Tech-saavy people more likely to trust digital doctors
(Penn State) Would you trust a robot to diagnose your cancer? According to researchers at Penn State, people with high confidence in machine performance and also in their own technological capabilities are more likely to accept and use digital healthcare services and providers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Believing machines can out-do people may fuel acceptance of self-driving cars
(Penn State) In order for self-driving cars to hit the streets, more people may need to concede that machines can outperform humans, at least in some tasks, according to Penn State researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People more likely to trust machines than humans with their private information
(Penn State) Not everyone fears our machine overlords. In fact, according to Penn State researchers, when it comes to private information and access to financial data, people tend to trust machines more than people, which could lead to both positive and negative online behaviors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Meditation needs more research: Study finds 25% suffer unpleasant experiences
(University College London) More than a quarter of people who regularly meditate have had a 'particularly unpleasant' psychological experience related to the practice, including feelings of fear and distorted emotions, a UCL-led study has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

THE SIGNS study by Duke-NUS researchers identify factors affecting active and productive ageing
This study is termed the 'Transitions in Health, Employment, Social Engagement, and Intergenerational Transfers in Singapore Study' (THE SIGNS Study) that was done in partnership with the Ministry of Health (MOH). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists find link between digital media use and depression in Chinese adolescents
(Elsevier) Adolescents in China who either spend more time on screen activities, such as watching TV or surfing the Web, or less time on non-screen activities, including physical activity, are at risk and significantly more likely to experience depression, according to a new study in the journal Heliyon, published by Elsevier. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

White people struggle to perceive emotion on black people's faces
(University of Granada) Being able to accurately identify emotions in others is important for social interaction in general, but particularly so in interracial contexts, which are prone to misinterpretations and misunderstandings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dexterous herring gulls learn new tricks to adapt their feeding habits
(University of Southampton) Observations of Herring Gulls by scientists from the University of Southampton have shown how the coastal birds have developed complicated behaviour to 'skin' sea creatures to make them safe to eat. Researchers think this feeding habit may be a response to urbanisation and changes in food availability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

PSU researchers helping develop HIV prevention app for transgender women
(Portland State University) Two Portland State University researchers have received federal funding to help develop a mobile app aimed at reducing HIV among transgender women, a group whose HIV rates are much higher than other high-risk groups. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Transmission of divine knowledge in the sapiential Thanksgiving Psalms from Qumran
(University of Helsinki) A recently completed doctoral dissertation in Old Testament studies supports a notion gained through prior research, according to which scribes and wisdom teachers had a central role in transmitting divine knowledge in the Second Temple period (approximately 200 BCE-70 CE). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What's the chemistry behind the home pregnancy test? (video)
(American Chemical Society) There are many ways to find out if you're pregnant. One is to wait and see. For those of us who are a little less patient, there's the take-home chemistry kit known as a pregnancy test. But how do a little strip of paper and a few drops of urine tell you whether or not you've got a bun in the oven? Find out here: https://youtu.be/jc2_iBZ9r_k. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

