Bystander CPR Save Underscores Importance of Community Role
“Everyone has a part to play and when everything aligns, you get the best chance for a good outcome,” said Mike Roulette, an apparatus operator and paramedic with Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue in Portland, Oregon. Saves like the one involving Bob Brands are a daily reminder of why the work he does in the community is so important. Brands was taking a breather between go-kart races on Feb. 22, 2015, when he suddenly collapsed. An employee at the racing center immediately called 9-1-1. Evan Schenck, another racer, began CPR. Within moments, a sheriff’s deputy had arrived and was applying an automat...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 20, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeff A. Woodin, NRP, FAHA Tags: Rescue & Vehicle Extrication Cardiac Resuscitation Operations Source Type: news

A Closer Look at the Impact of Heroin Overdoses in Toledo, Ohio
TOLEDO, Ohio (13abc Action News) - The 43605 zip code has the highest number of heroin overdose in the city of Toledo and in Lucas County. Fire crews in the area responded to over 300 overdoses since the beginning of this year. There are some addresses that crews make multiple trips to, rescuing the same people multiple times. Raul is one of those people. He lives on Parker Street in East Toledo, and overdosed for the third time early on a November Morning. "Mam, I used to 100 dollars 200 dollars a day, I was bad." says Raul. While 13abc talks with Raul, a young 18-year old girl overdoses just a few feet fro...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 17, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: 13abc Action News Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Opioid Addiction Treatments Face Off in US Trial
CHICAGO (AP) — The first U.S. study to compare two treatments for opioid addiction finds a monthly shot works as well as a daily drug to prevent relapse. The shot requires days of detox first and that proved to be a stumbling block for many. For those who made it past that hurdle, the shot Vivitrol worked about the same as an older treatment, Suboxone. Both drugs had high relapse rates and there were overdoses, including fatal ones, in the experiment in 570 adults. The study , published Tuesday in the journal Lancet, is the first to compare the two drugs in the United States, where an opioid addiction epidemic has do...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Carla K. Johnson, AP Medical Writer Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Study Suggests Women Less Likely to Get CPR From Bystanders
ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) — Women are less likely than men to get CPR from a bystander and more likely to die, a new study suggests, and researchers think reluctance to touch a woman's chest might be one reason. Only 39 percent of women suffering cardiac arrest in a public place were given CPR versus 45 percent of men, and men were 23 percent more likely to survive, the study found. It involved nearly 20,000 cases around the country and is the first to examine gender differences in receiving heart help from the public versus  professional responders. "It can be kind of daunting thinking about pushing hard and fa...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 12, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation News Source Type: news

Woman Reunited with EMS Crew Who Saved Her Life
WASHINGTON (ABC7) — For 50-year-old D.C. resident, Kim Jenifer, Thursday was an emotional reunion. “Thank you so much!” She said, crying and hugging a first responder. “Ya’ll saved me. I can see my grandkids grow up and make sure they stay on the right track. It’s just a lot.” Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amy Aubert, WJLA Tags: News Videos Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

Is it an Emergency? Insurer Asks Patients to Question ED Visits
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Alison Wrenne was making waffles for her two young children one morning when abdominal pain forced her to the floor. A neighbor who is a physician assistant urged her to go to the emergency room. Wrong decision, according to her health insurer. Wrenne was diagnosed with a ruptured ovarian cyst, but Anthem said that wasn't an emergency and stuck her with a $4,110 bill. "How are you supposed to know that?" said the 34-year-old from Lexington, Kentucky. "I'm not a doctor ... that's what the emergency room is for." In an effort to curb unnecessary and costly ER visits, the Blue Cro...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 10, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tom Murphy, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Las Vegas Shooting Victims Search for Their Heroes
LOS ANGELES (AP) — As soon as Chris Gilman knew she would survive the gunshot wound she sustained in the Las Vegas massacre, she wanted to find the two strangers who saved her life — a man and woman whose names she didn't even know. She found a Facebook page called "Find My LV Hero" and posted a plea. "Looking for husband and wife who were by the VIP bleachers and helped me get out," wrote Gilman, of Bonney Lake, Washington. "My wife gave the husband her shirt and the wife held it against my side to stop bleeding as they carried me through the VIP area out to the street." Despite t...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 9, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda Lee Myers, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Mass Casualty Incidents Patient Care Source Type: news

