Helicopter parents should step back and watch, study recommends
(Edith Cowan University) As part of her PhD at Edith Cowan University in Western Australia, Mandy Richardson conducted the world's first data-driven study of parenting classes based on the Respectful Approach intervention.The Respectful Approach, modelled on Resources for Infant Educators (RIE)TM, guides parents to treat young children as capable and independent humans who can flourish if given safe space and freedom from too much adult direction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Coastal cities leave up to 75% of seafloor exposed to harmful light pollution
(University of Plymouth) New research is the first in the world to quantify the extent to which biologically important artificial light is prevalent on the seafloor and could, in turn, be having a detrimental effect on marine species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Plastics, pathogens and baby formula: What's in your shellfish?
(University of California - Irvine) The first landmark study using next-generation technology to comprehensively examine contaminants in oysters in Myanmar reveals alarming findings: the widespread presence of human bacterial pathogens and human-derived microdebris materials, including plastics, kerosene, paint, talc and milk supplement powders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study highlights mental health risks facing healthcare workers during pandemic
(North Carolina State University) A new study finds healthcare workers in the United States are struggling with a suite of mental-health challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study reports healthcare workers are at greater risk than the general public of experiencing health problems such as depression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

One-size does not fit all for post-disaster recovery, PSU study finds
(Portland State University) A new Portland State University study that followed 400 households after the 2015 Nepal earthquakes provides insight into better understanding the factors that contribute to resilience and change in short-term rural natural disaster recovery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Arguments between couples: Our neurons like mediation
(Universit é de Gen è ve) When couples argue, mediation improves the outcome of the confrontation. But that's not all: mediation is also linked to heightened activity in key regions of the brain belonging to the reward circuit. This is the main conclusion of a study carried out by the University of Geneva. This is the first time that a controlled, randomised study has succeeded in demonstrating the advantages of mediation for couple conflicts and identifying a related biological signature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

C & EN names top 50 chemical companies
(American Chemical Society) After being dethroned last year, German chemical giant BASF is once again number one in C&EN's annual Global Top 50 list of chemical companies for 2019.Chemical& Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, reports that a shakeup in the international chemical markets was brewing even before the upheaval caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19: Social media users more likely to believe false information
(McGill University) A new study led by researchers at McGill University finds that people who get their news from social media are more likely to have misperceptions about COVID-19. Those that consume more traditional news media have fewer misperceptions and are more likely to follow public health recommendations like social distancing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Maplegrove Center earns prestigious blue distinction
(Henry Ford Health System) Henry Ford Maplegrove Center is Michigan's first residential addiction treatment center to be recognized as national Blue Distinction Center for Substance Use Treatment and Recovery.The designation recognizes facilities that show a commitment to improving patient safety and health outcomes, based on objective measures developed with input from the community and leading accreditation and quality organizations.Among criteria considered for the Substance Use Treatment and Recovery distinction, centers must provide treatment for opioid use disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Subsidies, weather, and financial education promote agricultural insurance adoption
(University of Maryland) A University of Maryland-led study shows that subsidies can help people continually purchase insurance, but only if they have the financial literacy to understand the benefits and have the experience of seeing the policy in action. In a new paper published in American Economic Review, researchers conducted the first ever experimental study to look at the impact of subsidies. This paper provides insight into the " insurance puzzle " , with implications for policy and educational programs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMMS scientists lead effort to annotate human genome
(University of Massachusetts Medical School) UMass Medical School scientists Jill Moore, PhD, Zhiping Weng, PhD, and MD/PhD students Michael Purcaro and Henry Pratt are lead authors on the latest publication of data from the ambitious ENCODE project to annotate the human genome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sense of normalcy bounces back fast: New study
(University of Maryland) Forthcoming in the Journal of Applied Psychology, a study of subjects during the outset of the COVID-19 crisis shows that psychological recovery can take place even while a person is still in the throes of a stressful experience. That's significant; previous research has suggested that recovery processes start after stressors abate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hot urban temperatures and tree transpiration
