Academies Task Force on the 2020 Census Releases Letter Report on Proposed Information Collection
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine's Task Force on the 2020 Census today issued a letter report and submitted it as a public comment to the U.S. Department of Commerce, which recently requested public comments on the 2020 Census. The task force, which was established by the Academies' Committee on National Statistics to examine challenges in conducting the next decennial census, concluded that the Commerce Department's recent decision to add a question on citizenship status to the 2020 census is inconsistent with the"proper performance of the functions" of the Census Bureau. The America...
Source: News from the National Academies - August 7, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

NASA Makes Progress Toward Science Priorities Outlined in 2013-2022 Planetary Decadal Survey
Despite significant cuts to NASA's Planetary Science Division budget early in this decade, the agency has made impressive progress in meeting goals outlined in the 2013-2022 planetary decadal survey by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, says a midterm assessment from the National Academies. The report notes that NASA met or exceeded the decadal survey's recommendations for funding research and analysis, and for technology programs. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - August 7, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

National Academies' Gulf Research Program Announces 2018 Science Policy Fellowships
The Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine today announced the recipients of its 2018 Science Policy Fellowships. These competitive awards are among a suite of program activities aimed at supporting the development of future generations of scientists, engineers, and health professionals who are prepared to work at the intersections of offshore energy system safety, human health and well-being, and environmental stewardship in the Gulf of Mexico and other U.S. coastal regions. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - August 1, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

NAS President Comments on Nomination of OSTP Director
I am pleased that the White House is moving to fill the position of director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy. This is a key step toward giving science a seat at the table so decisions that shape our country are informed by the best available evidence. In particular, our nation is facing mounting costs from weather-related disasters, including more severe hurricanes, floods, droughts, and forest fires. Having a distinguished atmospheric scientist advising the president is timely and a great choice. I look forward to working with Dr. Droegemeier.Marcia McNuttPresident, National Academy of SciencesOfficial Whit...
Source: News from the National Academies - August 1, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

National Academy of Medicine Launches Action Collaborative to Counter Opioid Epidemic; Public-Private Partnership Will Coordinate Initiatives Across Sectors to Drive Collective Solutions
In recognition of the need for a national coordinated and collective response to the epidemic of opioid addiction in the U.S., the National Academy of Medicine, in partnership with the Aspen Institute, launched a public-private partnership made up of more than 35 organizations representing federal, state, and local governments, health systems, associations and provider groups, health education and accrediting institutions, pharmacies, payers, industry, nonprofits, and academia. This partnership -- the NAM Action Collaborative on Countering the U.S. Opioid Epidemic -- is committed to sharing knowledge, aligning ongoing init...
Source: News from the National Academies - July 31, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Gulf Research Program Announces $10 Million Grant Opportunity for Enhancing Coastal Community Resilience in the Gulf of Mexico Region
The Gulf Research Program (GRP) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine today announced a new grant opportunity focused on enhancing coastal community resilience and well-being in the Gulf of Mexico region. The GRP intends to award up to $10 million to projects bringing together researchers and practitioners to collaborate on efforts that increase understanding of how community attributes and systems affect resilience and provide actionable information that can be used to implement policies and practices to enhance resilience. This new funding opportunity builds on previous GRP funding intended to ...
Source: News from the National Academies - July 25, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

A Domestic Electron Ion Collider Would Unlock Scientific Mysteries of Atomic Nuclei, Maintain U.S. Leadership in Accelerator Science
The science questions that could be answered by an electron ion collider (EIC)– a very large-scale particle accelerator– are significant to advancing our understanding of the atomic nuclei that make up all visible matter in the universe, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Beyond its impact on nuclear science, the advances made possible by an EIC could have far-reaching benefits to the nation's science- and technology-driven economy as well as to maintaining U.S. leadership in nuclear physics and in collider and accelerator technologies. Read More (Source: News fr...
Source: News from the National Academies - July 24, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Academies' Presidents Comment on the EPA's Proposed Rule for Strengthening Transparency in Regulatory Science
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has issued a proposed rule for strengthening transparency in regulatory science (April 30, 2018, 83 Federal Register 18768), which stipulates that EPA will ensure that the data and models underlying the pivotal science that informs significant regulatory actions are made publicly available, in a format that allows for outside analysis and validation. In a July 16 letter to EPA's acting administrator, the presidents of the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and National Academy of Medicine said that while EPA's proposed provision is generally consistent wi...
Source: News from the National Academies - July 18, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

