Announcing Nutrition 2020 live online
(American Society for Nutrition) Journalists and bloggers are invited to attend NUTRITION 2020 LIVE ONLINE, a dynamic virtual event showcasing new research findings and timely discussions on food and nutrition. The online meeting will be held June 1-4, 2020. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Autism risk estimated at 3 to 5% for children whose parents have a sibling with autism
(NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) Roughly 3 to 5% of children with an aunt or uncle with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can also be expected to have ASD, compared to about 1.5% of children in the general population, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The findings call into question the female protective effect, a theory that females have a lower rate of ASD than males because they have greater tolerance of ASD risk factors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Personal accounts of childhood maltreatment matter more for mental health than records
(King's College London) Personal accounts of childhood maltreatment show a stronger association with psychiatric problems compared to legal proof that maltreatment occurred, according to a new study co-written by a King's College London researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Emissions from road construction could be halved using today's technology
(Chalmers University of Technology) The construction sector accounts for a quarter of carbon dioxide emissions, in Sweden and globally. Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg studied the construction of an eight km stretch of road and calculated how emissions could be reduced now and by 2045, looking at everything from materials choice, production technology, supply chains and transport. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Aboriginal rock art, frontier conflict and a swastika
(Flinders University) A hidden Murray River rockshelter speaks volumes about local Aboriginal and European settlement in the Riverland, with symbols of conflict -- including a swastika symbol -- discovered in Aboriginal rock art.The engravings studied in 188 engravings in a remote South Australian rockshelter are a stark reminder of colonial invasion and the strife brewing in Europe ahead of World War Two, Flinders University archaeologists have revealed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gestures heard as well as seen
(University of Connecticut) Gesturing with the hands while speaking is a common human behavior, but no one knows why we do it. Now, a group of UConn researchers reports in the May 11 issue of PNAS that gesturing adds emphasis to speech--but not in the way researchers had thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Arts-based method to detect school bullying
(Kazan Federal University) Co-authors Daria Hanolainen and Elena Semenova created and tested an experimental method of graphical vignettes - a set of incomplete comic strips which kids are asked to complete using their own creative vision. The paper discusses possible applications for the method. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Technological changes and new low-carbon lifestyles, key to mitigating climate change
(Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona) In order to mitigate climate change impacts and achieve a more sustainable society, it is necessary to transform the current energy system based on fossil fuels into a model based on renewable energies, and to change society's lifestyles, accepting less mobility, low-carbon diets and smaller-sized dwellings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ambitious EU climate efforts could increase emissions in the rest of the world
(University of Copenhagen) The more the EU economy succeeds in dialing down greenhouse gas emissions, the more the rest of the world will turn them up -- unless a similar level of green ambitions is shared by others. Up to 61.5% of the saved EU emissions could end up as increased emissions elsewhere in the world. The outcome is described in a new policy brief prepared by economists at the University of Copenhagen. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chinese to rise as a global language
(Flinders University) With the continuing rise of China as a global economic and trading power, there is no barrier to prevent Chinese from becoming a global language like English, according to Flinders University academic Dr Jeffrey Gil.Dr Gil's paper challenges arguments that suggest Chinese faces insurmountable hurdles to become a commonly used international language due to the complexity of Chinese written characters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Written WhatsApps work like a spontaneous informal conversation
(Universitat Pompeu Fabra - Barcelona) The emergence of new means of communication via the Internet has brought about new genres of discourse, understood as socially situated communication practices that did not previously exist, and which require studying from the linguistic standpoint. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Seibold Prize 2020 goes to four researchers from Germany and Japan
(Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) This year the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation) is to honor four researchers -- two women and two men -- with the Eugen and Ilse Seibold Prize. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Washington Post's depictions of autism shift from 'cause and cure' to acceptance
(University of California - Santa Cruz) The Washington Post's depiction of autism has shifted over the years from a focus on 'cause and cure' toward one of acceptance and accommodation, say the authors of a study that examined 315 articles published from 2007 to 2017. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Social good creates economic boost
(Queensland University of Technology) As unemployment rates skyrocket around the world due to the COVID-19 pandemic, a world-first study out of Australia and Sweden has found social venture start-ups not only alleviate social problems but are also much more important for job creation than previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Repurposed drug helps obese mice lose weight, improve metabolic function
(NIH/National Institute on Aging) An off-label experiment in mice using disulfiram, which has been used to treat alcohol use disorder for more than 50 years, consistently normalized body weight and reversed metabolic damage in obese middle-aged mice of both sexes. The international study was led by researchers at the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health . The results were published online in the journal Cell Metabolism on May 14, 2020. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SCAI issues expert consensus on managing patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest
(Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions) The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) has released an expert consensus statement describing recommendations for the management of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). The statement, published today in Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions, was presented during the SCAI 2020 Scientific Sessions Virtual Conference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Patients with intermediate left main disease experience worse cardiovascular events
(Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions) A new study shows that when compared with patients without intermediate left main coronary artery disease, those with intermediate left main disease have greater risk of cardiovascular events. The findings of the ISCHEMIA trial sub study were presented during the SCAI 2020 Scientific Sessions Virtual Conference as featured clinical research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Forensic Genomics launching fall 2020
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A dynamic new peer-reviewed journal, will launch its preview issue at the annual International Symposium on Human Identification (ISHI) in September 2020.Modern advances in genetic testing, genome sequencing, and analysis which are enabling investigators to break through previously impenetrable barriers in forensic testing and enable advances in live and cold case investigations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Latin America's livestock sector needs emissions reduction to meet 2030 targets
(International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)) Reducing livestock's carbon footprint in Latin America is necessary if countries in the region are to meet emission reduction goals under the Paris Agreement, researchers argue in a new analysis published May 14 in Frontiers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pandemic research: Economics project to explore impact of biases on social distancing
(Binghamton University) With neither a vaccine nor a proven treatment available, many communities are relying on social distancing to battle the coronavirus pandemic. The problem: Not everyone agrees to follow these measures. A team of economists at Binghamton University, State University of New York is studying the phenomenon for a new research project. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reptile poaching in Balochistan (Pakistan) is on a decreasing trend but still troublesome
(Pensoft Publishers) Since 2013, following strict enforcement of provincial wildlife legislation in the less studied regions of Asia, the overall trend of illegal reptile poaching is steadily decreasing. Despite that, the issue is not yet resolved and poached reptiles are largely destined not only for the international pet trade, but also utilized in folk medicines and snake charmer shows, according to a recent study, published in the open-access journal Herpetozoa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Beads made of boa bones identified in lesser Antilles
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) Today Boa snakes have a patchy distribution in the islands that form the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean Sea, but the constrictors are nearly absent from archaeological deposits in the region. Whether this scarcity is due to biological or cultural factors remains unknown. The current study describes the first Boa finds on Martinique, Basse-Terre and La D é sirade, and provides a new hypothesis concerning the relationship between indigenous human populations and Boa prior to Western colonization. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Patients prefer their consent to share their data and to manage it digitally
(University of Warwick) Patients with diabetes often have to see many different stakeholders who each specialize in different aspects of their treatment. Researchers from WMG, University of Warwick surveyed patients on their understanding of how their data was shared, and found they would prefer to have it shared digitally using the Dovetail Digital consent application. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cahokia's rise parallels onset of corn agriculture
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) Corn cultivation spread from Mesoamerica to what is now the American Southwest by about 4000 B.C., but how and when the crop made it to other parts of North America is still debated. In a new study, scientists report that corn was not grown in the ancient metropolis of Cahokia until sometime between A.D. 900 and 1000, a relatively late date that corresponds to the start of the city's rapid expansion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Army researchers develop new ways to nudge the brain
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) For Army scientists, the goal of neuroscience research is pursuing the inner workings of the human brain to advance scientific understanding and improve Soldier performance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Chicago Booth research suggests patients prefer expert guidance for medical decisions
(University of Chicago Booth School of Business) New research from University of Chicago Booth School of Business suggests that in times of uncertainty, people want expert guidance when making choices about their medical care. The study, released by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, examines the important question of how patients, and advisees in general, react to full decisional autonomy when making difficult decisions about their health. It also indicates that the preference for paternalistic guidance could extend beyond doctors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 and terrorism: Assessing the short and long-term impacts of terrorism
(Cranfield University) A new report authored by Pool Re and Cranfield University's Andrew Silke, Professor of Terrorism, Risk and Resilience, reveals how the COVID-19 pandemic is already having a significant impact on terrorism around the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Return to work at the office? Energy workers say 'not so fast'
(University of Houston) As Texas and other states begin to reopen for business, workers who have been working from home face the prospect of returning to the office. A study of the energy workforce found that more than 70% of workers prefer to continue working remotely. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bike commuting accelerated when bike-share systems rolled into town
(University of Washington) Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, in cities where bike-share systems have been introduced, bike commuting increased by 20%, according to a new UW study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Lean lab' approach enables quick research ramp down
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT Assistant Professor Canan Dagdeviren runs her Conformable Decoders Group at the Media Lab using " lean lab " management principles, with benefits that include cost savings, increased productivity, and a strong safety record. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A lost world and extinct ecosystem
(Arizona State University) The field study site of Pinnacle Point, South Africa, sits at the center of the earliest evidence for symbolic behavior, complex pyrotechnology, projectile weapons, and the first use of foods from the sea, both geographically and scientifically, having contributed much on the evolutionary road to being a modern human. A special issue of Quaternary Science Review has compiled research on this pivotal location. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Jones named fellow of the Institute of Industrial and Systems Engineers
(University of Texas at Arlington) The Institute of Industrial and Systems Engineers (IISE) has named Erick Jones, a researcher at The University of Texas at Arlington, as a fellow, an honor that recognizes outstanding leaders of the profession who have made significant, nationally recognized contributions to industrial engineering. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Investigating associations of common medical conditions, alcohol use
