When storing memories, brain prioritizes those experiences that are most rewarding
(Columbia University) A Columbia University study finds that overnight the brain automatically preserves memories for important events and filters out the rest, revealing new insights into the processes that guide decision making and behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Personality and mood affect brain response to personal choice
(Elsevier) Personality traits and mental health affect how people value personal control in decision making, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Economist calls for creation of global tax authority to tackle inequality
(City University London) An economist has called for the creation of a global tax authority as a way of tackling worldwide wealth inequality. In a new book, Professor Photis Lysandrou of City, University of London argues a powerful international body is essential because the current financial system is geared towards more wealth concentration and further financial crises. The book is titled Commodity: The Global Commodity System in the 21st Century. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First-of-its-kind study finds loss of local media worsens political polarization
(Louisiana State University) Changes to the media environment have increased polarized voting in America through both addition and subtraction. We argue that the decline of local newspapers has contributed to the nationalization of American politics: as local newspapers close, Americans rely more heavily on available national news or partisan heuristics to make political decisions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Smart car technologies save drivers $6.2 billion on fuel costs each year
(Stevens Institute of Technology) In the first study to assess the energy impact of smart technology in cars, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have put a number on the potential fuel-cost savings alone: $6.2 billion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When it comes to love: Personality matters: QUT research
(Queensland University of Technology) Throughout history, competitive advantages have helped men and women achieve increased success in their occupation, sport, artistic endeavors, their ability to acquire and secure resources, and ultimately, their survival. Now a study from Australia's QUT shows the same can be said for sex and procreation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

White matter pathway and individual variability in human stereoacuity
(National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT)) Researchers in the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), and Osaka University have identified a human white matter pathway associated with individual variability in human stereoacuity. By combining neuroimaging and psychophysical measurements, we found that the neural tissue density of the white matter pathway, the vertical occipital fasciculus (VOF), correlated with the individual variability in stereoacuity. This finding is important to understand the neural basis of dysfunction in stereopsis. (Source: EurekAlert! -...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Boomeranging' back to a parents' home negatively affects young adults' mental health
(Max-Planck-Gesellschaft) The number of young adults living in their own household has dropped dramatically in the last decades in the United States, and a growing proportion of young people will move back in with their parents at some point in time. These 'boomerang' moves are associated with an increase in depressive symptoms, a recent MPIDR study suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

€ 13.6m SFI Research Centre for neurological diseases launched by Minister Humphreys
(RCSI) FutureNeuro, a € 13.6 million SFI Research Centre has been launched at RCSI, Dublin today. The Centre aims to translate breakthroughs in understanding of brain structure and function to transform the patient journey for people with neurological diseases (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A program of personalized physical exercise reverses functional decline in the over-75s
(Elhuyar Fundazioa) A program of personalized physical exercise implemented over a three-year period and involving 370 people over the age of 75 admitted to the Geriatric Service of the Hospital Complex of Navarre (CHN) has turned out to be 'safe and effective' in reversing the functional deterioration associated with hospitalization to which patients in this age group are subjected. Other aspects such as cognitive status and life quality also benefited. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insilico Medicine to present predictors of drug-induced cardiotoxicity at BioData EU 2018
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Insilico Medicine presents predictors of drug-induced cardiotoxicity at BioData EU 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bio jet fuels good for the climate, but technologies need tweaking
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) As much as 20 per cent of jet fuel burned in Norway in 2030 could be biofuel made from the country's forest residues. This alone could cut greenhouse gas emissions from Norway's aviation sector by 17 per cent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dogs know when they don't know
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) In a new study, researchers have shown that dogs possess some 'metacognitive' abilities -- specifically, they are aware of when they do not have enough information to solve a problem and will actively seek more information. The researchers created a test in which dogs had to find a reward behind one of two fences. They found that the dogs looked for additional information significantly more often when they had not seen where the reward was hidden. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Post-Soviet Union happiness lag between east and west Europe explained