Mobile Stroke Unit in New York Takes Treatment to the Patient
NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Ever see an ambulance stuck in traffic and say to yourself, “I hope they get to the person in time?” Seconds count in all emergency cases, but time is especially critical if the victim is having a stroke. (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 8, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: CBS New York Tags: News Videos Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

Pennsylvania Trooper Saves Own Life With Tourniquet
A Pennsylvania State Police trooper who was shot several times during a traffic stop likely saved his own life by applying a tourniquet to his leg before help arrived, authorities said Wednesday as they released more details of the violent confrontation along a busy highway. Cpl. Seth Kelly, 39, remained hospitalized in critical condition after suffering gunshot wounds to his neck and shoulder area and to his leg in the close-quarters gunfight. The 13-year veteran was set to undergo another surgery to remove a bullet. "He's battling. He's certainly not out of the woods by any means, but ... he is a very strong individ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 8, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michael Rubinkam, Associated Press Tags: Trauma Patient Care News Source Type: news

Public Schools in Richmond, Va. Equipped with Stop The Bleed Kits
RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) — It’s every parent’s worst nightmare — a shooting at your child’s school. It’s something we all hope never happens, but now, local school staff are being equipped to respond if the worst were to ever occur. 8News got a look inside Richmond Public Schools as the new ‘bleed kits’ were delivered. Richmond Ambulance Authority and VCU Medical Center delivered the so-called “bleed kits,” or hemorrhage control kits, to Richmond Public Schools. The kits have essential tools to respond to an emergency. (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 3, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Whitney Harris, WRIC Tags: News Videos Patient Care Operations Source Type: news

Evaluating Temperature is Essential in the Prehospital Setting
Evaluating temperature is essential in the prehospital setting The measurement of patient temperature is, and has been, throughout the history of modern medicine, one of the four core physiological measurements that we collectively call "vital signs." Over the past decade we've added the measurement of oxygen saturation (transcutaneous pulse oximetry, or SpO2) as the fifth vital sign and we hope that in the near future we'll add end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) measurement as the sixth vital sign. Our review and discussion in this article will concentrate on the renewed importance, implications and technical meas...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joseph E. DiCorpo, BSC, MMSc, PA Tags: Patient Care Source Type: news

Identifying and Managing Accidental Hypothermia
Free CE Offer! (limited time only) To receive 0.5 hours of continuing education from JEMS CE Powered by Medic-CE, visit www.jems.com/novemberCE. Learning Objectives Explain the four different ways a body can lose heat. Define the four stages of hypothermia and understand the assesment considerations. Understand the treatment strategies for accidental hypothermia. Key Terms Conduction: Transfer of heat to a solid object or a liquid by direct contact. Convection: Mechanism by which body heat is picked up and carried away by moving fluid currents. Core body temperature: The temperature in the...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Daniel Du Pont, BA, EMT Tags: Patient Care Source Type: news

Mortality Rates for Overdose Patients Who Refuse Transport
This study was published March 28, 2016. The data obtained was from 2011-2013. Oh, how quickly things change in the drug trade. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported the number of opioid-related deaths in 2014 was a 9% increase from the previous year.1 The illegal drug trade changes every day. More potent forms of opioids are being manufactured, and with that, more deaths occur. (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Keith Wesley, MD, FACEP, FAEMS Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

Anticoagulant Reversal Drugs Stop Patient's Internal Hemorrhage
Pharmacology to the tune of anticoagulant reversal Your EMS flight crew is dispatched by rotor to a remote hospital in the Great Basin Desert for a patient with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The patient was brought in by her grandson. She was vomiting blood as well as suffering from bloody diarrhea. On arrival, you find an 80-year-old female sitting up in a hospital bed, although she's extremely weak. She has a Glasgow coma scale (GCS) of 15 and states she's been throwing up blood all day. She appears pale but is in no obvious distress. Her vital signs are a heart rate of 100 with regular pulse; blood pressure 60/35 mmHg...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brant Jaouen, MD Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

