To Benefit From its Investments in Fusion Energy, U.S. Should Remain in ITER and Initiate a National Program of Burning Plasma Research and Technology
Along with participation in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project– a large, international burning plasma experiment– the U.S. Department of Energy should start a national program of accompanying research and technology to build a compact pilot plant that produces electricity from fusion at the lowest possible capital cost, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report provides a strategic plan to guide implementation of the main recommendations. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - December 13, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Minority Serving Colleges and Universities Could Be Greater Resource for Meeting U.S. STEM Workforce Needs
Higher education leaders, policymakers, and the private sector should take a range of actions to strengthen STEM programs and degree attainment in the nation's Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs), says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. MSIs are an underutilized resource for producing talent to fulfill the needs of the current and future U.S. STEM workforce, the report says. It identifies strategies to support the long-term success of MSI students in STEM fields. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - December 13, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Gulf Research Program Opens New Funding Opportunity to Advance Safety Culture in the Offshore Oil and Gas Industry
The Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine today announced it will award up to $10 million through a new funding opportunity to support research projects that will advance understanding and facilitate improvement of safety culture in the offshore oil and gas industry. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - December 12, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

NAKFI Publication Marks 15 Years of Igniting Innovation
Collaborations of Consequence: NAKFI’s 15 Years Igniting Innovation at the Intersections of Disciplines, a new publication from the National Academies Keck Futures Initiative, summarizes the results of the Futures Initiative, a program supported by a 15-year, $40 million grant the W.M. Keck Foundation to advance the future of science, engineering, and medicine through interdisciplinary research. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - December 12, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Most Alternative Technologies to Open Burning and Open Detonation of Conventional Waste Munitions Are Mature, Says New Report
Most of the alternative technologies to open burning and open detonation (OB/OD) of conventional munitions designated for disposal are mature, including contained burn and contained detonation chambers with pollution control equipment, and many are permitted to replace OB/OD of waste munitions, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Read More  (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - December 6, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Reusable Respirators Could Help Protect Health Care Personnel During Routine Work and Public Health Emergency Response, Says New Report
Half-facepiece reusable elastomeric respirators are an effective and viable option for protecting health care workers from exposure to airborne transmissible contaminants or infectious agents— for example, influenza virus— during day-to-day work or with a sudden or rapid influx of patients, such as during a public health emergency, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Implementation challenges need to be addressed, including storage, disinfection, and maintenance; training and education; user comfort and tolerability; and supply logistics and emergency stockpilin...
Source: News from the National Academies - December 6, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

U.S. Interstate Highways Need Overhaul
The future of the U.S. Interstate Highway System is threatened by a persistent and growing backlog of structural and operational deficiencies and by various looming challenges, such as the progress of automated vehicles, developments in electric vehicles, and vulnerabilities due to climate change. Unless a commitment is made to remedy the system's deficiencies and prepare for these oncoming challenges, there is a real risk that the nation's interstates will become increasingly unreliable and congested, far more costly to maintain, less safe, incompatible with evolving technology, and vulnerable to the effects of extreme we...
Source: News from the National Academies - December 6, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Lauren Alexander Augustine Appointed to Lead Gulf Research Program
Lauren Alexander Augustine has been appointed executive director of the Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The Gulf Research Program was established in 2013 as part of the settlement of criminal charges against two companies involved in the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. The federal government entrusted the National Academies with $500 million to enhance human health, environmental resources, and the safety of offshore energy systems in the Gulf of Mexico region. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - December 5, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

