Slow down: Reduced speed limits save lives in busy cities
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) Traffic accidents are the leading cause of non-natural deaths worldwide. Lower speed limits may help prevent accidents. But speed-reduction policies can be controversial and effects are not well documented. A new study from University of Illinois shows that speed reductions in S ã o Paulo, Brazil, dramatically reduced fatal accidents and increased travel times only minimally. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

USC survey suggests the importance of clearly communicating coronavirus risk, behaviors
(University of Southern California) A newly published USC analysis of March survey data sheds light on our understanding of how perceptions of the virus impact behavior, finding individuals who perceive greater risk from COVID-19 were more likely to engage in protective behaviors like handwashing and social distancing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Place doesn't trump race as predictor of incarceration
(Cornell University) Steven Alvarado is the author of 'The Complexities of Race and Place: Childhood Neighborhood Disadvantage and Adult Incarceration for Whites, Blacks, and Latinos,' published June 1 in the journal Socius showing that for black Americans growing up in better neighborhoods doesn't diminish the likelihood of going to prison nearly as much as it does for whites or Latinos. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stiffer roadways could improve truck fuel efficiency
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A theoretical study by MIT researchers suggests that small changes in roadway paving practices could reduce that efficiency loss, potentially eliminating a half-percent of the total greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector, at little to no cost. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fentanyl tops list of drugs found in Baltimore overdose patients
(University of Maryland Medical Center) Hospital testing for illicit drug use does not typically include fentanyl, however, a new University of Maryland study found after expanding testing, that fentanyl, a potent synthetic opioid linked to most fatal overdoses in Maryland, tops the list of drugs detected in overdose patients at two Baltimore hospital emergency departments. The researchers suggest the addition of fentanyl to routine drug testing panels. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Experts clarify subtypes of multiple sclerosis to improve care and clinical trials
(National Multiple Sclerosis Society) An international committee has clarified previously published descriptors of courses of MS and disease activity. MS subtypes are consensus definitions rather than pathologically defined phenotypes, and easily misconstrued. The clarification was prompted in part by differences in specified indications for MS therapies recently approved by the FDA and EMA. The goal is to improve care and refine the selection of clinical trial participants so that trial outcomes can better inform clinical care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The mystery of visual stability
(Tohoku University) We move our eyes several times per second. These fast eye movements, called saccades, create large image shifts on the retina -- making our visual system work hard to maintain a stable perceptual world. Remapping the retinal image compensates for this; however, errors in actual eye movements cause image shifts, even with remapping. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Elite gamers share mental toughness with top athletes, study finds
(Queensland University of Technology) In one of the first studies to investigate mental toughness and stress and coping in high performing esports athletes, researchers have found similarities to traditional elite athletes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Projects funded to assess the economic and societal benefits of satellites
(Resources for the Future (RFF)) Satellite data can be used to make decisions that improve economic and societal outcomes. A partnership between NASA and Resources for the Future quantifies the value of satellite data along with the economic and societal benefits. This partnership -- the Consortium for the Valuation of Applications Benefits Linked to Earth Science (VALUABLES) -- has chosen three winning proposals for research quantifying the benefits of satellite data in decisions that improve socioeconomic outcomes for people and/or the environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tropical disease in medieval Europe revises the history of a pathogen related to syphilis
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) Plague was commonplace in medieval times, so finding its victims in a 15th century Lithuanian graveyard was no surprise. However, discovering one woman with a second disease, yaws -- a close relative of modern syphilis found today only in tropical settings -- was something researchers did not expect. The current study's findings are changing perspectives on the evolutionary history of a disease family thought to be out of reach for the study of ancient DNA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The brain uses minimum effort to look for key information in text
(University of Helsinki) The human brain avoids taking unnecessary effort. When a person is reading, she strives to gain as much information as possible by dedicating as little of her cognitive capacity as possible to the processing. This is a finding presented in an article by specialists in computer science and psychology at the University of Helsinki, published in Scientific Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A post-pandemic world: will populations be on the move? Study shows contagions could be catalysts for mass migration