Mortality Rates for Overdose Patients Who Refuse Transport
This study was published March 28, 2016. The data obtained was from 2011-2013. Oh, how quickly things change in the drug trade. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reported the number of opioid-related deaths in 2014 was a 9% increase from the previous year.1 The illegal drug trade changes every day. More potent forms of opioids are being manufactured, and with that, more deaths occur. (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Keith Wesley, MD, FACEP, FAEMS Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

Anticoagulant Reversal Drugs Stop Patient's Internal Hemorrhage
Pharmacology to the tune of anticoagulant reversal Your EMS flight crew is dispatched by rotor to a remote hospital in the Great Basin Desert for a patient with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The patient was brought in by her grandson. She was vomiting blood as well as suffering from bloody diarrhea. On arrival, you find an 80-year-old female sitting up in a hospital bed, although she's extremely weak. She has a Glasgow coma scale (GCS) of 15 and states she's been throwing up blood all day. She appears pale but is in no obvious distress. Her vital signs are a heart rate of 100 with regular pulse; blood pressure 60/35 mmHg...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brant Jaouen, MD Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

Evaluating Temperature is Essential in the Prehospital Setting
Evaluating temperature is essential in the prehospital setting The measurement of patient temperature is, and has been, throughout the history of modern medicine, one of the four core physiological measurements that we collectively call "vital signs." Over the past decade we've added the measurement of oxygen saturation (transcutaneous pulse oximetry, or SpO2) as the fifth vital sign and we hope that in the near future we'll add end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) measurement as the sixth vital sign. Our review and discussion in this article will concentrate on the renewed importance, implications and technical meas...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joseph E. DiCorpo, BSC, MMSc, PA Tags: Patient Care Source Type: news

Identifying and Managing Accidental Hypothermia
Understanding, identifying & treating accidental hypothermia Learning Objectives Explain the four different ways a body can lose heat. Define the four stages of hypothermia and understand the assesment considerations. Understand the treatment strategies for accidental hypothermia. Key Terms Conduction: Transfer of heat to a solid object or a liquid by direct contact. Convection: Mechanism by which body heat is picked up and carried away by moving fluid currents. Core body temperature: The temperature in the part of the body comprising the heart, lungs, brain and abdominal viscera. Evapo...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Daniel Du Pont, BA, EMT Tags: Patient Care Source Type: news

The Community Paramedicine Approach to the Opioid Epidemic
Managing the opioid epidemic with mobile integrated healthcare programs A recent meeting between police and recovering addicts provided fascinating insight into the great extent of the opioid epidemic. Most of the dozen or so officers in the workgroup shared that the epidemic had an impact on their personal lives. One detective shared that her colleagues, burned out from too many overdose responses, had verbally attacked her son when he was arrested for heroin use and possession. They told him he was a "scumbag" and an embarrassment to his mother. According to the detective, her son was neither-he was simply an a...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dan Swayze, DrPH, MBA, MEMS Tags: Patient Care Mobile Integrated Healthcare Source Type: news

Quickly Recognizing a Life-Threatening Infection
Careful assessment helps recognize life-threatening infection You and an engine company arrive to a single family, two-story home. You're met at the door by a male in his late 20s. He says he called you after coming to check on his 58-year-old father after he missed their tee time. He found his father, Matt, lying in bed and unresponsive. He leads you upstairs to his father's bedroom and tells you his mom died two years ago and Matt now lives by himself. He isn't aware of his dad having any significant medical history. As you enter the bedroom you see Matt sleeping. His breathing is rapid and deep. His skin looks flushed f...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 30, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dennis Edgerly, EMT-P Tags: Patient Care Columns Source Type: news