New Cryptography Must Be Developed and Deployed Now, Even Though a Quantum Computer That Could Compromise Today's Cryptography Is Likely at Least a Decade Away, Says New Report
Given the current state of quantum computing and the significant challenges that still need to be overcome, it is highly unlikely that a quantum computer that can compromise public-key cryptography– a basis for the security of most of today's computers and networks– will be built within the next decade, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. However, because replacing an established Internet protocol generally takes over a decade, work to develop and deploy algorithms that are resilient against an attack by a quantum computer is critical now. Read More (Source: News ...
Source: News from the National Academies - December 4, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Gulf Research Program Now Accepting Applications for 2019 Early-Career Research and Science Policy Fellowships
The Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is now accepting applications for its Early-Career Research Fellowships and Science Policy Fellowships for 2019. Both fellowship programs are designed to help early-career scientists hone their skills while working on issues at the intersections of human health, environmental resources, and offshore energy safety. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - December 3, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Curbing Climate Change and Sustainably Supplying Food, Water, and Energy Among Top Challenges Environmental Engineering Can Help Address, New Report Says
Over the next several decades as the global population grows, society will be faced with pressing challenges such as providing reliable supplies of food and water, diminishing climate change and adapting to its impacts, and building healthy, resilient cities. These challenges call for new and expanded roles for environmental engineers, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. To address the challenges, the report recommends that the environmental engineering field evolve its education, research, and practice to advance practical, impactful solutions for society’s multifacete...
Source: News from the National Academies - December 3, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Independent Reviews, Environmental Assessments Needed to Build Trust and Inform DOE NNSA's Plans if it Proceeds with the Dilution and Disposal Process of Surplus Plutonium
If the dilute and dispose approach for disposing of the surplus plutonium in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is fully implemented, the U.S. Department of Energy should use two independent review teams to develop public trust in and improve its decisions, says a new interim report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The first team is a re-initiation of an independent review organization representing the concerns of the state of New Mexico, where WIPP is located, and the second is a separate independent team that would review the classified aspects of DOE's conceptual plan as they are dev...
Source: News from the National Academies - November 30, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

U.S. NAS and NAM Presidents Issue Statement on Summit
Marcia McNutt, president of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and Victor Dzau, president of the U.S. National Academy of Medicine, have issued a statement on the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing. Read the statement (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - November 29, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Organizing Committee Issues Statement on Human Genome Editing
The organizing committee for the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing has issued a statement on human genome editing research and its potential applications, including heritable genome editing. Read the statement (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - November 29, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

New IAP Report Urges Reliance on Science to Develop Sustainable Food and Agricultural Systems
The InterAcademy Partnership– the global network of science, engineering, and medical academies– has released a new, wide-ranging report, Opportunities for future research and innovation on food and nutrition security and agriculture– A global perspective from the InterAcademy partnership. The report urges global leaders to rely on science to find sustainable solutions for food systems given the complex interplay of health and nutrition, agriculture, and climate change. The report also stresses the importance of internationally supporting and sharing basic and applied research to improve food, nutrition, ...
Source: News from the National Academies - November 28, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

New Report Explores Science of Interventions to Save Coral Reefs
While the management of local and regional stressors threatening coral reefs is critical, these efforts on their own will not be enough in the face of global climate change, says a new interim report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The committee that is conducting the study explored the state of science on a variety of approaches to sustain coral reefs in rapidly deteriorating environmental conditions and assessed the interventions' benefits and goals, feasibility, risks, and infrastructure needs. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - November 28, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