(University of Sydney) Could the world soon be on the move again in the wake of COVID-19? Theoretical modelling by the University of Sydney's Centre for Complex Systems has shown that populations typically disperse following major global crises, including contagions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bulgaria's National Cardiac Society pioneers ARPHA's top-to-bottom bilingual publishing
(Pensoft Publishers) This month, ARPHA Platform welcomed the fourth medical academic journal to its portfolio: Bulgarian Cardiology. The scholarly outlet is also the third published on behalf of a Bulgarian institution or a society: in this case, the Bulgarian Society of Cardiology, a member of the European Society of Cardiology. With its first 2020 issue, Bulgarian Cardiology pioneers the Bulgarian-English bilingual publishing solution from ARPHA, the open-access, scholarly platform, developed by the publisher and technology provider Pensoft. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

E-health resource improves men's health behaviours with or without fitness facilities
(University of British Columbia) Men who regularly used a free web resource made significantly more health changes than men who did not, finds a new study from the University of British Columbia and Intensions Consulting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mental disorders in the family affects the treatment of people with bipolar disorder
(Aarhus University) Patients with bipolar disorder who have multiple family members with severe mental disorders, are more difficult to treat and require more medicine. But if they receive an intensive course of treatment, the effect of this is just as good as for patients who do not have a family history of severe mental disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research with industry executives reveals impact of COVID-19 on air transport sector
(Cranfield University) Research has assessed the initial impact of COVID-19 on air transport and found that it is likely to lead to a smaller, consolidated sector in the future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Past stressful experiences do not create resilience to future trauma, new study finds
(Brown University) Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, new research finds that past stressors and traumatic events increase vulnerability to mental illnesses, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Professor receives fellowship to study historical discrimination in US housing
(Virginia Tech) Winling will use the opportunity to research redlining, a term for discriminating against a community by refusing to offer credit or insurance on the basis of race or ethnicity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Political 'oil spill': Polarization is growing stronger and getting stickier
(Penn State) Experts have documented that political polarization is intensifying in the United States. However, a Penn State sociologist now suggests that this separation isn't just more intense, but it is also growing broader, coagulating into an ideological slick of opinions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Do you want a cheerleader or a critic? The Voice shows how we really choose our mentors.
(University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management) We think that we will choose our personal and professional advisors based on reasoned criteria about their expertise, competence and experience. In practice, we go more with our gut than our head, choosing the person who shows enthusiasm for us and our goals. A team of researchers has used the popular singing competition show The Voice to prove it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New book discusses racism and reactionary democracy in the 21st century
(University of Bath) The new book from Dr Aurelien Mondon and Dr Aaron Winter considers how our democracies often fall short on working for all members of society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

HKUST scientists develop world's first spherical artificial eye with 3D retina
(Hong Kong University of Science and Technology) An international team led by HKUST scientists has developed the world's first 3D artificial eye with capabilities better than existing bionic eyes and in some cases, even exceed those of the human eyes, bringing vision to humanoid robots and new hope to patients with visual impairment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTokyo joins COVID-19 data exchange
(University of Tokyo) The Data Co-creation Working Group at the University of Tokyo has joined the COVID-19 Data Exchange pro bono initiative launched by leading data exchange technology firm Dawex. The aim is to provide researchers and public or private organizations who tackle COVID-19 and its consequences with a free, intuitive, globally connected information system to share and exchange data. The COVID-19 Data Exchange platform has recently gone live. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How COVID-19 has altered sleep in the United States and Europe
(Cell Press) Two studies in Current Biology show that relaxed school and work schedules and more time spent at home has led people to sleep more on average with less 'social jetlag' as indicated by a reduced shift in sleep timing and duration on work days versus free days. But, at the same time, one of the studies also finds that the pandemic has taken a toll when it comes to self-reported sleep quality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Noise disturbs the brain's compass
(DZNE - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases) Our sense of direction tends to decline with age. In 'Nature Communications', researchers from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases and experts from the USA report on new insights into the causes of this phenomenon. These study results could contribute to the development of diagnostic tools for early detection of dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Will lockdown loneliness make us loners?
