Scientists engineer human-germ hybrid molecules to attack drug-resistant bacteria
Taking a cue from viruses that infect and kill bacteria, the researchers engineered molecules capable of targeting the bugs in a way the human immune system cannot—an approach that could be particularly valuable against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 17, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tashian Myers Tags: Science News antibiotic resistance Assaf Raz immunology Laboratory of Bacterial Pathogenesis and Immunology lysibodies lysins microbiology Vincent A. Fischetti Virology Source Type: news

Viral fossils reveal how our ancestors may have eliminated an ancient infection
Some viruses can insert their genetic material into the genome of their host, creating a genetic fossil record. Researchers have uncovered how our ancestors may have wiped out one such virus around 11 million years ago. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 13, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Science News ancient infections Laboratory of Retrovirology Paul Bieniasz retroviruses viral fossils Source Type: news

Shooting the messenger: how one protein allows germ cells to develop
Researchers have identified a molecule that guides the formation of eggs and sperm by preventing a host of factors related to cell death and inflammation from killing the precursors to these cells. Their findings reveal new knowledge about how a mutation in this molecule leads to male sterility. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 13, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Science News germ cells Laboratory of RNA Molecular Biology RNA binding protein stem cells sterility Thomas Tuschl Source Type: news

Researchers track fish migration by testing DNA in seawater
For the first time, researchers have successfully recorded fish migration by conducting DNA tests on water samples. Using this method to estimate the abundance and distribution of fish species could help scientists more easily understand the impact certain environmental factors are having on local fish populations. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 12, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Science News eDNA fish migration Jesse Ausubel Mark Stoeckle Program for the Human Environment Source Type: news

Scientists discover how crucial DNA sequences endure
The centromere region of chromosomes retains the same DNA from one generation to the next. Scientists have gained new insights into how it avoids being scrambled in normal cells, and how it becomes unstable in cancer. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 10, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Science News cancer centromere DNA recombination Hironori Funabiki Laboratory of Chromosome and Cell Biology Source Type: news

Rockefeller tops ranking of 1,300 universities in measures of scientific impact and productivity
Released by the European Commission–funded U-Multirank, the survey placed Rockefeller first in categories related to scientific impact and research productivity. The results incorporate data on more than 1,300 institutions in over 90 countries. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 10, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tashian Myers Tags: Science News U-Multirank Source Type: news

In the News – NBC News – Young
This Night Owl Gene Mutation Turns People Into Sleep Martians “‘It’s as if these people have perpetual jet lag, moving eastward every day,’ said Michael Young, who oversaw the study. ‘In the morning, they’re not ready for the next day … More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 7, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: In the News genetics Michael W. Young sleep Source Type: news

Rockefeller president Richard P. Lifton releases statement on proposed federal budget cuts to science
Responding to a White House budget proposal that calls for an 18 percent decrease in funding for the National Institutes of Health, Rockefeller President Richard P. Lifton today released a statement outlining the detrimental impact such cuts would have on health, national security, and the economy. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 6, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Zach Veilleux Tags: Campus News Source Type: news

Study identifies “night owl” gene variant
Scientists have discovered a common mutation that might explain why some people have trouble going to sleep at night and getting up early. The gene alteration slows the internal biological clock that regulates our sleeping patterns. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - April 6, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tashian Myers Tags: Science News Alina Patke circadian clock circadian rhythm CRY1 DSPD insomnia Laboratory of Genetics Michael W. Young molecular and cell biology sleep Source Type: news

For microbes fighting viruses, a fast response means a better defense
Researchers have found that the bacterial immune system targets an invading virus as soon as it enters the cell. This discovery answers a long-standing question about how microbes defend themselves. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 29, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News CRISPR CRISPR-Cas9 immunology Joshua W. Modell Laboratory of Bacteriology Luciano Marraffini microbiology spacer acquisition Virology Source Type: news

Bridge Medicines appoints William J. Polvino as Chief Executive Officer
As Chief Executive Officer of the newly formed drug discovery company, founded by Rockefeller University and its two neighboring institutions, Polvino will be responsible for building a portfolio of early-stage drug discovery projects and advancing each program from animal proof of principle to clinical trials. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 27, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Campus News Bridge Medicines drug discovery Tri-I TDI William J. Polvino Source Type: news