New Report Identifies Five Breakthroughs to Address Urgent Challenges and Advance Food and Agricultural Sciences by 2030
A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine identifies the most promising scientific breakthroughs that are possible to achieve in the next decade to increase the U.S. food and agriculture system's sustainability, competitiveness, and resilience. The urgent progress needed today, given challenges such as water scarcity, increased weather variability, floods, and droughts, requires a convergent research approach that harnesses advances in data science, materials science, information technology, behavioral sciences, economics, and many other fields. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - July 18, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Report Proposes Recommendations and New Framework to Speed Progress Toward Open Science
While significant progress has been made in providing open access to scientific research, a range of challenges -- including the economics of scientific publication and cultural barriers in the research enterprise -- must be overcome to further advance the openness of science, says a new report from the National Academies. It recommends coordinated action from the academic community and other research stakeholders, and the use of an"open science by design" framework to foster openness throughout the research process. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - July 17, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Permanent Supportive Housing Holds Potential for Improving Health of People Experiencing Homelessness, But Further Research on Effectiveness Is Needed
A new report from the National Academies examines evidence on whether providing permanent supportive housing (PSH) -- a combination of stable housing and supportive services -- to individuals who are experiencing homelessness improves their health. PSH holds potential for improving the health outcomes of people experiencing homelessness, and there is evidence that it improves outcomes among individuals with HIV/AIDS. However, evidence of its impact on other health conditions is lacking, largely because of multiple limitations in the research conducted so far. High priority should be given to studies aimed at identifying&ld...
Source: News from the National Academies - July 11, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Gulf Research Program and Sea Grant to Conduct Workshops Around the Country on Improving Regional Oil Spill Preparedness
The Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine is collaborating with the Sea Grant Oil Spill Science Outreach Program to convene a series of workshops aimed at improving community preparedness for future oil spills. The workshops, to be held in five regions around the United States, will bring together practitioners and stakeholders focusing on lessons learned about the health, social, and economic impacts of oil spills and identify regional needs and priorities for improving preparedness. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

New Report Says Individual Research Results Should Be Shared With Participants More Often, Recommends Framework for Decision-Making
When conducting research involving the testing of human biospecimens, investigators and their institutions should routinely consider whether and how to return individual research results to participants on a study-specific basis through an informed decision-making process, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Decisions will vary depending on the characteristics of the research, the nature of the results, and the interests of participants. The undertaking of biomedical research with human participants— from exploratory, basic science inquiries to clinical trials using w...
Source: News from the National Academies - July 10, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

NASA Should Update Policies That Protect Planets and Other Solar System Bodies During Space Exploration Missions, New Report Says
The current process for planetary protection policy development is inadequate to respond to increasingly complex solar system exploration missions, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. To prepare effectively for new dimensions of space exploration– including the entry of new international and private-sector players and eventual human presence on other planetary bodies– the report calls for NASA to develop a planetary protection strategic plan, assess the completeness of policies, and initiate a process to formally define requirements that are missing. NASA should...
Source: News from the National Academies - July 2, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

To Increase Protection of Miners from Black Lung Disease, A Comprehensive Report on Underground Coal Mine Dust Exposure Says Monitoring and Sampling Should Go Beyond Regulatory Compliance
Black lung disease cases in coal miners have been increasing since 2000 for uncertain reasons. A new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine says that even though mine operators today are complying with regulatory requirements for monitoring conditions that affect miner health, these approaches may not guarantee that exposures will be controlled adequately or that future disease rates will decline. A fundamental shift is needed in the way mine operators approach exposure control to continue progress toward eliminating coal mine dust-related lung diseases. The report recommends a number of ac...
Source: News from the National Academies - June 28, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

