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Depression linked to reduced arginine levels
(University of Eastern Finland) People suffering from major depressive disorder, MDD, have reduced arginine levels, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Turn off the telly and get moving
(Springer) Spending too much time in front of the television could increase your chance of developing potentially fatal blood clots known as venous thrombosis. Even trying to counterbalance hours of TV watching through adequate exercise is not effective warns Yasuhiko Kubota of the University of Minnesota in the US. Kubota is the lead author of a study in Springer's Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Asian elephants have different personality traits just like humans
(University of Turku) Researchers of the University of Turku, Finland, have studied a timber elephant population in Myanmar and discovered that Asian elephant personality manifests through three different factors. The personality factors identified by the researchers are Attentiveness, Sociability and Aggressiveness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Film Memento helped uncover how the brain remembers and interprets events from clues
(Aalto University) In an Aalto University film study combining art and neuroscience, viewers were shown Christopher Nolan's early classic Memento (2000). The protagonist suffers from long-term memory loss and is unable to retain new memories for no longer than a few minutes. The events unfold in reversed chronological order.The results deepen our understanding of how the brain functions, how narratives work in film, and memory mechanisms impaired by conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fertility study finds hormone could support early pregnancy
(University of Edinburgh) Scientists have identified a hormone that could help prepare the womb lining for pregnancy, research shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Haloperidol does not prevent delirium or improve survival rates in ICU patients
(Radboud University Medical Center) Prophylactic use of the drug haloperidol does not help to prevent delirium in intensive care patients or improve their chances of survival. Therefore, there is no reason anymore to administer the drug as a preventive measure to reduce the burden of delirium. This was revealed following a three-year, large-scale study among 1,800 patients in 20 Dutch ICUs, headed by Radboud university medical center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UNIST students win two HCI Korea 2018 Creative Awards
(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) Four students from South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) have won prizes at the 2018 HCI Korea Creative Awards, one of the largest academic conferences in the field of Human-Computer Interaction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An improved anti-addiction medication
(American Chemical Society) Drug addiction continues to plague vast numbers of people across the world, destroying and ending lives, while attempts to develop more effective pharmaceutical addiction treatments continue. Scientists now report in the Journal of the American Chemical Society the development of a potent new medicine to fight addiction, which might also be an effective treatment for epilepsy and other conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Recruiting the immune system to prevent relapse
(American Chemical Society) Substance abuse, particularly opioid abuse, is an ongoing issue in the US. While treatments such as drug counseling and a handful of medications to combat withdrawal symptoms and cravings exist, the fear and risk of relapsing is real. An article in Chemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, describes how vaccines targeting drugs of abuse could prevent relapse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research fails to support efficacy of desvenlafaxine for treating MDD in adolescents
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) New studies in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) reported negative outcomes, failing to support the effectiveness of desvenlafaxine (Pristiq, Pfizer) compared to placebo. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

American Psychological Association conference on technology, mind and society
(American Psychological Association) The conference will focus on efforts to understand and shape the interactions of human beings and technology. Topics to be presented include whether humans are ready for self-driving cars, how social media can help identify mental illness, how robots can help people with dementia and the effect on young children of growing up in a digital environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The writing on the wall
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) When and where did humans develop language? To find out, look deep inside caves, suggests an MIT professor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Infant skull binding shaped identity, inequality in ancient Andes
(Cornell University) The idea of binding and reshaping a baby's head may make today's parents cringe, but for families in the Andes between 1100-1450, cranial modification was all the rage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Smartphones are bad for some teens, not all
(Canadian Institute for Advanced Research) In a commentary published today in Nature's special issue on the science of adolescence, Candice Odgers argues that smartphones should not be seen as universally bad. Her piece highlights research on how teens use online tools to build up relationships and arrange activities in real life. However, she also examines evidence that vulnerable teens are experiencing greater negative effects of life online. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fragile X syndrome neurons restored using CRISPR/Cas9-guided activation strategy
(Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research) Fragile X syndrome is the most frequent cause of intellectual disability in males, affecting 1 out of 3600 boys born. For the first time, researchers at Whitehead Institute have restored activity to the fragile X syndrome gene in affected neurons using a modified CRISPR/Cas9 system that removes the methylation--the molecular tags that keep the mutant gene shut off--suggesting that this method may be useful for targeting diseases caused by abnormal methylation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Phishing success linked to incentives and sticking to an effective strategy
(Frontiers) A new study focusing on the attacker -- a largely ignored but crucial aspect of phishing -- identifies successful and less successful strategies. It also reveals that attackers are motivated by quicker and larger rewards -- with creative individuals putting more effort into constructing these malicious emails. Insights from the study can be used to develop tools and training procedures to detect phishing emails. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Perceptions of God make Democrats more conservative, Republicans more liberal in some ways
(Baylor University) Republicans who believe that God is highly engaged with humanity are like Democrats -- more liberal -- when it comes to social and economic justice issues, according to a Baylor University study analyzing data from the Baylor Religion Survey. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are bots a danger for political election campaigns?