New study resolves the structure of the human protein that causes cystic fibrosis
In order to better understand how genetic mutations give rise to cystic fibrosis, researchers need to map the protein responsible for the disorder. The new structure has led to new insights on how this molecular channel functions. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 23, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News CFTR cystic fibrosis David C. Gadsby Jue Chen Laboratory of Cardiac and Membrane Physiology Laboratory of Membrane Biology and Biophysics structural and chemical biology Source Type: news

Changes in the vascular system may trigger Alzheimer ’s disease
In some people whose cognitive functions are weakened due to Alzheimer’s, the disease can be traced back to changes in the brain’s blood vasculature. Scientists have found that a protein involved in blood clotting and inflammation might offer a potential path to new drugs. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 21, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tashian Myers Tags: Science News Alzheimer’s disease beta-amyloid neuroscience and behavior patricia and john rosenwald laboratory of neurobiology and genetics Sidney Strickland Zu-Lin Chen Source Type: news

In the News – Wall Street Journal – Brivanlou
Researchers Seek Guidelines for Embryo-Like Entities Created in Labs   “Some researchers say the concern is premature. Scientists in the lab of Ali Brivanlou at the Rockefeller University in 2014 published work describing how they reprogrammed cells taken from human … More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 21, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: In the News 14-day rule Ali Brivanlou bioethics embryo development Source Type: news

David Rockefeller, university benefactor for 76 years, dies at 101
The entire Rockefeller University community deeply mourns the loss of David Rockefeller, our beloved friend and benefactor, Honorary Chairman, and Life Trustee. During its long and storied history, no single individual had a more profound influence on the University than David. His inspired leadership, extraordinary vision, and immense generosity have been essential factors in the University’s success. His values—especially his unequivocal commitment to excellence—shaped the University and made it the powerhouse of biomedical discovery it is today. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 20, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Zach Veilleux Tags: Campus News Source Type: news

For biologists studying tiny worms, new technologies make big improvements
Two new technologies are helping scientists understand new aspects of organ and nervous system development in C. elegans. One allows them to image worms developing in a natural environment, while the other makes it possible to track single neurons as the worms grow. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 16, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Science News biotechnology c. elegans development Eric Siggia Laboratory of Developmental Genetics Laboratory of Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Shai Shaham Source Type: news

Early intervention with new treatment provides durable control of HIV-like virus in monkeys
Researchers have found that a new approach to HIV treatment can suppress an HIV-like virus for an extended period in monkeys. The therapy employs antibodies and takes advantage of the immune system’s natural defenses. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 13, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Science News 10-1074 3BNC117 broadly neutralizing antibodies controllers HIV immunotherapy Laboratory of Molecular Immunology Michel C. Nussenzweig Michel Nussenzweig Source Type: news

Study tests the “three-hit” theory of autism
Could a genetic predisposition to autism together with early stress have a more detrimental effect on boys than on girls? In experiments with mice, researchers found evidence that three factors—genes, environment, and sex—work together to produce problems with social interaction, a hallmark of autism. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 7, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News Source Type: news

A new way to reset gene expression in cancer cells shows promise for leukemia treatment
Scientists have discovered a potential new target for the treatment of leukemia that potentially could augment the activity of BET inhibitors, drugs currently in clinical trials. These therapies act on histones, DNA’s packaging proteins, to reset gene regulatory programs that go awry in cancer. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 6, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tashian Myers Tags: Science News C. David Allis cancer chemical and structural biology ENL epigenetics epigenome genetics and genomics histones Leukemia Liling Wan molecular and cell biology Source Type: news

In the News – NPR – Brivanlou
Embryo Experiments Reveal Earliest Human Development, But Stir Ethical Debate   “‘The amazing thing is that it’s doing its thing without any information from mom,’ Brivanlou says. ‘It just has all the information already in it. That was mind-blowing to … More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 2, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: In the News Ali Brivanlou embryo development human development infertility Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology and Molecular Embryology self-organization Source Type: news

Raphael Cohn wins 2017 Weintraub Graduate Student Award
Cohn, a member of Vanessa Ruta’s Laboratory of Neurophysiology and Behavior, is one of 13 recipients of this prestigious prize, which is given to graduate students at or near the completion of their studies in the biological sciences. Winners are selected for the originality and significance of their thesis research. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - March 1, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tashian Myers Tags: Awards and Honors Raphael Cohn Vanessa Ruta Weintraub Award Weintraub Graduate Student Award Source Type: news