New Report Identifies Three Critical Areas of Research to Fill Gaps in Scientific Knowledge of the Gulf Coast's Interconnected Natural and Human System
Improved understanding of the coupled natural-human coastal system will help promote resilience of coastal communities and ecosystems under rapidly changing environmental conditions and support informed decision-making, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - June 27, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Eight RWJF Health Policy Fellows Selected
The National Academy of Medicine and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation have named the 2018-2019 class of RWJF Health Policy Fellows. Eight individuals were chosen in a national competition for highly accomplished health, behavioral, and social science professionals who have an interest in health policy. Beginning in September, the fellows will spend a year in Washington, D.C., working on health-related legislative and regulatory issues with members of Congress and the executive branch. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - June 27, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Statement on Harmful Consequences of Separating Families at the U.S. Border
We urge the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to immediately stop separating migrant children from their families, based on the body of scientific evidence that underscores the potential for lifelong, harmful consequences for these children and based on human rights considerations.Reports from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine contain an extensive body of evidence on the factors that affect the welfare of children– evidence that points to the danger of current immigration enforcement actions that separate children from their parents. Research indicates that these family separations jeop...
Source: News from the National Academies - June 20, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

If Misused, Synthetic Biology Could Expand the Possibility of Creating New Weapons; DOD Should Continue to Monitor Advances in the Field, New Report Says
Synthetic biology expands the possibilities for creating new weapons— including making existing bacteria and viruses more harmful— while decreasing the time required to engineer such organisms, concludes a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Although some malicious applications of synthetic biology may not seem plausible right now, they could become achievable with future advances. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - June 19, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

National Academies' Gulf Research Program Awards Over $287,000 to Assist Scientific Research Impacted by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma
The Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine today announced 11 grant awards totaling $287,565 to assist in the recovery of Gulf of Mexico region scientific research efforts impacted by hurricanes Harvey and Irma. These awards are the result of the second of two fast-track grant cycles for Scientific Research Disaster Recovery Grants announced last November to help with repair, replacement, or recovery of equipment, data, or other research materials damaged or lost as a result of the hurricanes. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - June 13, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

To Prevent Sexual Harassment, Academic Institutions Should Go Beyond Legal Compliance to Promote a Change in Culture
A systemwide change to the culture and climate in higher education is needed to prevent and effectively respond to sexual harassment, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. There is no evidence that current policies, procedures, and approaches– which often focus on symbolic compliance with the law and on avoiding liability -- have resulted in a significant reduction in sexual harassment. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - June 12, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

FAA Should Change Its Safety Risk Assessment Approach for Drones to Effectively Integrate Them Into the Nation's Airspace
Introducing drone operations into the nation's airspace can provide substantial benefits to society, such as preventing derailments, inspecting cell phone towers, delivering medical devices to patients in cardiac distress, and assisting firefighters, says a new congressionally mandated report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. However, an overly conservative approach to safety risk assessments at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), which the report says tends to overestimate the severity and likelihood of risks from many types of drone operations, can be a significant barrier to introd...
Source: News from the National Academies - June 11, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