EMS Physicians Laud Senate Passage of Bipartisan Bill Protecting Medical Treatment of Emergency Patients
WASHINGTON, DC – The National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) applauds the Senate’s passage of the Protecting Patient Access to Emergency Medications Act of 2017. The House of Representatives unanimously passed a similar version of the bill (H.R. 304) in January. The Senate-approved bill included minor technical changes from the House version requiring the House to approve the Senate version of the bill before it becomes law. This bipartisan legislation ensures emergency medical service (EMS) care providers, such as paramedics, are able to continue administering the appropriate life-saving emergency medi...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 27, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: National Association of EMS Physicians Tags: Patient Care News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

EMS Physicians Laud Senate Passage of Bipartisan Bill Protecting Medical Treatment of Emergency Patients, Sponsored by Senators Bill Cassidy (Louisiana) and Michael Bennet (Colorado)
WASHINGTON, DC – The National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP) applauds the Senate’s passage of the Protecting Patient Access to Emergency Medications Act of 2017. The House of Representatives unanimously passed a similar version of the bill (H.R. 304) in January. The Senate-approved bill included minor technical changes from the House version requiring the House to approve the Senate version of the bill before it becomes law. This bipartisan legislation ensures emergency medical service (EMS) care providers, such as paramedics, are able to continue administering the appropriate life-saving emergency medi...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 27, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: National Association of EMS Physicians Tags: Patient Care News Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Shifting the Paradigm and Changing the Culture: The 2017-2018 PWW Executive Institute Kicks off in Hershey, Pa.
Page, Wolfberg & Wirth (PWW), the national EMS law firm, held their Xi leadership preconference on Monday, Oct. 23, 2017 in Hershey, Pa. PWW’s Executive Institute is an intense, one-day workshop with sessions tailored for EMS leaders who are interested in high-level views and discussions about ambulance finance, reimbursement, compliance and human resource management. Monday’s preconference was the start of PWW’s 2017-2018 “season”—the first of four workshops that will be held between October 2017 and June 2018 across the U.S. The themes that emerged from Monday’s sessions spok...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 27, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sarah Ferguson, MA Tags: Patient Care Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

4-Year-Old Patient Reunites With Paramedic Who Treated Him 2 Years Ago
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (11Alive.com) -- Four-year-old Dominic Mikowski has allergies to certain foods - eggs, in particular. It was 2 years ago that he had a bad reaction after eating pancakes, which triggered an interesting odyssey that has Dominic already considering a career as a paramedic. "He was at school and instead of giving him the breakfast we provided, they made a mistake and accidentally gave him the school breakfast," said Marie Sinclair, Dominic's mother. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 25, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brent Ashcroft, 11Alive.com Tags: Airway & Respiratory News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

NAAC Unveils New Ambulance Documentation Specialist Course
The National Academy of Ambulance Compliance (NAAC) unveiled their Certified Ambulance Documentation Specialist (CADS) course on Monday, October 23 in conjunction with the Page, Wolfberg, and Wirth (PWW) Xi and abc360 conferences taking place this week in Hershey, Pa.  NAAC's objective is to certify every EMT and paramedic in the country as an ambulance documentation specialist. A new session, and the only documentation course that offers certification through a national organization, CADS brings together the clinical, operational and financial aspects of EMS documentation. It was a full hous...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 24, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sarah Ferguson, MA Tags: Trauma Documentation & Patient Care Reporting Operations Source Type: news

9-1-1 Dispatcher Reunited with the Family Whose Baby She Helped Deliver
SPRINGDALE, Ark. (KFSM) -- A dispatcher with the Springdale Police Department is getting credit for helping bring a new life into the world. Monica Deason answered a father's call to 9-1-1 on Sept. 19 and helped deliver the baby via phone call. On that day, Courtney Velazquez said she was having contractions through out the day but when they went to the doctor, they were told they had a few hours. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 20, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: 5 News Web Staff, KFSM Tags: News Videos Patient Care Communications & Dispatch Source Type: news