(Sainsbury Wellcome Centre) Over the past months at least half of the world's population has been affected by some form of lockdown due to COVID-19. Many are experiencing the impact of social isolation. Loneliness affects both mental and physical health, but counterintuitively it can also result in a decreased desire for social interaction. To understand the mechanics of this paradox, UCL researchers based at the Wolfson Institute and the Sainsbury Wellcome Centre investigated social behaviour in zebrafish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UVA Health expanding food allergy research, clinical trials
(University of Virginia Health System) UVA Health and UVA Children's are increasing access to the latest food allergy clinical trials and expanding their cutting-edge food-allergy research, following their selection to a national food-allergy clinical network. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nutraceuticals for promoting longevity
(Bentham Science Publishers) The review, published in Current Nutraceuticals, offers a special focus on the nutraceuticals that impact insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor signaling and sirtuin activity in mediating longevity and healthspan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ECOTIP funded by EU Horizon 2020 to investigate ecosystem tipping points in the Arctic
(GRID-Arendal) The ambitious new ECOTIP initiative has received € 6.36 million from the European Union's Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme to study ecosystem tipping cascades in the Arctic marine environment. A multidisciplinary group of scientists from 10 countries will advance understanding of the impacts of climate change on Arctic biodiversity and the cascading effects that biodiversity change can have on marine ecosystems, the climate services they provide, and the human communities that depend on them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People make irrational trust decisions precisely
(University of Sussex) Online health information is deemed doubly less trustworthy if the text includes both " shouting " and spelling errors together, according to a new study at Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

National Autism Indicators Report: the connection between autism and financial hardship
(Drexel University) A.J. Drexel Autism Institute released the 2020 National Autism Indicators Report highlighting the financial challenges facing households of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including higher levels of poverty, material hardship and medical expenses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Secondary school admissions system is still a work in progress
(Lancaster University) A new study by Lancaster University Management School highlights important inequalities in access to chosen secondary schools in England with minority ethnic families 17% less likely to achieve their first choice school. Experts also say while allowing fewer choices enables local authorities to show that high proportions of children will be attending their first choice school, this is a hollow achievement when results show parents' first choices are not always true preferences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Experts outline research methods to study puberty suppression impacts on brains of transgender youth
(Children's National Hospital) A new set of expert consensus-based recommendations lays out how best to study possible neurodevelopmental impacts of pubertal suppression treatment in transgender youth. Developed by a consensus panel of 24 international scientists, the recommendations were published in the journal Transgender Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First impressions can sway financial professionals' forecasts of firms for up to 6 years
(Carnegie Mellon University) A new study looked at the influence among finance professionals of first impression bias of firms' performance, which spurs people to place undue weight on early experiences. The study found that equity analysts placed greater emphasis on early impressions than later ones, that negative first impressions had more power than positive ones, and that first impression bias could influence forecasts of a firm by a financial professional for up to 6 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study identifies strategies states use to limit local government control
(New York University) A new study by researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, takes a closer look at the strategies state legislatures use -- often behind closed doors -- to pass preemptive laws that limit local government control. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NUS and Stanford researchers uncover a new mindset that predicts success
(National University of Singapore) To succeed in modern life, people need to accomplish challenging tasks effectively. Many successful entrepreneurs, businesspeople, students, athletes and more, tend to be more strategic -- and hence, more effective -- than others at meeting such challenges. A new study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that one important psychological factor behind their success may be a 'strategic mindset'. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How effective are language learning apps?