National Academies Launch 'New Voices' Project to Engage Next-Generation Leaders in Science, Engineering, and Medicine
The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine are launching the“New Voices in Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine” initiative to identify outstanding early-career science, engineering, and medicine (SEM) leaders. They will engage in communicating the evidence base for addressing national and global challenges to provide new perspectives on issues of importance to the community represented by the National Academies. They will also help identify ways to expand the diversity of expertise that is brought to all of the Academies' convening and advisory activities. Learn More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - June 8, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Public Transit Agencies Should Not Have to Disclose Safety Planning Records in Court, Similar to Laws for State Highway Agencies and Passenger Railroads, Says New Report
To enable public transit agencies to engage in more rigorous and effective safety planning, their safety planning records should not be admissible as evidence in civil litigation, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. State highway agencies and commuter railroads have been granted such"evidentiary protections," and the committee that conducted the study and wrote the report found no compelling reason to advise Congress against current practice by treating transit agencies differently. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - May 30, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Strengthening Graduate STEM Education
A new report from the National Academies recommends substantial changes to U.S. graduate education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in order to meet the evolving needs of students, the scientific enterprise, and the nation. The report describes an ideal graduate education and identifies the core competencies that Ph.D. and master's students should acquire. Achieving this vision will require the graduate education system, whose incentive system is now heavily weighted toward rewarding faculty primarily for research output, to increase the value it places on best practices of teaching and mentorshi...
Source: News from the National Academies - May 29, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Program Committee Named for the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing
An international, multidisciplinary program committee has been appointed to plan the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing, which will take place Nov. 27-29 in Hong Kong. The three-day summit -- to be held in the Lee Shau Kee Lecture Centre at the University of Hong Kong -- will be co-hosted by the Academy of Sciences of Hong Kong, the Royal Society of London, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. National Academy of Medicine. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - May 29, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Statement by the Presidents of the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and National Academy of Medicine on Preventing Sexual Harassment
Sexual harassment in science, engineering, and medicine diminishes the integrity of the U.S. research enterprise. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine take this issue very seriously. We have long been committed to providing a safe workplace free of harassment and intimidation, and our sexual harassment policy applies to anyone who is involved in the work of the Academies, including staff, volunteers, and members of our three Academies. We want to be sure that we are doing everything possible to prevent sexual harassment, to instill a culture of inclusion and respect, and to reinforce that harassmen...
Source: News from the National Academies - May 22, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

G7 Science Academies Release Statements
In advance of the G7 Summit to be held in La Malbaie, Canada, on June 8 and 9, 2018, the national science academies of the G7 nations released joint statements to inform discussions at the summit. One statement calls for actions to secure a digital future, while the other proposes international collaboration on basic Arctic research. (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - May 17, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

EngineerGirl Announces 2018 "Community Infrastructure" Essay Contest Winners
The National Academy of Engineering today announced the winners of its 2018 EngineerGirl essay competition. This year's contest asked students in grades 3 to 12 to pick an infrastructure system in their community and write about how the system could be improved. The infrastructure systems were divided into categories: transportation, water treatment, energy, public safety, communication, financial security, health care, and recreation. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - May 15, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

NAE Elects Chair, Vice President, and Four Councillors
The National Academy of Engineering has re-elected Gordon R. England, chairman of PFP Cybersecurity, to serve a two-year term as the NAE's chair. The NAE chair works with the NAE president to promote the Academy and its policies to the engineering community and the public. Also re-elected to serve a four-year term as the NAE's vice president is Corale L. Brierley, principal of Brierley Consultancy LLC.Re-elected to a second term as councillor is John L. Anderson, Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at Illinois Institute of Technology, and newly elected to three-year terms as councillors are Nadine Aubry, dean o...
Source: News from the National Academies - May 14, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

New Report Says Programs and Services for Children With Disabilities Should Coordinate Care Across Service Sectors, Focus on Long-Term Goals
While a variety of services and programs exist to support the needs of children with disabilities and their families, a focus on achieving specific near- and long-term goals that help prepare for adulthood and coordination of care within and across service sectors are integral to encouraging healthy growth and development, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The committee that conducted the study and wrote the report examined federal, state, and local programs and services in a range of areas, such as health care, special education, transition to adulthood, vocational rehab...
Source: News from the National Academies - May 11, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing Announced
The Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing will take place Nov. 27-29 in Hong Kong. The three-day summit will be co-hosted by the Academy of Sciences of Hong Kong, the Royal Society of London, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. National Academy of Medicine. The summit will be held in the Lee Shau Kee Lecture Centre at the University of Hong Kong. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - May 8, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Report Urges Development of Approaches that Integrate STEMM Fields with Arts and Humanities
An emerging body of evidence suggests that integrating STEMM fields (science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine) with the humanities and arts in higher education is associated with positive learning outcomes that may help students enter the workforce, live enriched lives, and become active and informed citizens, says a new report from the Academies. Colleges and universities should consider developing, implementing, and evaluating programs that integrate these fields. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - May 7, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

