Talking about Brexit -- how did we get to this point?
(Lancaster University) With Brexit getting very close indeed, a new book cuts through the cacophony of the debate and shows how the language of politicians, the media and voters brought us to this historic juncture. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Seven moral rules found all around the world
(University of Chicago Press Journals) What is morality? And to what extent does it vary around the world? The theory of 'morality-as-cooperation' argues that morality consists of a collection of biological and cultural solutions to the problems of cooperation recurrent in human social life. These solutions or cooperative behaviors are plausible candidates for universal moral rules, and that morality-as-cooperation could provide the unified theory of morality that anthropology has hitherto lacked. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The political power of 'the': A linguistic analysis
(Linguistic Society of America) A new study of the English definite article 'the' demonstrates that even seemingly drab function words can send powerful social and political signals. The study 'Pragmatics and the social life of the English definite article,' by Eric Acton (Eastern Michigan University) will be published in the March, 2019 issue of the scholarly journal Language. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sex and aggression in mice controlled by cold-sensor in brain
(Biophysical Society) Researchers at the University of Illinois College of Medicine find that TRPM8, long ago identified as a cold-temperature sensor, regulates aggressive and hypersexual behavior in response to testosterone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Center for Advanced Studies explores crises in Latin America -- and their solutions
(Bielefeld University) Latin America is confronted with crises - from political unrest in Venezuela, the deforestation of the Amazon, violence against women ( " feminicide " ), the extreme divide between rich and poor, to the threat of a wall between the USA and Mexico. How do Latin American societies cope with crises? To answer this question, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) is funding the CALAS cooperative project with a total of 12 million euros in the six-year main phase starting in March. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Hooking' digital lives through cognitive science
(Simon Fraser University) A new app -- aptly called Hook -- uses cognitive science to help us more efficiently connect everything we do online. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Lancet: Conceiving within a year of stillbirth does not increase risks for next pregnancy
(The Lancet) The results are from the first large-scale observational study to investigate the interval between stillbirth and subsequent pregnancy, including almost 14,500 births in women from Australia, Finland and Norway who had a stillbirth in their previous pregnancy. The findings are published in The Lancet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Unveiling disease-causing genetic changes in chromosome 17
(Baylor College of Medicine) Extensive single Watson-Crick base pair mutations can occur in addition to duplication or deletion of an entire group of genes on chromosomal region 17p11.2. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Could medical marijuana help grandma and grandpa with their ailments?
(American Academy of Neurology) Medical marijuana may bring relief to older people who have symptoms like pain, sleep disorders or anxiety due to chronic conditions including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, neuropathy, spinal cord damage and multiple sclerosis, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 71st Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, May 4-10, 2019. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Data sharing uncovers five new risk genes for Alzheimer's disease
(NIH/National Institute on Aging) Analysis of genetic data revealed five new and confirmed 20 known risk genes for Alzheimer's disease. Research also shows that mutations in genes specific to tau, a hallmark protein of Alzheimer's, may play an earlier role in the disease. These new findings support developing evidence that groups of genes associated with processes, such as cell trafficking, lipid transport, inflammation and immune response, are 'genetic hubs' that are an important part of the disease process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Happy in marriage? Genetics may play a role
(Yale University) People fall in love for many reasons -- similar interests, physical attraction, and shared values among them. But if they marry and stay together, their long-term happiness may depend on their individual genes or those of their spouse, says a new study led by Yale School of Public Health researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Actor, advocate LeVar Burton named 2019 Inamori Ethics Prize-winner
(Case Western Reserve University) LeVar Burton, a celebrated American actor, director, producer and writer for more than 40 years, is adding another accolade -- this one for his tireless, decades-long dedication to children's literacy and AIDS research and treatment. This fall, the Inamori International Center for Ethics and Excellence at Case Western Reserve University will award the 2019 Inamori Ethics Prize to Burton for his outstanding global ethical leadership as an advocate for such important and worthy causes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mindfulness could promote positive body image
(Anglia Ruskin University) Making people more aware of their own internal body signals, such as heartbeat or breathing rate, could promote positive body image, according to new research published in the journal Body Image. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Goethe University co-ordinates mega-project on cybersecurity and data protection
(Goethe University Frankfurt) An extensive research project on cybersecurity and data protection in Europe will be launched this week. Goethe University Frankfurt has assumed the leadership and co-ordination of the 43 total consortium partners from science, business, industry and society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bungee jumping for science
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) Immediately before a person decides to launch themselves off a bridge for a bungee jump, there is a measurable increase in their brain activity. This can be recorded nearly one second before the person makes the conscious decision to jump. Researchers from Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin have, for the first time, succeeded in measuring this 'Bereitschaftspotential' (readiness potential) outside a laboratory and under extreme conditions. Results from this research have been published in Scientific Reports*. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists at FAU are researching a new method for developing artificial ovaries
(University of Erlangen-Nuremberg) An interdisciplinary team of researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universit ä t Erlangen-N ü rnberg led by Professor Aldo R. Boccaccini from the Chair of Materials Science (biomaterials) and Professor Dr. Ralf Dittrich from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Universit ä tsklinikum Erlangen have taken an important step towards developing artificial ovaries for patients suffering from cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Home insurance buyers lack access to public flood data
