Mentally Surviving a Hurricane
There's one belief I hold to be true: It's always reassuring to set out on a mission, and then achieve that mission. As a member of  Israel Rescue Coalition’s (IRC) mission which sent members of United Hatzalah’s (UH) Psychotrauma and Crisis Response Unit to Houston last week, I think that's what happened with us.   Our Mission Looking at the pictures from the trip might give someone the mistaken impression that we were there just to listen to people tell their stories and to give the hugs afterward. We certainly did a fair amount of that, but any caring person can do that. Our job was to help pe...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 7, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dr. Sharon Slater, United Hatzalah Psychotrauma Unit Tags: Major Incidents Patient Care Source Type: news

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE): What we Know
CHICAGO (AP) — Researchers are tackling fresh questions about a degenerative brain disease now that it has been detected in the brains of nearly 200 football players after death. The suspected cause is repeated head blows, an almost unavoidable part of contact sports. As a new NFL season gets underway, here's a look at what's known — and what still needs to be learned — about the condition: WHAT'S NEW? The largest report to date on chronic traumatic encephalopathy included 202 brains from football players at the youth, college and professional level, all donated post-mortem to a Boston brain bank. CTE was...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 7, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Good Samaritan Saves Man's Life With Tourniquet
LINCOLN, Neb. (KOLN) - Brandon Wainwright said he heard people screaming for help near 41st and Huntington after a crash and then an assault left one man's leg was sandwiched between two cars. Immediately after his leg was barely attached and he was losing blood quickly. Just being a good Samaritan, Brandon Wainwright took the simple step of stopping. When he got out of his car and saw just how much was blood was coming out, he realized the man desperately needed help and he had a skill set that saved the man's life. Wainwright said, "It was pretty bad. He was losing blood pretty fast." Because of his milita...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 5, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brandi B. Harris, KOLN Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Response Units from Israel Provide Support After Harvey
As of Sunday afternoon, some 2,500 evacuees from Houston and the surrounding towns of Beaumont and Port Arthur had made their way to the mega-shelter set up for them at the Dallas Convention Center. At the center, all the services that evacuees would need for their long-term stay until they could return home were being provided. Police, fire and rescue services, social services, EMS and hospital teams and even day care services were all on hand at the center. In the mix of the servicemen and women and multitudes of volunteers who were located at the center to provide a helping hand, were three volunteers from the Israel Re...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 5, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: United Hatzalah Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Hospital Officials Address Arrest of Nurse who Refused to Draw Blood
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Officials at a Utah hospital where a nurse was arrested after refusing to allow police to draw blood from an unconscious patient apologized that security officers didn't intervene and said Monday that they have implemented policy changes to prevent it from happening again. The announcements mark the latest fallout from nurse Alex Wubbels' release last week of July 26 video from a Salt Lake City police officer's body camera showing him dragging her from University of Utah Hospital and handcuffing her. The officer has been put on leave, and his agency has apologized. Hospital CEO Gordon Crabtree s...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 5, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brady McCombs, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Emergency Physician Rhiana Ireland Helps Hundreds in the Wake of Harvey
When Harvey hit, I found out that the small church near me had volunteered to take in 100 people. The church is an official Red Cross center, and the only one for League City, Texas. Initially, they were only able to send three volunteers to staff it. This city has over 100,000 people in it.  When people searched for a place to go, this church was the only one listed for the entire city and they poured in. So I decided to offer my services as an emergency physician. We had 200 cots, so the church agreed to take 200 people.   Like the rain, what started in drips turned into a torrent of people: soaking wet, clut...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Rhiana Ireland, MD Tags: Major Incidents Patient Care News Source Type: news

Emerging Technologies in EMS: Help or Hindrance?
We've seen some remarkable changes in the way EMS is provided around the country since its inception more than 50 years ago. We've gone from rudimentary first aid skills and rushing every patient to the hospital, to an expanded scope of practice that includes numerous treatment modalities and drugs, coupled with triaged response and selective, cautious transport. But we haven't always relied on science and evidence to make our decisions about new devices or protocols. Until recently, we've demonstrated a propensity to grab on to the latest gizmo or newest treatment fad based solely on assumptions. That's changing. Rapid Re...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Vincent D. Robbins, FACPE, FACHE Tags: Columns Patient Care Source Type: news