(University of Kent) The upheaval caused by the collapse of the Soviet Union that left millions of workers unemployed for long periods of time could be the reason for the sizeable 'transition happiness gap' that existed for many years between east and western nations in Europe, according to new research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cannabis youth prevention strategy should target mental wellbeing
(University of Waterloo) High school students with positive mental health are less likely to consume cannabis, a recent University of Waterloo study has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Having poor vision can raise risk for falls among older adults
(American Geriatrics Society) A research team, examining information from the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS) and publishing their study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, provided up-to-date information on the frequency of falls and learned more about the fear of falling and how it might limit activity among older adults who have vision impairments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Where you go tells who you are -- and vice versa
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Mining data to analyze tracking patterns, Civil Engineering Prof Sharon Di can infer the population travel demand level in a region from the trajectories of just a portion of travelers. She found three distinct groups whose demographics she could infer based on their travel patterns: seniors, who travel to a wider variety of places in a day; workers, who stay mostly at work or at home; parents, who visit more individual places in a day. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A symposium on the brain's compass
(DZNE - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases) The sense of direction is one of the most important human abilities. From 27 to 29 November 2018, about 70 experts from Europe, Canada and the US will discuss in Magdeburg how this navigation system operates and how it alters in old age or due to dementia. The conference is organized by the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Powerful new map depicts environmental degradation across Earth
(University of Cincinnati) University of Cincinnati geography professor Tomasz Stepinski created a new world map showing dramatic changes in land use over the last quarter century. Stepinski turned high-resolution satellite images from the European Space Agency into one of the most detailed looks so far at how people are reshaping the planet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Illinois professor recognized for passenger screening research after 9-11 attacks
(University of Illinois College of Engineering) As Professor Sheldon Jacobson watched the September 2001 terrorist attacks unfold, he was among the many Americans who realized that life was about to change. What he did not know was that a National Science Foundation-funded research project he began just days before would be part of that change, creating the groundwork for The Transportation Security Administration's PreCheck system. Precheck uses risk profiles to try to focus air security resources on higher-risk passengers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Digital offense: Anonymity dulls our moral outrage
(Society for Personality and Social Psychology) A recent study from The University of South Florida digs deeper into exactly why people react less strongly to insults online, and offers a glimpse at what might help people be more civil to each other. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Common tactics for health promotion at work may be detrimental to employees with obesity
(Frontiers) Workplace health promotion programs often emphasize personal responsibility for weight loss. However, this approach can have detrimental effects for employees with obesity. These include increased workplace weight stigma and weight discrimination. Worryingly, such programs also resulted in a catch-22 where employees feel increasingly responsible for their weight but less in control of it. Focusing on an employer's responsibility to maintain their employees' health did not produce these negative effects, and could be a viable alternative. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Growing number of state laws limit local government control over food and nutrition
(New York University) In recent years, more than a dozen states have passed laws limiting local governments' ability to create food and nutrition policies and more than two dozen states previously enacted laws preventing obesity-related lawsuits against food businesses, finds a new analysis led by NYU College of Global Public Health. These laws are examples of preemption, a legal mechanism in which a higher level of government withdraws or limits the ability of a lower level of government to act on an issue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dartmouth-Stanford study on economic impact of border wall finds high costs and few benefits to US
(Dartmouth College) A new Dartmouth-Stanford study examining the economic impact of a border wall expansion between the US and Mexico between 2007 to 2010 finds that the expansion minimally reduced unauthorized Mexican migration and was largely harmful to US workers. Despite construction costs of the wall of $2.3 billion, the study found that the border wall expansion harmed college educated US workers by $4.35 per person and only benefited less educated U.S. workers by an average of 36 cents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Spanking in developing countries does more harm than good
(University of Michigan) Spanking may be increasingly harmful for children on a more global scale than previously known, a new University of Michigan study indicates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Swarmlike collective behavior in bicycling
(American Physical Society) Nature is full of examples of large-scale collective behavior; humans also exhibit this behavior, most notably in pelotons, the mass of riders in bicycle races. Using aerial video footage of bicycle races, researchers analyzed peloton motion to determine what causes changes in the group's large-scale collective behavior and found that riders move through the peloton in a manner similar to circulation in a fluid. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Explaining a fastball's unexpected twist
