Re-mapping World Literature
(De Gruyter) How can we talk about World Literature if we do not actually examine the world as a whole? Research on World Literature commonly focuses on the dynamics of a western center and a southern periphery, ignoring the fact that numerous literary relationships exist beyond these established constellations of thinking and reading within the Global South. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researcher: New forensic analysis indicates bones were Amelia Earhart's
(University of Tennessee at Knoxville) Bone measurement analysis indicates that the remains found on a remote island in the South Pacific were likely those of legendary American pilot Amelia Earhart, according to a UT researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Some teachers don't talk to anyone about violent incidents
(Ohio State University) One in five teachers who were the victims of physical or verbal violence at their schools didn't report the incidents to school administrators, according to a nationwide study. The results showed that significant minorities of teachers who experienced violence also didn't tell their colleagues (14 percent) or family (24 percent). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Software aims to reduce food waste by helping those in need
(Iowa State University) An Iowa State University research team is testing a new online tool to provide food to those in need by reducing food waste. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study takes the guesswork out of selecting and seeding teams for 'March Madness'
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) New research has developed an automated approach for narrowing down and ranking the field of Division 1 college basketball teams from 351 to the 68 that would play in the annual 'March Madness' basketball tournaments, watched by more than 80 million people each year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why the latest shingles vaccine is more than 90 percent effective
(Westmead Institute for Medical Research) A new study has shown how the body's immune system responds to the new shingles vaccine, Shingrix, making it more than 90 percent effective at protecting against the virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dynamic processing in 5G networks
(IMDEA Networks Institute) Software-defined networks and the virtualization of network functions, two of the most revolutionary technologies in the information and communication technologies (ICT) sector, along with cloud computing, are at the heart of a new scientific research project that aims to achieve high performance and dynamic traffic processing in 5G networks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Job of a Congress member not one size fits all, authors find
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Legislators in Congress work their jobs in very different ways -- in fact, five distinct ways, according to two University of Illinois political scientists who studied 20 years of data on the US House of Representatives. William Bernhard and Tracy Sulkin, co-authors of a new book, call these 'legislative styles' and base them on everything from how members legislate and court public attention to how they staff their offices and share campaign funds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reality television played a key role in taking Trump from apprentice to president
(University at Buffalo) Many factors account for Donald Trump's presidential election victory, but Americans would be doing a disservice to their understanding of the country's political system by ignoring his role as a reality television personality, according to a forthcoming study that is the first to scientifically examine how parasocial relationships formed through 'The Apprentice' and " The Celebrity Apprentice " contributed to his being elected to the nation's highest office. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Different strokes for different folks
(Journal of Retailing at New York University) Individuals are inclined to have different mindsets depending on their consumption goals, and marketers should tailor their messages accordingly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rural claim lines with sleep apnea diagnoses increased 911 percent from 2014 to 2017
(FAIR Health) From 2014 to 2017, private insurance claim lines with a diagnosis of sleep apnea -- a potentially serious disorder in which a person repeatedly stops and starts breathing while asleep -- increased by 911 percent in rural America, according to FAIR Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Does single PSA test have effect on prostate cancer detection, death?
(JAMA Network) A screening program that invited men to a clinic to undergo a single prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test increased detection of low-risk prostate cancer but made no significant difference in prostate cancer deaths after 10 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Strict eating schedule can lower Huntington disease protein in mice
(University of British Columbia) New research from the University of British Columbia suggests that following a strict eating schedule can help clear away the protein responsible for Huntington disease in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rigor mortis in worms offers new insight into death
(University College London) A dying worm experiences rigor mortis early in the death process, rather than after the main event as it is for humans, according to a new study by an international team of scientists at UCL and Washington University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UToledo engineer creates solution to cheaper, longer lasting battery packs
(University of Toledo) The new technology called a bilevel equalizer is the first hybrid that combines the high performance of an active equalizer with the low cost of the passive equalizer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Poor mothers face greater scrutiny over their children's weight
(University of British Columbia) Low-income mothers who use food assistance programs face a high level of surveillance over their children's health and weight, new UBC research suggests. The study found low-income mothers, especially black and Latina mothers, of children who are either overweight or underweight face greater accusations from doctors, nutritionists and social workers that they don't properly feed their children compared to mothers whose children are deemed to be a healthy weight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research project will be looking at lifestyle of Kurland Jews in the interwar period
(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) A new research project at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz intends to address the small minority of the Jewish population in Latvia thoroughly assimilated to German culture and occasionally referred to themselves as 'Germans of Jewish faith' between 1919 and 1939. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Who's a good boy? Why 'dog-speak' is important for bonding with your pet
