Main gland in hormonal system ages due to process that can potentially be slowed down
(KU Leuven) Stem cell biologist Hugo Vankelecom (KU Leuven) and his colleagues have discovered that the pituitary gland in mice ages as the result of an age-related form of chronic inflammation. It may be possible to slow down this process or even partially repair it. The researchers have published their findings in PNAS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Untapped rice varieties could sustain crop supplies in face of climate change
(Earlham Institute) Local rice varieties in Vietnam could be used to help breed improved crops with higher resilience to climate change, according to a new study published in Rice. Earlham Institute researchers are part of an international collaboration with genebanks and rice breeders in Vietnam -- championed by the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) to help abolish world poverty and hunger -- are aiming to identify varieties that can survive an increasingly unpredictable climate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Small streams in agricultural ecosystems are heavily polluted with pesticides
(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ) Pesticides safeguard agricultural yields by controlling insects, fungi, and weeds. However, they also enter streams and damage the aquatic communities. In a nationwide monitoring program, scientists led by the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research have shown that the governmental thresholds for pesticides are too high and that these levels are still exceeded in over 80% of water bodies. The loss of biodiversity can only be halted if the environmental risk assessment of pesticides is revised. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bed sharing does not lead to stronger infant-mother attachment or maternal bonding
(University of Kent) New research led by the University of Kent has found that there is no link between bed sharing, infant-mother attachment, and infant behavioral outcomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research suggests ways to tackle water security challenges in world's drylands
(University of York) To counter the effects of climate change on drylands, a new study suggests that global access to water should be managed in a more integrated way. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to improve energy efficiency of historically significant buildings
(University of Gothenburg) How can historic buildings become more energy efficient while conserving their heritage values? A doctoral thesis provides the answer by presenting a new method for combining climate goals and heritage values in historic buildings stocks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Keeping the peace
(Washington University in St. Louis) New research sheds light on how - and in what context - peacekeepers can contain the spread of violence in fragile post-conflict areas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Understanding and mitigating user biases in online information searching
(University of Oklahoma) When searching for information online, the results can vary widely from person to person. Jiqun Liu, an assistant professor in the School of Library and Information Studies in the University of Oklahoma's College of Arts and Sciences, wants to improve the quality of online search results that accounts for users' biases and returns more balanced and useful results. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Analysis: Chile's transition to democracy slow, incomplete, fueled by social movements
(Carnegie Mellon University) A new article analyzes Chile's transition in 1990 from dictatorship to democracy, the nature of democracy between 1990 and 2019, and the appearance of several social movements geared to expanding this democracy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Quality supervision, coworker support key to child welfare caseworker retention
(Oregon State University) Instead of looking at the reasons child welfare caseworkers leave their jobs, Oregon State University researchers examined the common factors among workers who stay in the field, and what makes them feel most satisfied in their work. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

At underwater site, research team finds 9,000-year-old stone artifacts
(University of Texas at Arlington) An underwater archaeologist from The University of Texas at Arlington is part of a research team studying 9,000-year-old stone tool artifacts discovered in Lake Huron that originated from an obsidian quarry more than 2,000 miles away in central Oregon. The obsidian flakes from the underwater archaeological site represent the oldest and farthest east confirmed specimens of western obsidian ever found in the continental United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

That song is stuck in your head, but it's helping you to remember
(University of California - Davis) New research from UC Davis suggests that remembering a song in your head is more than a passing nuisance -- it plays an important role in helping memories form, not only for the song, but also related life events. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hollywood stereotypes of female journalists feed a 'vicious cycle' of sexism
(University of Florida) As threats against female journalists rise, a researcher examines the damage done by the Hollywood trope of the unethical female reporter who trades sex for information. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How political bias impacts believing sexual assault victims
(Syracuse University) A new study shows political partisans may engage in greater victim blaming for sexual assault crimes, especially when the members of their political party are accused. The more Republicans and Democrats identified with belonging to their political party and reported feeling defensive when members from their political party are criticized, the more accepting they were of common sexual assault myths and the less likely to perceive sexual assault as a serious issue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New treatment stops progression of Alzheimer's disease in monkey brains
(NYU Langone Health / NYU Grossman School of Medicine) A new therapy prompts immune defense cells to swallow misshapen proteins, amyloid beta plaques and tau tangles, whose buildup is known to kill nearby brain cells as part of Alzheimer's disease, a new study shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Young adults' alcohol use increases when casually dating
(Washington State University) When young adults are more interested in socializing and casually dating, they tend to drink more alcohol, according to a new paper led by a Washington State University professor.On the other hand, scientists found that when young adults are in serious relationships, are not interested in dating or place less importance on friendship, their alcohol use was significantly lower. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Job-related stress threatens the teacher supply - RAND survey
(RAND Corporation) Nearly one in four teachers may leave their job by the end of the current (2020-'21) school year, compared with one in six who were likely to leave prior to the pandemic, according to a new RAND Corporation survey. Teachers who identified as Black or African American were particularly likely to consider leaving. These results suggest potential immediate and long-term threats to the teacher supply. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Psychologists identify 18 best measures to assess intimate partner violence
(Binghamton University) Millions of people experience intimate partner violence (IPV) in their lifetime and assessment is important in conducting therapy and assisting victims. A team of psychologists at Binghamton University, State University of New York have evaluated dozens of available measures used to assess intimate partner violence and have pinpointed the most effective ones. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can encroachment benefit hotel franchisees?