Three-Step Method for EMS Management of Bus Collisions
Every day in every community, large vehicles travel the road filled with potential patients: some children, some elderly, some with special medical issues—all are potentially your responsibility.1,2 These mass casualties on wheels present a host of problems for EMS responders. If you're the head of your agency, you may wonder how you can prepare your system. If you're a frontline supervisor you may wonder what tools you should have on hand to manage such an incident. If you're a field provider you may wonder what you can do to prepare yourself for response. Bus collision incidents may be inherently complex, b...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Rommie L. Duckworth, LP Tags: Major Incidents Rescue & Vehicle Extrication Trauma Mass Casualty Incidents Operations Source Type: news

Firefighters Deliver Baby in Ambulance, Two Minutes from Hospital
PORTLAND, MAINE (WGME) -- Scarboroughsay they bring a lot of people to Maine Medical Center, but it's not every day they drop off a newborn baby that they delivered. On Wednesday, the firefighters delivered a baby just minutes away from the hospital. On Wednesday night around 7:30,  they got a call about a woman in labor, at the intersection of Saco Street and County Road. An ambulance consisting of four fire fighters put the woman in the ambulance, and took off toward Maine Medical Center. They say that's when firefighters turned into obstetricians, and the ambulance turned into a delivery room. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: WGME Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Israel Rescue Coalition Sending Psychological First Aid Team To Help in Houston
Jerusalem - On Wednesday evening, the Israel Rescue Coalition (IRC) will mobilize and dispatch a team comprised of elite members of United Hatzalah’s Psychotrauma and Crisis Response Unit to Houston, Texas in order to provide mental and emotional stabilization to people who need it. The team includes Psychologists, Psychiatrists, and therapists and will be arriving in Houston early Thursday morning, local time. While not yet confirmed, there is a succinct possibility that a military psychologist from the IDF will be joining the group. “People need help on the ground,” said Dov Maisel, Director of Internat...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 30, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: United Hatzalah Tags: Patient Care News Operations Source Type: news

CCEMS & ESD 48 First in U.S. to Deploy Whole Blood
On August 24, 2017 at approximately 7:30 pm Cypress Creek EMS became one of only two ground EMS systems in the country to carry Whole Blood in the field 24/7/365. The other agency is our partner in the program, Harris County ESD 48 Fire Department/EMS which deployed whole blood on Friday August 18. Exactly one year ago, CCEMS deployed packed red blood cells and plasma for the first time. Since then 133 units have been administered to 72 patients. About 56% percent were medical in nature such as gastrointestinal bleeding and 44% were trauma patients. Here’s the breakdown on trauma. While we enjoyed great success wit...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 30, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Cypress Creek EMS Tags: Patient Care Industry News Source Type: news

No Need to Administer Tetanus Shots to Those Exposed to Flood Waters
Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH, an advisor to the U.S. Metropolitan Medical Directors “Eagles” Coalition and an expert in the area of infectious diseases, has advised that there's no need to routinely administer tetanus shots to those exposed to flood waters. Dr. Osterholm notes that it's a long standing myth that there's an increased risk with such contact. The CDC recommendations further calcifies this issue. In watching the news coverage of Hurricane Harvey, Dr. Osterholm has seen and heard healthcare providers, emergency responders and public health officials in the impacted areas repeating the myth about t...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 29, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: A.J. Heightman, MPA, EMT P Tags: Major Incidents Patient Care News Source Type: news

Dayton International Airport Unveils CPR Training Kiosk
DAYTON, Ohio (WDTN) – The Dayton International Airport (DAY) unveiled a new amenity Thursday that could be life saving. It unveiled a Hands-Only CPR Training Kiosk at a ribbon cutting ceremony with local leaders and health care professionals. In a partnership between the airport and the Miami Valley Division of the American Heart Association, and sponsored by the Heart Institute of Dayton, the interactive kiosk, placed in a heavily trafficked area of Terminal A, will provide travelers an opportunity to learn hands-only CPR in fewer than five minutes. (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 25, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: WDTN/2News Tags: Training Cardiac & Resuscitation News Source Type: news

