Researchers 'bait' pathological proteins underlying many neurodegenerative disorders
(University of Pittsburgh) The vast majority of patients with neurodegenerative disorders do not have specific gene mutations, but a single misbehaving protein -- called TDP-43 -- seems to be at the heart of these diseases. Pitt researchers have found a way to recreate and rescue TDP-43 pathology in a dish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is prenatal vitamin use by moms associated with risk for autism spectrum disorder recurrence in young siblings?
This study examined whether prenatal vitamin use by mothers was associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) recurrence in high-risk families. The study included 241 children who were selected because a sibling was diagnosed with ASD. Mothers reported their use of prenatal vitamins during pregnancy. While most mothers reported taking prenatal vitamins while pregnant, only 87 (36 percent) mothers met the recommendations to take prenatal vitamins in the six months before pregnancy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers develop model to predict suicide risk in at-risk young adults
(University of Pittsburgh) New research from Pitt's School of Medicine shows that fluctuation and severity of depressive symptoms are much better at predicting risk of suicidal behavior in at-risk young adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTSA funded to develop accident tolerant nuclear fuels
(University of Texas at San Antonio) Almost eight years have passed since the accident at the nuclear power plant in Fukushima, Japan, in which thousands of residents have yet to return to their homes. Now the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has tapped The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) and other research institutes across the U.S. and abroad to assist with the development of new, accident tolerant fuels (ATF) that will permit nuclear plants to better sustain accidents like the one in 2011. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

High-tech laser scans uncover hidden military traverse at Alcatraz Island
(Binghamton University) High-tech radar and laser scans have uncovered a hidden military traverse underneath the infamous Alcatraz penitentiary, according to research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Predictive modeling could help fight neighborhood crime
(Washington State University) New technology developed by a Washington State University scientist could help police officers predict where burglaries are likely to occur. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Now you see heat, now you don't
(American Chemical Society) Hiding an object from heat-sensing cameras could be useful for military and technology applications as well as for research. Efforts to develop such a method have been underway for decades with varying degrees of success. Now, researchers report in ACS Nano that they have fabricated an inexpensive, easy-to-produce film that makes objects completely invisible to infrared detectors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Human settlements and rainfall affect giraffe home ranges
(Penn State) Giraffes that live close to densely populated towns have larger home ranges than giraffes that live far from towns, suggesting that the giraffes in human-impacted areas need to travel longer distances -- and expend more energy -- to obtain critical resources. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Batmobile with cruise control
(Forschungsverbund Berlin) A new study led by scientists at the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) investigated the energy requirements and travel speeds of migrating Nathusius' bats (Pipistrellus nathusii). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How listening to music 'significantly impairs' creativity
(Lancaster University) The popular view that music enhances creativity has been challenged by researchers who say it has the opposite effect.Psychologists investigated the impact of background music on performance by presenting people with verbal insight problems that are believed to tap creativity. They found that background music 'significantly impaired' people's ability to complete tasks testing verbal creativity -- but there was no effect for background library noise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

3D printed tool cuts through titanium, wins innovation prize
(RMIT University) High quality cutting tools can now be 3D printed, potentially saving time and money for aerospace and Defence manufacturers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New mothers reduce their alcohol intake, but this change is short-lived
(University of Melbourne) Most women dramatically reduce their alcohol intake on learning they are pregnant, but by the time their child is five they are back to their pre-pregnancy drinking levels, a new international study has found.The research, led by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, reported little change in the drinking patterns of men on becoming fathers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why a common antibiotic treating diarrhea is failing
(University of Houston) Clostridioides difficile (C-diff), a bacterium that causes diarrhea and colitis, is easily picked up in hospitals, but not so easily fought. After 30 years, the most commonly prescribed antibiotic used to fight it, metronidazole, known commonly by the brand name Flagyl, is no longer as effective as it used to be and a University of Houston pharmaceutical researcher aims to find out why. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

THC found more important for therapeutic effects in cannabis than originally thought
(University of New Mexico) Researchers at the University of New Mexico recently solved a major gap in scientific literature by using mobile software technology to measure the real-time effects of actual cannabis-based products used by millions of people every day. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First common risk genes discovered for autism
(Aarhus University) A study headed by researchers from the Danish project iPSYCH and the Broad Institute, USA, has found the first common genetic risk variants for autism and uncovered genetic differences in clinical subgroups of autism. The discovery means that we will in future be able to determine the genes which separate the diagnostic groups, make more precise diagnoses, and provide better counselling for the individual person suffering from autism disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Accompanying research to start on the test area for autonomous driving
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) On the Baden-W ü rttemberg Test Area for Autonomous Driving, research projects carried out under real conditions are to yield valuable findings for the development of automated driving. Within the 'bwirkt' project, research will focus on the impacts of these projects on automated and networked driving. Recommendations for science, industry, and politics will be derived. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology will concentrate on the impacts on traffic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Springer Nature expands its nanotechnology research solution with the inclusion of over 22 million patents
(Springer) A new module has now been added to the nanotechnology research database Nano. The patent module allows users to sort through over 22 million nano-related patents across all major jurisdictions and languages. This means that researchers can find patents from areas highly affected by nanotechnology, narrow their search by country, filing year and jurisdiction, and ultimately demonstrate the scientific and commercial value of their project and its anticipated impact. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neuroscientists at TU Dresden discover neural mechanisms of developmental dyslexia