(University of Erlangen-Nuremberg) Normally, autonomous computer programs known as bots are used to trawl the Internet. However, there are also programs known as social bots which interfere in social media, automatically generating replies or sharing content. They are currently suspected of being used to spread political propaganda. Scientists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universit ä t Erlangen-N ü rnberg (FAU) have investigated the extent to which autonomous programs such as these were used on the platform Twitter during the general elections in Japan in 2014. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why the boss always gets the blame
(Ruhr-University Bochum) An employee receives significantly more praise if his actions result in positive consequences than his superior. An experiment conducted by a team of researchers from Bochum and Cologne has demonstrated that, unlike previously assumed, the acting person's social status plays an important role when it comes to the distribution of praise and blame -- rather than the extent to which an individual has influenced a given situation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stigma increases risk of depression for people with Multiple Sclerosis
(Penn State) People with Multiple Sclerosis -- MS -- who feel stigmatized are more likely to suffer from depression, according to researchers, who add that having a support system of friends and family and a sense of autonomy may help reduce the harmful effects of stigma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sexual orientation discordance puts adolescents at greater risk for nonfatal suicidal behaviors
(Elsevier) Researchers have now identified sexual orientation discordance -- sexual contact that is inconsistent with the individual's sexual orientation -- as a potential risk factor for adolescent suicidal ideation and/or attempts. They found that discordant students were 70 percent more likely to have had suicidal ideas or to have made suicide attempts compared with concordant students, reports the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New structure discovered in human sperm tails
(University of Gothenburg) A highly effective tail is needed in order for a sperm to be able to swim, and for a baby to be conceived. By using cryo-electron tomography, researchers at the University of Gothenburg -- working in partnership with researchers in the USA -- have identified a completely new nanostructure inside sperm tails. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows higher risk of Dementia for adults with congenital heart disease
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) A new study is believed to be the first to show a higher risk of dementia in adults who were born with heart disease. The study of more than 10,000 adult with congenital heart disease (CHD) in Denmark discovered a particularly increased risk for early dementia in middle-age adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Innuendo and pointing suspicion in news coverage can fuel conspiracy theories
(University of Exeter) Innuendo and hinting at fake information in news coverage is enough to fuel belief in conspiracy theories, new research shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to get the most out of foreign investment
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Researchers at the Higher School of Economics (HSE University) have revealed that Russian companies need to invest in the development of intellectual resources in order to maximize the benefits from partners in developed countries. Results of the study have been published in the journal, Knowledge Management Research& Practice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bresnahan, Pakes and Porter win the Frontiers of Knowlede Award in Economics
(BBVA Foundation) The BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in the Economics, Finance and Management category goes, in this tenth edition, to Timothy Bresnahan, Ariel Pakes and Robert Porter for founding and shaping the field of empirical industrial organization, a branch of economics that has developed fundamental techniques to measure market power, understood as the ability of a firm to control prices in a given industry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Improving family-based comm. Key to enhancing sexual health outcomes of GBQ adolescents
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Studies have shown that talking with teens about sex-related topics is a positive parenting practice that facilitates important sexual health outcomes with heterosexual adolescents. But for LGBTQ youth, the topic of sexuality and sexual health is often ineffectively addressed at home. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More awareness, research needed on abuse risk of non-opioid painkiller
(University of Louisville) Gabapentin, a nerve pain medication and anticonvulsant sold under the brand name Neurontin and others, increasingly is being misused, necessitating prescribers to understand its abuse potential and risk profile, said Rachel Vickers Smith, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor in the University of Louisville School of Nursing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

TSRI stroke drug demonstrates safety in clinical trial
(Scripps Research Institute) 'These results lay the groundwork for the next steps toward FDA approval,' says John Griffin, PhD, professor at TSRI, whose team invented 3K3A-APC. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Housing problems found to be common at safety-net community health centers
(Massachusetts General Hospital) A new study led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program finds that more than 40 percent of patients treated at US community health centers have a history of housing problems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Governance of emerging technologies: Aligning policy analysis with social values
(The Hastings Center) A new special report examines how we can make wise policy decisions about emerging technologies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Corporations can benefit from altruism during a crisis
(North Carolina State University) Research finds that altruism -- and social media -- can help corporations cultivate trust with consumers on mobile devices during and after natural disasters, such as hurricanes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Illinois researchers researchers find tweeting in cities lower than expected
(University of Illinois College of Engineering) Studying data from Twitter, University of Illinois researchers found that less people tweet per capita from larger cities than in smaller ones, indicating an unexpected trend that has implications in understanding urban pace of life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Younger and older siblings contribute positively to each other's developing empathy
(Society for Research in Child Development) A new longitudinal study looked at whether younger siblings also contribute to their older sisters' and brothers' empathy in early childhood, when empathic tendencies begin to develop. The research found that beyond the influence of parents, both older and younger siblings positively influence each other's empathic concern over time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Parenting behavior in adoptive families
(Society for Research in Child Development) A new longitudinal study of adoptive families looked at whether symptoms of depression in adoptive fathers is also related to over-reactive parenting and behavior problems in children; the study also examined how social support networks affect parenting. It found that fathers' symptoms of depression were related to harsh, over-reactive parenting, but not to children's subsequent behavior problems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Health: Are the dice rolled before ten years of age?