(American Physical Society) An unexpected twist from fastball can make the difference in winning or losing the World Series. However, 'some explanations regarding the different pitches are flat-out wrong,' said Barton Smith, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Utah State University who considers himself a big fan of the game. He and Nazmus Sakib are conducting experiments to explain how baseballs move. Sakib and Smith will present at the Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting, Nov. 18-20. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Different types of physical activity offer varying protection against heart disease
(American College of Cardiology) While it is well known that physical activity is important for heart health, neither research nor recommendations consistently differentiate between the benefits of different types of physical activity. New research, presented at the ACC Latin America Conference 2018 in Lima, Peru, found that while all physical activity is beneficial, static activities -- such as strength training-- were more strongly associated with reducing heart disease risks than dynamic activities like walking and cycling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Organizations with broad social ties help recovering from natural disasters
(University at Buffalo) In order to encourage a wide economic recovery following a natural disaster, communities should think about activating advocacy organizations such as local environmental groups, political organizations and human-rights groups. New businesses alone, do not offset rise in post-disaster poverty levels. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Weight history may be important for determining risk of early death
(JAMA Network) A   patient's weight history could help identify those at increased risk of dying. Using data for nearly 6,200 people from the Framingham Heart Study, this study incorporated weight history to examine the association between obesity and risk of death because many studies typically rely on weight status at a single point in time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Religious policy in Germany lacks a concept'
(Cluster of Excellence " Religion and Politics ") New general volume Religionspolitik heute (Religious Policy Today) brings together for the first time positions on religious policy from the academic world, from politics, as well as from religious communities and other groups with a particular worldview -- contributions on fundamental questions of religious policy, current conflicts, and possible solutions -- " The building of mosques, the headscarf, the crucifix, employment law, antisemitism: we should no longer stumble into conflicts unprepared. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lancaster University supports global initiative to calculate 'value' of employees
(Lancaster University) A report from the Embankment Project for Inclusive Capitalism (EPIC) is launched today offering a new framework for reporting the contribution employees make to an organisation. EPIC was set up to make corporate reporting more useful and involves companies like Nestle, Unilever, PepsiCo and Johnson& Johnson that represent $30 trillion of assets under management and almost 2 million employees around the world. Dr Anthony Hesketh from Lancaster University is the academic behind the report. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Youth dating violence shaped by parents' conflict-handling views, study finds
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Parents who talk to their children about nonviolent ways of resolving conflict may reduce children's likelihood of physically or psychologically abusing their dating partners later - even when parents give contradictory messages indicating that violence is acceptable in certain circumstances, University of Illinois social work professor Rachel Garthe found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mount Sinai Health System of New York and Taikang Healthcare of China launch strategic hospital collaboration
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Mount Sinai Health System, New York's largest integrated academic medical center, announced today a historic agreement with Taikang Healthcare in China to provide clinical and management knowledge transfer services, and education and training programs for Taikang's Xianlin Drum Tower Hospital in Nanjing, the capital of Jiangsu Province in east central China. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How sperm find their way
(University of Tokyo) Researchers have found that a protein in the cell membranes of sperm plays a key role in how they find their way to eggs. The PMCA protein may also help explain how egg cells only interact with sperm from the same species. PMCA may even be a target of drug discovery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Women build less effective professional networks than men as they underestimate self-worth
(SAGE) A study, published by SAGE Publishing today in the journal Human Relations, contributes to this ongoing discussion, revealing that it is not only exclusion by men, but also self-imposed barriers including hesitation and gendered modesty that prevent women from networking as effectively as their male counterparts. The research revealed that women's tendencies to harbor moral concerns about 'exploiting' social ties causes them to under-benefit from networking activities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Voters would have forgiven Cameron for failing to hold an EU referendum, study shows
(University of Exeter) Many voters would have forgiven David Cameron if he had failed to deliver on his campaign promise to hold an EU referendum, a study suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why women rarely reach top positions in government
