Rapamycin changes the way our DNA is stored
(Max-Planck-Gesellschaft) Researchers discover an unexpected link between DNA winding and metabolism in the gut to ameliorate ageing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Free event will connect heart, lung, blood and sleep point-of-care inventors with resources
(University of Massachusetts Lowell) Life sciences entrepreneurs, researchers and investors working to shape the future of point-of-care medical technologies will gather next week for a free virtual event that will highlight new inventions and connect participants to resources to advance their work. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More 'fairness' needed in conservation
(ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies) Considering local stakeholder conceptions of fairness in conservation is critical. Current conservation practice and policy in low- and middle-income countries are shaped by rich Western countries, which means they are underpinned by Western ideas about fairness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Transportation is a form of freedom': How to make it more equitable
(University of Michigan) The routes and schedules of public transit, the presence or absence of sidewalks, the availability of different transportation options, and the design of highways that divide cities--these are examples of aspects of transportation systems that can profoundly impact underserved communities' access to basic needs like jobs, health care, education and even food. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Breakthrough study shows defining traits are forged the moment we're born
(Frontiers) A new study published by the open access publisher Frontiers is the first to research the link between functional brain network connectivity and behavioral temperament in newborns and one-month-old babies. The findings, which show that functional brain connectivity networks with behavioral relevance are already present in young infants, help further bridge the research gap between the human brain and our behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How should counselors broach topics of race, ethnicity, and culture?
(Wiley) It's incumbent upon counselors to initiate or respond to clients' concerns about racial, ethnic, and cultural issues, but guidelines lack specific instructions. An article published in the Journal of Counseling& Development provides counselors with strategies for broaching and discussing topics of race, ethnicity, and culture with clients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New heart metric may increase survival for heart-failure patients
(University of Virginia Health System) A new measurement of heart function developed at UVA Health could improve survival for people with heart failure by identifying high-risk patients who require tailored treatments, a new study suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mood matters: New app empowers moms to manage mental wellbeing
(University of South Australia) Recognizing the symptoms of maternal anxiety and depression can be difficult, but with the help of a new app -- developed by the University of South Australia and parent support group Village Foundation -- thousands of women will be empowered to monitor their mental health, both during pregnancy and after birth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Osteoporosis detection by a simple physical function test
(Shinshu University) The study which targeted postmenopausal women who are at high risk for primary osteoporosis found that if any of the following is true, TST (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preclinical study suggests new approach to reduce COVID-19 death among the elderly
(University of Minnesota Medical School) New research from the University of Minnesota Medical School and colleagues at the Mayo Clinic reveals a possible new approach to preventing death and severe disease in elderly people infected with SARS-CoV-2. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Weak brain waves may warn of age-related neurodegenerative disease
(eLife) Weakened electrical signals in the brain may be an early warning sign of age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Men with sensory loss are more likely to be obese
(Anglia Ruskin University) Men who suffer sensory loss, particularly hearing loss, are more likely to be physically inactive and obese than women, according to a new study published in the European Journal of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Jan Eeckhout explains his book " The Profit Paradox "
(Universitat Pompeu Fabra - Barcelona) In an era of technological progress and facilities for communication, it would be reasonable to assume that working people around the world have never had it so good nor enjoyed such good conditions as today's. But, the reality is that wages are frozen and prices are rising, resulting in everything being dearer, from a bottle of beer to a hip replacement. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exercise likely to be best treatment for depression in coronary heart disease
(RCSI) A study by RCSI indicates that exercise is probably the most effective short-term treatment for depression in people with coronary heart disease, when compared to antidepressants and psychotherapy or more complex care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study: Developers' skills and top management commitment lead to Agile project success
(Department of Computer Science, Aalborg University) Which are the most compelling success factors of a large-scale Agile software transformation? And how do these factors relate? A new long-term study from Aalborg University highlights the stakeholders' roles in such transformations. The main result is a valuable model for software managers to set up and effectively manage the transformation of organisations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Report calls for 'comprehensive action' to tackle poverty in UK city
(Staffordshire University) Rising unemployment, inadequate benefits and low paid work are the main causes of poverty and destitution in Stoke-on-Trent according to the findings of a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Science and performing arts against stereotypes
(University of Barcelona) Stereotypes are knowledge structures integrated in our world representation which are hard to change. A team from the University of Barcelona and the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, in collaboration with the È pica Foundation - La Fura dels Baus analysed how a performing experience could have a positive impact in reducing the population's bias against physical illnesses. This performing experience is a pioneer one for it combines scientific training and theatre performance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Outstanding education scholarship
(University of Delaware) Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Unidel H. Rodney Sharp Chair and professor in the School of Education (SOE) and in the departments of Psychological and Brain Sciences and Linguistics and Cognitive Science at the University of Delaware, has been elected to membership in the National Academy of Education. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study identifies major barriers to financing a sustainable ocean economy
(University of British Columbia) Financing a sustainable global ocean economy may require a Paris Agreement type effort, according to a new report from an international team of researchers led by the University of British Columbia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CSHL professor wins Horizon Prize in chemistry
(Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory) The Royal Society of Chemistry has awarded an international team of scientists the first-ever Organic Division Horizon Prize: the Robert Robinson Award in Synthetic Organic Chemistry. The prize was awarded to Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) Professor and Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry John E. Moses as a part of a collaborative effort with prestigious institutions around the world, including Nobel laureate K.B. Sharpless of Scripps Research Institute. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Peace accord in Colombia has increased deforestation of biologically-diverse rainforest
(Oregon State University) Since the end of the long-running conflict in Colombia, large areas of forest have been rapidly converted to agricultural uses, suggesting the peace agreement presents a threat to conservation the country's rainforest. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Springer Nature and LYRASIS announce open access sponsorship agreement for books
(Springer) Springer Nature has signed its first sponsorship agreement for open access books with LYRASIS, a US non-profit membership association of libraries, archives, and museums, starting in 2021. The agreement is set to lead to the publication of new open access book titles. The collaboration will focus on climate change, equity, peace, and justice and will provide free access to research in critical areas that support the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Most cities in S ã o Paulo state have low potential capacity to adapt to climate change
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Cities located in metropolitan areas of this Brazilian state score better according to an index that measures the existence of public policies designed to adjust critical sectors to the impacts of climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Radicalized and believing in conspiracies: Can the cycle be broken?
