Dermcidin may play role in the pathogenesis of skin disease hidradenitis suppurativa
(George Washington University) A team from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences have identified the protein dermcidin as having a potential role in the pathogenesis of the chronic skin disease hidradenitis suppurativa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New genetic test detects hundreds of harmful mutations among high-risk groups
(Nemours) Researchers at Nemours Children's Health System have developed a new low-cost genetic test that accurately identified more than 200 known disease-causing gene variations in two high-risk populations, the Old Order Amish and Old Order Mennonites of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The findings, published today in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, could help reduce morbidity and mortality from these rare genetic disorders, and dramatically reduce costs of care through early diagnosis of newborns. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Urging party supporters to sign up for postal votes is ineffective
(University of Kent) Research carried out by the University of Kent and Kings College London (KCL) into a common postal vote recruitment tactic found it to be ineffective in persuading people to change from visiting polling stations to vote.Traditionally the tactic involves writing to party supporters to suggest that using a postal vote would be more convenient and aid their participation and to urge them to apply either online or via an enclosed application form. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tech fixes can't protect us from disinformation campaigns
(Ohio State University) More than technological fixes are needed to stop countries from spreading disinformation on social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter, according to two experts. Policymakers and diplomats need to focus more on the psychology behind why citizens are so vulnerable to disinformation campaigns. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Inequality gap grew before the Great Recession and after, study finds
(Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs) The Great Recession hit Americans across the socioeconomic spectrum, but the drivers behind these socioeconomic divides were mounting before the decline even hit, according to a paper published in PLOS ONE. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Americans' beliefs about wildlife management are changing
(Colorado State University) A new 50-state study on America's Wildlife Values led by researchers at Colorado State University and The Ohio State University describes individuals' values toward wildlife. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Veterans suffer from 'culture shock' when returning to university
(Taylor& Francis Group) War veterans experience such extreme 'culture shock' at university, that they struggle to communicate their feelings and begin a destructive cycle of silence, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

One in 7 Washington State drivers with children in the car recently used marijuana
(Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs) According to a roadside survey conducted in Washington State, 14.1% of drivers with children in the car -- nearly one in seven -- tested positive for THC, the principal psychoactive compound in marijuana. The results are published in the latest issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Drug overdoses in young people on the rise
(Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs) In American adolescents and young adults, death rates from drug poisoning, particularly from opioids, have sharply increased over the last 10 years, according to new research in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In France, people living by protected areas are more environmentally conscious
(CNRS) When compared with their fellow citizens, French people residing near a protected area (PA) exhibit more environmentally friendly behaviors. That is the conclusion of scientists from the CNRS and the University of Montpellier. The direct impact PAs have on the promotion of proenvironmental behavior among people living within their borders has thus been proven for the first time. The researchers suggest that PAs preserve the connection between humans and nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Who really hit the basketball out of bounds?
(Arizona State University) When a basketball is knocked out of bounds, it matters who touched it last. Determining which player touched last is often not so simple but can have consequences, especially during playoff basketball. Researchers from the ASU Department of Psychology have found people consistently experience their own actions as happening 50 milliseconds earlier than other people's actions. This self-centered bias in touch perception provides a new quantifiable example of how experience does not always match reality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Human settlements in Amazonia much older than previously thought
(Penn State) Humans settled in southwestern Amazonia and even experimented with agriculture much earlier than previously thought, according to an international team of researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Synthetic speech generated from brain recordings
(University of California - San Francisco) A state-of-the-art brain-machine interface created by UC San Francisco neuroscientists can generate natural-sounding synthetic speech by using brain activity to control a virtual vocal tract -- an anatomically detailed computer simulation including the lips, jaw, tongue, and larynx. The study was conducted in research participants with intact speech, but the technology could one day restore the voices of people who have lost the ability to speak due to paralysis or neurological damage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study confirms value of exposure therapy for vets with PTSD, alcohol problems
(Veterans Affairs Research Communications) A Veterans Affairs study has confirmed the value of prolonged exposure therapy for veterans coping with both PTSD and alcohol problems. Some experts have worried exposure therapy could worsen drinking in this population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Treatment, spending on outpatient care for depression in US
(JAMA Network) Researchers analyzed national survey data on the use of health services and spending to examine trends in the outpatient treatment of depression in the US population from 1998 to 2015, a time when many policy changes have expanded insurance coverage for mental health conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Treating addiction: Cryo-EM technology enables the 'impossible'
(Oregon Health& Science University) Scientists used a compound found in a shrub native to Africa to reveal the three major shapes of the serotonin transporter, a protein in the brain linked to anxiety and depression. The discovery opens new avenues for developing medications to treat addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