New structural studies reveal workings of a molecular pump that ejects cancer drugs
Sometimes cells spit out things we don’t want them to—like medications. Researchers have determined the three-dimensional structure of a tiny pump that expels, among other things, chemotherapy agents. This new knowledge could lead to the design of more effective drugs. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - February 24, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News ABC transporters cancer biology chemical and structural biology drug resistance Jue Chen Laboratory of Membrane Biology and Biophysics molecular pumps MRP1 Zachary Johnson Source Type: news

New research explains why a common bacterium can produce severe illness
How can the same infection result in dramatically different levels of illness in two different people? A new study identifies two conditions—a genetic immunodeficiency and delayed acquired immunity—that explain why a patient developed a life-threatening disease in response to a common strain of bacterium. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - February 23, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Science News case study immune system Jean-Laurent Casanova St. Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases Staphylococcus aureus Source Type: news

Oceanographer and explorer Sylvia Earle will receive the 2017 Lewis Thomas Prize
Oceanographer and explorer Sylvia Earle has been named the recipient of Rockefeller’s prestigious science writing prize. The award recognizes Earle’s body of work, which includes memoirs, atlases, and children’s books, as well as advocacy for global marine conservation. Earle will be honored at an award ceremony on March 6. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - February 22, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Alexandra MacWade Tags: Awards and Honors Jesse Ausubel Jesse H. Ausubel Lewis Thomas Prize Lewis Thomas Prize for Writing about Science Sylvia Earle Source Type: news

Jeffrey V. Ravetch receives 2017 Ross Prize in Molecular Medicine
Ravetch, who studies the role of antibodies in the immune system, has won the 2017 Ross Prize in Molecular Medicine. Given by The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and its journal Molecular Medicine, the award recognizes scientists who have made a significant impact on the understanding of human disease pathogenesis. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - February 21, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Alexandra MacWade Tags: Awards and Honors Jeffrey Ravetch Jeffrey V. Ravetch Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Immunology Ross Prize Ross Prize in Molecular Medicine Source Type: news

Crowdsourcing effort helps researchers predict how a molecule will smell
While it’s possible to anticipate the color of light or the pitch of sound, odor defies prediction. New research has taken an important step toward decoding smell, by linking a scent back to a molecule’s chemistry. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - February 20, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News Source Type: news

Mouse studies offer new insights about cocaine ’s effect on the brain
Researchers have determined how a specific protein regulates the brain’s response to cocaine. Their findings provide fresh insights into the neurobiology of addiction, and could lead to the development of better interventions and treatments. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - February 15, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tashian Myers Tags: Science News addiction cocaine dopamine Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience molecular and cell biology Paul Greengard WAVE1 Yong Kim Source Type: news

Newly discovered beetle species named after Rockefeller ’s Daniel Kronauer
A former Rockefeller postdoctoral associate has named a new species of beetle Nymphister kronaueri, after his mentor, Daniel Kronauer. Discovered in the Costa Rican rainforest, the beetle anchors itself tightly to backside of nomadic ants, hitchhiking a ride to new nesting sites. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - February 13, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Science News ants beetles Daniel Kronauer nomenclature Nymphister kronaueri Source Type: news

Scientists discover an unexpected influence on dividing stem cells ’ fate
When it divides, a stem cell has a choice: produce more stem cells or turn into the specific types of cells that compose skin, muscle, brain, or other tissue. New experiments in skin show this decision can be altered if tiny organs within cells aren’t positioned and divvied up properly. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - February 10, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News Amma Asare cell division Elaine Fuchs Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology mitosis organelle inheritance peroxisomes pex11b stem cells Source Type: news

Howard C. Hang receives 2017 Eli Lilly Award in Biological Chemistry
Hang, who develops chemical tools to study microbe–host interactions, has won the 2017 Eli Lilly Award in Biological Chemistry. The prize, given by the American Chemical Society, recognizes outstanding research in biological chemistry of unusual merit and independence of thought and originality. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - February 7, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tashian Myers Tags: Awards and Honors Eli Lilly Award Eli Lilly Award in Biological Chemistry Howard C. Hang Howard Hang Laboratory of Chemical Biology and Microbial Pathogenesis Source Type: news