Student Attacks 4 With Bat at Australian University
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — A student was detained after assaulting his teacher and three of his fellow students with a baseball bat on Friday in a classroom at the Australian National University, police said. Shortly after 9 a.m., the student stood up from his seat armed with a bat and approached the teacher at the front of the classroom, the Australian Federal Police said. Other students in the class intervened and tried to restrain the attacker, but he assaulted four people, including the teacher. They were hospitalized with serious but non-life threatening injuries, including broken bones. Police were called to th...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 25, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Rod McGuirk, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Hiker Recounts Experience of Being Struck by Lightning
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — There was no rain, no rumbling, no sign of danger before the blinding flash and deafening bang of a lightning bolt threw Mathias Steinhuber to the ground, tore off his clothes and burned a gaping hole in his shoe. The 31-year-old Austrian teacher, an avid hiker, had just reached the 9,000-foot summit of a Northern California mountain range ahead of his companions when he raised his arms for a picture and was struck in the back of the head. The electricity shot through his body and exited through his foot, and he was too stunned to know what had happened. "It was like in a dream," S...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 25, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Olga R. Rodriguez and Jonathan J. Cooper, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Cura çao EMS Uses ZOLL AutoPulse to Save Tourist in Sudden Cardiac Arrest
CHELMSFORD, Mass.-- ZOLL Medical Corporation, an Asahi Kasei Group Company that manufactures medical devices and related software solutions, announced today that Curaçao Emergency Medical Services used the ZOLL AutoPulse Resuscitation System to revive a Venezuelan tourist who was experiencing sudden cardiac arrest. When Curaçao EMS arrived at the hotel, they found bystanders trying to revive an 88-year-old man, who was nearly dead, with CPR. Curaçao EMS immediately placed the man, a hotel guest, on the AutoPulse for the delivery of high-quality, automated chest compressions,...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 24, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ZOLL Medical Corporation Tags: Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation Industry News Source Type: news

Studies Suggest Automated Safety Systems are Preventing Car Crashes
WASHINGTON (AP) — Safety systems to prevent cars from drifting into another lane or that warn drivers of vehicles in their blind spots are beginning to live up to their potential to significantly reduce crashes, according to two studies released Wednesday. At the same time, research by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety raises concern that drivers may be less vigilant when relying on automated safety systems or become distracted by dashboard displays that monitor how the systems are performing. The two institute studies found that lane-keeping systems, some of which even nudge the vehicle back into its lane f...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 23, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joan Lowy, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Wisconsin Man Drives to ED After Accidentally Puncturing His Heart With a Nail
MILWAUKEE (AP) — A Wisconsin man who doctors say came perilously close to death after accidentally shooting a nail into his heart while working on his house calmly drove himself to the hospital and even parked his pickup truck in the lot before walking into the emergency room. Doug Bergeson is ready to get back to work this week after surviving a June 25 ordeal that others might not have taken in such stride. Bergeson told The Associated Press he was working on framing in a fireplace at his house near Peshtigo in northeast Wisconsin when his nail gun accidentally fired, sending a nail ricocheting off some wood and in...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 16, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Gretchen Ehlke, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

St. Vincent ’s Medical Center Takes Emergency Preparedness to a Higher Level
BRIDGEPORT, Connecticut – For St. Vincent’s Medical Center, safety and emergency preparedness are critical to its role in serving the Bridgeport community. St. Vincent’s continually evaluates and assesses the needs of the community at its sites of care to ensure they have the proper safety-related resources and protocols in place. This month, St. Vincent’s further strengthened its relationship with the Bridgeport Police Department, while improving its own resources to enhance emergency preparedness. Protecting Bridgeport’s Finest Earlier this week, St. Vincent’s Medical Center Foun...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 16, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: St. Vincent's Medical Center Tags: Patient Care Industry News Source Type: news

Data Shows Fewer Deaths from Lightning Strikes
WASHINGTON (AP) — Lightning — once one of nature's biggest killers —is claiming far fewer lives in the United States, mostly because we've learned to get out of the way. In the 1940s, when there were fewer people, lightning killed more than 300 people annually. So far this year, 13 people have died after being struck, on pace for a record low of 17 deaths. Taking the growing population into account, the lightning death rate has shrunk more than forty-fold since record-keeping began in 1940. People seem to be capturing the phenomenon more on camera than before, making it seem like something new and sizzlin...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Seth Borenstein, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

