Helping dental retainers and aligners fight off bacteria
(American Chemical Society) Clear, plastic aligners have been growing in popularity as alternatives to bulky, metal braces. And once the teeth are straightened, patients graduate to plastic retainers to maintain the perfect smile. But these appliances can become contaminated, so one group is now reporting in ACS Applied Materials& Interfaces that they have developed a film to prevent bacteria from growing on them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cultivating cannabis
(American Chemical Society) Not long ago, cannabis growers learned their trade mainly by trial and error, passing along tips to others behind a veil of secrecy. But with expanding legalization of cannabis in the US, this situation is changing. According to an article in Chemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society, cannabis growers are starting to benefit from increased communication and scientific research about the plant and its cultivation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People with family history of alcoholism release more dopamine in expectation of alcohol
(Elsevier) People with a family history of alcohol use disorder (AUD) release more dopamine in the brain's main reward center in response to the expectation of alcohol than people diagnosed with the disorder, or healthy people without any family history of AUD, reports a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Andy Slavitt to receive national award From the American College of Physicians
(American College of Physicians) The American College of Physicians (ACP) will award Andy Slavitt the Joseph F. Boyle Award for Distinguished Public Service. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Perceived socioeconomic status can affect how old we feel
(North Carolina State University) A recent study finds that how older adults perceive their socioeconomic status influences how old they feel and their attitudes toward aging. Specifically, the lower people deem their relative socioeconomic status, the worse they feel about growing older. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Self-consistency influences how we make decisions
(eLife) When making decisions, our perception is influenced by judgments we have made in the past as a way of remaining consistent with ourselves, suggests new research published in eLife. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study highlights environmental cost of tearing down Vancouver's single-family homes
(University of British Columbia) Rising property values in Vancouver have resulted in the demolition of an unprecedented number of single-family homes in recent years, many of which were replaced with the same type of structure. Despite the better energy performance of the new homes, this cycle is likely to increase overall greenhouse gas emissions, according to new analysis from researchers at the University of British Columbia and MountainMath Software. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boys continue to lag behind in reading
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) When boys start school, they recognize fewer letters and their corresponding sounds than girls do. The difference is just as great at the end of the school year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fleet of autonomous boats could service cities to reduce road traffic
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and the Senseable City Lab in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning (DUSP), have designed a fleet of autonomous boats that offer high maneuverability and precise control. The boats can also be rapidly 3D printed using a low-cost printer, making mass manufacturing more feasible. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers challenge genetic tests for guiding psychiatric treatment
(McLean Hospital) The paper reviewed the scientific basis and effectiveness of pharmacogenetic (Pgen) tests in guiding the choices and doses of psychiatric medications for treating major depressive disorder (MDD) and related psychiatric conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Change the face of nanoparticles and you'll rule chemistry!
(Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences) Depending on the lighting, the surface of appropriately crafted nanoparticles can change its topography. Researchers from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences have shown that the molecular mechanism they have designed makes it possible, by the use of light, to effectively uncover or hide catalyst molecules. The technique they present leads to qualitatively new possibilities to control the course of chemical reactions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Leg exercise is critical to brain and nervous system health
(Frontiers) New research shows that using the legs, particularly in weight-bearing exercise, sends signals to the brain that are vital for the production of healthy neural cells. The groundbreaking study fundamentally alters brain and nervous system medicine -- giving doctors new clues as to why patients with motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy and other neurological diseases often rapidly decline when their movement becomes limited. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The role of race in police contact among homeless youth
(Crime and Justice Research Alliance) A new longitudinal study examined the likelihood of homeless youth of different races being harassed and arrested by police. The study found that nonwhite homeless youth are more likely than white homeless youth to report police harassment and arrest, but that elements of living on the street -- including increased visibility and prior experiences with harassment -- offset racial disparities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Poor sleep may keep arthritis patients from getting enough exercise
(Wiley) Poor sleep quality was linked with less physical activity in an Arthritis Care& Research analysis of individuals with or at risk for knee osteoarthritis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Trump Presidency's impact on public perception of the Republican Party
(Wiley) A new Presidential Studies Quarterly article analyzes the effects of the early Trump Presidency on public attitudes toward the Republican Party. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Do childhood development programs help children living in conflict and crisis settings?
(Wiley) Millions of young children living in conditions of war, disaster, and displacement are at increased risk for developmental difficulties that can follow them throughout their lives. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Centenarians' end-of-life thoughts: is their social network informed?
