Can incentivizing e-bikes support GHG goals?
(Portland State University) TREC researchers have developed an online tool to enable policymakers, public stakeholders, and advocates to quickly visualize the potential outcomes of an incentive program made up of several vehicle types. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How conspiracy theories emerge -- and how their storylines fall apart
(University of California - Los Angeles) A new study in the journal PLOS One, by UCLA professors of engineering and folklore, uses machine learning to visualize how unrelated facts and false information can connect into a narrative framework that would quickly fall apart if some of elements are taken out of the mix. One of the characteristics of a conspiracy theory narrative framework-- like what built up around Pizzagate online -- is that it is easily disconnected, they found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 pandemic has unleashed unique worldwide wave of anti-semitism
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) The Kantor Center for the Study of Contemporary European Jewry at Tel Aviv University has published a special report, a summary of worldwide anti-Semitic phenomena associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Confrontation may reduce white prejudices, Rutgers study finds
(Rutgers University) Confronting a white person who makes a racist or sexist statement can make them reflect on their words and avoid making biased statements about race or gender in the future, Rutgers researchers find. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Selling something? Tap into consumer arrogance
(Michigan State University) In today's world of consumption, likes and shares, a new study shows that that leveraging consumer arrogance might be marketers' most effective strategy for promoting their brands and products. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Helping consumers in a crisis
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A new study shows that the central bank tool known as quantitative easing helped consumers substantially during the last big economic downturn -- a finding with clear relevance for today's pandemic-hit economy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Columbia engineers to develop power grid risk dashboard
(Data Science Institute at Columbia) Columbia University researchers affiliated with the Data Science Institute won a grant from DOE to develop a risk dashboard that will enhance the electrical grid. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Better sleep with a partner
(Frontiers) Do couples that share a bed sleep better, worse, or just different? A new study in Frontiers in Psychiatry sheds light on the effects of sharing a bed with a partner by measuring subjective and objective sleep parameters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Twitter data research reveals more about what patients think about statins
(University of York) More than one in seven people taking statins -- prescribed to lower cholesterol levels -- believed that meant they could still eat unhealthy foods, a new study shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Indirect adverse effects of COVID-19 on children and youth's mental, physical health
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) Despite reports that children and young people may be less likely to get coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) than older adults, there may be substantial indirect adverse effects of the disease on their physical and mental health, according to an analysis in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.201008 (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dolphins learn in similar ways to great apes
(University of Zurich) Dolphins learn new foraging techniques not just from their mothers, but also from their peers, a study by the University of Zurich has found. More than 1,000 bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Western Australia were observed over 10 years and found to have cultural behavior that is similar to great apes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Seattle researchers team up to build hi-res brain map of Alzheimer's Disease
(Allen Institute) If scientists understood how Alzheimer's disease starts, they might have a better handle on how to stop it. That's the premise behind a new $40.5 million collaborative research center in Seattle to build high-resolution maps of Alzheimer's patients' brains and identify how their neurons and other brain cells differ from those of healthy people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Uganda's Ik are not unbelievably selfish and mean
(Rutgers University) The Ik, a small ethnic group in Uganda, are not incredibly selfish and mean as portrayed in a 1972 book by a prominent anthropologist, according to a Rutgers-led study. Instead, the Ik are quite cooperative and generous with one another, and their culture features many traits that encourage generosity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study unveils ultrathin boron nitride films for next-generation electronics
(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has unveiled a novel material that could enable major leaps in the miniaturization of electronic devices. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Variability in natural speech is challenging for the dyslexic brain
(University of Helsinki) A new study brings neural-level evidence that the continuous variation in natural speech makes the discrimination of phonemes challenging for adults suffering from developmental reading-deficit dyslexia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study unveils ultrathin boron nitride films for next-generation electronics
(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has unveiled a novel material that could enable major leaps in the miniaturization of electronic devices. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research news tip sheet: Story ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) The latest Johns Hopkins Medicine research achievements and clinical advances, covering topics not related to COVID-19 or the SARS-CoV-2 virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Electricity price more volatile during uncertainty periods in renewable energy regulation
(University of the Basque Country) Incorporating renewable energies into the electricity system entails a certain degree of volatility in the electricity price owing to the intermittent nature of generation by plants of this type. However, a study by the UPV/EHU shows that the greatest volatility is caused when unexpected regulatory changes are made in the renewable sector. What disrupts economic players most is uncertainty. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children of academics exhibit more stress
(Ruhr-University Bochum) If the parents have a degree, their children also believe that they have to get one. This can put them under pressure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Control over work-life boundaries creates crucial buffer to manage after-hours work stress
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) Workers with greater boundary control over their work and personal lives were better at creating a stress buffer to prevent them from falling into a negative rumination trap, says a new study co-written by a trio of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign experts who study occupational stress and employee well-being. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Voter ID laws discriminate against racial and ethnic minorities, new study reveals
(University of California - San Diego) Voter ID laws are becoming more common and more strict, and the stakes for American democracy are high and growing higher by the year. New research from the University of California San Diego provides evidence that voter ID laws disproportionately reduce voter turnout in more racially diverse areas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan in input-output analysis
(Shinshu University) Supply constraint from earthquakes in Japan was examined in IOA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Racism in development: How much do Black lives matter in global development
(London International Development Centre) The London International Development Centre (LIDC) Research Webinar series spotlights exciting research and initiatives taking place in international development. The LIDC is a consortium of seven University of London institutions. We facilitate interdisciplinary research, events and training in international development. Membership is free for students, staff and alumni from our member institutions. Find more information on our website: lidc.ac.ukIn this webinar, we explore the extent and impact of racism in global development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Should nursing home residents nearing the end of life continue taking statins?
