GSA advances initiative to change 'conventional wisdom' on aging
(The Gerontological Society of America) On behalf of eight national aging organizations, The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) has secured multi-year grant funding from several foundations to lead the next phase of the Reframing Aging Initiative -- a long-term social change endeavor designed to improve the public's understanding of what aging means and what contributions older people bring to society. Ultimately, this understanding will counter ageism and guide our nation's approach to ensuring healthy and productive aging for all people across the life course. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Acetaminophen may increase stroke risk for those with diabetes
(American Geriatrics Society) Surprisingly, we are only now coming to understand how acetaminophen works -- and recent research shows that we may need to develop a better understanding of the need for caution when using acetaminophen, especially when it comes to avoiding some of the risks associated with its use. A team of researchers decided to study the safety of acetaminophen in a nursing home setting. Their study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Team models cocaine trafficking response to counternarcotic efforts
(University of Wyoming) A new computer model offers a much-needed, evidence-based tool to assess different cocaine interception scenarios and predict how drug smugglers react to attempts by authorities to intercept their narcotics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Omega-3 fatty acid supplements, hypothyroidism could lower risk of T-zone lymphoma in dogs
(Morris Animal Foundation) Dogs that receive omega-3 fatty acid supplements or have hypothyroidism may be less likely to develop T-zone lymphoma (TZL). Those are two findings from Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at Colorado State University, who studied associations of environment and health history of the disease among golden retrievers. They published their results in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Does live tweeting while watching TV distract from the ads?
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) Researchers from the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University and at Goizueta Business School at Emory University published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science which reveals that advertisers can see a boost in online shopping when television viewers multitask and engage in social media activity while watching certain programs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Adults at high risk for HIV infection have low rates of vaccination against HPV
(American Association for Cancer Research) Adults who are at high risk of becoming infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which causes AIDS, were less likely than the general population to be vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV), which can cause anal and cervical cancer, according to results presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, held in Atlanta March 29-April 3. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Love Island: Flamboyant males get the girls on Madagascar
(Frontiers) German scientists have discovered two new species of giant stick insect on Madagascar, whose males become dazzling blue or multicolored at sexual maturity.Writing in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, the researchers describe their rare and exciting findings, and wonder at the reproductive success of the least stick-like stick insects on the planet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Israel's Ocular discovery partners with all India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
(Ocular Discovery) Today, Israeli-based Ocular Discovery and All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) New Delhi, announced the launch of a novel research partnership investigating the mechanism of action of DCGI approved Dipyridamole, for optimized delivery and therapeutic treatment of various Ocular Surface Disorders (OSD). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How the brain finds meaning in metaphor
(University of Arizona) Whether you bend a rod or bend the rules, the brain processes the word 'bend' similarly, with the sensory motor region playing a key role, according to new research by University of Arizona assistant professor of psychology Vicky Lai. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mental health disorders rife in post-conflict areas
(Anglia Ruskin University) A new study has found that 58 percent of people displaced following the civil war in Sri Lanka have suffered mental health problems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pregnant women with long commutes to work at increased risk for adverse birth outcomes
(Lehigh University) In a study published in Economics& Human Biology researchers from Lehigh University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison found that pregnant women who commute long-distance to work have an increased risk of adverse birth outcomes, including having babies born at a low-birth weight. The study is the first to examine the impact of long-distance commuting during pregnancy on infant health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Drugs used to enhance sexual experiences, especially in UK
(University College London) Combining drugs with sex is common regardless of gender or sexual orientation, reveals new research by UCL and the Global Drug Survey into global trends of substance-linked sex.The findings, published today in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, revealed that alcohol, cannabis, MDMA and cocaine are the drugs most commonly combined with sex. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A bald gene find ­ ing
(University of Helsinki) Hairlessness in dogs can be the result of deliberate breeding or, in certain breeds, a defect. A recent study completed at the University of Helsinki describes a gene variant in the SGK3 gene, which causes hairlessness in Scottish deerhounds. The gene defect results in puppies born with thin fur that lose all of their hair in a few weeks. SGK3 is also a candidate for association with non-hormonal baldness in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GGC launches EpiSign, a novel clinical test for epigenetic changes
(Greenwood Genetic Center) Greenwood Diagnostic Laboratories at the Greenwood Genetic Center, in collaboration with London Health Sciences Centre, announce the launch of a new diagnostic test focused on disease-specific epigenetic signatures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Martin Borch Jensen to present at the 6th Aging Research for Drug Discovery Forum in Basel
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Martin Borch Jensen to present at the 6th Aging Research for Drug Discovery Forum in Basel (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Violence between intimate partners -- new book launched
(University of Huddersfield) The second edition of Dr. Helen Gavin's book, 'Criminological and Forensic Psychology,' was launched recently and includes a new chapter looking at violence between intimate partners. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tiger geckos in Vietnam could be the next species sold into extinction, shows a new survey