New Report Calls for Health Monitoring and Research Program on Gulf War and Post-9/11 Veterans and Descendants
To help determine if the descendants of Gulf War and post-9/11 veterans are at risk for health effects resulting from the service members' exposure to toxicants during deployment, a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine recommends the creation of a health monitoring and research program (HMRP). The committee that carried out the study and wrote the report assessed the available evidence on the reproductive, developmental, and generational health effects related to exposures that may have occurred during the Gulf War and post-9/11 conflicts. While there is a growing base of human and ...
Source: News from the National Academies - November 28, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Research Priorities for U.S. DOT Truck Size and Weight Regulations
A new report from the National Academies presents a research roadmap to address uncertainties in estimating the impacts of proposed changes in truck size and weight limits -- the regulations that set the maximum weights, lengths, and numbers of trailers allowed for trucks on U.S. highways. The report defined a program of 27 research projects focused on pavements, bridges, safety, enforcement, and shippers' decisions to transport freight by truck, rail, or other modes. The U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Highway Administration tasked the National Academies to develop a plan for a research program to reduce uncer...
Source: News from the National Academies - November 27, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Human Genome Editing Summit Kicks Off in Hong Kong
HONG KONG -- Carrie Lam, Hong Kong’s chief executive, welcomed hundreds of participants from around the world to the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing, which began today.“Hong Kong is honored to be hosting this prestigious group of scientists and experts from around the world,” Lam said at the three-day summit, being held on the campus at the University of Hong Kong. She noted that the acceleration of genome editing research that has occurred since the first international summit in 2015 in Washington D.C. makes it an opportune time to reconsider the science, ethics, and governance of thi...
Source: News from the National Academies - November 27, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Statement from the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing Organizing Committee on Reported Human Embryo Genome Editing
On the eve of the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing, we were informed of the birth of twins in China whose embryonic genomes had been edited. The researcher who led the work, He Jiankui, is scheduled to speak at the summit on Wednesday. The criteria under which heritable genome-editing clinical trials could be deemed permissible have been the subject of much debate and discussion by many research groups. Numerous studies have provided guidance for the conduct of heritable genome-editing clinical trials. One such study, a 2017 report by the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, co...
Source: News from the National Academies - November 26, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Hypertension Upgraded in Latest Biennial Review of Research on Health Problems in Veterans That May Be Linked to Agent Orange Exposure During Vietnam War
The latest in a series of congressionally mandated biennial reviews of the evidence of health problems that may be linked to exposure to Agent Orange and other herbicides used during the Vietnam War found sufficient evidence of an association for hypertension and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). The committee that carried out the study and wrote the report, Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 11 (2018), focused on the scientific literature published between Sept. 30, 2014, and Dec. 31, 2017. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - November 15, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Gulf Research Program to Collaborate with Shell on Gulf of Mexico Ocean Observation Effort
The Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine today announced a new collaboration with Shell and others to provide $1 million in funding support for a pilot effort to convert an existing ocean mooring owned by Shell into the first long-term deep ocean observatory in the Gulf of Mexico. Known as the Stones Metocean Observatory Project, this collaboration will provide a new means to collect important marine data to support scientific research and improve understanding of the Gulf of Mexico. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - November 14, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Investigation and Design Can Improve Student Learning in Science and Engineering; Changes to Instructional Approaches Will Require Significant Effort
Centering science instruction around investigation and design can improve learning in middle and high schools and help students make sense of phenomena in the world around them. Current approaches to science in many classrooms do not reflect this approach and constrain the opportunities afforded to students, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Changing instructional approaches will require significant and sustained work by teachers, administrators, and policy makers, the report says. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - November 13, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Arab-American Frontiers Symposium Held in Kuwait City
The sixth Arab-American Frontiers Symposium of Science, Engineering, and Medicine was held earlier this week in Kuwait City in partnership with the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Sciences (KFAS). The symposium brought together over 100 young researchers from the U.S. and 12 Arab countries to discuss cutting-edge advances in big data, water systems, microbiome, air quality, and next generation buildings and infrastructure. More information on the Arab-American Frontiers program and symposia can be found here. (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - November 9, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

'Citizen Science' Can Support Both Learning and Research Goals, Says New Report
Scientific research that involves nonscientists contributing to research processes– also known as‘citizen science’– supports participants’ learning, engages the public in science, contributes to community scientific literacy, and can serve as a valuable tool to facilitate larger scale research, says a new report from the National Academies. If one of the goals of a citizen science project is to advance learning, designers should plan for it by defining intended learning outcomes and using evidence-based strategies to reach those outcomes. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - November 1, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Full Agenda Now Available for Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing
The full agenda is now available for the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing, which will take place Nov. 27-29 in Hong Kong. The three-day summit will be co-hosted by the Academy of Sciences of Hong Kong, the Royal Society of London, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. National Academy of Medicine. For more information, visit the summit website. General registration | Journalist and news media registration (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 30, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

New Editor-in-Chief of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Named
The National Academy of Sciences announced the appointment of May R. Berenbaum, professor and Swanlund Chair of Entomology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, as editor-in-chief of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the official journal of the Academy. Berenbaum, who was elected to the NAS in 1994 and has served on the PNAS editorial board since 1998, will begin the editorship on Jan. 1, 2019. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 26, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Technologies That Remove Carbon Dioxide From Air and Sequester It Need to Play a Large Role in Mitigating Climate Change
“Negative emissions technologies” (NETs) that remove and sequester carbon dioxide from the air will need to play a significant role in mitigating climate change, says a new Academies report. Some of these technologies can be deployed now, but additional ones are needed to meet climate goals. The report calls for the launch of a substantial research initiative to advance these technologies as soon as possible. Although climate mitigation remains the motivation for global investments in NETs, advances in NETs also could have economic rewards, as intellectual property rights and economic benefits will likely accru...
Source: News from the National Academies - October 24, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