(University of York) Scientists at the University of York have shown that the way we speak to our canine friends is important in relationship-building between pet and owner, similar to the way that 'baby-talk' is to bonding between a baby and an adult. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Einstein's revolution: A study of theory unification
(Bentham Science Publishers) The ebook, Einstein's Revolution: A Study of Theory Unification, gives students of physics and philosophy, and general readers, an epistemological insight into the genesis of Einstein's special relativity and its further unification with other theories, that ended well by the construction of general relativity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study finds couples do poorly at knowing when their partner is sad or feeling down
(Southern Methodist University) Couples do poorly at knowing when their partner is sad, lonely or feeling down, finds a new study from Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Couples do pretty well at picking up one another's more intense feelings, like happiness or anger, but they aren't as sensitive to 'soft negative' emotions. Since spouses are each other's primary source of social support, it's important they stay attuned to each other, said psychologist Chrystyna Kouros, the study's lead author. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Frequent 'I-Talk' may signal proneness to emotional distress
(University of Arizona) People who talk a lot about themselves are not narcissists as one might expect. Instead, those who say 'I' and 'me' a lot may be prone to depression, anxiety and other negative emotions, University of Arizona researchers found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What the smell can tell
(Wiley) Breath analysis in disease diagnostics is a promising research field, and the advances in instrumentation allows the accurate detection of metabolites. But not only the health status of patients, but also the preservation status of museum artifacts could be monitored. In their publication in Angewandte Chemie, heritage science researchers have investigated emissions of volatile organic compounds from plastics-based art objects and provided a first calibration scheme for polymer degradation in museum environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Towards an unconscious neural reinforcement intervention for common fears
(ATR Brain Information Communication Research Laboratry Group) In a collaboration between researchers based Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International (ATR), Japan, and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) scientists have moved one major step towards the development of a novel form of brain-based treatment for phobia that may soon be applicable to patients (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Biodiversity Literature Repository passes the 200,000-items milestone
(Pensoft Publishers) More than 200,000 scientific articles, and images extracted therefrom, have been uploaded to the Biodiversity Literature Repository, a reflection of the successful automated workflow developed by Plazi, Pensoft and Zenodo/CERN. The decades of combined experience of the three organizations in the areas of open science, digitization, and biodiversity data publication has resulted in this achievement, making it easier to find, access, reuse and cite biodiversity data. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

You don't think your way out of a tiger attack
(California Institute of Technology) Assistant Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience Dean Mobbs and other researchers have discovered the presence of two 'fear' circuits in the brain. One circuit deals with immediate threats without using conscious thought. The other circuit deals with more distant threats in a cognitive, strategic fashion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Social sensing emerges as a tool for Army leaders
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) Army and university scientists are turning to problems with social media to create social sensing as a scientific discipline. For the Army in particular, this emerging science space, they say, will better help commanders assess and comprehend the accuracy and true meaning of information on the battlefield. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Don't talk and drive
(Human Factors and Ergonomics Society) Analysis of research from 1991 to 2015 on talking on the phone while driving can inform lawmakers in crafting driver safety legislation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is strength of state firearm laws associated with firearm homicide, suicide rates?
(JAMA Network) Strong state firearm laws were associated with lower rates of firearm homicide, firearm suicide and suicide overall. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Italian law must change to improve survival from cardiac arrest
(European Society of Cardiology) An Italian law requiring citizens to hold a certificate to use a defibrillator must change to improve survival from cardiac arrest, researchers argued today at Acute Cardiovascular Care 2018, a European Society of Cardiology congress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Engineers, physicians, team to replace heart valves using personalized modeling
(MediaSource) Engineers are exploring applications for 3-D printers in the medical field, and the newest research is now going from the lab to the operating room. Experts at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center use CT scans to model a patient's aorta, then create a 3D-printed replica down to its exact texture based on the calcification in a patient's tissue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Minimally invasive surgeries underused in older patients, new study finds
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) A study of more than 200,000 Medicare patients who had common surgical procedures shows that, compared to the general population, they underwent far fewer minimally invasive operations, whose benefits include lower rates of complications and readmissions, along with shorter hospital stays. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Number of paid sick days directly impacts how Americans use preventive care like flu shots
(Florida Atlantic University) In the first study to measure the link between an employee's number of paid sick leave days and the use of vital preventive health care services like getting a flu shot, researchers found a 26 to 85 percent increase in preventive health care use among those with at least 10 or more paid sick leave days. For the female-focused preventive services, they showed a 55 percent increase in the use of preventive mammography. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

World's largest ivory burn delivered a strong message -- but who received it?