(Pensoft Publishers) While information about the conservation status of the tiger gecko species is largely missing, these Asian lizards are already particularly vulnerable to extinction. A study, published in the open-access journal Nature Conservation, provides an overview of their domestic and international trade with a focus on species native to Vietnam. By providing further knowledge about the species abundance and threats for the Vietnamese Cat Ba tiger gecko, the research team urges for strict conservation measures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Counties with more trees and shrubs spend less on Medicare, study finds
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A new study finds that Medicare costs tend to be lower in counties with more forests and shrublands than in counties dominated by other types of land cover. The relationship persists even when accounting for economic, geographic or other factors that might independently influence health care costs, researchers report. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research connects big data marketing tools, land conservation
(The University of Montana) The same data used by digital marketers to sell products can also help inspire conservation behaviors, according to new research from the University of Montana. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Be the change you want to see in the world
(University of Sussex) Individuals have as big a role to play in tackling climate change as major corporations but only if they can be encouraged to make significant lifestyle changes by effective government policy, a major new European study co-authored by a University of Sussex academic has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

London cyclists warned evening commute has the dirtiest air, so pick a clean route home
(University of Surrey) Cyclists in London should take a different route back home during evening peak-time hours to avoid breathing in harmful black carbon from vehicles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Women dominate ob/gyn field but make less money than male counterparts
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) While women outnumber men as ob/gyn practitioners, they still make significantly less money and the pay gap extends to subspecialties like reproductive endocrinology and infertility, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, April 2019
(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) ORNL used artificial intelligence to analyze data from published medical studies about bullying to reveal the potential of broader impacts, such as mental illness or disease; New low-cost, printed, flexible sensor can wrap around power cables to precisely monitor electrical loads from household appliances; ORNL is evaluating paths for licensing remotely operated microreactors, which could provide clean energy to isolated regions; ORNL-led team used carbon nanotubes to improve process that removes salt from water. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Drinking diplomacy
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Using newly discovered archival materials, Igor Fedyukin of the Higher School of Economics, in collaboration with Robert Collis (Drake University) and Ernest A. Zitser (Duke University), sheds light on the significance and context surrounding a Spanish diplomat's initiative which sought to establish an informal men's club called the 'Order of the Anti-Sober' at Peter II's court. Their study was published in The International History Review. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to ice-proof the next generation of aircraft
(American Institute of Physics) To prevent ice formation on aircraft during flight, current systems utilize the heat generated by burning fuel, but these high-temperature, fuel-dependent systems cannot be used on the proposed all-electric, temperature-sensitive materials of next-generation aircraft. As some scientists search for new anti-icing methods, some have taken a different approach. They've published evidence in Physics of Fluids showing that equipment important in controlling landing and takeoff can double-up as icing control. It depends on plasma actuators. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Changes in public perception of e-cigarettes, cigarettes
(JAMA Network) An analysis of data from two nationally representative surveys reports   a greater proportion of US adults perceived electronic cigarettes to be as, or more, harmful than cigarettes and a decreasing proportion of US adults perceived e-cigarettes to be less harmful than cigarettes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Smoking and mortality in Asia
(JAMA Network) In this analysis of data from 20 studies conducted in China, Japan, South Korea, Singapore, Taiwan and India with more than 1 million participants, deaths associated with smoking continued to increase among men in Asia grouped by the years in which they were born. Among the study participants, there were 144,366 deaths (with 9,158 from lung cancer) during an average follow-up of almost 12 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new model to trial preventative treatments for schizophrenia
(University of Queensland) Neuroscientists at The University of Queensland have developed a new animal model of schizophrenia that will enable researchers around the world to better understand the disease and develop new treatments.Schizophrenia, which affects around seven people in 1,000, is a poorly understood group of mental disorders that disrupt cognition and behavior. The precise neurological cause of schizophrenia is unknown and the development of better treatments are urgently needed. This research will provide a model to begin to address some of the underlying fundamental mechanisms involved. (Source: EurekAlert! ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Seven young scientists to receive President of Russia grants for 2019/2020
(Kazan Federal University) Annual President of Russia grant results have been announced. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Kicking goals for kids with autism
(University of South Australia) Ahead of World Autism Awareness Day on April 2, researchers from the University of South Australia are turning autism interventions on their head with a stand-out sports program that's training coaches how to best achieve results for students with autism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Amazon rainforest could become US-China trade war casualty, experts warn
(University of Edinburgh) Deforestation of the Amazon rainforest could accelerate as a result of the US-China trade war, University of Edinburgh researchers have warned. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

April Fools hoax stories could offer clues to help identify 'fake news'
(Lancaster University) Academic experts in natural language processing from Lancaster University who are interested in deception have compared the language used within written April Fools hoaxes and fake news stories. They have discovered that there are similarities in the written structure of humorous April Fools hoaxes -- the spoof articles published by media outlets every April 1 -- and malicious fake news stories. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New plant breeding technologies for food security