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Gender stereotypes are the main reason why women rarely take up senior positions in the civil service, according to researchers from the Higher School of Economics Olga Isupova and Valeriya Utkina. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Juice displaces milk and fruit in high school lunches
(Elsevier) High school students participating in school meal programs are less likely to select milk, whole fruit, and water when fruit juice is available, which on balance may decrease the nutritional quality of their lunches, according to a new study by the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at the University of Connecticut. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insomniac prisoners sleeping better after one-hour therapy session
(Northumbria University) Three-quarters of prisoners struggling to sleep have reported major improvements after receiving cognitive behavioural therapy to treat their insomnia. In the first study of its kind in the world, experts from Northumbria University have found that a single one-hour session of cognitive behavioural therapy was effective in preventing the development of chronic insomnia in 73% of prisoners. Inmates also reported that the therapy made notable improvements to their anxiety and depression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Historian tells new story about England's venerated 'Domesday book'
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Nearly a thousand years ago, a famous king created a famous book, later given the title 'Domesday' (pronounced 'doomsday'). It's among the most famous documents in English history, but its origins had not been thoroughly investigated. University of Illinois history professor Carol Symes makes the case that it came years later than the 1087 date to which it's attributed. The process that produced it also exposed a load of grievance from a conquered people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCSF-led consortium to receive $3.45 million from NFL to study traumatic brain injury
(University of California - San Francisco) The National Football League (NFL) has awarded more than $3.45 million to a UCSF-led research consortium tasked with identifying the causes, risk factors, biomarkers and prognoses for patients with traumatic brain injury, as well as breaking the deadlock in the development of effective treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The party of veterans: Democrats or Republicans?
(Stevens Institute of Technology) Republicans are viewed as the party of veterans, public opinion and voting data says so. But in her new book, Congress and U.S. Veterans: From the GI Bill to the VA Crisis, Stevens Assistant Professor Lindsey Cormack questions how that came to be, as her research shows that congressional Democrats, more often than not, are the ones working to enhance veteran benefits. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An evidence-based way to help fix our broken politics
(Ohio State University) It is an idea for repairing our broken political system that is so promising that new members of Congress will learn about it before taking office in January. It is an idea tested with actual representatives and their constituents, with intriguing and positive results. Now the question is: Will more members of Congress adopt it?The idea is 'deliberative town halls,' which are conducted online between representatives and randomly selected constituents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA researcher to use grant to employ better ways to bolster embankments, soil
(University of Texas at Arlington) A UTA civil engineering soil researcher is using multiple-year, $600,000 grant funding from the U.S. Department of Transportation regional center and the Texas Department of Transportation that will employ geopolymers for soil modification and sustainable cement materials to strengthen highway embankments in the Paris, Texas, district. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Diagnostic tool helps engineers to design better global infrastructure solutions
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Designing safe bridges and water systems for low-income communities is not always easy for engineers coming from highly industrialized places. A new discipline called contextual engineering helps engineers think beyond personal values, expectations and definitions of project success when tackling global infrastructure problems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Spending our carbon budgets wisely
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Our carbon emissions are much higher than are needed for us to have happy, healthy lives. But cutting these emissions requires us to think differently about how we measure growth and progress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Houston's urban sprawl increased rainfall, flooding during Hurricane Harvey
(Princeton University) Princeton and University of Iowa researchers found that Houston's urban landscape directly contributed to the torrential rainfall and deadly flooding of Hurricane Harvey in 2017. They report in the journal Nature that Houston's risk for extreme flooding was 21 times greater due to urbanization. The results highlight the human role in extreme weather events and the need to consider urban and suburban development when calculating hurricane risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Older people are more likely to have an inappropriate prescription after hospitalization
(RCSI) A new study has found that older patients who were hospitalised were 72 percent more likely to be given a potentially inappropriate prescription after their hospital admission, independent of other patient factors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Competition for shrinking groundwater
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Groundwater, which has been used to irrigate crops, satiate livestock and quench thirst in general for thousands of years, continues to be a vital resource around the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news