(American Institute of Biological Sciences) The BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscienceaibs.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Anti-Asian racism during COVID-19 has historical ties in United States
(Iowa State University) Anti-Asian hate crimes during health crises are unfortunately not new, according to a new academic paper examining the history of this phenomenon. The research team, including an Iowa State University criminal justice researcher, looked at how anti-Asian hate crimes during the COVID-19 pandemic have furthered the historical 'othering' of Asian Americans and reproduced inequalities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Americans are consuming less sugar but more nonnutritive sweeteners
(Elsevier) A new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, found that between 2002 and 2018 purchases by US households of foods and beverages containing caloric sweetener (CS, i.e., sugar) declined while purchases of products containing both caloric sugars and nonnutritive sweeteners (NNS, i.e., sugar substitutes) increased. Beverages accounted for most of the products purchased containing NNS only or combined with CS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dean of UT AgResearch honored with ASABE Award for Global Engagement
(University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture) Hongwei Xin, a biosystems engineer who serves as Dean of UT AgResearch, is the recipient of the 2020 Lalit and Aruna Verma Award for Excellence in Global Engagement presented by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Supportive communities and progressive politics can reduce suicide risk among LGBTQ girls
(University of British Columbia) Many LGBTQ youth continue to experience stigma and discrimination despite Canada's progress in protecting human rights. New research from UBC's school of nursing shows that supportive communities--and a progressive political climate--can help mitigate the effects of stigma on mental health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Identification of new " oxidative stress sensor " MTK1
(The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo) A research group at the Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo in Japan has uncovered a new mechanism that elicits a cellular response by detecting oxidative stress in the human body. MTK1 SAPKKK functions is identified as a new human oxidative stress sensor that senses excess active oxygen in the body and transmits that information to cells, leading to cell death and inflammatory cytokine production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Lancet Psychiatry: First clinical trial of its kind studies whether cannabidiol could help treat cannabis use disorder, compared to placebo
(The Lancet) Prescription medication of cannabis extract cannabidiol, or CBD, is safe for daily use in treating cannabis use disorder, and could help people to cut down on cannabis use, according to an initial randomised controlled trial published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers urge the scientific community to #StopPandemicBias
(Carnegie Mellon University) While there is little doubt that COVID-19 will have lasting impacts on health and the economy, a group of researchers is bringing attention to the effects the pandemic could have on the careers of scientific researchers. Carnegie Mellon University and Max Planck Institute physicist Ulrike Endesfelder, University of Stuttgart's Dirk Pfl ü ger and Technische Universit ä t Braunschweig's Timo de Wolff launched a Twitter campaign #StopPandemicBias, which aims to bring broader understanding to how COVID-19 will impact scientists (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Experimental drug for Alzheimer's may help children with autism
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) An extensive international study led by Tel Aviv University researchers found deposits of the tau protein typically found in Alzheimer's patients in tissues taken from the postmortem brain of a 7-year-old autistic child. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Therapy helps children with food allergies manage severe anxiety
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has launched the Food Allergy Bravery (FAB) Clinic to help children with a phobia of anaphylaxis. This revolutionary clinic, housed within the Food Allergy Center, is the first in the world to bring together psychologists and food allergy experts to treat food allergic children with severe phobia of anaphylaxis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence could speed up and improve Alzheimer's diagnosis
(University of Sheffield) Research from the University of Sheffield's Neuroscience Institute examines how the routine use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in healthcare could help to relieve the economic impact neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's, put on the NHS (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Prescribed CBD could help people quit cannabis
(University of Bath) A benchmark clinical trial published today shows that cannabidiol (CBD) could be a safe and effective treatment for problematic cannabis use. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Iowa State University scientists examine reproductive effects of glyphosate in mice
(Iowa State University) A pair of recently published studies analyzed how ovarian function in mice responded to various levels of exposure to glyphosate, a chemical extensively used to kill weeds. The results showed exposure changed the level of some ovarian proteins but did not impact ovarian steroid production, an indication glyphosate may not adversely affect reproduction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Increased attention to sad faces predicts depression risk in teenagers