EMS Physicians Endorse Toxicology Groups' Opioid Safety Precautions Guidance
WASHINGTON, D.C. – The National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) announces its endorsement of a new American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) and American Academy of Clinical Toxicology (AACT) document detailing pragmatic and actionable safety precautions for first responders in opioid overdose situations. NAEMSP is an organization of physicians and other professionals partnering to provide leadership and foster excellence in the subspecialty of EMS medicine. In pursuing its mission to improve out-of-hospital emergency medical care, NAEMSP’s Executive Board and Standards and Clinical Practice Committe...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Patient Care Industry News Source Type: news

Curaplex Launches Stop the Bleed Kits as Licensees of the Department of Homeland Security ’s Stop the Bleed Initiative
Dublin, Ohio–Curaplex, the brand carried exclusively by Sarnova’s family of companies, is adding Stop the Bleed kits to their product portfolio. Curaplex Stop the Bleed kits were designed to provide their end user with immediate access to products intended to stop traumatic hemorrhaging. These kits contain basic products for emergency responders or civilians to address a traumatic bleeding situation. These kits are all vacuum‐packed and tamper‐proof for easy storage and opening. These kits are available through both Bound Tree Medical (www.boundtree.com) and Emergency Medical Products Inc. (www.buyemp.com)...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 10, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sarnova Tags: Patient Care Industry News Source Type: news

Paramedics Save Nurse in Cardiac Arrest in Their Home
LACKAWANNA, N.Y. (WGRZ) -- When Wayne Howard talks about the call he received on July 29th, at first he said he didn’t feel much urgency. Michael and Maureen McCarthy said the same thing.  Michael even admits he was out golfing with his grandson when he got a similar call. 42-year-old Lynn Howard — Wayne’s wife and the daughter of Michael and Maureen — had collapsed while at work.  Could it have been exhaustion? Maybe she hadn’t eaten properly that day? After playing through each of the less severe options, Lynn’s family were called to the hospital in a much more serious tone. ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 10, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joshua Robinson, WGRT Tags: News Videos Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

First Responders Rescue Man Found With Both Hands Nailed to a Tree
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (KRQE) – Police found him nailed to a tree in the middle of the Bosque, and now KRQE News 13 obtained the video of those moments, including how first responders worked to rescue him. Back in May, a city worker discovered a man, both hands nailed to a tree and screaming for help. “He kept yelling, ‘Help. Help,’ and so I came and I saw him and I kind of freaked out because I didn’t know if there was any other guys around,” the city worker told police. (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 9, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marissa Lucero, KRQE Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Parasitic Cyclospora Infections up 134% This Summer
A recent article from CNN highlighted the increase in the number of cases of cyclospora infections: There were 206 cases of cyclospora infections reported by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from the first of May to the beginning of August, a 134% increase from the 88 cases reported over the same time period in 2016. Cyclospora infections or cyclosporiasis are caused by ingestion of the parasite Cyclospora cayetanensis in food or water. Cyclospora infect the small intestine and most commonly cause watery diarrhea; other symptoms include abdominal cramping, nausea and weight loss. Those with...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 9, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Katherine West, BSN, MSEd, CIC Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Enhanced Version of New SIPQuik Vacuum Cervical Splint Getting Rave Reviews
The new, enhanced version of the SIPQuik (Stabilize in Place) one-size-fits-all vacuum cervical splint, one of the 30 Hot Products selected at the 2017 EMS Today Conference in Salt Lake City, is getting rave reviews by early adopters, and its enhanced version is now available. I had the opportunity recently to meet with Steve Islava, the creator of the SIP cervical splint to see the latest, enhanced version and try it out. The splint is unique from other collars and splints because one size truly fits all patients. The splint is designed to be placed on the patient in the position they are in to avoid excessive movement of...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 8, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: A.J. Heightman, MPA, EMT P Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Enhanced Version of New SIPQuick Vacuum Collar Getting Rave Reviews
The new, enhanced version of the SIPQuick (Stabilize in Place) one-size-fits-all vacuum collar, one of the 30 Hot Products selected at the 2017 EMS Today Conference in Salt Lake City, is getting rave reviews by early adopters, and its enhanced version is now available. I had the opportunity recently to meet with Steve Islava, the creator of the SIP collar to see the latest, enhanced version and try it out. The collar is unique from other collars because one size truly fits all patients. The collar is designed to be placed on the patient in the position they are in to avoid excessive movement of their neck. The enhancements...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 8, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: A.J. Heightman, MPA, EMT P Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Experts Stumped by Australian Teen's Foot Injury
MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — A teenager who went for a swim at a Melbourne beach and emerged with his feet covered in blood has stumped marine experts. Sam Kanizay's legs felt sore after playing a game of football on Saturday, so he decided to soak them at the beach. About 30 minutes later, the 16-year-old walked out of the water with his feet and ankles covered in what looked like hundreds of little pin holes that were bleeding profusely. Upon returning home, his parents promptly took him to the hospital. Kanizay's father, Jarrod, said hospital staff had no idea what kind of creature could have caused the injuries. S...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 7, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Derivation of a Termination of Resuscitation Clinical Decision Rule in the UK
In the United Kingdom, sudden cardiac arrest accounts for close to 100,000 deaths annually.1 Despite improvements in resuscitation practices,2 outcomes from OHCA remain poor, regardless of interventions utilized.3 In a one-year period during 2014-2015, approximately 30,406 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) in England were transported to hospitals by ambulance, with a survival rate of 8.6%.4 Transporting patients with nearly certain poor outcomes represents an ineffective use of ambulance resources.5,6 Termination of resuscitation (TOR) clinical decision rules (CDRs) for OHCA exist and have been validated.5,7,8 These ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Matthew House, DHC, MSc, LL.B (hons) Tags: Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