'Carbon Utilization' Technologies Could Reduce Emissions by Turning Greenhouse Gases Into Useful Products
A new Academies report outlines a research agenda for improving the commercial viability of technologies that turn greenhouse gases from the burning of fossil fuels into useful products such as fuels, construction materials, and chemicals. The report urges the U.S. government and private sector to support research and development to advance these technologies and coordinate their efforts. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 18, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Shift Needed in How STEM Subjects are Taught to English Learners, New Report Says
A new report from the National Academies says that English learners develop proficiency in both STEM subjects and language when they are engaged in meaningful interaction in the classroom with teachers who can support them with content that allows language to develop simultaneously. However, many STEM teachers are not prepared adequately to provide robust learning opportunities that foster simultaneous content knowledge and language development in their classrooms. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 18, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Everglades Restoration Should Consider Climate Change and Sea-level Rise, New Report Says
As new evidence about climate change and sea-level rise in South Florida continues to emerge, agencies responsible for the restoration of the Everglades should conduct a mid-course assessment that rigorously analyzes scenarios of future change to the region’s ecosystem in its planning, says a new congressionally mandated report by the National Academies. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 17, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Academy Members Receive Breakthrough Prizes
NAS members Angelika Amon, Xiaowei Zhuang, and Zhijian“James” Chen are among those awarded the 2019 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences, and NAS member Charles Kane is sharing the 2019 Breakthrough Prize in Physics. The prizes, known as the"Oscars of science," each come with a $3 million award. (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 17, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

National Academies Launching New Study on Sunlight-Reflection Research
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is forming a new committee to develop a research agenda and research governance approaches for climate intervention strategies that reflect sunlight to cool Earth. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 16, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

NAM Announces Fellowships and Presents Awards
The National Academy of Medicine announced the 2018 class of NAM Fellows and presented two prestigious awards at its annual meeting today. In addition, the 2018 Gustav O. Lienhard Award for Advancement of Health Care was presented to Stuart Altman for his pioneering role in national health policy and health services research. NAM also presented the 2018 Rhoda and Bernard Sarnat International Prize in Mental Health to Kenneth Wells, f or his work developing quality and outcomes approaches to psychiatry and mental health, fostering a generation of clinical investigators and mental health system leaders, and championing par...
Source: News from the National Academies - October 15, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

NAM Honors Three Members for Outstanding Service
For their outstanding service, the National Academy of Medicine honored members Elaine L. Larson, senior associate dean of scholarship and research, Anna C. Maxwell Professor of Nursing Research, and professor of epidemiology at Columbia University; Hedvig Hricak, chair of the department of radiology at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; and Nicholas Peppas, professor and director of the Institute for Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, and Regenerative Medicine and Cockrell Family Regents Chair in Engineering #6 at the University of Texas at Austin. News Release | Annual Meeting Page (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 15, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

National Academy of Medicine Elects 85 New Members
The National Academy of Medicine today announced 75 new regular members and 10 new international members at its annual meeting. Election to the NAM is considered one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine and recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service. Annual Meeting Page (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 15, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Annual Meeting of National Academy of Medicine
Oct. 15 - The National Academy of Medicine is holding its annual meeting in Washington, D.C. Today's public events include a scientific program called Cancers: Can We Beat the Odds? and a President's Forum on affordable medications. Agenda | Webcast (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 15, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

National Academy of Medicine Publication Outlines Steps Toward Making Health Care Systems Fully Interoperable
While health care has made great strides in recent years with the proliferation of electronic health records (EHRs), establishment of regional health information exchanges, and development of data exchange standards and interfaces, interoperability among health care technologies remains very limited, says a new National Academy of Medicine (NAM) special publication. The lack of interoperability results in waste, inefficiency, and clinician burnout, which can contribute to patient safety risk.Digital interoperability across clinicians, care units, facilities, and systems has become more essential because of increasing compl...
Source: News from the National Academies - October 12, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