(American Geriatrics Society) A team of researchers conducted a study to learn more about statin use among older adults, especially those nearing the end of their lives. The study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, evaluated statin use by people with life-limiting conditions across nearly all U.S. nursing homes. The researchers hoped to identify statin use among nursing home residents who were unlikely to benefit from treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Plastics markets adapt in the age of COVID-19
(American Chemical Society) The COVID-19 pandemic has upended life around the world, leaving industries to find creative solutions to stay open and keep up with demand. The polymer industry has been especially " plastic " during this time, adapting materials and equipment to produce personal protective equipment (PPE) and more. A new article inChemical& Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, details how plastics markets have adjusted to their new realities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cowbirds change their eggs' sex ratio based on breeding time
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) Brown-headed cowbirds show a bias in the sex ratio of their offspring depending on the time of the breeding season, researchers report in a new study. More female than male offspring hatch early in the breeding season in May, and more male hatchlings emerge in July. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Should diabetes treatment lessen for older adults approaching the end of life?
(American Geriatrics Society) Researchers published one of the first national studies to examine overtreatment and deintensification of diabetes management in nursing home residents with limited life expectancy or dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

World's first genetic and environmental risks identified for common form of childhood epilepsy
(King's College London) A new study of childhood epilepsy has identified the world's first environmental risk factor for the disease - maternal smoking in pregnancy, and discovered a new genetic association with the condition, pointing to potential new treatments for the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New scenarios to help global finance go green
(International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) A key-role of central banks is to strive for financial stability. To assess climate destabilization risks, major central banks and supervisors plan to utilize a new set of climate scenarios developed by an international team of researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Manchester experts launch spin-out to bring new water-filtration technology to market
(University of Manchester) A new high-performing membrane coating, based around a new class of 2D materials pioneered by researchers at The University of Manchester, could be a game-changer for the water filtration sector. The coating is being taken to market by new spin-out Molymem Ltd and has applications in the pharmaceutical, wastewater management and food and beverage sectors. Molymem is being supported by Graphene@Manchester and now ideally placed to raise investment capital to embark on its commercial journey. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New NYC initiative weighs pros and cons of data re-use for COVID-19 and future threats
(NYU Tandon School of Engineering) The Governance Lab (The GovLab), an action research center at New York University Tandon School of Engineering, with the support of the Henry Luce Foundation, announced the creation of The Data Assembly. Beginning in New York City, the effort will explore how communities perceive the risks and benefits of data re-use for COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Examining media coverage of protests worldwide
(University of Houston) As anti-racism solidarity protests continue around the world, new research suggests mainstream media have a tendency to focus on the violence and spectacle of a protest rather than the substance. That mentality and approach need to change according to Summer Harlow, assistant professor of journalism at the University of Houston Jack J. Valenti School of Communication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Twitter posts reveal polarization in Congress on COVID-19
(Ohio State University) The rapid politicization of the COVID-19 pandemic can be seen in messages members of the US Congress sent about the issue on the social media site Twitter, a new analysis found.Using artificial intelligence and resources from the Ohio Supercomputer Center, researchers conducted an analysis that covered all 30,887 tweets that members sent about COVID-19 from the first one on Jan. 17 through March 31. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Steep NYC traffic toll would reduce gridlock, pollution
(Cornell University) Cornell University and the City College of New York research shows that by creating steep tolls for cars to enter Manhattan, traffic congestion and greenhouse gas emissions could be reduced. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers launch new website for people to test their sensitivity
(Queen Mary University of London) Studies have shown that some people seem more sensitive than others. Now researchers have developed a free online questionnaire that allows you to test exactly how sensitive you are. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pulse pressure: A game changer in the fight against dementia
(Frontiers) Researchers unravel a pulse-pressure-induced pathway of dementia providing a new understanding on the pathogenesis of dementia. This is significant as it suggests that pulse pressure is a promising therapeutic target for dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Teens' technology use and mental health: New report released
(Connected Learning Lab) Three leading researchers have just published Youth Connections for Wellbeing, an integrative review paper that illuminates how teens support each other through digital media during times of stress and isolation. The position paper summarizes current knowledge and redirects the conversation about adolescent social media use and wellbeing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A furry social robot can reduce pain and increase happiness -- Ben-Gurion University researchers