(American Marketing Association) Targeted encroachment can benefit existing franchisees. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Impact of COVID-19 on weddings reinforces need for marriage law reforms
(University of Exeter) Coronavirus disruption to weddings has highlighted the complexity and antiquity of marriage law and reinforced the need for reform, a new study shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers to investigate 'flexible furlough' and employers' attitudes to part-time work
(Cranfield University) A research project by Cranfield School of Management will seek to determine to what extent so-called 'flexible furlough' during the coronavirus pandemic has increased employer openness to part-time working. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mains to Rains website promotes steps towards sustainable gardening
(Cranfield University) Researchers at Cranfield University have worked with colleagues at the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) to launch a new website aimed at saving water in the garden. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Das researching use of artificial intelligence
(George Mason University) Sanmay Das, Professor, Computer Science, is conducting an exploratory study in the use of techniques from artificial intelligence (AI) to improve early screening and the delivery of targeted assistance to households that are at risk of future homelessness and child maltreatment. Das and the other members of the research team seek to develop novel methods for allocation of scarce housing support to at-risk households, taking into account considerations of both overall efficiency and fairness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Communication technology, study of collective behavior must be 'crisis discipline'
(University of Washington) Social media and other forms of communication technology restructure these interactions in ways that have consequences. Unfortunately, we have little insight into whether these changes will bring about a healthy, sustainable and equitable world. As a result, researchers now say that the study of collective behavior must rise to a " crisis discipline, " just like medicine, conservation and climate science have done, according to a new paper published June 14 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research reveals why people pick certain campsites
(The University of Montana) Those in love with the outdoors can spend their entire lives chasing that perfect campsite. New University of Montana research suggests what they are trying to find. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Introducing play to higher education reduces stress and forms deeper connection material
(University of Colorado Denver) Higher education students are more engaged and motivated when they are taught using playful pedagogy rather than the traditional lecture-based method. Play also resulted in reduced stress and anxiety. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New app tracks human mobility and COVID-19
(University of Miami) To understand just how COVID-19 affected human movement on a global scale, researchers in the University of Miami College of Arts and Sciences Department of Geography and Sustainable Development developed COVID-19 vs. Human Mobility, an innovative and interactive web application that shows the connections between human mobility, government policies, and cases of COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hope for infertile men; mice could hold the secret
(The Company of Biologists) Male infertility affects around 8-12% of men globally, with over 20 million cases known. Now, researchers at Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center, China, led by Na Li and Ling Sun, may be able to offer infertile men a glimpse of hope, after discovering a new protein that controls male fertility in mice. These findings, published in the journal Development, pinpoint a new potential target to treat the underlying causes of male infertility in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Barks in the night lead to the discovery of new species
(Yale University) A new study in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society co-authored by Yale anthropologist Eric Sargis finds that the barking hyraxes are a separate species from their shrieking neighbors. The newly described species, Dendrohyrax interfluvialis, populates the wet and dry forests that lie between the two rivers in coastal regions of southeastern Ghana, southern Togo and Benin, and southwestern Nigeria. The researchers based their conclusion on the distinctive calls combined with anatomical and genetic differences they identified among tree hyrax populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Professor Jim Al-Khalili awarded CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List
(University of Surrey) Professor Jim Al-Khalili, Professor of Theoretical Physics and Distinguished Chair in physics at the University of Surrey as well as a university chair in public engagement in science, has been awarded a CBE for outstanding services to science and public engagement in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Consumers will pay more for ready-to-eat meals made with fewer ingredients
(Washington State University) New WSU research shows many consumers are willing to pay a premium for ready-to-eat meals with a 'clean label' showing few ingredients. They are also more willing to fork out their hard-earned cash when they know their processed foods are made with a new technology that helps limit the number of additives and preservatives commonly found in most ready-to-eat meals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Impact of digitization on democracies
(Leopoldina) Digitization is an integral part of democracy today. This is particularly evident in election campaigns, political initiatives, and societal debates that are increasingly being conducted via social media. On Tuesday, 22 June, and Wednesday, 23 June, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, and the U.S. National Academy of Sciences are organizing the virtual symposium " Digitization and Democracy " in order to discuss associated risks, policy options, and trends from a scientific point of view. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Luxembourg and Frontiers strike national Open Access publishing agreement
(Frontiers) Luxembourg's research community has strengthened its commitment to Open Access through a new national publishing agreement, announced this week. The Biblioth è que Nationale du Luxembourg, the country's national library, and the open access publisher Frontiers have reached a three-year publishing deal that will run until February 2024. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trees, plants and soil could help cities cut their carbon footprints -- when used smartly