(Technische Universit ä t Dresden) Neuroscientist Professor Katharina von Kriegstein from TU Dresden and an international team of experts show in a recently published study that people with dyslexia have a weakly developed structure that is not located in the cerebral cortex, but at a subcortical processing stage; namely the white matter connectivity between the left auditory motion-sensitive planum temporale (mPT) and the left auditory thalamus (medial geniculate body, MGB). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Student-led rheumatology interest group increases interest in field
(George Washington University) A group of student and faculty researchers from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences published outcome of establishing Rheumatology Interest Group in the International Journal of Rheumatology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Electronic 'word of mouth' useful in detecting, predicting fashion trends
(University of Missouri-Columbia) According to new research from the University of Missouri, social media hashtags could be the tool fashion designers use to forecast trends in the industry to better connect with consumers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Savoring ... It's not just for dinner
(University of Arizona) Just as we can savor a decadent dessert, so, too, can we savor a meaningful conversation. And the latter may be better for us. University of Arizona researcher Maggie Pitts studies the role of 'savoring' in human communication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researcher finds data-driven evidence on warrior vs. guardian policing
(Florida State University) A Florida State University-led team of researchers has created a model to measure the differences between two distinct approaches to policing -- the warrior approach and the guardian approach. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How economic inequality shapes mobility expectations and behavior in disadvantaged youth
(Boston College) By integrating the methods and techniques of economics and psychology, an inventive framework reveals how rising economic inequality can weaken the motivating belief that achieving socioeconomic success is possible, which reduces the likelihood that young people from low socioeconomic status backgrounds will engage in behaviors that could improve their chances of upward mobility. Based on this interdisciplinary approach, policy recommendations that would advance mobility opportunities are proposed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Army lab, industry announce partnership to develop new materials
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) The Army and a major defense contractor established a new research partnership to create novel materials to further enhance the devices and technology used by warfighters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why do innocent people plead guilty?
(University of Massachusetts Lowell) A new, five-year $498,000 National Science Foundation CAREER grant will allow UMass Lowell's Miko Wilford, a psychology professor from Dracut, to study why defendants opt for plea deals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exposing flaws in metrics for user login systems
(Rutgers University) How good is the research on the success or failure of the system that verifies your identity when you log into a computer, smartphone or other device? Chances are it's not good, and that's a major security and privacy issue that should be fixed, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study that proposes a novel solution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Binghamton University to establish Institute for Social Justice for Women and Girls
(Binghamton University) A seven-figure gift from alumna and world-renowned psychologist Ellyn Uram Kaschak will help establish the Institute for Social Justice for Women and Girls at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Indigenous knowledge, key to a successful ecosystem restoration
(Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona) Ecological restoration projects actively involving indigenous peoples and local communities are more successful. This is the result of a study carried out by the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology at the Universitat Aut ò noma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB), which places value on indigenous and local knowledge contribution in the restoring of degraded ecosystems, and highlights the need to engage them in these projects for ensuring a long-term maintenance of restored areas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blinking ground lights developed to ensure pedestrian traffic safety
(National Research Council of Science& Technology) The Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology (KICT, President Seung Heon Han) has announced the development of its 'next-generation pedestrian traffic accident prevention system.' The system induces motor vehicles approaching crosswalks to reduce their speed, thereby reducing pedestrians' traffic accidents. In particular, it is effective in ensuring the safety of pedestrians using smartphones, the elderly and people with cognitive impairment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

International team of scientists detect cause of rare pediatric brain disorder
(McGill University Health Centre) An international effort led by physician-scientists at Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine (RCIGM), in collaboration with a team at the Montreal Children's Hospital of the McGill University Health Centre (MCH-MUHC), has identified the cause of a devastating pediatric brain disorder paving the way for the first step in developing potential therapies for this rare neurodegenerative condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A reward now or later? Exploring impulsivity in Parkinson's disease patients
(Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati) Promises of food, sums of money or entertaining pastimes: it does not matter what the temptation is, a new study shows that patients suffering from Parkinson's disease who are treated with DBS of the subthalamic nucleus are not more impulsive than others when making decisions about an appealing stimulus. To establish this, in the experiment the scientists placed the patients in front of a choice: have a small prize immediately or a bigger one, later. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New chimpanzee culture discovered
(Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology) Different cultures, different habits and different behavioral patterns -- this applies not only to humans but also to chimpanzees, one of our two closest living relatives. A team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology (MPI-EVA) in Leipzig, Germany, and the University of Warsaw in Poland now describes a new 'behavioral realm' of the Eastern chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) of the Bili-U é r é region in Northern DR Congo, based on the results of a 12-year study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain scans shine light on how we solve clues
(Aalto University) Partnered with machine learning, brain scans reveal how people understand objects in our world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A gene involved in ADHD could be related to addictive substance use
