Study Documents Extent of Unexpected Sexual Consequences for Young Women Who Drink Alcohol - 8/20/15
In-depth interviews conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine of 20 young women attending an urban sexually transmitted disease clinic have documented a variety of unexpected, unintended sexual encounters linked to their alcohol use before sex occurs. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - August 20, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Clamshell-Shaped Protein Puts the 'Jump' in 'Jumping Genes' - 8/19/15
Scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have deciphered the structure and unusual shape of a bacterial protein that prepares segments of DNA for the insertion of so-called jumping genes. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - August 19, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

'Jumping Genes' Unusually Active in Many Gastrointestinal Cancers, Studies Find - 8/18/15
Results of a trio of studies done on human cancer tissue biopsies have added to growing evidence that a so-called jumping gene called LINE-1 is active during the development of many gastrointestinal cancers. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - August 18, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Scientists Report Success Using Zebrafish Embryos to Identify Potential New Diabetes Drugs - 8/18/15
In experiments with 500,000 genetically engineered zebrafish embryos, Johns Hopkins scientists report they have developed a potentially better and more accurate way to screen for useful drugs, and they have used it to identify 24 drug candidates that increase the number of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - August 18, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Alert to Biologists: Ribosomes Can Translate the 'Untranslated Region' of Messenger RNA - 8/17/15
In what appears to be an unexpected challenge to a long-accepted fact of biology, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have found that ribosomes — the molecular machines in all cells that build proteins — can sometimes do so even within the so-called untranslated regions of the ribbons of genetic material known as messenger RNA (mRNA). (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - August 17, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins Researchers Sound Off on the Dangers of Hospital Consolidation - 8/17/15
In a commentary published in the Aug. 13 issue of JAMA, Johns Hopkins experts say consolidation of hospitals into massive chains threatens healthy competition, reduces patient choice and could drive up medical expenses. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - August 17, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Medical Student Tiffany Ho Elected to the American Academy of Family Physicians Board of Directors - 8/14/15
Tiffany Ho, M.P.H., a member of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine’s class of 2016, has been elected to serve as a student member on the American Academy of Family Physicians board of directors for the next year. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - August 14, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Richard S. Ross, Longtime Johns Hopkins Medical School Dean, Dies - 8/13/15
Richard S. Ross, M.D., former dean of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, vice president for medicine of The Johns Hopkins University and a renowned cardiologist who served as president of the American Heart Association, died Aug. 11, 2015. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - August 13, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Pulmonary Hypertension: A Growing Problem in U.S. Children - 8/12/15
A review of 15 years’ worth of data in a national pediatric medical database has documented a substantial increase in the rate of hospitalizations for children with a form of high blood pressure once most common in those with congenital heart disease. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - August 12, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins, Mayo Experts Suggest Upgrades to Current Heart Disease Prevention Guidelines - 8/11/15
Acknowledging key strengths and “lessons learned,” preventive cardiologists from Johns Hopkins and Mayo Clinic have developed a short list of suggested upgrades to the controversial heart disease prevention guidelines issued jointly in 2013 by the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - August 11, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Hepatitis C Infection May Fuel Heart Risk - 8/11/15
People infected with the hepatitis C virus are at risk for liver damage, but the results of a new Johns Hopkins study now show the infection may also spell heart trouble. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - August 11, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Research Advances Potential for a Globally Accurate Diagnostic Test and Vaccine for Genital and Oral Herpes - 8/11/15
Findings from a pair of new studies could speed up the development of a universally accurate diagnostic test for human herpes simplex viruses (HSV), according to researchers at Johns Hopkins and Harvard universities and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - August 11, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Survey Reveals Best Practices That Lead to High Patient Ratings of Hospital Care - 8/10/15
Based on responses to questionnaires and letters sent to CEOs and medical personnel from a nationwide sample of 53 hospitals, Johns Hopkins investigators have identified a handful of best practices they say are most likely to give patients a positive hospital experience, a sense of satisfaction and the feeling they come first. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - August 10, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Scientists Report Explanation for Protein Clumps in Autopsy Brain Cells of ALS Patients - 8/6/15
Autopsies of nearly every patient with the lethal neurodegenerative disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and many with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), show pathologists telltale clumps of a protein called TDP-43. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - August 6, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Researchers Identify Drug Candidate for Skin, Hair Regeneration Among Scarred Victims of Burns and Trauma - 8/6/15
Johns Hopkins researchers have identified a novel cell signaling pathway in mice through which mammals — presumably including people — can regenerate hair follicles and skin while healing from wounds. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - August 6, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Nanoparticles Used to Breach Mucus Barrier in Lungs - 8/3/15
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and Federal University of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil have designed a DNA-loaded nanoparticle that can pass through the mucus barrier covering conducting airways of lung tissue — proving the concept, they say, that therapeutic genes may one day be delivered directly to the lungs to the levels sufficient to treat cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and other life-threatening lung diseases. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - August 3, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Howard W. Jones Jr., Pioneer in Reproductive Medicine, Dies at 104 - 8/1/15
Howard W. Jones Jr., a pioneer in reproductive medicine who oversaw the 1965 Johns Hopkins research that resulted in the world’s first successful fertilization of a human egg outside the body, then collaborated with his wife, gynecologic endocrinologist Georgeanna Seegar Jones, to oversee the 1981 birth of the first “test tube” baby in the United States, died July 31 at Sentara Heart Hospital in Virginia. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - August 1, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Blood Test Predicts Prognosis for Traumatic Brain Injuries - 7/30/15
A new blood test could help emergency room doctors quickly diagnose traumatic brain injury and determine its severity. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 30, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Hospital Penalties Based on Total Number of Blood Clots May Be Unfairly Imposed, Study Shows - 7/29/15
Johns Hopkins researchers say their review of 128 medical case histories suggests that financial penalties imposed on Maryland hospitals based solely on the total number of patients who suffer blood clots in the lung or leg fail to account for clots that occur despite the consistent and proper use of the best preventive therapies. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 29, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Small Study Affirms Accuracy of Free Mobile App That Screens for Liver Disease in Newborns - 7/29/15
In a small study, researchers from the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center report they have verified the ability of a free smartphone app to accurately read, interpret and record the color of a newborn’s poop as a possible early symptom of biliary atresia (BA) — a rare disorder that accounts for nearly half of pediatric end-stage liver disease in the United States. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 29, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Proof-of-Concept Study Shows Successful Transport of Blood Samples with Small Drones - 7/29/15
In a proof-of-concept study at Johns Hopkins, researchers have shown that results of common and routine blood tests are not affected by up to 40 minutes of travel on hobby-sized drones. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 29, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