(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) Ben-Gurion University researcher Levy-Tzedek and her team discovered that a single, 60-minute interaction with PARO actually improved mood as well as reduced mild or severe pain. When participants touched PARO, they experienced greater pain reduction than when it was simply present in their room. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research brings tech tutorials to people with visual impairments
(Dartmouth College) Project allows users to interact with models of circuit boards that provide audio feedback in response to being touched. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vets walking pets: Strolls with shelter dogs may reduce PTSD symptoms in military veterans
(Florida Atlantic University) About 6 to 8 million dogs end up in shelters in the U.S. each year. Researchers worked with two no-kill shelters on a study examining the effects of walking with a shelter dog on psychological and physiological stress indicators in military veterans. Results confirm the importance of the human-animal bond and provide evidence that walking with a shelter dog may affect psychological and physiological stress indicators in veterans - with particular potential benefits for those with an increase in PTSD symptom severity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Parkinson's Foundation awards nurse faculty grants
(Parkinson's Foundation) The Parkinson's Foundation today announced that it has awarded the third Parkinson's Foundation Nurse Faculty Award to three nurses, totaling nearly $30,000. Each will receive nearly $10,000 in grant funding from the Foundation to launch individual projects to help make life better for people with Parkinson's disease (PD) in their local community. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Copyright Clearance Center partners with Editage to offer research promotion services
(Cactus Communications) Copyright Clearance Center, Inc. (CCC), a leader in advancing copyright, accelerating knowledge, and powering innovation, announces a partnership with Editage, the flagship brand of Cactus Communications (CACTUS), a technology company accelerating scientific advancement, to offer its Research Promotion Solutions for authors through the growing community of RightsLink ® for Scientific Communications publishers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-READY helps hotels during and after the pandemic
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) With hotels reopening after the corona lockdown, there is a lot to consider for them to protect their guests and employees as well as possible. Hotel Resilient, a spin-off from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, supports hotels around the world with its free " COVID-READY " offers. It includes hygiene and protection standards, self-audit software, an e-learning module and the possibility of certification. Hotel Resilient's COVID-READY program has recently been launched in cooperation with 75 hotels in Phuket/Thailand. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Prenatal stress associated with infant gut microbes
(University of Turku) Mother's chronic prenatal psychological distress and elevated hair cortisol concentrations are associated with gut microbiota composition of the infant, according to a new publication from the FinnBrain research project of the University of Turku, Finland. The results help to better understand how prenatal stress can be connected to infant growth and development. The study has been published in the esteemed Psychoneuroendocrinology journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nearly 70% of patients make personal or financial sacrifices to afford medications
(CoverMyMeds) The 2020 Medication Access Report uncovers the impact of common medication access challenges, including those caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, and assesses how the market is responding to these challenges with tools that inform medication decisions, streamline administrative tasks and support remote healthcare. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Role-play shows which expectant dads will thrive as new fathers
(Ohio State University) A five-minute role-play done with men before the birth of their first child predicted the quality of their parenting after the baby arrived, a new study showed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Marching for change: 2017 Women's March met with mostly positive support online
(Penn State) New Penn State research found that the 2017 Women's March, which championed goals in support of women and human rights, was met with mostly positive support on social media, with relatively few negative messages. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NYU Dentistry awarded $2 million to train dentists to treat people with disabilities
(New York University) NYU College of Dentistry's Department of Pediatric Dentistry has received a nearly $2 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to train dentists and other health professionals to provide oral health care to people with disabilities and complex medical conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researcher develops tool to protect children's online privacy
(University of Texas at Dallas) A University of Texas at Dallas study of 100 mobile apps for kids found that 72 violated a federal law aimed at protecting children's online privacy. Dr. Kanad Basu, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering in the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science and lead author of the study, along with colleagues elsewhere, developed a tool that can determine whether an Android game or other mobile app complies with the federal Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Does 'mommy brain' last? Study shows motherhood does not diminish attention
(Purdue University) 'Mommy brain' is a long-held perception that mothers are more forgetful and less attentive. A new study shows that mothers are equally as attentive, or more attentive than, non-mothers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news