How to Read and Interpret End-Tidal Capnography Waveforms
Capnography is a great way to confirm airway device placement and monitor ventilation, but it can do so much more. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a product of metabolism transported via perfusion and expelled through ventilation. End-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) waveform monitoring allows you to measure all three simultaneously, making it the most important vital sign you use.1 To evaluate the metabolism, ventilation and perfusion of a patient through EtCO2 waveform monitoring you need to read the PQRST: proper, quantity, rate, shape and trend. Proper means that you should know the normal readings for quantity, rate, shape and tr...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Rommie L. Duckworth, LP Tags: Airway & Respiratory Patient Care Source Type: news

Listening to Our Patients
When was the last time any of us used a stethoscope and felt it made a difference either to clinch a diagnosis or to change the management of a sick patient? Diagnostic Tool or Neckwear? How many of us have had a patient with a history of hypertension, diabetes or myocardial infarction (MI), who presented with complaints of chest pain and shortness of breath? On exam, he might have been anxious and diaphoretic, with a heart rate of 130, respirations of 24, blood pressure of 190/110, bilateral pedal edema, oxygen saturation (SpO2) of 89% and 12-lead ECGs showing ST-elevation. Then you put your scope on hi...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neal Richmond, MD Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

The Impact of Telehealth-Enabled EMS on Ambulance Transports
The Research Langabeer R, Gonzalez M, Alqusairi D, et al. Telehealth-enabled emergency medical services program reduces ambulance transport to urban emergency departments. West J Emerg Med. 2016;17(6):713-720. The Science Researchers in Houston wanted to measure the ability of using a combination of telemedicine, social service pathways and alternative means of patient transportation for patients who didn't require an ED visit by ambulance. It was conducted by the Houston Fire Department and termed the Emergency Telehealth and Navigation (ETHAN) program. Eligible patients included those with primary care-re...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Keith Wesley, MD, FACEP Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

Ketamine May Aid in Prehospital Management of Severe Asthma
An ALS unit that has a 60-year-old female on board in severe respiratory distress. On arrival, you find your patient altered in the back of the ambulance. She's hypoxic, with oxygen saturation (SpO2) in the upper 60s, and has audible wheezing. She will not keep the non-rebreather mask on. Initially she was found unresponsive by the ALS crew, who first attempted intubation, but had difficulty doing so as they don't carry paralytics. An 18-gauge IV had been established in the left antecubital area, and she received 125 mg of solumedrol IV. The first arriving ALS crew has treated her before and indicates she has a history of ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jennifer Keefer, BSN, CFRN, NRP Tags: Airway & Respiratory Columns Source Type: news