(University of G ö ttingen) An international team, including researchers from the University of G ö ttingen, argues in a perspective article recently published in " Science " that new plant breeding technologies can contribute significantly to food security and sustainable development. Genome editing techniques in particular, such as CRISPR/Cas, could help to make agriculture more productive and environmentally friendly. The researchers advocate the responsible use and support of these new technologies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Over a million UK businesses see Brexit as major obstacle to success
(Taylor& Francis Group) The number of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that view Brexit as a major obstacle to success has increased significantly since the referendum, according to research published in the journal Regional Studies by Ross Brown and John Wilson from the Centre for Responsible Banking& Finance at the University of St Andrews and Jose Li ñ ares-Zegarra, University of Essex. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Home-based tools can help assess dementia risk and progression
(University of California - San Diego) Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues elsewhere, report on a novel four-year, randomized clinical trial evaluating different home-based methods to assess cognitive function and decline in participants over the age of 75. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Death rates from cesarean section far higher in developing countries
(Queen Mary University of London) Cesarean sections are disproportionately threatening the lives of women and babies in low and middle-income countries (LMIC), according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cultured stem cells reconstruct sensory nerve and tissue structure in the nose
(Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus) Researchers have developed a method to grow and maintain olfactory stem cells. The work is a launch pad for developing stem cell transplantation therapies or pharmacologic activation of a patient's own dormant cells, to restore the sense of smell where it has been damaged by injury or degeneration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Arbitrary categories improve visual learning transfer, study finds
(Brown University) This type of learning transfer opens the door for applying basic cognitive science research to help patients with vision loss. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What Americans know about science
(Pew Research Center) There are substantial differences among Americans when it comes to knowledge and understanding of science and scientific processes. People's level of science knowledge varies by education, race, ethnicity and gender. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Crime scene schizophrenia -- 30 genes under suspicion
(University of Basel) The research group led by Prof. Alex Schier, Director of the University of Basel's Biozentrum, has identified 30 genes associated with schizophrenia. The team was able to show which pathological changes in the brain and behavioral abnormalities are triggered by these genes. The results of the study have now been published in Cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Seismic safety upgrades may cost CA hospitals billions
(RAND Corporation) California hospitals would need to make substantial investments -- between $34 billion and $143 billion statewide -- to meet 2030 state seismic safety standards, according to a new RAND Corporation report. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stabilizing ends of chromosomes could treat age-related disease
This study suggests that maintaining telomere length might help sustain the regenerative capacity of cells and tissues and improve disease outcome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Major EU grant for research on collective identity
(University of Copenhagen - Faculty of Humanities) The European Research Council has awarded Professor Dan Zahavi from University of Copenhagen an Advanced Grant of € 2.4 million for the research project 'Who are we', which will examine what it means to feel, think and act as a group -- as a we (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sexual satisfaction among older people about more than just health
(London School of Hygiene& Tropical Medicine) Sexual satisfaction among older people about more than just health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

KIT expert comments on current topic: Trade war imperils Amazon rainforest
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) Last year, the United States of America imposed tariffs of up to 25 percent on goods imported from China. The Chinese government reacted by imposing tariffs of 25 percent on US goods, including US soybeans. Exports of US soybeans to China in 2018 dropped by 50 percent, even though the trade war had begun in the middle of the year only. Replacement may be provided by Brazil. This might have dramatic impacts on the rainforest, KIT experts warn. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Being a woman in ancient Egypt: A hidden history of changing rights
(University of Kent) Women's rights in ancient Egypt were better before the 4th century BC than during the Greco-Roman period that followed, according to a new book by a University of Kent expert.Dr Ada Nifosi, a lecturer in Ancient History in the University's School of European Culture and Languages, found that the status of women in ancient Egypt was higher and had more autonomy than generations to come, including over issues that remain contested today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

For some people, attractive wives and high status husbands enhance marital quality
(Society for Personality and Social Psychology) Researchers from Florida State University found that maximizing men -- those who seek to make the 'best' choice -- who had attractive wives were more satisfied at the start of their marriages than maximizing men who had less attractive wives, and maximizing women who had high status husbands experienced less steep declines in satisfaction over time than maximizing women who had low status husbands. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Professor Dr Elena Esposito receives ERC Advanced Grant
(Bielefeld University) Computers evaluate data that are then used to make predictions for medicine, insurance, or policing: what effect do these algorithms and their predictions have in society? The Bielefeld academic Elena Esposito is receiving an ERC Advanced Grant from the European Research Council (ERC) for her sociological research on this topic. This grant is awarded to outstanding researchers who are already established, leading principal investigators in their field of research. It is worth 2.1 million euros over a period of five years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Surgical implications of rising heroin abuse
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) With heroin abuse on the rise in the United States, related surgical complications are also increasing, including severe infections and complications related to heroin injection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New medication gives mice bigger muscles
(Aarhus University) Researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have studied a new group of medicinal products which increase the muscle- and bone mass of mice over a few weeks. This offers hope to the elderly and people suffering from weak muscles and bones due to illness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news