New Computer-Based Technology May Lead to Improvements in Facial Transplantation - 7/29/15
Following several years of research and collaboration, physicians and engineers at Johns Hopkins and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center say they have developed a computer platform that provides rapid, real-time feedback before and during facial transplant surgery, which may someday improve face-jaw-teeth alignment between donor and recipient. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 29, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

One in Four Patients with Defibrillators Experiences Boost in Heart Function over Time - 7/27/15
A Johns Hopkins-led study of outcomes among 1,200 people with implanted defibrillators — devices intended to prevent sudden cardiac death from abnormal heart rhythms — shows that within a few years of implantation, one in four experienced improvements in heart function substantial enough to put them over the clinical threshold that qualified them to get a defibrillator in the first place. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 27, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

The Johns Hopkins hospital ranked among the top U.S. hospitals by U.S. News & World Report - 7/21/15
The Johns Hopkins Hospital ranked in the top five in nine specialties and #3 overall in the nation in the U.S. News & World Report annual Best Hospitals list, sharing the spot with UCLA Medical Center, in this year ’s ranking of 4,716 hospitals. In the magazine’s ranking of hospitals in the state, The Johns Hopkins Hospital was again ranked #1 in all specialties. It also ranked #1 in all specialties in Baltimore. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 21, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Cellphones Seen as Change Agents for Health Among Young, Poor, Urban Women in Need of Care - 7/21/15
In a survey of a diverse group of almost 250 young, low-income, inner-city pregnant and postpartum women, Johns Hopkins researchers have learned that more than 90 percent use smartphones or regular cellphones to give and get information. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 21, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