NASA Should Expand the Search for Life in the Universe and Make Astrobiology an Integral Part of its Missions, Says New Report
To advance the search for life in the universe, NASA should support research on a broader range of biosignatures and environments, and incorporate the field of astrobiology into all stages of future exploratory missions, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Read More  (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 10, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

NAS Member Shares 2018 Nobel in Economics
The 2018 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel was divided equally between National Academy of Sciences member William D. Nordhaus of Yale University"for integrating climate change into long-run macroeconomic analysis" and Paul M. Romer of New York University"for integrating technological innovations into long-run macroeconomic analysis." (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 8, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

NAM International Member Shares 2018 Nobel Peace Prize
Oct. 5 - The Nobel Peace Prize 2018 was awarded to National Academy of Medicine international member Denis Mukwege and Nadia Murad"for their efforts to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict." (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - October 5, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

National Academy of Engineering Announces Winners of 2018 Ramo Founders and Bueche Awards
On Sunday, Sept. 30, during its 2018 annual meeting, the National Academy of Engineering will present two awards for extraordinary impact on the engineering profession. The Simon Ramo Founders Award will be presented to Thomas Kailath for his research contributions and leadership in engineering. The Arthur M. Bueche Award will be given to Venkatesh Narayanamurti for his contributions to technology research, policy, and national and international cooperation. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - September 28, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

NAE Annual Meeting to Focus on Privacy and Cybersecurity
National Academy of Engineering members will gather Sept. 30 and Oct. 1 in Washington, D.C., to induct new members and welcome distinguished speakers who will discuss privacy and cybersecurity in the 21st century. Agenda | Video webcast of public sessions (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - September 28, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

National Academy of Medicine Announces Recipients of Awards for Outstanding Achievements in Improving Mental Health and Advancing Health Care
The National Academy of Medicine today awarded the 2018 Rhoda and Bernard Sarnat International Prize in Mental Health to Kenneth Wells for developing quality and outcomes approaches to psychiatry and mental health, fostering a generation of clinical investigators and mental health system leaders, and championing partnered, participatory research to advance equity for under-resourced populations. For his pioneering role in national health policy and health services research, NAM also awarded the 2018 Gustav O. Lienhard Award for Advancement of Health Care to Stuart Altman, Sol C. Chaikin Professor of National Health Policy ...
Source: News from the National Academies - September 25, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

NAS, NAM Members Receive Prestigious Lasker Awards
The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation announced today that National Academy of Sciences members Michael Grunstein and C. David Allis share the 2018 Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for discoveries into how gene expression is influenced by the chemical modification of histones— the proteins that package DNA within chromosomes. Joan Argetsinger Steitz, a member of both the NAS and the National Academy of Medicine, is the recipient of the 2018 Lasker~Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science for four decades of leadership in biomedical science— exemplified by pioneering discoveries in RNA bio...
Source: News from the National Academies - September 11, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

U.S. Department of Transportation Should Revisit Federal Safety Regulations for Liquid Petroleum Gas Distribution Systems, Says New Report
Current federal safety regulations for small distribution systems used for propane and other liquefied petroleum gases (LPGs) should be improved for clarity, efficiency, enforceability, and applicability to risk, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Because compliance with the federal regulations is not enforced consistently by states, there is little understanding of how the requirements affect the safety of the gas pipeline systems, particularly the smallest ones with fewer than 100 customers. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - September 10, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

John L. Anderson Nominated to Be Next National Academy of Engineering President
The National Academy of Engineering 2019 nominating committee has recommended John L. Anderson, President Emeritus and distinguished professor of chemical engineering at the Illinois Institute of Technology (Illinois Tech), as the sole candidate for the NAE presidency. NAE members will vote in March 2019 to elect a new NAE president to a six-year term beginning July 1. If elected, Anderson will succeed C. D. (Dan) Mote, Jr., whose term will end June 30, 2019. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - September 7, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Learning Is a Complex and Active Process That Occurs Throughout the Life Span, New Report Says
A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine highlights the dynamic process of learning throughout the life span and identifies frontiers in which more research is needed to pursue an even deeper understanding of human learning. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - September 6, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news