(University of Queensland) Media coverage of the torching of huge caches of ivory presented a strong message against elephant poaching and ivory trade, but many of those who needed to hear it most may not have received it, an international study has found.University of Queensland researcher Alexander Braczkowski said an examination of the global media coverage of the world's largest ivory burn in Kenya in 2016, revealed that coverage disproportionately reached western audiences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cognitive benefits of bilingualism overstated
(Abo Akademi University) Bilingualism is naturally very useful in communication between people, but a new meta-analysis shows that it does not seem to increase the cognitive skills related to executive functions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dying for the group: What motivates the ultimate sacrifice?
(University of Oxford) Whether idolized as heroes or demonized and labelled terrorists, throughout history people have been willing to die for their groups and the causes they believe in. But why? New Oxford University research, suggests that there is a unique psychological process that may play a crucial role in motivating the ultimate sacrifice: identity fusion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sexual behavior of the university students
(University of Seville) The study used a sample of students from the University of Seville, who belonged to all the various departments. These students completed a questionnaire that consisted of three parts: sociodemographic variables, sexual and contraceptive experiences, and a last part about knowledge of and attitudes towards sexually transmitted infections, as well as about the use of contraceptive methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ball or stuffed toy -- Do dogs 'know' what they're smelling?
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) Dogs' excellent sense of smell is well-known, whether it is in the context of searching for people or for contraband substances. However, the question of how dogs understand what they perceive with their sense of smell has largely been unexplored. In a study published today in the Journal of Comparative Psychology, scientists investigated this question and found evidence that dogs create a 'mental representation' of the target when they track a scent trail. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Squaring the circle: Merchandising embarrassing products
(Journal of Retailing at New York University) Packaging shapes and colors of embarrassing products, as well as where the products are placed in stores, make a difference in how likely shoppers are to follow through on purchase intentions (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The 'robot harvest' -- Technology to transform the future of produce growing
(University of Plymouth) Pioneering work at the University of Plymouth is bringing researchers together with producers in Cornwall to create robots which could potentially work alongside their existing workforces and ensure any availability gaps are filled (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Retaining talent is paramount for successful firm acquisitions
(University of Texas at Dallas) A recent UT Dallas study found that when acquiring firms avoid the exodus of scientists from the target firms, their likelihood of creating highly impactful knowledge increases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Adopted children need closer ties to their birth families, according to national enquiry
(University of Huddersfield) The enquiry into adoption in the UK was led by Huddersfield and Royal Holloway universities and commissioned by the British Association of Social Workers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Coping with trauma after parkland and other distressing episodes
(American Psychological Association) Exposure to trauma is increasingly common among school-aged American students, yet many affected children are not receiving the mental health care that could enable them to heal and thrive. Schools are the most common source of mental health care for students, which is why school administrators, counselors and teachers need the tools to enable them to develop an environment that promotes evidence-based interventions to help students overcome trauma and excel. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Historian wins national prize for text/documentary submission
(University of Huddersfield) Huddersfield-man Joe Hopkinson wins the national prize for his text/documentary on the controversial approach to the education of immigrants in Huddersfield in the 1960s and 1970s. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

It's not you, it's me: How customers break up with sellers
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) Companies invest billions each year in expensive customer service programs, sales forces, and sophisticated discounting programs such as Groupon to lure and retain customers only to find that churn remains one of their biggest, most expensive challenges. According to a new study, customers have a tendency to send clear signals before they 'break up' with a company, but you have to know what to be monitoring, and the key to any relationship remains effective communication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Millennials are not adequately saving for retirement, MU study finds
This study is among the first to examine the state of millennials' retirement savings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NCDR annual conference highlights the power of clinical data
(American College of Cardiology) The American College of Cardiology's NCDR Annual Conference begins on Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Orlando. The conference brings together registry professionals, quality improvement professionals, physicians and administrators involved in the NCDR suite of cardiovascular data registries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Suicide prevention: Choosing the right word
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) A new study reveals the impact of the associative meaning of a single word on how readers subsequently view and refer to suicide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Enrichment program boosts STEM for black students but leaves Latinos behind
(Cornell University) In a new study that capitalizes on data from the National Center for Educational Statistics and methods that address causality, Cornell sociologists looked at an earlier portion of the pipeline -- in high school, when students' commitment to STEM fields tends to solidify. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chapman University's Institute for Quantum Studies partners with Perimeter Institute
(Chapman University) Chapman University's Institute for Quantum Studies (IQS) has partnered with Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics to facilitate joint research, collaboration, and visiting positions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rethinking childbirth education could save AU $97 million p.a.
(NICM, Western Sydney University) Research led by The University of Notre Dame Australia, NICM and Western Sydney University, shows antenatal education not only reduces the rates of medical interventions during childbirth, but can save the healthcare system up to AU$97 million per year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news