Emotions from touch
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Touching different types of surfaces may incur certain emotions. This was the conclusion made by the psychologists from the Higher School of Economics in a recent empirical study. Previously, emotional perception was generally studied in relation to visual and audial modalities. The study's results were published in the journal Consciousness and Cognition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Law as Data' explores radical leap for legal analysis
(Santa Fe Institute) From lawyer-bots appealing parking tickets to machine learning algorithms finding the smoking gun document, change is coming to the law. 'Law as Data,' borne out of a transdisciplinary Santa Fe Institute working group, explores the new field of computational legal analysis -- the study of the law that uses legal texts as data. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The history of Arctic ecosystems as a guide to the future
(University of Konstanz) How are tundra ecosystems impacted by grazing and climate change, and how will future changes to the Arctic affect the living conditions of its residents? These questions are being addressed by an international research collaboration between environmental genomics, ecology and anthropology in a project coordinated by Junior Professor Laura Epp from the University of Konstanz. The researchers will combine ancient DNA from sediment cores with current ecological data and anthropological studies. The knowledge gained will be transferred into the communities of the studied areas. (Source: EurekAlert! - ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Remote sensing of toxic algal blooms
(King Abdullah University of Science& Technology (KAUST)) Algal blooms in the Red Sea can be detected with a new method that accounts for dust storms and aerosols. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Advancing dementia and its effect on care home relationships
(University of Chichester) New research published today in the journal Dementia by researchers from the University of Chichester focuses on the effects of behavioral change due to dementia in a residential care home setting. Its findings are based on a survey of professional care-givers who shared their own experiences of the deterioration of the carer/cared-for relationship as dementia advances. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Measuring impact of product placement
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) Researchers from Indiana University and Emory University published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science (Editor's note: The source of this research is INFORMS), which reveals the impact of product placement in television programming. The findings indicate that prominent product placement embedded in television programming does have a net positive impact on online conversations and web traffic for the brand. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In the aftermath of company scandals, auditors charge higher fees or leave
(University of Colorado Denver) CU Denver researcher predicts that auditors notice and incorporate media-provided ESG information in their risk response, which has not been examined before. Supporting this prediction, she finds that ESG-related negative media coverage of an audit client is associated with a higher likelihood of auditor resignation and increased audit fees. This response is incremental to the issues that underlie this media coverage. These findings identify an additional economic incentive for companies to avoid poor ESG practices. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lack of sleep may increase likelihood of teens engaging in risky sexual behaviors
(American Psychological Association) Teenagers who don't get enough sleep may be at an increased risk of engaging in unsafe sexual behaviors, such as not using condoms or having sex under the influence of alcohol or drugs, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

LGBTQ adolescents experiencing weight-based bullying found to have increased substance use
(UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity) Weight-based victimization among sexual and gender minority youth is associated with increased offs of alcohol use, binge drinking, marijuana use, and cigarette use. These findings persist regardless of adolescents' demographic characteristics, body weight, sexual identity, gender identity, and sexual or gender minority victimization. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lower-amp ECT appears effective against suicidal thoughts
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) Nearly half the amplitude typically used in standard electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) seems to be effective at treating suicidal thoughts, investigators report. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SMU researcher wins grant to develop sustainable man-machine interaction intelligence
(Singapore Managment University) The NRF Investigatorship grant will support SMU Professor Archan Misra's vision of a smart city where humans and devices work collaboratively on projects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SMU researcher awarded grant to study religious diversity in Singapore
(Singapore Managment University) SMU Assistant Professor Orlando Woods is studying new types of religious pluralism in Singapore -- the differences that exist not just between but also within religious groups. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Leaky pipeline: Women subject to disadvantages in career development
(Goethe University Frankfurt) A website presenting the results from a web-based tracking tool about the proportion of women working in economic research institutions in European countries was launched on Tuesday, May 28. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cambridge University Press publishes lexicon on J ü rgen Habermas
(Goethe University Frankfurt) A great honor for J ü rgen Habermas: in the year of his 90th birthday, Cambridge University Press has published an extensive lexicon about the philosopher and sociologist who was a professor at the Institute for Philosophy at Goethe University until 1994. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Living healthier with digital technologies
(University of W ü rzburg) Through the research network ForDigitHealth, five Bavarian universities are jointly researching the stress that digitization causes in humans. The Bavarian State Ministry of Science and the Arts is funding this initiative with€3.35 million. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Do violent video games affect kids' behavior with real guns?