(Wiley) People in centenarians' close social networks are often not aware of their thoughts on end-of-life issues, a new Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study reveals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Humboldt professorship for FAU
(University of Erlangen-Nuremberg) Friedrich-Alexander-Universit ä t Erlangen-N ü rnberg (FAU) succeeds in bid for most prestigious international research award in Germany for the fourth time. Prof. Ewa Dabrowska, 54, a linguistics expert nominated by FAU, has been awarded an Alexander von Humboldt Professorship. The award of 3.5 million euros will allow Dabrowska to continue her current scientific research at FAU. The Polish native currently teaches at the University of Birmingham in England. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds popular 'growth mindset' educational interventions aren't very effective
(Michigan State University) A new study co-authored by researchers at Michigan State University and Case Western Reserve University found that 'growth mindset interventions,' or programs that teach students they can improve their intelligence with effort -- and therefore improve grades and test scores -- don't work for students in most circumstances. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Ancient mound builders carefully timed their occupation of coastal Louisiana site
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A new study of ancient mound builders who lived hundreds of years ago on the Mississippi River Delta near present-day New Orleans offers new insights into how Native peoples selected the landforms that supported their villages and earthen mounds -- and why these sites were later abandoned. (Includes link to video.) (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People with ASD risk being manipulated because they can't tell when they're being lied to
(University of Kent) A new study shows that the ability to distinguish truth from lies is diminished in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) -- putting them at greater risk of being manipulated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Decoding digital ownership: Why your e-book might not feel like 'yours'
(University of Arizona) People feel very differently about owning physical books versus e-books, a recent study shows. While stereotypes suggest that younger consumers prefer digital books, that is not actually the case, researchers found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gauging language proficiency through eye movement
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) An MIT study indicates eye movement can reveal the proficiency of people reading English as a second language. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Critical advice for families to help heart patients
(European Society of Cardiology) When a 50-year-old mother or father returns home after a heart attack, will the whole family adopt a better diet? Is it really necessary? This is an issue facing millions of families each year and one of the many to be addressed next month at EuroHeartCare 2018, the annual congress of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Guns in Chicago just '2.5 handshakes' away
(Northwestern University) In one of the first studies to try to map a gun market using network science, researchers used the novel scientific approach to understand how close offenders are to guns in the city of Chicago. Recreating Chicago's co-offending network of approximately 188,000 people, the researchers used data on firearms recovered by the Chicago Police Department to locate who in the network possessed those guns. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Posttraumatic stress affects academics
(Penn State) Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) caused by traumatic military experiences is associated with feelings of anxiety, anger, sadness and/or guilt. New Penn State research is evaluating how PTSD symptoms increase risks for academic difficulties as well. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Including Indigenous elders in primary care positively affects Indigenous patients' mental health
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) Indigenous elders can have a broad range of positive effects on the mental and physical health of urban Indigenous people who often experience marginalization and barriers accessing health care, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) that partnered elders with mainstream health care providers in primary care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Friends influence middle schoolers' attitudes toward peers of different ethnicities, races
(Society for Research in Child Development) Studies have shown that for young people, simply being around peers from different ethnic and racial backgrounds may not be enough to improve attitudes toward other groups. Instead, children and adolescents also need to value spending time and forming relationships with peers from diverse groups. A new study examined how friends in middle school affect each other's attitudes about interacting with peers of different ethnicities and races, finding that they significantly influence each other's racial and ethnic views. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Young toddlers may learn more from interactive than noninteractive media
(Society for Research in Child Development) Preschoolers can learn from educational television, but younger toddlers may learn more from interactive digital media (such as video chats and touchscreen mobile apps) than from TV and videos alone, which don't require them to interact. That's the conclusion of a new article in the journal Child Development Perspectives that also notes that not all children learn to the same degree from these media. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Oxytocin mediates subjective duration of social interactions
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Psychologists ZHOU Wen, JIANG Yi and their colleagues at the Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, probed this issue by examining individuals' temporal perception of social interactions and the variation among individuals, noting the gregarious nature of humans, the ubiquity of social interactions in daily life and the pronounced interindividual differences in social proficiency -- a stable personality trait. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New PLOS channel for the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) community
(PLOS) PLOS, in collaboration with GARDP, is delighted to announce the launch of the Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Channel during the World Health Assembly, Geneva. This new channel offers the AMR research community access to the latest research, as well as commentaries, blogs, news and discussions that span science, research and development, policy and public health in the fight against AMR. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Power to the people
(University of Utah) The University of Utah College of Engineering has received a $2 million grant to create a laboratory and develop new technology for communities with backup power sources, known as microgrids, so they can quickly and more securely operate in the event of a massive power outage due to a natural disaster. Researchers will develop better computerized controllers for microgrids that will be faster and more secure to cyberattacks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The case for not taxing multinationals
(Bocconi University) The habit of taxing Multinational Enterprises (MNEs)' profits is the legacy of a time when " GM had to make cars in Detroit and Hollywood had to make movies in L.A. " , but is now inefficient and detrimental to global welfare, a new study by Nicolai Foss, Rodolfo Debenedetti Chair of Entrepreneurship at Bocconi University, and colleagues asserts. The solution would be zeroing corporate tax and replacing it with a hike in taxes on dividends and sales. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Schizophrenics' blood has more genetic material from microbes