(Binghamton University) Teenagers who tend to pay more attention to sad faces are more likely to develop depression, but specifically within the context of stress, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Survey results: Having a higher purpose promotes happiness, lowers stress
(Washington University in St. Louis) When a company commits to a statement of higher purpose, it promotes well-being, more happiness and even lower stress from the COVID-19 pandemic in the company's employees. And when the employees write down their own purpose statement, the effect was more substantial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Owe the IRS? No problem, some Americans say
(Ohio State University) A new study shows the surprising way that many American taxpayers adjust their standard of living when they owe money to the IRS versus when they receive tax refunds.Researchers found that when households received tax refunds, they immediately started spending that new money. But those same households didn't cut their spending in years when they owed taxes to the IRS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Econometric study on the JUUL system ’ s market entry in Canada finds vaping product availability could reduce combustible cigarette sales
(Orangefiery) As part of Juul Labs' ongoing engagement with the public health community, the company today announced findings from a new study at the AcademyHealth 2020 Annual Research Meeting linking the JUUL System's market entry to decreased cigarette sales in Canada. The conference, which took place virtually, focuses on the intersection of health, health care, and policy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How Salt Lake's buildings affect its climate future
(University of Utah) With climate change, we'll need less natural gas for heat and more electricity for cooling -- but what's the balance ? University of Utah researchers used hyper-localized climate models and building projections to find out. The answer is that buildings' energy use in the future varies wildly, depending on the climate scenario, and that local building policy now could have a big impact on energy use in the future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hedonism leads to happiness
(University of Zurich) Relaxing on the sofa or savoring a delicious meal: Enjoying short-term pleasurable activities that don't lead to long-term goals contributes at least as much to a happy life as self-control, according to new research from the University of Zurich and Radboud University in the Netherlands. The researchers therefore argue for a greater appreciation of hedonism in psychology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Government urgently needs to gauge public perception of new track and trace app
(Lancaster University) One of the earliest studies to look at mass acceptance of tracing apps, undertaken by international researchers, including Lancaster University, suggests that privacy (which is generally prioritised by governments in terms of app design) is only the top consideration for a certain group of people. Others would place greater weighting on other considerations, such as how convenient it would be to use. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

$7.2M NIDA grant allows temple scientists to continue critical research on drugs of abuse
(Temple University Health System) For the last two decades, scientists at the Center for Substance Abuse Research (CSAR) at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have been working to advance the understanding of the biological basis of drug addiction and actions of drugs of abuse. Now, thanks to a $7.2M grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), that work is funded for another five years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study seeks to explain decline in hip fracture rates
(Hebrew SeniorLife Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research) In a paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine today, researchers showed how analysis of data from the multigenerational Framingham Osteoporosis Study may in part explain why the incidence of hip fracture in the US has declined during the last two decades. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lithium in drinking water linked with lower suicide rates
(University of Sussex) Naturally occurring lithium in public drinking water may have an anti-suicidal effect - according to a new study from Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) and the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology& Neuroscience at King's College London.Published in the British Journal of Psychiatry, the study collated research from around the world and found that geographical areas with relatively high levels or concentration of lithium in public drinking water had correspondingly lower suicide rates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study identifies top reasons for sewer line failure
(Ohio State University) Concrete sewer pipes around the world are most likely to fail either because their concrete is not strong enough or because they can't handle the weight of trucks that drive over them, a new study indicates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Leaving money on the table to stay in the game
(Santa Fe Institute) Unlike businesses or governments, organisms can't go into evolutionary debt -- there is no borrowing one's way back from extinction. This can lead to seemingly irrational economic choices that suddenly make sense when viewed as a multiplicative, evolutionary process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Jobs for the boys: How children give voice to gender stereotyped job roles