(JAMA Network) This randomized clinical trial in a university laboratory examined the effects of video games with weapons on children's behavior when they found a real gun. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Politicians walk the walk, when it comes to financial investments
(North Carolina State University) For the most part, politicians do put their money where their mouths are. A recent study of US senators and representatives finds that the more liberal a politician's voting record is, the more likely the politician is to invest in socially responsible stocks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Childhood adversity linked to early puberty, premature brain development, & mental illness
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Growing up in poverty and experiencing traumatic events like a bad accident or sexual assault were linked to accelerated puberty and brain maturation, abnormal brain development, and greater mental health disorders, such as depression, anxiety, and psychosis, according to a new Penn Medicine study published this week in JAMA Psychiatry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stanford engineers develop a more stable, efficient prosthetic foot
(Stanford University) Hiking trails and other rough terrain are especially difficult for people with prosthetic legs. Now, Stanford engineers have come up with more stable prostheses -- and a better way to design them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stand up to cancer-funded research to be presented at ASCO May 31-June 4 in Chicago
(Stand Up To Cancer) SU2C supported researchers will present work on pediatric brain tumors, cfDNA for early cancer detection, dual blockade of CTLA-4 and PD-1 in mCRC, cancer interception of pancreatic and lung cancers, machine learning RECIST in RWE study of lung cancer, and molecular markers of response to neoadjuvant nivolumab in resectable NSCLC. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Belief in learning styles myth may be detrimental
(American Psychological Association) Many people, including educators, believe learning styles are set at birth and predict both academic and career success even though there is no scientific evidence to support this common myth, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Multi-step spread of first herders into sub-Saharan Africa
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) An analysis of 41 ancient African genomes led by Mary Prendergast and David Reich suggests that the spread of herding and farming into eastern Africa affected human populations in phases, involving multiple movements of -- and gene flow among -- ancestrally distinct groups. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient DNA tells the story of the first herders and farmers in east Africa
(Saint Louis University) A collaborative study led by archaeologists, geneticists and museum curators is providing answers to previously unsolved questions about life in sub-Saharan Africa thousands of years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Lancet: Health progress threatened by neglect of gender
(The Lancet) Today, The Lancet published a new Series on 'Gender Equality, Norms and Health', which finds that governments and health institutions have persistently failed to make progress towards gender equality, despite the impact of gender -- and the spoken and unspoken rules of societies about acceptable gender behaviors -- on health throughout life. Set to be launched at the annual 'Women Deliver 2019' [1] conference, this Lancet Series is the result of a four-year project developed by over 100 contributors from five continents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient DNA illuminates first herders and farmers in east Africa
(Harvard Medical School) Genome-wide analyses of 41 ancient sub-Saharan Africans answer questions left murky by archaeological records about the origins of the people who introduced food production -- first herding and then farming -- into East Africa over the past 5,000 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers restore beta-cell function by deleting old cells
(Joslin Diabetes Center) Joslin researchers confirmed similarly increased proportion of aged beta-cells in islets recovered from humans with type 2 diabetes. The study also showed that beta cell function can be recovered by removing these aged populations either via genetic modification or oral medication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cold-parenting linked to premature aging, increased disease risk in offspring
(Loma Linda University Adventist Health Sciences Center) New research out of Loma Linda University Health suggests that unsupportive parenting styles may have several negative health implications for children, even into their adult years. The study found that the telomeres -- protective caps on the ends of the strands of DNA -- of subjects who considered their mothers' parenting style as 'cold' were on average 25% smaller compared to those who reported having a mother whose parenting style they considered 'warm.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain activity in teens predicts future mood health
(Elsevier) An imbalance of functioning in attention-related brain systems may help forecast the course of teen depression, according to a study published in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, published by Elsevier. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Depression sufferers at risk of multiple chronic diseases
(University of Queensland) Women who experience symptoms of depression are at risk of developing multiple chronic diseases, research led by The University of Queensland has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Raw or cooked: this is how we recognise food
(Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati) Do we see an apple? The occipital cortex in our brain will activate itself to recognise it. A plate of pasta? Another region will come into play, called middle temporal gyrus. According to a new study, different regions are implicated in recognition of different foods, raw in one case and processed in the other, because two components of the 'semantic memory', the one that we always use to recognise the world around us, are involved. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Church, couch, couple: Social psychological connections between people and physical space
(Society for Personality and Social Psychology) From couples to communities, the built environment shapes us as much as we shape it. A newly published literature review in Personality and Social Psychology Review describes the importance of the person-environment connection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How can organizations promote and benefit from socioeconomic diversity?
(Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology) A new white paper has been published by the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology. Written by SIOP members McKenzie Preston and Sumona De Graf, this research evidence explains how individuals from lower social class backgrounds tend to engage highly in prosocial behaviors, which have shown to be related to improvements in team cooperation and performance. Socioeconomic diversity also increases the diversity of perspectives on teams, which has been related to improvements in team preparation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study could lead to 'cognitive therapy in your pocket'
(McLean Hospital) People living with anxiety, depression, and other mental health conditions may soon be able to use a smartphone app to deliver on-demand cognitive bias modification for interpretation (CBM-I), a way to change mental habits without visiting a therapist. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Aubrey de Grey to present at the 6th Aging Research for Drug Discovery Forum in Basel
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Aubrey de Grey, Ph.D., CSO, SENS Research Foundation; VP of New Technology Discovery, AgeX Therapeutics, Inc., to present at the 6th Aging Research for Drug Discovery Forum in Basel, Switzerland (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Healthy fat hidden in dirt may fend off anxiety disorders
(University of Colorado at Boulder) Thirty years after scientists first suggested that increased exposure to microorganisms could benefit health, CU Boulder researchers have identified an anti-inflammatory fat in a soil-dwelling bacterium that may be partly responsible. Someday, they hope to use it to develop an immunization against stress-related disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A research study analyzes employment hiring practices in Europe
(Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) The largest study on hiring practices in Europe reveals that children of immigrants experience discrimination when accessing the labor market. That is the main conclusion of the European GEMM Project, in which researchers from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid are participating. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Collaborative Research Center dedicated to the study of control in addiction
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) Approximately 10 million people in Germany are addicted to either alcohol, tobacco, prescription drugs or illegal drugs. A small percentage manage to overcome their addiction without any outside help. How they manage to do so is being explored by the new transregional Collaborative Research Center (SFB/TRR) 'Losing and Regaining Control in Addiction -- Development, Mechanisms and Interventions', which is being led by Charit é -- Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin. This collaborative research project will receive a total of approximately € 12 million over four yea...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cognitive behavior therapy shown to improve multiple menopause symptoms
(The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)) Although hormone therapy (HT) is the most commonly recommended treatment for menopause symptoms, research is ongoing for alternatives, especially nonpharmacologic options. Cognitive behavior therapy has previously been proposed as a low-risk treatment for hot flashes, but a new study suggests it may also effectively manage other menopause symptoms. Results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chimpanzees catch and eat crabs
(University of Zurich) Chimpanzees have a mainly vegetarian diet, but do occasionally eat meat. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown for the first time that chimpanzees also eat crabs. In the rainforest of Guinea, the researchers observed how chimpanzees regularly fish for crabs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Extroverts enjoy four key advantages according to science; here they are
(University of Toronto) Researchers have determined that extroverts enjoy four key advantages over their more introverted peers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Early humans deliberately recycled flint to create tiny, sharp tools
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) A new Tel Aviv University study finds that prehistoric humans 'recycled' discarded or broken flint tools 400,000 years ago to create small, sharp utensils with specific functions. The artifacts were discovered at the site of Qesem Cave, located just outside Tel Aviv. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using nature to adapt to climate change
(American Institute of Biological Sciences) Climate change poses major threats to people around the world. One important method for adapting to these changes may lie in the deployment of nature-based solutions in urban areas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Schools that are socially connected have similar educational outcomes
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Ivan Smirnov, a researcher from the Higher School of Economics, analysed the data of 36,951 students from 590 schools of Saint Petersburg and found that there is a strong correlation between the educational outcomes of a school and its digital neighbors. Students are more likely to be connected if the educational outcomes of their schools are similar. The results were published in PLOS ONE. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Potential novel biomarker for alcohol dependence
(Boston University School of Medicine) Specific molecules (small noncoding microRNAs or miRNAs) found in saliva may be able to predict alcohol dependence as biomarkers. This is the first study to examine changes in the miRNA expression in the saliva of people with alcohol dependence. Currently, no genetic markers exist to test for this condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More than victims: Migration images provide a chance to tell a greater story
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Keith Greenwood, an associate professor in the Missouri School of Journalism, has found that a majority of photos depicting the 2015 Syrian refugee crisis portrayed the refugees as victims. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A student's disability status depends on where they go to school, PSU study finds
(Portland State University) A new Portland State University study suggests that the likelihood of a child being classified with an educational disability depends on the characteristics of their school and how distinctive they are from their peers (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Put more father-friendly cues in OB/GYN offices, Rutgers-led study suggests
(Rutgers University) A new Rutgers-led study finds that by adding a few subtle cues to prenatal care waiting rooms, such as photos of men and babies, and pamphlets and magazines aimed toward men, OBGYNS can get fathers more involved in prenatal care and increase healthier outcomes for women and infants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Inconsistent choice-making a normal part of how the brain evaluates options
(University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management) Sometimes consumers will switch their preferences, known in industry terms as 'customer churn.' While economists have previously called that an error in rationality, a new study says an important part of inconsistent choice-making is due to idiosyncratic activity in the brain areas that assess value. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Societal values and perceptions shape energy production and use as much as new technology
(Oregon State University) Societal values and perceptions have shaped the energy landscape as much as the technologies that drive its production and consumption, a new paper from an Oregon State University researcher suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Climate undermined by lobbying
(University of California - Santa Barbara) For all the evidence that the benefits of reducing greenhouse gases outweigh the costs of regulation, disturbingly few domestic climate change policies have been enacted around the world so far. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news