The Johns Hopkins hospital ranked among the top U.S. hospitals by U.S. News & World Report - 7/21/15
The Johns Hopkins Hospital ranked in the top five in nine specialties and #3 overall in the nation in the U.S. News & World Report annual Best Hospitals list, sharing the spot with UCLA Medical Center, in this year’s ranking of 4,716 hospitals. In the magazine’s ranking of hospitals in the state, The Johns Hopkins Hospital was again ranked #1 in all specialties. It also ranked #1 in all specialties in Baltimore. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 21, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Pairing Urban Farmers with Local Stores Improves Access to Healthy Food, Small Case Study Finds - 7/15/15
Buying fresh fruits and vegetables can be hard for families living in low-income urban neighborhoods, many of which are known as “food deserts” for their lack of full-service grocery stores that stock healthy food. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 15, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Scientists 'Watch' Rats String Memories Together - 7/15/15
By using electrode implants to track nerve cells firing in the brains of rats as they plan where to go next, Johns Hopkins scientists say they have learned that the mammalian brain likely reconstructs memories in a way more like jumping across stepping stones than walking across a bridge. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 15, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Magnetic Nanoparticles Could Be Key To Effective Immunotherapy - 7/15/15
In recent years, researchers have hotly pursued immunotherapy, a promising form of treatment that relies on harnessing and training the body's own immune system to better fight cancer and infection. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 15, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Sounds Familiar: Lessons Learned from Infection Control Can Help Solve Inpatient Glucose Problems - 7/14/15
Borrowing a page from a winning team's playbook, Johns Hopkins endocrinologist Nestoras Mathioudakis, M.D., and his colleagues are taking on the topic of managing hospital patients' diabetes. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 14, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Found: A Likely New Contributor to Age-Related Hearing Loss - 7/13/15
Conventional wisdom has long blamed age-related hearing loss almost entirely on the death of sensory hair cells in the inner ear, but research from neuroscientists at Johns Hopkins has provided new information about the workings of nerve cells that suggests otherwise. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 13, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

New Evidence That Genetic Differences May Help Explain Inconsistent Effectiveness Of Anti-Hiv Drug - 7/9/15
Research with human tissue and cells suggests that genetic variations, in addition to failure to comply with treatment regimens, may account for some failures of an anti-HIV drug to treat and prevent HIV infection. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 9, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Study Advances Potential of Tumor Genome Sequencing and DNA-Based Blood Tests in Precision Treatment and Detection of Pancreatic Cancer - 7/9/15
In a genome-sequencing study of pancreatic cancers and blood in 101 patients, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists say they found at least one-third of the patients' tumors have genetic mutations that may someday help guide precision therapy of their disease. Results of blood tests to detect DNA shed from tumors, they say, also predicted cancer recurrence more than half a year earlier than standard imaging methods. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 9, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Aggressive Cancer Treatment Near End of Life Persists Despite Rise in Advance Planning Efforts - 7/9/15
In a review of nearly 2,000 surveys with people whose loved ones died of cancer, researchers led by Johns Hopkins experts say they found a 40 percent increase over a 12-year period in the number of patients with cancer who participated in one form of advance care planning — designating durable power of attorney privileges to a loved one — but no corresponding impact on their rates of aggressive medical care received in the last weeks of life. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 9, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Faster Weight Gain Can Be Safe For Hospitalized Anorexia Patients - 7/8/15
A new study led by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers of patients hospitalized with anorexia nervosa shows that a faster weight gain during inpatient treatment — well beyond what national standards recommend — is safe and effective. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 8, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins and the Queen ’s Health Systems Collaborate to Advance Patient Safety and Quality in Hawaii - 7/7/15
The Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality and The Queen ’s Health Systems in Honolulu have entered into a collaboration agreement to improve patient safety and quality of care initiatives at hospitals in the state of Hawaii. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 7, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Stress-Coping Strategy and Mom ’s Stress Levels During Pregnancy May Determine Anorexia Susceptibility in Rats - 7/7/15
Johns Hopkins researchers have found that offspring born to mother rats stressed during pregnancy lost weight faster and failed to turn on appropriate brain hunger signals in response to exercise and food restriction, compared to offspring from non-stressed mothers. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 7, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Sculpting a Cell's Backside - 7/7/15
When Greek mythology and cell biology meet, you get the protein Callipygian, recently discovered and named by researchers at The Johns Hopkins University for its role in determining which area of a cell becomes the back as it begins to move. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 7, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