(University of Waterloo) Canadian homeowners do not have the information they need to know if they should buy flood insurance leaving them exposed to significant financial risk. A recent study from the University of Waterloo found flood mapping information in Canada was inadequate, incomplete, hard to locate and varied widely from province-to-province. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Despite export bans global seahorse trade continues
(University of British Columbia) Many countries are engaged in a vast illegal and unrecorded international trade in seahorses, one that circumvents global regulations, according to new UBC study that has implications for many other animal species. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New project explores how international security alliances fail
(University of California - Davis) UC Davis political scientists have been awarded a Department of Defense grant to study what makes alliances like NATO work and what breaks them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Intervention with at-risk infants increases children's compliance at age 3
(Society for Research in Child Development) Children who are maltreated often develop problems complying with directions and expectations of parents and other authority figures. Lack of compliance can lead to other problems, including difficulty regulating anger and academic troubles. A new study tested a home-visiting intervention for parents of children referred to Child Protective Services (CPS). The study found that children whose parents took part in the intervention demonstrated significantly better compliance than children whose parents did not, and that parents' sensitivity also increased. (Source: EurekAlert! - So...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

WSU researcher discovers oldest tattoo tool in western North America
(Washington State University) Washington State University archaeologists have discovered the oldest tattooing artifact in western North America. The tool was made around 2,000 years ago by the Ancestral Pueblo people of the Basketmaker II period in what is now southeastern Utah. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Achieving Paris climate target could net additional billions in fisheries revenue
(University of British Columbia) Achieving the Paris Agreement global warming target could protect millions of tonnes in annual worldwide fisheries catch, as well as billions of dollars of annual revenues for fishers, workers' income and household seafood expenditures, according to new research from the University of British Columbia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sandia spiking tool improves artificially intelligent devices
(DOE/Sandia National Laboratories) The aptly named software package Whetstone enables neural computer networks to process information up to 100 times more efficiently than current standards, making possible an increased use of artificial intelligence in mobile phones, self-driving cars, and image interpretation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Facial recognition software to identify Civil War soldiers
(Virginia Tech) Photo Sleuth may help uncover the mysteries of nearly 4 million photographs of Civil War-era images. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers 'bait' pathological proteins underlying many neurodegenerative disorders
(University of Pittsburgh) The vast majority of patients with neurodegenerative disorders do not have specific gene mutations, but a single misbehaving protein -- called TDP-43 -- seems to be at the heart of these diseases. Pitt researchers have found a way to recreate and rescue TDP-43 pathology in a dish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is prenatal vitamin use by moms associated with risk for autism spectrum disorder recurrence in young siblings?
This study examined whether prenatal vitamin use by mothers was associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) recurrence in high-risk families. The study included 241 children who were selected because a sibling was diagnosed with ASD. Mothers reported their use of prenatal vitamins during pregnancy. While most mothers reported taking prenatal vitamins while pregnant, only 87 (36 percent) mothers met the recommendations to take prenatal vitamins in the six months before pregnancy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers develop model to predict suicide risk in at-risk young adults
(University of Pittsburgh) New research from Pitt's School of Medicine shows that fluctuation and severity of depressive symptoms are much better at predicting risk of suicidal behavior in at-risk young adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTSA funded to develop accident tolerant nuclear fuels
(University of Texas at San Antonio) Almost eight years have passed since the accident at the nuclear power plant in Fukushima, Japan, in which thousands of residents have yet to return to their homes. Now the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has tapped The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) and other research institutes across the U.S. and abroad to assist with the development of new, accident tolerant fuels (ATF) that will permit nuclear plants to better sustain accidents like the one in 2011. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

High-tech laser scans uncover hidden military traverse at Alcatraz Island
(Binghamton University) High-tech radar and laser scans have uncovered a hidden military traverse underneath the infamous Alcatraz penitentiary, according to research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Predictive modeling could help fight neighborhood crime
(Washington State University) New technology developed by a Washington State University scientist could help police officers predict where burglaries are likely to occur. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Now you see heat, now you don't
(American Chemical Society) Hiding an object from heat-sensing cameras could be useful for military and technology applications as well as for research. Efforts to develop such a method have been underway for decades with varying degrees of success. Now, researchers report in ACS Nano that they have fabricated an inexpensive, easy-to-produce film that makes objects completely invisible to infrared detectors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Human settlements and rainfall affect giraffe home ranges
(Penn State) Giraffes that live close to densely populated towns have larger home ranges than giraffes that live far from towns, suggesting that the giraffes in human-impacted areas need to travel longer distances -- and expend more energy -- to obtain critical resources. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Batmobile with cruise control
(Forschungsverbund Berlin) A new study led by scientists at the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) investigated the energy requirements and travel speeds of migrating Nathusius' bats (Pipistrellus nathusii). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How listening to music 'significantly impairs' creativity
(Lancaster University) The popular view that music enhances creativity has been challenged by researchers who say it has the opposite effect.Psychologists investigated the impact of background music on performance by presenting people with verbal insight problems that are believed to tap creativity. They found that background music 'significantly impaired' people's ability to complete tasks testing verbal creativity -- but there was no effect for background library noise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

