming from. When a hole in the ozone formed over Antarctica, countries around the world in 1987 agreed to phase out several types of ozone-depleting chemicals called chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Production was banned, emissions fell and the hole slowly shrank. But starting in 2013, emissions of the second most common kind started rising, according to a study in We...
Source: TIME: Science - May 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized Environment onetime Source Type: news

Hawaii Volcano Eruption Is Already Costing the Big Island ’s Tourism Industry at Least $5 Million
(PAHOA, Hawaii) — People nixing vacations to Hawaii’s Big island has cost the tourism industry millions of dollars as the top attraction, Kilauea volcano, keeps spewing lava. Cancellations from May through July have hit at least $5 million, said Ross Birch, executive director of the island’s tourism board. The booking pace for hotels and other activities, such as tours for lava viewing, zip lines and glass bottom boats have fallen 50 percent. A handful of cruise ships have also decided not to come into port even in Kona on the west side of the island, about 80 miles (129 kilometers) away from the volcano....
Source: TIME: Science - May 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Caleb Jones and Sophia Yan / AP Tags: Uncategorized hawaii onetime Volcano Source Type: news

An Asteroid the Size of the Statue of Liberty Will Whiz Past Earth Tomorrow. Here ’s How to See It
An asteroid the size of the Statue of Liberty will zoom past Earth on Tuesday. The asteroid, dubbed 2010 WC9, is about the size of a football field and will fly past Earth at about 28,655 miles per hour, according to EarthSky. It will come within 126,419 miles of Earth — the closest it has come to our planet in 300 years — though it is still considered a safe passing distance. The asteroid is expected to whiz past Earth at 6:05 p.m. E.T. on Tuesday, May 15. 'Lost' asteroid to pass closely May 15:https://t.co/GReylBTMIr Asteroid 2010 WC9 will pass at about half the moon's distance, in one of the c...
Source: TIME: Science - May 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alix Langone Tags: Uncategorized astronomy onetime World Source Type: news