Encouraging clinical results for an antibody drug to prevent or treat HIV
A drug known as 10-1074, based on a human antibody against HIV, has dramatically reduced virus levels in patients and appeared to prevent infection among those at high risk, according to data from a new clinical trial. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - February 6, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News 10-1074 3BNC117 antibody therapy broadly neutralizing antibodies HIV Laboratory of Molecular Immunology Marina Caskey Michel Nussenzweig Till Schoofs Source Type: news

Atomic-scale view of bacterial proteins offers path to new tuberculosis drugs
In studying a cousin of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, scientists have drawn a molecular map of the target for rifampicin, a common antibiotic. They are now using it in an effort to combat multi-resistant tuberculosis, for which existing treatments don’t work. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - February 3, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tashian Myers Tags: Science News chemical and structural biology Elisabeth Campbell immunology RNA polymerase Seth Darst tuberculosis Virology and Microbiology Source Type: news

Study reveals the structure of a protein crucial for DNA replication
For life to propagate, the instructions in our DNA must be copied and passed on to future generations. Focusing on the structure of the machinery that executes this process, scientists have revealed that the orientation of the proteins involved is different from what has previously been reported. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - January 31, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Science News CMG helicase cryo-electron microscopy DNA replication Laboratory of DNA Replication Michael O'Donnell structural biology Source Type: news

Discovery helps explain why only some people develop life-threatening dengue infections
After contracting dengue fever once, certain people who encounter the virus again develop much more severe infections. New research identifies an immunological signature that could help identify and better treat these patients. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - January 31, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News antibody-dependent enhancement dengue Fc region immunology Jeffrey Ravetch Jeffrey V. Ravetch Leonard Wagner Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Immunology Taia Wang Virology Source Type: news

Rockefeller president Richard P. Lifton releases statement on U.S. immigration policy
In response to an executive order on immigration issued by President Donald J. Trump Friday, Rockefeller University President Richard P. Lifton today released a statement condemning the policy and outlining the detrimental effects it will have on the development of science and technology in the U.S. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - January 30, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Zach Veilleux Tags: Campus News Source Type: news

Researchers explore how protein production gets distorted in skin cancer
Researchers have shown that a shift in translation, the process by which cells produce proteins from RNA, may promote skin cancer. The discovery could potentially aid the development of new treatments. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - January 27, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tashian Myers Tags: Science News Ataman Sendoel EIF2a Elaine Fuchs Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology skin cancer squamous cell carcinoma translation translational regulation Source Type: news

Antibody Combination Puts HIV on the Ropes
Researchers have shown that a combination of three antibody drugs can completely suppress HIV in infected mice. The antibodies were isolated from a patient whose immune system mounted an unusually effective response against the virus. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - January 25, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tashian Myers Tags: Science News antibody therapy BG1 BG18 HIV Michel Nussenzweig NC37 neutralizing antibodies Source Type: news

Elaine Fuchs wins 2017 McEwen Award for Innovation
Fuchs has received the 2017 McEwen Award for Innovation. The prize, given by the International Society for Stem Cell Research, recognizes outstanding contributions in the fields of stem cell research or regenerative medicine. Fuchs will receive a $100,000 award and present her research at the society’s annual meeting in June. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - January 23, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: pubaff Tags: Awards and Honors Elaine Fuchs Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development McEwen Award for Innovation Robin Chemers Neustein Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development Source Type: news

In the News – New York Times – Kronauer
Gene-Modified Ants Shed Light on How Societies Are Organized   “‘Our ultimate goal is to have a fundamental understanding of how a complex biological system works,’ Dr. Kronauer said. ‘I use ants as a model to do this.’ As he … More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - January 23, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: pubaff Tags: In the News ants Daniel Kronauer Laboratory of Social Evolution social behavior Source Type: news

MacKinnon lab charts the anatomy of three molecular channels
By determining the three-dimensional structures of these molecules down to the level of atoms, the researchers have unlocked key details as to how they function in the body. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - January 19, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News Chia-Hsueh Lee chloride channel CLC Eunyong Park HCN Laboratory of Neurobiology and Biophysics Richard Hite Roderick MacKinnon Slo2.2 structural and chemical biology Source Type: news