(University of Rochester) In a recent study, University of Rochester and University of Michigan political scientist examined two common policy interventions--economic and psychological--designed to counter the growing radicalization in the US. They found that improving economic conditions reduces both radicalization efforts and dissent. However, trying to render people psychologically less susceptible to radicalization can backfire and instead increase radical leaders' efforts to influence and radicalize more followers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Consumers spent less on candy and desserts when shopping online
(Elsevier) When shopping online, participants surveyed spent more money, purchased more items, and spent less on candy and desserts than when they shopped in-store, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Orphans and exiles: Research shows the impact of family separation
(Binghamton University) New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York shows the human trauma and family separation that resulted from the Trump Administration's zero tolerance policy on undocumented immigration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Finnish Basic Income experiment failed to produce short-term employment effects
(VATT Institute for Economic Research) Finland carried out the first nationwide randomized experiment on basic income. A study by the VATT Institute for Economic Research and the Labour Institute for Economic Research shows that replacing minimum unemployment benefits with a basic income of equal size has minor employment effects at best. Additionally, participation in reemployment services remained high. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gender bias is real for women in family-owned businesses
(University of Ottawa) A study examining gender bias and family-owned businesses found daughters were rarely encouraged nor received support to pursue entrepreneurship education while sons mostly did. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Acoustics in Focus: Virtual press conference schedule for 180th ASA Meeting
(Acoustical Society of America) Press conferences at the 180th ASA Meeting will cover the latest in acoustical research during the Acoustics in Focus meeting. The virtual press conferences will take place each day of the meeting and offer reporters and outlets the opportunity to hear key presenters talk about their research. To ensure the safety of attendees, volunteers, and ASA staff, Acoustics in Focus will be hosted entirely online. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows cities can consider race and income in household energy efficiency programs
(Princeton University, Engineering School) A new study, led by researchers at Princeton, unpacks income and racial disparities in energy use across neighborhoods and offers a roadmap for cities to reduce both carbon emissions and energy inequality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Do customer loyalty programs really help sellers make money?