New Report Recommends Academic Institutions Should Prepare Undergraduates for a Data-Driven Workplace
All U.S. undergraduate students should develop a basic understanding of data science to prepare them adequately for the workforce, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report examines the importance and benefits of postsecondary data science education and recommends offering a range of educational pathways, attracting students with varied backgrounds to the discipline, and embedding ethics and privacy into the curriculum. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - May 2, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Academy Elects New Members, Foreign Associates
The National Academy of Sciences elected 84 new members and 21 foreign associates in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. Election to the Academy is widely regarded as one of the highest honors that a scientist can receive. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - May 1, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

NAS Honors Award Winners
During a ceremony at its 155th annual meeting, the National Academy of Sciences presented the 2018 Public Welfare Medal to physician, anthropologist, and humanitarian Paul Farmer for"pioneering enduring, community-based treatment strategies that demonstrate the delivery of high-quality health care in resource-poor settings in the U.S. and other countries." NAS also honored 19 other individuals with awards for their outstanding scientific achievements.News Release - Public Welfare MedalNews Release - Awards (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - April 30, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

NAS Annual Meeting Begins
The National Academy of Sciences will hold its 155th annual meeting April 28 to May 1. During the meeting, the Academy will elect new members, induct members elected in 2017, and present its 2018 awards recognizing excellence in research or public service. Selected presentations and ceremonies will be video webcast. Follow the annual meeting activities on Twitter @theNASciences and join the annual meeting conversation #NAS155. (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - April 28, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

NAS, NAE, and NAM Presidents Honor American 2017 Nobel Laureates
NAS President Marcia McNutt, NAE President C. D. Mote, Jr., and NAM President Victor J. Dzau honored U.S. 2017 Nobel Prize recipients Barry Barish, Joachim Frank, Michael Rosbash, Kip Thorne, and Michael Young at a reception on Capitol Hill on Wednesday, April 18. U.S. Senators Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and Christopher Coons (D-Del.) co-hosted the event. The ceremony recognized the scientists for their significant contributions to their fields as well as to the advancement of human knowledge. (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Gulf Research Program Awards Over $340,000 to Assist Scientific Research Impacted by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma
The Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine today announced 11 grant awards totaling $341,283 to assist in the recovery of Gulf Coast scientific research efforts impacted by hurricanes Harvey and Irma. These awards are the result of the first of two fast-track grant cycles for Scientific Research Disaster Recovery Grants announced last November to help with repair, replacement, or recovery of equipment, data, or other research materials damaged or lost as a result of the hurricanes and their aftermaths. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - April 18, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Reforms Needed to Help Launch Careers of Young Biomedical and Behavioral Scientists
A new report from the National Academies calls for a series of substantial reforms to strengthen the U.S. biomedical research system for the next generation of scientists. The congressionally requested report includes recommendations to open career paths inside and outside of academia for early career scientists, broaden responsibility among public and private stakeholders for the future of the research ecosystem, and increase policy experimentation and investment in that research ecosystem, so that scientists are empowered to imagine new and innovative treatments for diseases and improvements to health and well-being. Rea...
Source: News from the National Academies - April 12, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