Biophysicist Gregory M. Alushin receives White House honor for early career scientists
Alushin, who recently joined Rockefeller as assistant professor, has been chosen by President Obama as a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. The prestigious award, given annually by the White House, recognizes scientists and engineers who show exceptional potential early on in their careers. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - January 13, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Alexandra MacWade Tags: Awards and Honors Gregory Alushin Gregory M. Alushin Laboratory of Structural Biophysics and Mechanobiology PECASE Presidential Early Career Award Source Type: news

New research offers clues into how the brain shapes perception to control behavior
Some of the visual information our brains receive is potentially misleading. New research on fruit flies demonstrates how even a simple brain can filter out such misinformation, hinting at how our own brains might shape how we see the world—and how we react to it. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - January 5, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News Anmo Kim Drosophila fruit flies Gaby Maimon Laboratory of Integrative Brain Function neurosciences and behavior vision visual processing visual system Source Type: news

Scientists learn how to ramp up microbes ’ ability to make memories
Researchers have identified a mutation that prompts bacterial cells to acquire genetic memories 100 times more frequently than they do naturally. This discovery provides a powerful research tool and could bring scientists one step closer to developing DNA-based data storage devices. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - January 4, 2017 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News biotechnology Cas9 CRISPR I473F immunology Laboratory of Bacteriology Luciano Marraffini microbiology Robert Heler synthetic biology Virology Source Type: news

Research on sweat glands suggests a route to better skin grafts
Scientists have discovered the signaling pathways that help hair follicles and sweat glands form during development, and identified the mechanism that allows both of these features to coexist in human skin. The findings may improve the methods used to grow tissue used in grafting procedures. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - December 23, 2016 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Science News BMP signaling Elaine Fuchs hair follicles Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development skin grafts sweat glands Source Type: news

Researchers develop automated melanoma detector for skin cancer screening
Doctors have trouble diagnosing melanoma because benign moles look very similar to malignant growths. But in developing a new technology that automatically extracts quantitative data from images of melanomas, scientists hope to help doctors detect the disease earlier and avoid unnecessary biopsies. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - December 23, 2016 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Science News automated detection cancer screening imaging biomarker James G. Krueger Laboratory of Investigative Dermatology melanoma Source Type: news

Human embryo discovery wins People ’s Choice of Science Breakthrough of the Year
A revolutionary system that allows researchers to study human embryo development in the lab was chosen by Science magazine readers as the scientific advancement of 2016 that has done the most to benefit humanity, answer long-standing questions, or pave the way for fruitful research. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - December 22, 2016 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Awards and Honors Ali Brivanlou embryo development Eric Siggia Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology and Molecular Embryology Science Breakthrough of the Year Source Type: news

New molecular map reveals how cells spew out potassium
Researchers have determined for the first time the complete structure of an ion channel known as BK, or “big potassium.” This molecular map offers new insights on how BK works and may aid in the development of treatments for diseases in which it malfunctions. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - December 22, 2016 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News BK Laboratory of Neurobiology and Biophysics potassium Richard Hite Roderick MacKinnon Slo1 structural and chemical biology Xiao Tao Source Type: news

In the News – Reuters – Brady
NYC dirt has scientists digging for antibiotic success   “Researchers at The Rockefeller University in New York City have found that bacteria extracted from local parks contain genes that might encode drug-like molecules like antibiotics, immunosuppressants, and cancer-curing agents. ‘Almost … More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - December 19, 2016 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: In the News antibiotics drugs from dirt Laboratory of Genetically Encoded Small Molecules New York City Sean Brady Zachary Charlop-Powers Source Type: news

New structure shows how cells assemble protein-making machinery
Researchers have created the most detailed images to date of a particle destined to become part of a ribosome. Their findings gave them a new view of how these essential nano-machines are put together. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - December 15, 2016 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Wynne Perry Tags: Science News chemical and structural biology cryo-electron microscopy cryo-EM Laboratory of Protein and Nucleic Acid Chemistry Malik Chaker-Margot ribosome sebastian klinge small ribosomal subunit Source Type: news

Fifty years after landmark methadone discovery, stigmas and misunderstandings persist
In 1966, Rockefeller scientists published a landmark paper that would lead to the first medical treatment for heroin addiction. The drug has helped millions of heroin users around the world, yet its use in the United States remains controversial. More » (Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire)
Source: The Rockefeller University Newswire - December 9, 2016 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Katie Fenz Tags: Science News addiction anniversary Laboratory of the Biology of Addictive Diseases Mary Jeanne Kreek methadone Rockefeller History Source Type: news