New Insights into Hyperthermia Cancer Therapy
In a paper published in the Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, a team of investigators led by Kevin O’Grady from the University of York have shown that the amount of heat generated by magnetic nanoparticles can be understood when both the physical and hydrodynamic size distributions for the samples are known to high accuracy. (Source: NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer)
Source: NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - October 27, 2014 Category: Nanotechnology Source Type: news

Single Molecule Detection of a Cancer Biomarker
Using a nano-enhanced version of a device capable of detecting the smallest viruses in solution, researchers at the Polytechnic Institute of New York University (NYU-Poly) have demonstrated that they can detect a single cancer marker protein without the use of fluorescent labels. Stephen Arnold and his collaborators describe their new device in the journal Nano Letters. (Source: NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer)
Source: NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - October 27, 2014 Category: Nanotechnology Source Type: news

Nanoparticles, Made to Order - Inside and Out
A new coating technology developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, combined with a novel nanoparticle-manufacturing technology developed at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, may offer scientists a way to quickly mass-produce tailored nanoparticles that are specially coated for specific medical applications. Using this new combination of the two existing technologies, scientists can produce very small, uniform particles with customized layers of material that can carry drugs or other molecules to interact with their environment, or even target specific types of cells. This research was published...
Source: NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - October 27, 2014 Category: Nanotechnology Source Type: news

Nanoparticles Enhance RNA Interference
Nanoparticles that deliver short strands of RNA offer a way to treat cancer and other diseases by shutting off malfunctioning genes. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have discovered that once nanoparticles enter cells they become trapped in bubbles known as endosomes, where their contents either get recycled back out of the cell or degraded. The research was published in the journal Nature. In addition, investigators from the Carolina Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have shown that one nanoparticle can be used to deliver both siRNA and t...
Source: NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - October 27, 2014 Category: Nanotechnology Source Type: news