The Impact of Telehealth-Enabled EMS on Ambulance Transports
The Research Langabeer R, Gonzalez M, Alqusairi D, et al. Telehealth-enabled emergency medical services program reduces ambulance transport to urban emergency departments. West J Emerg Med. 2016;17(6):713-720. The Science Researchers in Houston wanted to measure the ability of using a combination of telemedicine, social service pathways and alternative means of patient transportation for patients who didn't require an ED visit by ambulance. It was conducted by the Houston Fire Department and termed the Emergency Telehealth and Navigation (ETHAN) program. Eligible patients included those with primary care-related complaints...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Keith Wesley, MD, FACEP Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

Innovative Approaches to Management of Mass Casualty Incidents
New approaches to mass casualty care Emergency responders are trained to recognize disasters, though some are easier to identify than others. Regardless of the cause and scope, medical providers of all types feel the impact when resources are overwhelmed. This threshold will differ for various agencies and regions, but responders can usually predict when their capabilities will be taxed. Mass or multiple casualty incidents (MCIs) are among the more common disasters that emergency services will manage. These events are typically related to trauma or hazardous materials, which have an acute onset and relatively short respons...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: David French, MD Tags: Major Incidents Patient Care Source Type: news

Mother and Baby Found in Hot Car
HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (WHNT) -- Sunday morning HEMSI crews responded to a 911 call that a baby was in a car and the mother was passed out in the parking lot of the Oakwood Avenue Kroger. "We had no idea how long the child and the lady had been in the vehicle. Fortunately a person that was walking by the vehicle was very alert to their surroundings, and saw it and tried to stimulate it and then activated the 911 system," said Don Webster, HEMSI Chief Operations Officer. Webster said the baby is between four and five months old. Paramedics assessed both mother and child on the scene. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Caitlan Dallas, WHNT Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

U.S. Hospitals Set Record for Fast Heart Attack Care
There's never been a better time to be treated for a heart attack. U.S. hospitals have set a record for how quickly they open blocked arteries, averaging under one hour for the first time since these results have been tracked. More than 93 percent of patients now have their arteries opened within the recommended 90 minutes of arrival. "Things have definitely improved" from a decade ago, when less than half of heart attack patients were treated that fast, said Dr. Fred Masoudi, a University of Colorado cardiologist who led a recent report examining response times. It's based on records from about 85 percent of U.S...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 31, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marilynn Marchione, Chief Medical Writer, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation News Source Type: news

CPR App Helps Save a Man's Life
HOWARD COUNTY, Md. (ABC7) — A CPR app called “PulsePoint” helped save the life of a man having a heart attack inside of a conference room in Howard County, Maryland. While Sean McGuire was slouched over in a chair in his office, co-workers called 911. The PulsePoint app activates once a cardiac arrest and/or a 911 call is registered in the system in Howard County. The app notifies everyone in the area of the location where an incident happens or if someone needs CPR. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 28, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sam Sweeney, ABC7 Tags: News Videos Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

Parents, Players, Coaches Educated on Concussions
Jefferson County, Ohio (WTOV9) - One day after a new study was released on concussions, local experts educate parents, coaches and players on the issues. Summer is coming to a close and that means football season is quickly approaching and as exciting as that time of year is, it is also the time of year parents start to worry a little more about concussions. “Concussions are a problem and can potentially be a problem, but if found out appropriately and treated appropriately it should not be a long term issue," says Director of Trinity Sports Medicine Michael Scarpone. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 27, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kate Siefert, WTOV9 Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Librarians Being Trained to Respond to Overdoses
King County, Wash. (KING) - Unlikely recruits are now at the forefront of the heroin epidemic: librarians. Some libraries around the country are training their staff to use Naloxone, better known as Narcan, to prevent overdose deaths. “It’s been for a long time something that we’ve seen in our more urban libraries, and now we’re seeing it in our suburban libraries as well. Suburban communities are facing this issue in ways they haven’t before,” said King County librarian Angelina Benedetti. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 27, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: LiLi Tan, KING Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

New Study Examines Brain Injury in Football Players
CHICAGO (AP) — Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school. It's the largest update on chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a debilitating brain disease that can cause a range of symptoms including memory loss. The report doesn't confirm that the condition is common in all football players; it reflects high occurrence in samples at a Boston brain bank that studies CTE. Many donors or their families contributed because of the players' repeated concussions a...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 26, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