Illinois Woman Thanks the First Responders Who Saved Her Daughter's Life
Lansing, Ill. (WGN9) - Three months ago, Elizabeth Avila’s life was turned upside down. Her 3-year-old daughter Teci choked on a grape and stopped breathing. "She was without oxygen for 19 minutes," she said. Teci was on life support for eight days, in the ICU for a month and was finally discharged from the hospital Wednesday. Read more... (Source: JEMS Patient Care)
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 20, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kelly Davis, WGN9 Tags: News Videos Patient Care Source Type: news

Runner Collapses During Marathon, Nurse Rushes to Help
PORTLAND, Ore. (KGW) — It was the right place at the right time. A man running in the Portland Marathon found himself in a scary, life-threatening situation. Fortunately for him, a nurse running in the opposite direction jumped in to help. On Sunday, he got to meet her for the first time and thank her in person for saving his life. Dave Brenner has run more than 130 marathons. But as he waited for his turn to run in this year's Portland Marathon, he had no idea what would happen around mile 13. “Felt really good and felt a little light headed, and then it's like,' Oh, this isn't normal.’ I mean I've ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 17, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Christine Pitawanich, KGW Tags: News Videos Patient Care Cardiac & Resuscitation Source Type: news

H & H Medical Introduces the H*VENT Vented Chest Dressing
H&H Medical Corporation, a leading provider of emergency trauma products, is proud to announce the introduction of our newest product in our chest seal line, the H*VENT vented chest dressing. Open chest wounds that develop into a tension pneumothorax, commonly referred as a sucking chest wound, can be life threatening if not treated immediately by the first responder. The H*VENT from H&H Medical Products is an innovative chest seal that treats not only the presence of air in the chest (pneumothorax) but also allows fluids such as blood to be released from the chest (hemothorax). The unique six-port design of the H*...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 16, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: H & H Medical Tags: Patient Care Industry News Equipment & Gear Source Type: news

Successful Beginnings: Sound Advice for the Entry-Level EMS Provider
As a new provider I was naive and eager. As a second-generation paramedic, I'd had more previous exposure to the profession than most. But as an entry level paramedic, I was clueless to the intricacies of being a quality provider and partner.  When I began my orientation for my first position as a paramedic, I was paired with supervisors and senior paramedics as a primary provider on the unit. Many of my new mentors had more than 20 years on the job. They were reasonable and fair people who took great pride in their work.  As I reflect on the experiences I've had as an FTO, I can appreciate the frustration that I...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brittin Short, EMT-P, I/C Tags: Trauma Patient Care Operations Source Type: news

ZOLL Showcases New Ventilator Capabilities at AMTC 2017
CHELMSFORD, MASS.—ZOLL Medical Corporation, an Asahi Kasei Group Company that manufactures medical devices and related software solutions, will offer Air Medical Transport Conference 2017  (AMTC) attendees the opportunity to experience the new capabilities of its mechanical ventilation devices in booth 901 October 16-18 at the Fort Worth Convention Center in Fort Worth, Texas. Respiratory Care—Launching New Capabilities Using ZOLL’s EMV+ Ventilator, participants will experience firsthand how lungs adapt to each ventilator mode. With its unique Smart HelpT technology, ZOLL ventilators provid...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ZOLL Tags: Airway & Respiratory Cardiac Resuscitation Equipment Gear Operations Source Type: news

Flirtey Partners with Pioneering Ambulance Service to Launch First Emergency Drone Delivery Program in United States
RENO, Nev. -- Flirtey, the leading drone delivery service, and REMSA, a community-integrated emergency medical services provider, today announced a partnership to launch the first automated external defibrillator (AED) drone delivery service in the United States. Cardiac arrest is the leading cause of natural death in America, with more than 350,000 out-of-hospital cases each year, according to the American Heart Association. For every minute that a victim of cardiac arrest waits to receive defibrillation, their odds of survival decrease by about 10 percent. By using drones to deliver AEDs, Flirtey's technology will i...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - October 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Flirtey Tags: Ambulances & Vehicle Ops Cardiac Resuscitation Patient Care Operations Industry News Source Type: news