No assembly required: University of Toronto Engineering researchers automate microrobotic designs
(University of Toronto Faculty of Applied Science& Engineering) University of Toronto Engineering researchers have developed an automated approach that significantly cuts down on, and expands, the types of microrobots they can manufacture. Their findings were published today in Science Robotics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Growing up in poverty increases diagnoses of psychosis-spectrum mental illnesses
(University of California - Davis) Growing up in impoverished urban neighborhoods more than doubles your chances over the average person of developing a psychosis-spectrum disorder by the time you reach middle adulthood, according to a new UC Davis and Concordia University study of nearly 4,000 families who were monitored over 30 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

LSHTM awarded £ 7 million to help improve the health of disabled people in LMICs
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) The London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) is to lead a major new projectthat aims to reveal which interventions should be implemented to improve the well-being ofpeople with disabilities in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Schadenfreude: Your pain is my gain
(University of Zurich) If someone in the workplace is mistreated, their colleagues may respond with empathy -- or with schadenfreude. The latter emotion, according to a new study by the University of Zurich, occurs primarily in highly competitive working environments, when one person's misfortune facilitates another's goals. Even worse, schadenfreude can be contagious. For this reason, it is worth establishing an inclusive working climate and team-based incentives. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

International law should be clearer in regulating the use of armed force base
(University of Helsinki) A recently completed doctoral dissertation in law indicates that armed intervention based on the consent and invitation of states is in desperate need of a new supranational party to control the deployment of this concept. Recent examples of armed intervention include the occupation of Crimea by Russia and, increasingly, the crisis in Venezuela. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The mobile game that can detect Alzheimer's risk
(University of East Anglia) A specially designed mobile phone game can detect people at risk of Alzheimer's -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia. Researchers studied gaming data from an app called Sea Hero Quest, which has been downloaded and played by more than 4.3 million people worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Corruption contagion: How legal and finance firms are at greater risk of corruption
(University of Sussex) Companies with fewer levels of management such as legal, accountancy and investment banking firms could be up to five times more susceptible to corruption than similar sized organizations with a taller structure such as those in manufacturing, a new study by the University of Sussex and Imperial College has revealed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reggaeton can also contribute to feminist claims
(Universitat Pompeu Fabra - Barcelona) A study led by M ò nica Figueras, a researcher with the Department of Communication at UPF, together with N ú ria Ara ü na and Iolanda Tortajada, researchers from the Department of Communication at Rovira i Virgili University, published on March 25 in the journal Young. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fossil crab reveals a new branch in the tree of life
(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Taking on characteristics from another, younger stage in its life-cycle, a newly named fossil crab species was able to adapt to new conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Policies valuing cultural diversity improve minority students' sense of belonging
(Society for Personality and Social Psychology) Psychology researchers exploring the belonging and achievement of middle school students found valuing cultural diversity reduces achievement gaps over the course of a year, while policies that favor colorblindness and assimilation led to wider achievement gaps. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cannabis addiction influenced by genetic makeup
(University College London) Some people may be more genetically prone to cannabis addiction, finds a new UCL-led study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CBD reduces impairment caused by cannabis
(University College London) The more cannabidiol (CBD) in a strain of cannabis, the lower the impairment to brain function, finds a new UCL-led brain imaging study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Playing video games generally not harmful to boys' social development
(Society for Research in Child Development) A new longitudinal study conducted in Norway looked at how playing video games affects the social skills of 6- to 12-year-olds. It found that playing the games affected youth differently by age and gender, but that generally speaking, gaming was not associated with social development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New approach to repair fetal membranes may prevent birth complications
(Queen Mary University of London) Researchers from Queen Mary University of London and University College London have developed a new approach to repair defects in fetal membranes which could prevent life-long medical conditions and disabilities associated with preterm birth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds improved WIC food packages reduced obesity risk for children
(Tulane University) A decade ago, the federal government overhauled nutrition standards for food packages in its primary food assistance program for young mothers and their children. The change reduced obesity risks for 4-year-olds, according to a new study lead by a Tulane University researcher and published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Short period of parental sexual contact prior to pregnancy increases offspring risk of schizophrenia
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Mount Sinai study may help explain some of the excess risks for inflammatory diseases in first born children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COPD and type 2 diabetes
(Bentham Science Publishers) COPD and type 2 diabetes are two highly prevalent global health conditions associated with high mortality and morbidity. In this review article, a team of researchers from USA discuss the studies demonstrating the associations between COPD and type 2 diabetes, underlying pathophysiology and recommended therapeutic approach in the management of patients with coexisting COPD and diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stressed, anxious? Ask the brain!