(Aalto University) Carbon footprint declarations are used in construction to ease product selection for low carbon building, but these standards don't yet exist for green elements like soil, bushes and plants. A new study led by Aalto University is the first to map out how green infrastructure can be a resource for cities on the path to carbon neutrality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Free and nutritious school lunches help create richer and healthier adults
(Lund University) Universal school lunch programs make students healthier, and increase their lifetime income by 3%, according to a unique study from Lund University in Sweden published in The Review of Economic Studies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Food home delivery companies need up to 8,000 daily services to be profitable in a big city
(Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC)) UOC experts have studied the operation of the main food home delivery platforms, such as Just Eat, Glovo and Deliveroo, which work in the city of Barcelona, to analyze the profitability of these business models and estimate the number of orders needed to achieve this profitability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Call for G7 to prioritize future generations supported by University of Toronto
(University of Toronto) The U7+ Alliance of World Universities calls on world leaders to prioritize the interest of future generations and recognize universities' capacity to help tackle pressing global issues such as climate change, the economic recovery from COVID-19 and championing social justice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Designing public institutions that foster cooperation
(University of Pennsylvania) People are more likely to cooperate with those they see as 'good.' Using a mathematical model, University of Pennsylvania researchers found it's possible to design systems that assess and broadcast participants' reputations, leading to high levels of cooperation and adherence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New model identifies levers for stability for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac credit
(Carnegie Mellon University) In a new article, an economist proposes a scenario in which large lenders temporarily boost high-risk activity at the end of a boom. According to her model, lenders with many outstanding mortgages have incentives to extend risky credit to prop up housing prices, which lessens the losses on their outstanding portfolio of mortgages. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

LSU Health New Orleans awarded $2.38 million to sequence COVID-19 virus variants
(Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center) LSU Health New Orleans has been awarded $2.38 million in funding to lead partnerships to sequence SARS-CoV-2 variants. The funding is from a contract with the Louisiana Department of Health (LDH)) and a National Institute of General Medical Sciences supplement to the LACaTS (Louisiana Clinical& Translational Science Center) grant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds links between Whites having Black neighbors and party affiliation
(Harvard University) White men who had a Black neighbor when they were growing up are more likely to be Democrats and less likely to be Republican, an influence that can last several decades later. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Physical activity may curb health care worker burnout
(University of Georgia) Investing in more physical activity programming could mitigate the effects of stress and improve worker mental and emotional health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds that inflammatory processes are altered in the brains of people with OUD
(Boston University School of Medicine) Prevalence rates of opioid use disorder (OUD) have increased dramatically, accompanied by a surge of overdose deaths--nearly 50,000 in the U.S. in 2019. While opioid dependence has been extensively studied in preclinical models, an understanding of the biological alterations that occur in the brains of people who chronically use opioids and who are diagnosed with OUD remains limited. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vitamin D deficiency may increase risk for addiction to opioids and ultraviolet rays
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Lab animals deficient in vitamin D crave and become dependent on opioids, which is curbed when normal levels of the vitamin are restored. Human health records indicate that people with low vitamin D are more likely to use and misuse opioids. Study results suggest a potential role for vitamin D supplementation in fighting opioid addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Winner Art of Neuroscience competition announced
(Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience - KNAW) The eleventh edition of the Art of Neuroscience competition is won by Yas Crawford, an associate of the Royal Photographic Society and independent artist. With her artwork 'Cognition IX', Crawford looks at neurological interoception in myalgic encephalomyelitis (M.E) patients. The winner was chosen by a jury out of 293 entries from over 20 countries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Economic crime is going uninvestgated as Police hide behind the veil of Action Fraud
(University of Portsmouth) Fraud is going uninvestigated by police who are " hiding behind the veil " of the Action Fraud national crime reporting agency. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers test model to predict drug overdose deaths in US
(University of California - San Diego) Researchers at UC San Diego, San Diego State University, and international collaborators have designed and validated a prediction model to signal counties at risk of future overdose death outbreaks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pitt's Aleksandar Stevanovic receives Fulbright Specialist Award
(University of Pittsburgh) Aleksandar Stevanovic of the University of Pittsburgh received a Fulbright Specialist Program award. Dr. Stevanovic, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering in Pitt's Swanson School of Engineering, will complete a project at the University of Kragujevac in Serbia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Moral disgust has a 'bad taste'
(Universit à di Bologna) Witnessing shared moral norms being disrespected inhibits the neurons responsible for controlling our tongue, a reaction similar to the one we have when we taste something unpleasant. This is what emerges from a study led by the University of Bologna and the University of Messina. This work received the " Best Paper Prize 2021 " during the XII International Scientific Conference on Neuroethics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Many surgery patients get opioid prescriptions, but many don't need to, study suggests
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Surgeons can ease their patients' pain from common operations without prescribing opioids, and avoid the possibility of starting someone on a path to long-term use, a pair of new studies suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news