(University of Barcelona) Some variations in the gene LPHN3-associated with the attention deficit / hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in kids and adults -- could favor likelihood to smoke, consume alcohol, cannabis and other addictive substances, according to an article published in the journal Translational Psychiatry, from the Nature Publishing Group. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New clues about why non-smokers, as well as smokers, develop chronic lung disease revealed
(University of Leicester) A group of researchers led by the universities of Leicester and Nottingham has discovered genetic differences that put some people at higher risk than others of developing chronic lung disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Life's transitions easier with a sense of a well-rounded ending, new study shows
(New York University) We are more likely to have positive feelings about transitioning from one stage of life to the next if we have a 'well-rounded ending' -- or one marked by a sense of closure--finds a team of psychology researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Be yourself at work -- It's healthier and more productive
(Rice University) At work, it's healthier and more productive just to be yourself, according to a new study from Rice University, Texas A&M University, the University of Memphis, Xavier University, Portland State University and the University of California, Berkeley. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Health literacy can promote older people's health
(University of Jyv ä skyl ä - Jyv ä skyl ä n yliopisto) A new study on older Finnish people's health literacy found that one third of 75-year-old Finns find it difficult to understand and use health-related information. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An educational program designed to lessen the risk of falls in children
(University of Seville) The programme Safe Fall- Safe Schools © establishes a methodology that is suitable for different ages of students, centred on progression by levels and types of fall (backwards, sideways and forwards), in which the child, goes from being a passive to an active participant. The programme is thought out to be implemented in PE classes, with between five and ten minutes in each PE class being given over to doing exercises simulating falls. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fetal growth inhibited by cocktail of chemicals in the mother
(Aarhus University) For the first time, researchers have shown that a combination of perfluorinated substances in the mother significantly inhibits child growth. These are the substances which Denmark's minister for environment and food is currently working to ban. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Federal fire grant spending could be more balanced, new model suggests
(University at Buffalo) The federal government considers many factors when spending money to prevent structure fires. The key driver, however, is economic losses -- the greater the cost of fire within a state, the more aid that state is likely to receive. A new model emphasizes an additional factor: losses associated with human fatalities and injuries. That tweak throws the current system off-track, suggesting that some states receive an outsized share of fire protection money, while others are shortchanged. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Belief in conspiracy theories makes people more likely to engage in low-level crime
(University of Kent) People who believe in conspiracy theories -- such as the theory that Princess Diana was murdered by the British establishment -- are more likely to accept or engage in everyday criminal activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bentham Science launches animated abstracts -- A new exciting venture in publishing!
(Bentham Science Publishers) Extend the scope and visibility of your research by creating an animated abstract. Bentham Science has collaborated with Focus Medica, one of the world's largest publishers of expert animated atlases and videos in medicine and science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Younger Americans much more likely to be arrested than previous generations
(RAND Corporation) One possible byproduct of the of the nation's zero-tolerance criminal justice policies may be a trend that finds that Americans under the age of 26 are much more likely to be arrested than Americans born in previous decades. A new study finds the increase in arrests occurred most rapidly among white men and all women, and is linked to a lower likelihood of being married and lower income during adulthood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Political parties sideline minority voters, leave other orgs to pick up the slack
(San Francisco State University) Political parties sideline minority voters, and leave other organizations to pick up the slack. Outreach by nonpartisan institutions increases nonwhite voter participation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Some personal beliefs and morals may stem from genetics
(Penn State) Penn State researchers found that while parents can help encourage their children to develop into responsible, conscientious adults, there is an underlying genetic factor that influences these traits, as well. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mothers with children taken into out-of-home care at risk of poor prenatal care in next pregnancies
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) Mothers whose first child was taken into care were found to have inadequate or no prenatal care during subsequent pregnancies, according to a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).The study was conducted in the province of Manitoba, which has one of the highest rates of children in out-of-home care in developed countries. About 3 percent of children live in homes without parental caregivers compared with a rate of 1 percent of children in most developed countries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Faced with choice overload, Indian farmers say, 'I'll have what he's having'
(Purdue University) After the Indian government liberalized its economy, shops stocking a previously controlled market of public agricultural goods were suddenly flooded with new private brands. Rather than relying on data for seed yields, many farmers make socially motivated purchasing decisions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New marine protected area established in the Batangas Province of the Philippines
(California Academy of Sciences) The global marine community has cause to celebrate a conservation milestone in the Philippines. The Municipality of Tingloy on Maricaban Island in Batangas Province recently designated 22.01 hectares (54.4 acres) of thriving coral reef habitat as a marine protected area (MPA), only the second MPA to be established in the municipality. Located within the most biologically diverse waters on Earth, the new MPA protects against localized threats while bolstering an emerging ecotourism industry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exclusive breastfeeding lowers odds of some schoolchildren having eczema
(Children's National Health System) Children exclusively breastfed for the first three months of life had significantly lower odds of having eczema at age 6 compared with peers who were not breastfed or were breastfed for less time, according to preliminary research presented during the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma& Immunology 2019 Annual Meeting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news