(Friedrich Miescher Institute) Our actions are driven by 'internal states' such as anxiety, stress or thirst -- which will strongly affect and motivate our behaviors. Little is known about how such states are represented by complex brain-wide circuits, including sub-cortical structures such as the amygdala. In a study recently published in Science, the group of Andreas L ü thi at the FMI used a deep brain imaging technique to monitor amygdala activity in active mice and revealed the neuronal dynamics encoding behavioral states. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Army publishes new findings to support soldier training
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) Researchers recently demonstrated that people's attitudes about avoiding negative outcomes versus achieving positive outcomes is related to how their performance changes in response to gamified feedback during simulation-based training exercises.The research took place at the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command's Army Research Laboratory, the Army's corporate research laboratory known as ARL, at its extended site ARL-West, in collaboration with the University of California, Santa Barbara and is published in the journal Frontiers in Cognitive Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Some women could be more susceptible to PTSD than others, according to new study
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Childhood trauma is known to increase the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder in adulthood, especially for women, but the biological reasons for this correlation remain largely unknown. In a new study from the University of Missouri, researchers have proposed a solution to this mystery in the form of a model that could help psychiatrists better understand the far-reaching impacts of early trauma on women, while also clarifying why not all women with traumatic childhoods develop PTSD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Historic examples of civility may help today's civil discourse, according to new book
(Kansas State University) A look at the past may help ordinary people improve civility, according to Kansas State University's Timothy J. Shaffer, co-editor/author of the book, 'A Crisis of Civility?: Political Discourse and Its Discontents' from Routledge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Strongly agree: It's time to test the Likert scale
(University at Buffalo) Researchers often tweak the number of response options in the traditional five-point Likert Scale with little empirical justification for doing so. Now a UB psychologist has tested the test. Leonard Simms says 'six appears to be the magic number' of responses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Moscow State University's journal Population and Economics now published on ARPHA platform
(Pensoft Publishers) Population and Economics is the latest renowned journal to feature on the growing portfolio of open-access titles making use of the innovative scholarly platform ARPHA. Having taken advantage of ARPHA's white-label publishing solution, the journal accommodates a long list of high-tech novelties which benefit authors, readers and editors alike. Marking the new partnership is the first 2019 issue of the journal, now available on its brand new website. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When is sexting associated with psychological distress among young adults?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) While sending or receiving nude electronic images may not always be associated with poorer mental health, being coerced to do so and receiving unwanted sexts was linked to a higher likelihood of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, according to a new study published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ten ASU engineering faculty receive the National Science Foundation CAREER Award
(Arizona State University) Ten faculty members in the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University have received National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER) Awards between September 2018 and April 2019. The awards total an estimated $5 million to fund their projects over the next five years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mount Sinai study: Intervention in preschool -- an opportunity to promote healthy lifestyle
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Children may have a better chance of avoiding unhealthy habits linked to obesity and cardiovascular disease later in life if they are taught properly about healthy behaviors in preschool, Mount Sinai researchers have shown in a first-of-its-kind study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How blindness shapes sound processing
(Society for Neuroscience) Adults who lost their vision at an early age have more refined auditory cortex responses to simple sounds than sighted individuals, according to new neuroimaging research published in JNeurosci. The study is among the first to investigate the effects of early blindness on this brain region, which may contribute to superior hearing in the blind. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Climate change has worsened global economic inequality
(Stanford's School of Earth, Energy& Environmental Sciences) The gap between the economic output of the world's richest and poorest countries is 25 percent larger today than it would have been without global warming, according to new research from Stanford University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Physical activity may offset mortality risk caused by too much sitting
(American College of Cardiology) For less active adults, the amount of time spent sitting may be associated with an increased risk of death; however, increasing physical activity to recommended levels may eliminate this association in some, according to a study published today in the annual cardiovascular health promotion issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preschool health program successful in instilling heart healthy habits
(American College of Cardiology) Preschoolers in an underserved community who took part in a health promotion educational program aimed at establishing health behaviors showed a 2.2-fold increase in knowledge, attitudes and habits compared to their classmates who did not take part in the program, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neuroscientists reverse some behavioral symptoms of Williams syndrome
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) In a study of mice, MIT neuroscientists have found that impaired myelination underlies the hypersociability seen in patients with Williams syndrome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain regions linked to memory and emotion help humans navigate smell
(University of Pennsylvania) Using varying combinations of banana and pine scents, University of Pennsylvania professor Jay Gottfried discovered that three key brain regions help humans navigate from one odor to the next. The work points to the existence of a grid-like hexagonal architecture in the olfactory brain, similar to mapping configurations previously found to support spatial navigation in animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Skipping breakfast associated with increased risk of cardiovascular death
(American College of Cardiology) New evidence underscores the importance of eating breakfast every day, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that showed skipping breakfast was significantly associated with an increased risk of death from heart disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wakeup call: Pervasiveness of sexual harassment and its effect on female physics students
(American Physical Society) A recent study revealed that sexual harassment in physics is insidious and experienced at a significantly higher rate than is generally acknowledged. The study also found that gender harassment, one type of sexual harassment, is correlated with two harmful psychological patterns: a diminished sense of belonging and the imposter phenomenon. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news