National security, science collaboration bolstered by new agreement
(DOE/Sandia National Laboratories) Sandia National Labs and the University of New Mexico have signed an umbrella Cooperative Research and Development Agreement to bolster national security and advance science and engineering. The CRADA allows the labs and university to explore research collaborations among scientists, faculty and students in several areas. The agreement will immediately launch two projects focusing on radiation testing and developing particle detector designs for the European particle physics laboratory CERN. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Do most Americans believe in human-caused climate change?
(Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania) A survey of more than 7,000 US adults finds that three format changes produce significant changes in estimates of acceptance of human-caused climate change. Estimates range from 50% to 71% of US adults -- and 29% to 61% of Republicans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Abrupt climate change drove early South American population decline
(University College London) Abrupt climate change some 8,000 years ago led to a dramatic decline in early South American populations, suggests new UCL research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The enduring effects of mother-child interactions as children become adults
(Wiley) Interactions between a mother and her child have been linked to cognitive outcomes in childhood, but little work has looked at farther-reaching effects. In a Journal of Marriage& Family study that examined data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, more positive mother-child interactions during the first 16 years of life predicted higher education in adulthood, which predicted less decline in episodic memory, or the memory of autobiographical events. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Opposites attract and, together, they can make surprisingly gratifying decisions
(Boston College) Little is known about how consumers make decisions together. A new study by researchers from Boston College, Georgia Tech and Washington State University finds pairs with opposing interpersonal orientations -- the selfish versus the altruistic -- can reach amicable decisions about what to watch on TV, or where to eat, for example. All they have to do is let one partner drive the decision. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rural innovation policies need to exploit differences within communities
(University of East Anglia) Policies aimed at encouraging rural innovation should take into account the differences between entrepreneurs and how they view where they live, according to a new study.Researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA) and De Montfort University have found that meanings attached to where someone lives are shaped by previous experiences, and this in turn influences their innovation strategies and entrepreneurial activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Elections: New report highlights innovative research on 21st century political world
(European Research Council) How and why people become engaged in politics? Are the electronic voting machines immune to vote-rigging? Can we tackle the growing phenomenon of misinformation on social media? What impact the financial crash had on the development of political conflict in Europe? Is civil society increasingly dependent on state finance and regulation? Here are some of the questions, ERC grantees investigate and solve. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Statewide initiative doubles survival rates after severe TBI
(University of Arizona) The implementation of a massive, statewide public health initiative led by University of Arizona researchers and involving 21,000 prehospital care patients has doubled the survival rate of severe traumatic brain injury victims and tripled the survival rate among those who were intubated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Otago ethicist shines light on lack of discussion about body donation after euthanasia
(University of Otago) As New Zealand considers a bill looking to legalise euthanasia, an Otago University ethicist considers it's time to shine the light on the ethical complications surrounding body donation and assisted dying. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research to improve access to justice for people with disabilities
(Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) The Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) is taking part in a European research project called Just4All, coordinated by the ONCE Foundation, which aims to improve access to justice for people with disabilities through awareness and training of law professionals in the European Union. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Negative economic messaging impacting on suicide rates, says new research
(University of Portsmouth) Relentless negative reporting on economic downturns is impacting on people's emotions and contributing to the suicide rate, according to new research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A highly sensitive detection for spicy tastes to choose kimchi of your preference!
(National Research Council of Science& Technology) The World Institute of Kimchi has announced that it has developed a new analytical tool for the ultra-trace ratiometric detection of capsaicinoids, an analysis method that can be easily applied to analyze the spicy tastes of kimchi in industrial fields. As a result, the team successfully devised a simple yet reliable ultrasensitive analytical technique that takes less than 30 mins, while its detection strength was improved by up to one million times. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research highlights role of psychological distress and emotional eating in obesity
(University of Liverpool) New research, published in the research journal Obesity, has found that people on lower incomes may be more likely to have obesity due to psychological distress that gives rise to emotional eating to cope. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Press invitation to the presentation of the Humboldt Professorships on May 9, 2019 in Berlin
(Alexander von Humboldt Foundation) Germany's most valuable research award, the 2019 Alexander von Humboldt Professorship, will be presented by the German Federal Minister of Education and Research and the President of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in Berlin on May 9, 2019. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insilico to present at the Russian Pharmaceutical Forum
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Insilico to present at the Russian Pharmaceutical Forum (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Development of 'transparent and flexible battery' for power generation and storage at once
(DGIST (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology)) DGIST Senior Researcher Changsoon Choi's team developed single-layer graphene based multifunctional transparent devices. Expected to be used in various devices such as electronics and skin-attachable devices with power generation and self-charging capability (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Workplace discrimination: if they don't fit, they always call in sick?
(University of Konstanz) Prof. Florian Kunze (University of Konstanz, Cluster of Excellence 'The Politics of Inequality') and Max Reinwald (University of Konstanz, Graduate School for Decision Sciences) investigate workplace behavior of employees who are in the minority in their teams. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stress in early life could make people more likely to develop depression
(University of Bristol) New research by the University of Bristol has found that early life adversity could make an individual more at risk of developing negative thinking, which could lead to major depressive disorder (MDD). The findings provide biological and psychological evidence to support work first proposed in the 1960s. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