(Oregon State University) The blood of schizophrenia patients features genetic material from more types of microorganisms than that of people without the debilitating mental illness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

International award for QUT Head of Nursing
(Queensland University of Technology) An Australian pioneer in improving the quality of life for people with cancer has become the first person outside of North American to receive the prestigious Distinguished Researcher award from the international Oncology Nursing Society. The award was presented to QUT's Professor Patsy Yates in Washington DC on the weekend. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pregnant smokers may reduce harm done to baby's lungs by taking vitamin C
(American Thoracic Society) Women who are unable to quit smoking during their pregnancy may reduce the harm smoking does to their baby's lungs by taking vitamin C, according to a new randomized, controlled trial presented at the ATS 2018 International Conference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Palliative care may reduce suicide risk in veterans with advanced lung cancer
(American Thoracic Society) Palliative care appears to reduce the risk of suicide in veterans diagnosed with advanced stage lung cancer, according to new research presented at the ATS 2018 International Conference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Physicians report feeling moral distress over hospital policies that force inadequate care
(American College of Physicians) Clinicians in safety-net hospitals describe feeling moral distress and being driven toward professional burnout because of policies that prevent them from performing hemodialysis to undocumented immigrants, except in the case of an emergency. Being forced to provide inferior care due to the patient's immigration status was a significant burden to the clinicians who reported feeling a sense of admiration for these patients and a desire to advocate on their behalf. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Single 'clock' syncs action and perception
(Society for Neuroscience) A difficult task that requires participants to determine which of two stimuli appears first demonstrates how varying rhythms of brain activity may be synchronized to achieve a stable sense of time. The research is published in eNeuro. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Personalizing therapeutic brain stimulation
(Society for Neuroscience) A study of epilepsy patients with implanted electrodes provides an unprecedented view of the changes in brain activity created by electrical stimulation. These findings, published in Journal of Neuroscience, have the potential to improve noninvasive stimulation approaches toward the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

International anesthesia standards updated with WHO in global effort to improve surgical care
(World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesiologists) This month the World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesiologists (WFSA) launched an update of the International Standards For A Safe Practice of Anaesthesia, co-published with World Health Organization (WHO) for the first time as an official WHO guideline. The standards are recommended for anesthesia professionals throughout the world and are intended to provide guidance to anesthesia professionals, their professional societies, hospital and facility administrators, and governments for improving and maintaining quality and safety in anesthesia. (Source: EurekAlert! - ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Perceived trustworthiness helps women entrepreneurs with crowdfunding backers
(Louisiana State University) Female entrepreneurs have been at a disadvantage when seeking financial backing from traditional sources, but new research shows that crowdfunding investors view them as more trustworthy, making female-led projects more likely to secure support through crowdfunding platforms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sleep better, parent better: Study shows link between maternal sleep and permissive parenting
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) A new study from Kelly Tu, a human development and family studies researcher at the University of Illinois, and colleagues, looks at the link between maternal sleep and permissive parenting during late adolescence. Findings show that mothers who don't get enough sleep or who take longer falling asleep have a greater tendency to engage in permissive parenting -- parenting marked by lax or inconsistent discipline. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pregnancy drug DES might have triggered ADHD in the grandchildren of women who used it
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) A new study reported elevated odds for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the grandchildren of users of diethylstilbestrol, a synthetic estrogen commonly known as DES prescribed between 1938 and 1971 to prevent pregnancy complications. This is the first study to provide evidence of the potential neurodevelopmental consequences of DES use across generations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Age-related racial disparities in suicide rates among youth ages 5 to 17 years
(Nationwide Children's Hospital) The study shows racial disparities in suicide rates are age-related. Specifically, suicide rates for black children aged 5-12 were roughly two times higher than those of similarly-aged white children. For older children, the trend reverses back to the national average. For youth aged 13-17 years, suicide was roughly 50 percent lower in black children than in white children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Age-related racial disparity in suicide rates among US youth
(NIH/National Institute of Mental Health) Researchers investigated race-related differences in suicide rates in US youth. The researchers analyzed data separately for children ages 5-12 and adolescents ages 13-17. The suicide rate was roughly two times higher for black children compared with white children of the same age group. In contrast, the suicide rate for black adolescents was half that of white adolescents. The findings suggest the need for more research into contributing factors and targeted interventions for children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Age-related racial disparity in childhood suicide
(JAMA Network) Age-related racial disparity exists in suicide rates among US youths. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preventing murder by addressing domestic violence
(Case Western Reserve University) Victims of domestic violence are at a high risk to be murdered -- or a victim of attempted murder -- according to a Cuyahoga County task force of criminal-justice professionals, victim advocates and researchers working to prevent domestic violence and homicides. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Many Americans say infectious and emerging diseases in other countries will threaten the US
(Research!America) An overwhelming majority of Americans (95%) think infectious and emerging diseases facing other countries will pose a 'major' or 'minor' threat to the U.S. in the next few years, but more than half (61%) say they are confident the federal government can prevent a major infectious disease outbreak in the US, according to a new national public opinion survey commissioned by Research!America and the American Society for Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children understand plant-animal interdependence by the age of eight
(University of the Basque Country) When do children start to become aware of the relationship between animal and plant life? According to a study by the UPV/EHU, they begin to associate animals and plants with each other spontaneously in their drawings by the age of eight. The UPV/EHU researchers Jos é Domingo Villarroel, Á lvaro Ant ó n, Teresa Nu ñ o and Daniel Zuazagoitia are the authors of this work, published in the scientific journal Sustainability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news