3D printed tool cuts through titanium, wins innovation prize
(RMIT University) High quality cutting tools can now be 3D printed, potentially saving time and money for aerospace and Defence manufacturers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New mothers reduce their alcohol intake, but this change is short-lived
(University of Melbourne) Most women dramatically reduce their alcohol intake on learning they are pregnant, but by the time their child is five they are back to their pre-pregnancy drinking levels, a new international study has found.The research, led by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, reported little change in the drinking patterns of men on becoming fathers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why a common antibiotic treating diarrhea is failing
(University of Houston) Clostridioides difficile (C-diff), a bacterium that causes diarrhea and colitis, is easily picked up in hospitals, but not so easily fought. After 30 years, the most commonly prescribed antibiotic used to fight it, metronidazole, known commonly by the brand name Flagyl, is no longer as effective as it used to be and a University of Houston pharmaceutical researcher aims to find out why. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

THC found more important for therapeutic effects in cannabis than originally thought
(University of New Mexico) Researchers at the University of New Mexico recently solved a major gap in scientific literature by using mobile software technology to measure the real-time effects of actual cannabis-based products used by millions of people every day. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First common risk genes discovered for autism
(Aarhus University) A study headed by researchers from the Danish project iPSYCH and the Broad Institute, USA, has found the first common genetic risk variants for autism and uncovered genetic differences in clinical subgroups of autism. The discovery means that we will in future be able to determine the genes which separate the diagnostic groups, make more precise diagnoses, and provide better counselling for the individual person suffering from autism disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Accompanying research to start on the test area for autonomous driving
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) On the Baden-W ü rttemberg Test Area for Autonomous Driving, research projects carried out under real conditions are to yield valuable findings for the development of automated driving. Within the 'bwirkt' project, research will focus on the impacts of these projects on automated and networked driving. Recommendations for science, industry, and politics will be derived. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology will concentrate on the impacts on traffic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Springer Nature expands its nanotechnology research solution with the inclusion of over 22 million patents
(Springer) A new module has now been added to the nanotechnology research database Nano. The patent module allows users to sort through over 22 million nano-related patents across all major jurisdictions and languages. This means that researchers can find patents from areas highly affected by nanotechnology, narrow their search by country, filing year and jurisdiction, and ultimately demonstrate the scientific and commercial value of their project and its anticipated impact. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neuroscientists at TU Dresden discover neural mechanisms of developmental dyslexia
(Technische Universit ä t Dresden) Neuroscientist Professor Katharina von Kriegstein from TU Dresden and an international team of experts show in a recently published study that people with dyslexia have a weakly developed structure that is not located in the cerebral cortex, but at a subcortical processing stage; namely the white matter connectivity between the left auditory motion-sensitive planum temporale (mPT) and the left auditory thalamus (medial geniculate body, MGB). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Student-led rheumatology interest group increases interest in field
(George Washington University) A group of student and faculty researchers from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences published outcome of establishing Rheumatology Interest Group in the International Journal of Rheumatology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Electronic 'word of mouth' useful in detecting, predicting fashion trends
(University of Missouri-Columbia) According to new research from the University of Missouri, social media hashtags could be the tool fashion designers use to forecast trends in the industry to better connect with consumers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Savoring ... It's not just for dinner
(University of Arizona) Just as we can savor a decadent dessert, so, too, can we savor a meaningful conversation. And the latter may be better for us. University of Arizona researcher Maggie Pitts studies the role of 'savoring' in human communication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researcher finds data-driven evidence on warrior vs. guardian policing
(Florida State University) A Florida State University-led team of researchers has created a model to measure the differences between two distinct approaches to policing -- the warrior approach and the guardian approach. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How economic inequality shapes mobility expectations and behavior in disadvantaged youth
(Boston College) By integrating the methods and techniques of economics and psychology, an inventive framework reveals how rising economic inequality can weaken the motivating belief that achieving socioeconomic success is possible, which reduces the likelihood that young people from low socioeconomic status backgrounds will engage in behaviors that could improve their chances of upward mobility. Based on this interdisciplinary approach, policy recommendations that would advance mobility opportunities are proposed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Army lab, industry announce partnership to develop new materials
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) The Army and a major defense contractor established a new research partnership to create novel materials to further enhance the devices and technology used by warfighters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why do innocent people plead guilty?
(University of Massachusetts Lowell) A new, five-year $498,000 National Science Foundation CAREER grant will allow UMass Lowell's Miko Wilford, a psychology professor from Dracut, to study why defendants opt for plea deals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exposing flaws in metrics for user login systems
(Rutgers University) How good is the research on the success or failure of the system that verifies your identity when you log into a computer, smartphone or other device? Chances are it's not good, and that's a major security and privacy issue that should be fixed, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study that proposes a novel solution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news