VisiBlends, a new approach to disrupt visual messaging
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) To help non-professionals create visual blends for their news and PSAs, Columbia Engineering researchers have developed VisiBlends, a flexible, user-friendly platform that transforms the creative brainstorming activity into a search function, and enables a statistically higher output of visually blended images. The VisiBlends platform combines a series of human steps or 'microtasks' with AI and computational techniques. Crowd-sourcing is a key component of the system enabling groups of people to collaborate, either together or off-site. (Source: EurekAlert! - ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Source credibility is key to derailing fake news
(Cornell University) Fake news is a threat to American democratic institutions and false information can have far-reaching effects. A new study provides a roadmap for dealing with fake news. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Teaching children to eat healthy: Repetition is the key
(Elsevier) Early childhood is a critical period for establishing healthy eating behaviors, yet many preschoolers in the United States are not meeting dietary recommendations. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, found repeated opportunities for children to become familiar with the food without pressure helped them understand the benefits of healthy eating and increased consumption. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CMU researchers make transformational ai seem 'unremarkable'
(Carnegie Mellon University) A surgeon might never feel the need to ask an AI for advice, much less allow it to make a clinical decision for them, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University say. But an AI might guide decisions if it were embedded in the decision-making routines already used by the clinical team, providing AI-generated predictions and evaluations as part of the overall mix of information. It's an approach they call " Unremarkable AI. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Paper wasps capable of behavior that resembles logical reasoning
(University of Michigan) A new University of Michigan study provides the first evidence of transitive inference, the ability to use known relationships to infer unknown relationships, in a nonvertebrate animal: the lowly paper wasp. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Teen girls more vulnerable to bullying than boys
(Rutgers University) Girls are more often bullied than boys and are more likely to consider, plan, or attempt suicide, according to research led by a Rutgers University-Camden nursing scholar. 'Bullying is significantly associated with depressive symptoms, suicidal ideation, suicide planning, and suicide attempts,' says Nancy Pontes, an assistant professor at the Rutgers School of Nursing-Camden. 'We wanted to look at this link between bullying victimization, depressive symptoms, and suicidality by gender.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Electroconvulsive therapy reboots certain brain networks to help depressed individuals
(Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care) Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) helps people with severe depression by 'pushing the reset button' on brain networks involved in creating a mental picture, according to recent Baycrest findings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Electoral regulations must tackle 'inequalities' caused by political advertising on Facebook
(University of Exeter) Regulators must find a way of monitoring and addressing the way political advertising on Facebook creates new types of inequalities for campaigners, experts have said. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

World Economic Forum has announced the introduction of a Space Sustainability Rating
(University of Texas at Austin) 'The near-Earth space is a global commons and is in dire need of environmental protection and measures of sustainability. The SSR is the first major step in establishing those sustainability metrics' - UT Engineer Moriba Jah. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New report examines reproducibility and replicability in science
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) While computational reproducibility in scientific research is generally expected when the original data and code are available, lack of ability to replicate a previous study -- or obtain consistent results looking at the same scientific question but with different data -- is more nuanced and occasionally can aid in the process of scientific discovery, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Developed countries benefit economically from counterterrorism efforts
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in Oxford Economic Papers suggests that developed counties may see significant economic gains from their efforts to combat terrorist threats. Developing counties, in contrast, appear to suffer economically from counterterrorism threats. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mainz University welcomes leading researchers and bestows 2019 Gutenberg Research Award
(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) The Gutenberg Research College (GRC), the central institution for promoting top-level research at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU), yesterday presented the 2019 Gutenberg Research Award and welcomed five new fellows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Academics show how to create a spotlight of sound with LEGO-like bricks
(University of Sussex) Informatics experts create low-cost directional beams of sound. Using age-old principles of magnifying glasses, lighthouses and telescopes to create state-of-the-art sound. Bringing the vision of Minority Report into reality and transforming possibilities of entertainment industry (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A study analyzes the academic repercussions of institutional scientific dissemination
(Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) Communicating research results to the public generates a range of positive effects on the careers of university professors, according to a study carried out by researchers at Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Universidad de Valencia (UV), which analyzed the perception of university researchers who have participated in institutional communication campaigns. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Prison tobacco ban significantly reduces secondhand smoke
(University of Stirling) Levels of secondhand smoke in Scotland's prisons fell by more than 80% in the week after smoking was banned, according to new University of Stirling research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Climate education for kids increases climate concerns for parents
(North Carolina State University) A new study from North Carolina State University finds that educating children about climate change increases their parents' concerns about climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Social media has limited effects on teenage life satisfaction
(University of Oxford) A study of 12,000 British teenagers has shown that links between social media use and life satisfaction are bidirectional and small at best, but may differ depending on gender and how the data are analysed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Direct dispensing of naloxone by pharmacists can cut opioid overdose deaths, study finds
(RAND Corporation) The opioid antidote naloxone can reverse the effects of an overdoes if given to a person promptly and many states have approved rules to make the drug more widely available. A new study finds that allowing pharmacists to directly dispense the drug without a physician's prescription can sharply reduce fatal opioid-related overdoses, while less-robust strategies had little effect on deaths. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How common is e-cigarette use among adults in households with kids?
(JAMA Network) Nearly 5 percent of adults living in households with children use e-cigarettes based on analyses of national survey data from 2016-2017. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Unexpectedly big wins improve two kinds of memory
(Brown University) Brown University researchers have discovered that instances in which outcomes are better than expected -- finding an unexpectedly good parking spot, for example, or spotting a $20 bill on the sidewalk -- improves memories of specific events. This is in addition to the long-established role that unexpectedly good outcomes have in influencing what are called integrated memories. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The perils of a leader who is too extroverted
(Ohio State University) Extroverts are often seen as natural leaders in organizations. But a new study suggests that some leaders may have too much of a good thing. Researchers found that informal leaders were better liked and more sought after for advice when they hit a middle 'sweet spot' on levels of assertiveness and warmth, two facets of extroversion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news