(Michigan State University) Researchers from Michigan State University recently conducted a study focusing on Babbel, a popular subscription-based language learning app and e-learning platform, to see if it really worked at teaching a new language. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ischemic stroke admissions, life-saving thrombectomy procedures decrease during COVID-19 pandemic
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Research reveals fewer people have been admitted to stroke centers in Michigan and northwest Ohio since the onslaught of the COVID-19 pandemic, and significantly fewer patients received a mechanical thrombectomy for their ischemic stroke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers put a price tag on alcohol use
(University of Eastern Finland) Alcohol use disorders are associated with high social welfare and health care costs -- but what causes them? A new Finnish study looks at the magnitude and reasons behind the economic burden alcohol use disorders have on society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Holders of negative opinions towards GM food likely to be against other novel food tech
(Nanyang Technological University) Scientists at NTU Singapore and the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health have found that people who hold negative opinions of genetically-modified (GM) food are likely to feel the same about nano-enabled food -- food with nano-additives to enhance flavor, nutrition or prolong shelf life. The 'spillover effect' they observed from GM food to nano-enabled food could possibly extend to other novel food technologies as well. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medical interventions and diversity: A multidisciplinary issue
(Bentham Science Publishers) This book serves as a guide for health care professionals working with disabled people in the society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The neurobiology of social distance
(McGill University) Never before have we experienced social isolation on a massive scale as we have during the evolving COVID-19 pandemic. A new paper published in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences explores the wide-ranging, negative consequences that social isolation has on our psychological well-being and physical health, including decreased life span. The paper was co-authored by Associate Professor Danilo Bzdok (McGill University and Mila Quebec Artificial Intelligence Institute) and Emeritus Professor Robin Dunbar (University of Oxford). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Orthotics breakthrough helps children with Cerebral Palsy walk and play
(Staffordshire University) Children with Cerebral Palsy have more energy to play and be physically active for longer thanks to specially designed orthotics.Researchers have confirmed that adapting splints in combination with the footwear used by disabled children to help them walk can decrease the energy they use by as much as 33%. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study reveals birth defects caused by flame retardant
(University of Georgia) A new study from the University of Georgia has shown that exposure to a now-banned flame retardant can alter the genetic code in sperm, leading to major health defects in children of exposed parents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Down to the bone: Understanding how bone-dissolving cells are generated
(Tokyo University of Science) Bone-dissolving cells called osteoclasts are derived from a type of immune cells called macrophages. They are necessary for the maintenance and renewal of bones. But the intracellular mechanisms through which macrophages convert to osteoclasts are not fully understood. Recently, scientists at the Tokyo University of Science uncovered the role of a protein called Cpeb4 in this process. Their findings suggest potential therapeutic targets for bone and joint diseases like arthritis and osteoporosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 loneliness linked to elevated psychiatric symptoms in older adults
(Bar-Ilan University) A new study has linked COVID-19-based loneliness in older adults with elevated psychiatric symptoms of anxiety, depression, and trauma symptoms that immediately follow exposure to trauma. Notably, the researchers found that the effect of loneliness on psychiatric symptoms was most pronounced among participants who felt subjectively older than their chronological age. On the other hand, participants who felt subjectively younger than their chronological age exhibited no psychiatric symptoms related to loneliness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study examines environmental justice impact of Senate Bill 181 in Colorado
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded researchers in Colorado a grant to examine the impact of Senate Bill 181, a bill that changes the way oil and gas development is regulated. Researchers will look at whether or not shifting oil and gas decision-making to the local level will lead to fairer outcomes for marginalized communities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dr. Ernesto Priego collaborates with blind illustrator
(City University London) City, University of London's Dr Ernesto Priego collaborates with blind illustrator in response to COVID-19 accessibility appeal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Improved MRI scans could aid in development of arthritis treatments
(University of Cambridge) An algorithm which analyses MRI images and automatically detects small changes in knee joints over time could be used in the development of new treatments for arthritis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AI sentencing tools need to be closely scrutinised, says new study
(University of Surrey) Judges should closely vet the AI tools they use to help them predict whether a defendant is likely to re offend, urges a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news