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) Customer loyalty programs have been around for decades and are used to help businesses, marketers and sellers build a sustainable relationship with their customers. But do they work? A recent study sought to find out and researchers learned that while yes, customer loyalty programs do work, perhaps not in ways most may assume. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mandating vaccination could reduce voluntary compliance
(Santa Fe Institute) Mandating vaccination could have a substantial negative impact on voluntary compliance, according to research published today in PNAS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Correcting misperceptions about, and increasing empathy for, migrants
(University of Pennsylvania) A new study from the Peace and Conflict Neuroscience Lab at the Annenberg School for Communication found that Americans dramatically overestimate the number of migrants affiliated with gangs and children being trafficked, and that this overestimation contributes to dehumanization of migrants, lack of empathy for their suffering, and individuals' views on immigration policy. In addition, the researchers developed and tested interventions to address this misinformation and increase empathy for undocumented immigrants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New incubator model for CSHL spin-outs
(Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory) Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) is collaborating with Autobahn Labs, a new life sciences incubator, to catalyze the Laboratory's early-stage discovery programs into spin-out companies that commercialize transformational new therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Spread of misinformation about face masks, COVID-19 by automated software on Facebook
(JAMA Network)What The Study Did:Researchersanalyzed conversations on public Facebook groups to explore automated misinformation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Simple blood test can accurately reveal underlying neurodegeneration
(King's College London) A new study of over 3000 people led by King's College London in collaboration with Lund University, has shown for the first time that a single biomarker can accurately indicate the presence of underlying neurodegeneration in people with cognitive issues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Experiment evaluates the effect of human decisions on climate reconstructions
(University of Cambridge) The first double-blind experiment analysing the role of human decision-making in climate reconstructions has found that it can lead to substantially different results. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers identify a molecule critical to functional brain rejuvenation
(Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY) A new study from a CUNY ASRC Neuroscience Initiative team has identified a molecule called ten-eleven-translocation 1 (TET1) as a necessary component in the repair of myelin, which protects nerves and facilitates accurate transmission of electrical signals. The discovery could have important implications in treating neurodegenerative diseases and for molecular rejuvenation of aging brains in healthy individuals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Malicious bots are the primary pathogen of COVID-19 misinformation on social media
(Elevated Science Communications) A new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine finds that bots (large numbers of automated accounts controlled by single users) on Facebook spread malicious COVID-19 misinformation at far greater rates than ordinary users. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Applying mathematics takes 'friendship paradox' beyond averages
(Santa Fe Institute) In network science, the famous " friendship paradox " describes why your friends are (on average) more popular, richer, and more attractive than you are. But   a   slightly more nuanced picture emerges when we apply mathematics to real-world data. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Popularity runs in families
(Rice University) To investigate the role genes play in the evolution of social structure, Rice University researchers created an experiment they likened to the 1998 film 'The Truman Show.' Genetically identical versions of 20 fruit flies were placed in 98 controlled enclosures, and video cameras recorded their interactions. The study in this week's Nature Communications revealed the same clones occupied the same social positions in each enclosure, regardless of living conditions, providing evidence that popularity is heritable. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Andrea Caggese obtains a grant from the European Investment Bank Institute
(Universitat Pompeu Fabra - Barcelona) Andrea Caggese, an associate professor with the UPF Department of Economics and Business, linked to the Research Centre for International Economics (CREI-UPF) and the Barcelona GSE, will be the principal investigator of the project 'Intangibles, Technology Diffusion and Public Policies: Implications for Investment Firm, Market Structure and Aggregate Productivity.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rhino anti-poaching research goes nuclear
(University of the Witwatersrand) The innovative anti-poaching Rhisotope Project aims to significantly reduce demand for rhino horns through the safe application of radioisotopes and radiation research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Asian American': A rallying cry that united Asians in the 1960s but is it still relevant?
(Dartmouth College) The recent attacks against Asian Americans, have put Asians in the U.S. in the spotlight. A new Dartmouth study explores who Asian Americans are today and the range of identities this category encompasses. Based on 2016 pre-election survey data, the study finds that Asian Americans tend to have progressive opinions towards public policy, including on healthcare, education, climate change, and racial justice, but diverge on views towards Muslim immigration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Journal of the Bulgarian Geographical Society revamped on ARPHA Platform
(Pensoft Publishers) The Journal of the Bulgarian Geographical Society boasts an improved technological infrastructure after moving to the publishing platform ARPHA and signing with the scholarly publisher and technology provider Pensoft. With features such as machine-readable XML format for papers, automated data export to aggregators, and web-service integrations with major global indexing databases, the easy-to-use, open-access platform ensures that research is easy to discover, access, cite and reuse by both humans and machines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Quantifying the role of chance in professional football
(German Sport University) In the German Bundesliga, FC Bayern Munich has just become champion for the ninth time in a row. Yet there are always those great moments in professional football that come like a bolt out of the blue, for example Greece winning the European Championship title in 2004 or Leicester City's grabbing that sensational Premier League title in 2016, which begs the question: can we always find a systematic explanation for success? Or does chance ultimately play a decisive role? (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UEFA EURO forecast: France will be European Champion
(University of Innsbruck) After winning the FIFA World Cup, France could also win the European Football Championship - this is the conclusion of researchers from the Universities of Innsbruck (Austria) and Ghent (Belgium), the Technical Universities of Dortmund and Munich (Germany) and Molde University College (Norway). England and Spain also have a good chance of winning the title, according to the forecast. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nobody's been studying socially isolated kids -- that's a problem
(North Carolina State University) For years, psychology researchers have treated peer rejection and social network isolation as being somewhat interchangeable when it comes to early adolescence; it was thought that if kids fell into one of those two groups, they fell into the other. A recent study finds there is actually little overlap between the groups -- and socially isolated kids face different risks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Soft tissue measurements critical to hominid reconstruction
(University of Adelaide) Accurate soft tissue measurements are critical when making reconstructions of human ancestors, a new study from the University of Adelaide and Arizona State University has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ADHD medications associated with reduced risk of suicidality in certain children
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) ADHD medications may lower suicide risk in children with hyperactivity, oppositional defiance and other behavioral disorders, according to new research from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania. The findings, published today in JAMA Network Open, address a significant knowledge gap in childhood suicide risk and could inform suicide prevention strategies at a time when suicide among children is on the rise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news