EPA's IRIS Program Has Made Substantial Progress, Says New Report
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Integrated Risk Information System program has made"substantial progress" in implementing recommendations outlined in past reports by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, improving the program's overall scientific and technical performance, says a new Academies report. The program, which is used to assess the hazards posed by environmental contaminants, remains a work in progress and should continue to evolve as it adapts and applies new scientific practices and knowledge, the report says. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - April 11, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Single Breakthrough Discovery for Citrus Greening Disease in Florida Unlikely, Says New Report; Calls for a Master Plan to Coordinate Research Efforts and Management
A single breakthrough discovery for managing citrus greening in Florida in the future is unlikely, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The committee that wrote the report called for a systems approach to prioritize research on the disease and strategically distribute resources for research to effectively manage the disease, which is the most serious threat for citrus growers worldwide. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - April 10, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

New Report Recommends a Nationwide Effort to Better Estimate Methane Emissions
The U.S. should take bold steps to improve measurement, monitoring, and inventories of methane emissions caused by human activities, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Better data on methane— a greenhouse gas that contributes to air pollution and threatens public and worker safety— would help inform decisions related to climate, economics, and human health. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - March 27, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

New Report Considers Remedies for Important Knowledge Gaps in Current Crime Statistics
A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine reviews the U.S. crime statistics system, and considers the appropriate governance structure to set a policy for the system as a whole, establish the process for updating and maintain the underlying classifications of crime, provide a voice for the range of crime data stakeholders, and facilitate ongoing methodological research and development. Read More (Source: News from the National Academies)
Source: News from the National Academies - March 21, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Statement by NAS, NAE, and NAM Presidents on Effort to Counter Online Misinformation
We are pleased to announce that the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine are exploring ways to mobilize our expertise to counter misinformation on the web related to science, engineering, and health. Part of the mission of the National Academies has always been to help ensure that public discourse is informed by the best available evidence. To that end, we are convening Academy members to discuss ways by which we could help verify the integrity and accuracy of content in these fields in a manner that is consistent with our standards for objective, trustworthy, evidence-based information; this explorato...
Source: News from the National Academies - March 20, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Quality of Abortion Care Depends on Where a Woman Lives, Says One of Most Comprehensive Reviews of Research on Safety and Quality of Abortion Care in the U.S.
While legal abortions in the U.S. are safe, the likelihood that women will receive the type of abortion services that best meet their needs varies considerably depending on where they live, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. In addition, the report notes, the vast majority of abortions can be provided safely in office-based settings. The committee that wrote the report examined the scientific evidence on the safety and quality of the four abortion methods used in the U.S. -- medication, aspiration, dilation and evacuation (D&E), and induction. It assessed quality of ca...
Source: News from the National Academies - March 16, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

National Academies Review of the Draft Fourth National Climate Assessment and Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report
The U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) asked the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to review the draft Fourth National Climate Assessment (NCA4)– a congressionally mandated report that evaluates the state of climate science and the broad range of impacts of climate change in the United States every four years– and the draft Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2)– a report that feeds into the overall assessment process developed by the USGCRP. The final NCA4 and SOCCR2 reports are anticipated to be released by USGCRP later this year. The National Academies releas...
Source: News from the National Academies - March 12, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Report Identifies Options for Lowering Risk of Failure of Undersea Bolts on Offshore Oil and Natural Gas Rigs
A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine identifies strategies for improving the reliability of bolts used in offshore oil and gas drilling rigs, thereby reducing the risk that a bolt failure could cause a spill of oil, drilling fluids, or natural gas into the environment. Although the oil and gas industry has made important advances in improving the reliability of bolts, there are multiple opportunities for the industry and the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement to work together to further improve reliability and safety culture, the repor...
Source: News from the National Academies - March 9, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Unclassified Version of New Report Predicts Small Drone Threats to Infantry Units, Urges Development of Countermeasures
The emergence of inexpensive small unmanned aircraft systems (sUASs) that operate without a human pilot, commonly known as drones, has led to adversarial groups threatening deployed U.S. forces, especially infantry units. Although the U.S. Army and the U.S. Department of Defense are developing tactics and systems to counter single sUASs, a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine emphasizes the need for developing countermeasures against multiple sUASs— organized in coordinated groups, swarms, and collaborative groups— which could be used much sooner than the Army anticipates....
Source: News from the National Academies - March 6, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news