The Johns Hopkins University and the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry Enter into Extended Drug Discovery Collaboration - 7/7/15
The Johns Hopkins Drug Discovery (JHDD) program, created with the mission of identifying novel drug targets arising from Johns Hopkins faculty research and translating them into new therapeutics, and the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Czech Academy of Sciences (IOCB Prague) have entered into a five-year drug discovery research agreement to develop small-molecule and peptide drugs for a range of therapeutic areas including neurological diseases, cancer, and gastrointestinal disorders. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 7, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins and the Queen’s Health Systems Collaborate to Advance Patient Safety and Quality in Hawaii - 7/7/15
The Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality and The Queen’s Health Systems in Honolulu have entered into a collaboration agreement to improve patient safety and quality of care initiatives at hospitals in the state of Hawaii. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 7, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Stress-Coping Strategy and Mom’s Stress Levels During Pregnancy May Determine Anorexia Susceptibility in Rats - 7/7/15
Johns Hopkins researchers have found that offspring born to mother rats stressed during pregnancy lost weight faster and failed to turn on appropriate brain hunger signals in response to exercise and food restriction, compared to offspring from non-stressed mothers. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 7, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Cellular Sentinel Prevents Cell Division When the Right Machinery Is Not in Place - 7/6/15
For cell division to be successful, pairs of chromosomes have to line up just right before being swept into their new cells, like the opening of a theater curtain. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 6, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

'Decorative' Molecule on Brain Cells Affects Motor Skills, Learning and Hyperactivity - 7/6/15
New research from The Johns Hopkins University suggests that a molecule commonly found "decorating" brain cells in higher animals, including humans, may affect brain structure. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 6, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Heart Attack Treatment Hypothesis 'Busted' - 7/6/15
Researchers have long had reason to hope that blocking the flow of calcium into the mitochondria of heart and brain cells could be one way to prevent damage caused by heart attacks and strokes. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 6, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

New Hepatitis C Treatment Needs No Antiviral Boost - 7/1/15
An analysis of the results of more than 16,000 brain and spine surgeries suggests patients have nothing to fear from having residents — physicians-in-training — assist in those operations. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - July 1, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Brain and Spine Surgery No More Risky When Physicians-In-Training Participate, Study Finds - 6/29/15
An analysis of the results of more than 16,000 brain and spine surgeries suggests patients have nothing to fear from having residents — physicians-in-training — assist in those operations. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - June 29, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

DNA Shed from Head and Neck Tumors Detected in Blood and Saliva - 6/24/15
On the hunt for better cancer screening tests, Johns Hopkins scientists led a proof of principle study that successfully identified tumor DNA shed into the blood and saliva of 93 patients with head and neck cancer. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - June 24, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins Scientists Restore Normal Function in Heart Muscle Cells of Diabetic Rats - 6/24/15
Working with heart muscle cells from diabetic rats, scientists at Johns Hopkins have located what they say is the epicenter of mischief wreaked by too much blood sugar and used a sugar-gobbling enzyme to restore normal function in the glucose-damaged cells of animal heart muscles. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - June 24, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Geography Is Destiny in Deaths from Kidney Failure, Study Shows - 6/24/15
The notion that geography often shapes economic and political destiny has long informed the work of economists and political scholars. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - June 24, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Nanoparticle 'Wrapper' Delivers Chemical that Stops Fatty Buildup in Rodent Arteries - 6/23/15
In what may be a major leap forward in the quest for new treatments of the most common form of cardiovascular disease, scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have found a way to halt and reverse the progression of atherosclerosis in rodents by loading microscopic nanoparticles with a chemical that restores the animals' ability to properly handle cholesterol. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - June 23, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news