(JAMA Network) The association between 26 common medical conditions including diabetes and high blood pressure and levels of use of alcohol was investigated with data from electronic health records of 2.7 million primary care patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pofatu: A new database for geochemical 'fingerprints' of artefacts
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) Due to the improvement and increased use of geochemical fingerprinting techniques during the last 25 years, the archaeological compositional data of stone tools has grown exponentially. The Pofatu Database is a large-scale collaborative project that enables curation and data sharing. The database also provides instrumental details, analytical procedures and reference standards used for calibration purposes or quality control. Thus, Pofatu ensures reproducibility and comparability between provenance studies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Oink, oink makes the pig
(Technische Universit ä t Dresden) In a new study, neuroscientists at TU Dresden demonstrated that the use of gestures and pictures makes foreign language teaching in primary schools more effective and sustainable. They thus provide important fundamental findings for the development of modern teaching methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Secure land rights essential to protect biodiversity and cultures within indigenous lands
(University of East Anglia) New research argues that legally protected large territories in Brazil are crucial to protect biodiversity and provide essential conditions for indigenous populations to maintain their traditional livelihoods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Excess coffee consumption a culprit for poor health
(University of South Australia) Cappuccino, latte or short black, coffee is one of the most commonly consumed drinks in the world. But whether it's good or bad for your health can be clarified by genetics, as a world-first study from the University of South Australia's Australian Centre for Precision Health shows that excess coffee consumption can cause poor health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Expandable foam for 3D printing large objects (video)
(American Chemical Society) It's a frustrating limitation of 3D printing: Printed objects must be smaller than the machine making them. Huge machines are impractical for printing large parts because they take up too much space and require excessive time to print. Now, a new material reported in ACS Applied Materials& Interfaces can be used to 3D print small objects that expand upon heating. The foam could find applications in architecture, aerospace and biomedicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chemistry job seekers face tough outlook during pandemic
(American Chemical Society) Even though it's been over a decade, the 2008 recession and its effects still loom over the chemistry enterprise. And now with the COVID-19 pandemic shutting down labs and universities across the world, chemistry students and professionals are again facing hiring freezes, reduced pay and other career obstacles.Chemical& Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, spoke with chemists about how they're navigating the current economic downturn. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

WPI awarded NSF grant to study impact of stress on student learning during pandemic
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) An interdisciplinary group of researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) will use a $199,999 RAPID grant from the National Science Foundation to study how stress and learning environments impact college students who are attending remote classes during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scarcity reduces consumers' concerns about prices, even during a pandemic, research shows
(Indiana University) New research published in the Journal of Consumer Marketing Research finds that scarcity actually decreases consumers' tendency to use price to judge a product's quality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Older, larger companies benefit from not investing in worker safety, study finds
(Oregon State University) Companies best equipped to provide safe workplaces are the least likely to do so, because they benefit financially from forgoing the cost of enacting workplace safety practices, a recent study found. In some cases, companies with worker injury claims were more than 50% more likely to survive than their safer counterparts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New imaging tool helps researchers see extent of Alzheimer's early damage
(Yale University) New imaging technology allows scientists to see the widespread loss of brain synapses in early stages of Alzheimer's disease, a finding that one day may help aid in drug development, according to a new Yale University study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blockchain: forget the criminal record, it might just save your life -- new study
(University of Bath) Blockchain is set to become a friend to consumers, protecting them from tainted food, fake medicine, fraud and products with illegal or unethical origins (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Soybean seeding rates and risk
(American Society of Agronomy) Broad study helps define optimal soybean seeding rates in North America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Beauty and the beast: Why both can win at social selling
(American Marketing Association) Consumers tend to make judgments of a seller's sociability, competence, and credibility based on facial attractiveness. Interestingly, the " premium " works at both ends of the spectrum in that attractive and unattractive sellers do better than people with ordinary faces. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Acute stress may slow down the spread of fears
(University of Konstanz) Psychologists from the University of Konstanz in Southern Germany find that we are less likely to amplify fears in social exchange if we are stressed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A hidden history of artificial intelligence in primary care
(American Academy of Family Physicians) Artificial intelligence methods are being utilized in radiology, cardiology and other medical specialty fields to quickly and accurately process large quantities of health data to improve the diagnostic and treatment power of health care teams. Compared to other medical specialty fields, primary care physicians deal with a very broad spectrum of illnesses, taking a person-centric approach to care, with fewer diagnostic instruments or tests available. The nature of primary care may pose unique challenges to the meaningful application of AI. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trouble getting a doctor's appointment may drive Medicaid enrollees to opt for the ER
(American Academy of Family Physicians) The expansion of Medi-Cal, California's Medicaid program, gave millions of low-income Californians access to health insurance, but this study conducted in Northern California found that new patients may have to wait up up to a month for an appointment with a participating primary care provider, depending on their county of residence. It is not uncommon for Medi-Cal enrollees to visit emergency rooms if they require more immediate care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins: What we can't see can help us find things
(Johns Hopkins University) Anyone who's ever tried to find something in a hurry knows how helpful it is to think about the lost item's color, size and shape. But surprisingly, traits of an object that you can't see also come into play during a search, Johns Hopkins University researchers found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news