New Study Shows Prevalence of Brain Disease in Former Football Players
CHICAGO (AP) — Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school. It's the largest update on chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, a debilitating brain disease that can cause a range of symptoms including memory loss. The report doesn't confirm that the condition is common in all football players; it reflects high occurrence in samples at a Boston brain bank that studies CTE. Many donors or their families contributed because of the players' repeated concussions a...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 25, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Trauma Patient Care News Source Type: news

Paramedic, EMT, Probationary EMT Save Premature Baby
DETROIT (WXYZ) - A medic-in-training is being hailed for helping to save the life of a mother and newborn. Steven Andary, a probationary technician with the Detroit Fire Department was with paramedic James LaCroix and EMT James Basirico on June 24th when they were called to the 1900 block of E. Larned. Inside the home the found a 28-year-old mother in active labor, delivering her baby 15 weeks early. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 21, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Shelley Childers, WXYZ Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Unlikely Hero Helps a Family After Crash
  Amarillo, Tx (KAMR) - He's only been out of prison for three months, and was returning home before his strict curfew when he witnessed a car crash.  When he heard the cries of an infant, he ran toward the accident.  Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 18, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: KAMR Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

FDA Grants De Novo Clearance for Z-Medica ’s QuikClot Control+ Only Non-Absorbable Hemostatic Dressing for Severe Bleeding in Internal Organ Space
Wallingford, Conn. - Z-Medica, LLC, a leading developer and marketer of hemostatic devices, announces that QuikClot Control+ has been cleared for use by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) under the de novo classification process and is designated as a Class II medical device. QuikClot Control+ is the first and only non-absorbable hemostatic dressing cleared for internal organ space use in severely bleeding patients. QuikClot Control+ is indicated for temporary control of internal organ space bleeding for patients displaying class III or class IV bleeding. It may also be used for control of severely bleeding wound...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dave Schemelia Tags: Patient Care Industry News Source Type: news

EMT Firefighter Saves Newborn Baby
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (mypanhandle.com) -  When Panama City Firefighter and EMT, Marty McFaul, loaded up on the engine at 2 a.m., he and his crew expected nothing more than a routine medical call. It wasn't until they got on scene did they realize time was working against them. "A woman just, just had a baby unexpectedly," said McFaul. The new mom is in shock and the baby is too quiet. "The baby is not breathing, it's not moving," said McFaul. "The baby is still." Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kelsey Peck, MyPanhandle.com Tags: Airway & Respiratory News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Hospital Protocols Under Review After NYPD Officer Fatally Shot
NEW YORK (AP) — Four days before Alexander Bonds ambushed and killed a New York City police officer, he was in a hospital emergency room getting a psychiatric evaluation. The hospital released him the same day. Now the hospital's actions are under a state review ordered by the governor. St. Barnabas Hospital says it handled Bonds appropriately and welcomes the inquiry. The decision was one psychiatrists across the country make regularly: whether patients pose enough danger to themselves or others to require hospitalization. Practitioners say that it's often a difficult call to make and that even an experienced evalua...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 10, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jennifer Peltz, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

EMT Treats Girl for Allergic Reaction to Lotion, Develops Same Reaction In Spite of Following Protocol
Jerusalem - An allergic reaction is not something that is contagious, however, an unlikely situation occurred on Wednesday, when EMS teams were called to help treat a young woman who developed a severe allergic reaction to a tanning cream that she had been using. Shai Levi (17) who hails from Kibbutz Matzuva in the western Galilee, went to a tanning spa in Nahariya and applied some tanning lotion that was intended to speed up the tanning process.   “This is not the first time that I have used this cream, but it is the first time I had an allergic reaction to it,” Levi explained to Yisrael Hayom reporters. ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 7, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: United Hatzalah Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

A Profile of James Dunford, MD, Recipient of the 2017 James O. Page/JEMS Leadership Award
It would be easy to trip over the seemingly endless supply of plaques and awards possessed by James Dunford, MD, if they weren't so meticulously tucked away out of sight. The fact that the awards are hidden behind his well-organized desk isn't because their owner trivializes them. It's merely a testament to the disarming humility of this emergency physician. Dunford isn't in it for the praise. He's on a tireless quest to fix a broken system. But talent like his can't hide behind a desk, which is why it's no surprise that he's the 2017 James O. Page/JEMS Leadership Award recipient. Dunford passionately believes in helping s...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - July 6, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lauren Crosby, NREMT Tags: Patient Care Administration and Leadership Source Type: news