(Universit é de Gen è ve) Researchers at UNIGE found that socio-economically disadvantaged individuals in childhood are a greater risk of low muscle strength at an older age. Moreover, this risk is not offset by an improvement in their socio-economic status as adults. This means that inequalities in childhood are biologically embodied to literally 'get into the skin'. Why? They suggest that a physiological deregulation caused by stress in childhood might change the body's ability to maintain good health along time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Assassination of political leaders connected to increase in social conflict
(Binghamton University) An increase in social conflict increases the likelihood of assassinations of political leaders, according to new research co-conducted by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study exposes misperception of poaching on the GBR and its remedy
(ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies) New research has revealed the tiny minority of fishers who poach on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) think the illegal practice is justified, because they believe 'everyone else is doing it.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research shows that parental care is associated with mate value in adult offspring
(Academy of Finland) Adults, who report having received higher levels of parental care in childhood, perceive themselves as more attractive mates. In particular, maternal care is associated with experienced mate value in adulthood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hitting rock bottom after job loss can be beneficial, study shows
(University of Notre Dame) Bottoming out as a result of job loss can be necessary before finding the radical solution that will lead to a new work identity, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Alexa, how do word senses evolve?
(Lehigh University) A paper called 'Algorithms in the historical emergence of word senses'--that appears online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)--is the first to look at 1,000 years of English development and detect the kinds of algorithms that human minds have used to extend existing words to new senses of meaning. This kind of 'reverse engineering' of how human language has developed could have implications for natural language processing by machines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Social media to blame for poor grades?
(University of W ü rzburg) Do teenagers who frequent Snapchat, Facebook, Instagram and other social media sites perform worse academically? Scientists from Germany have looked into these worries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dispersal of fish eggs by water birds -- just a myth?
(University of Basel) How do fish end up in isolated bodies of water when they can't swim there themselves? For centuries, researchers have assumed that water birds transfer fish eggs into these waters -- however, a systematic literature review by researchers at the University of Basel has shown that there is no evidence of this to date. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Autonomous vehicles improve traffic flow
(Rutgers University) Improvements in traffic flow and fuel consumption are boosted when even a few autonomous vehicles are immersed in bulk traffic, according to research by Rutgers University-Camden mathematics scholar Benedetto Piccoli. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Jymmin: How a combination of exercise and music helps us feel less pain
(Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences) Pain is essential for survival. However, it could also slow rehabilitation, or could become a distinct disorder. How strongly we feel it depends on our individual pain threshold. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig discovered that this threshold can be increased by a new fitness method called Jymmin. It combines working out on gym machines with free musical improvisation -- and makes us less sensitive towards physical discomfort. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Infection site affects how a virus spreads through the body
(Gladstone Institutes) A person is more likely to get infected by HIV through anal intercourse than vaginal, but no one knows quite why. A new study by scientists at the Gladstone Institutes shows that infection sites could affect the immune system's response to a virus and the way the virus spreads through the body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How the brain responds to injustice
(Society for Neuroscience) Punishing a wrongdoer may be more rewarding to the brain than supporting a victim. That is one suggestion of new research published in JNeurosci, which measured the brain activity of young men while they played a 'justice game.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study identifies traces of indigenous 'Ta í no' in present-day Caribbean populations
(St John's College, University of Cambridge) A thousand-year-old tooth has provided the first clear genetic evidence that the Ta í no -- the indigenous people whom Columbus first encountered on arriving in the New World -- still have living descendants today, despite erroneous claims in some historical narratives that these people are extinct. The findings are likely to have particular resonance for people in the Caribbean and the US who claim Ta í no ancestry, but have until now been unable to prove definitively that such a thing is possible. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fake news 'vaccine': Online game may 'inoculate' by simulating propaganda tactics
(University of Cambridge) A new experiment, launching today online, aims to help 'inoculate' against disinformation by providing a small dose of perspective from a " fake news tycoon " . A pilot study has shown some early success in building resistance to fake news among teenagers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

College roommates underestimate each other's distress, new psychology research shows
(New York University) College roommates are sensitive to their roommates' distress but tend to underestimate the level of distress being experienced by others. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news