(University of Sussex) Children, and especially boys, show stronger stereotyping about masculine and feminine jobs than previously suspected, an innovative study by the University of Sussex reveals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Safe work protocols can increase the likelihood the business will fail
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) There are conflicting predictions on the relationship between worker safety and organization survival. New research in the INFORMS journal Management Science finds organizations that provide a safe workplace have a significantly lower chance of survival because it costs to be safe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Selfish and loveless' society in Uganda really is not
(Baylor University) A mountain people in Uganda -- branded as selfish and loveless by an renowned anthropologist half a century ago -- really is not, according to a study led by a Baylor University anthropologist. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lead white pigments on Andean drinking vessels provide new historical context
(Dickinson College) Researchers studying lead white pigments on Andean ceremonial drinking vessels known as qeros have found new similarities among these artifacts that could help museums, conservators, historians and scholars better understand the timeline and production of these culturally significant items during the colonial period (1532-1821). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Men are more likely than women to endorse COVID-19 conspiracy theories
(University of Delaware) A new study found men are more likely than women to endorse conspiracy theories connected to COVID-19. The study included a national survey that showed belief in these theories had more to do with gender than political affiliation. The research will help debunk potentially dangerous falsehoods regarding the pandemic and enhance public health practices. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blueprint may power up KSA's wind energy future
(King Abdullah University of Science& Technology (KAUST)) High-resolution analysis of wind speed across Saudi Arabia can help fast track the expansion of the Kingdom's emerging world-class wind energy industry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

sEH enzyme: A new pharmacological target against Alzheimer's disease
(University of Barcelona) A UB study published in the journal Neurotherapeutics has validated a new pharmacological target for Alzheimer's disease. The results show the inhibition of the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) in murine models with the disease reduces the neuroinflammatory process, improving the endogen response of the organism and reducing the neuronal damage and death that cause this type of dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Big brains and dexterous hands
(University of Zurich) Primates with large brains can master more complex hand movements than those with smaller brains. However, fine motor skills such as using tools can take time to learn, and humans take the longest of all. Large-brained species such as humans and great apes do not actually learn more slowly than other primates but instead start later, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Risk of sepsis greatest for patients with frailty, older age or urinary tract infections
(King's College London) Patients with frailty, older age and urinary tract infections (UTIs) are at greatest risk of developing sepsis following infection consultations in primary care, research has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mouse study shows spinal cord injury causes bone marrow failure syndrome
(Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center) Research conducted at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Medicine found that spinal cord injuries in mice cause an acquired bone marrow failure syndrome that may contribute to chronic immune dysfunction. " We also found that it's possible to overcome certain aspects of spinal cord injury-induced bone marrow failure. This could have an immediate impact on people affected by spinal cord injury, " said lead author Phillip Popovich. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AsEH enzyme: A new pharmacological target against Alzheimer's disease
(University of Barcelona) A UB study published in the journal Neurotherapeutics has validated a new pharmacological target for Alzheimer's disease. The results show the inhibition of the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) in murine models with the disease reduces the neuroinflammatory process, improving the endogen response of the organism and reducing the neuronal damage and death that cause this type of dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

" Historically, conversions like Hagia Sophia are no isolated cases "
(Cluster of Excellence " Religion and Politics ") Research at the Cluster of Excellence on the conversion of religious buildings such as synagogues, churches and mosques from antiquity to the present day - researchers in Jewish Studies Kogman-Appel and Kleybolte in a dossier article on the destruction of synagogues in the Middle Ages - Byzantinist Gr ü nbart on " national(istic) affectivity " concerning Hagia Sophia (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sci-fi foretold social media, Uber and Augmented Reality, offers insights into the future
(Lancaster University) Science fiction authors foresaw augmented reality video games, the rise of social media and trends of hyper-consumption, and can help predict future consumer patterns. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news