Project teams humans and AI to scan social media posts to aid in disaster response
(Virginia Tech) Given the immense amount of data in social media posts, only some of which may be important to emergency managers, researchers are using artificial intelligence, or AI, to make the process more efficient. Such computer systems use a process called machine learning, in which the computers are " trained " by humans, who help identify the characteristics of relevant posts in different situations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New evidence regarding emerald production in Roman Egypt coming from Wadi Sikait
(University of Chicago Press Journals) A new paper published in the Journal of Near Eastern Studies presents the results of and images from the resuming of the archaeological seasons in the Mons Smaragdus region in the Egyptian Eastern Desert. During the 1990s a team from the " Berenike Project " started to survey the area and conducted the first excavations, focusing on the main site identified, Sikait, where the archaeological seasons resumed in January of 2018 and January 2020. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to gain a sense of well-being, free and online
(Yale University) In 2018, when Professor Laurie Santos introduced her course " Psychology and the Good Life, " a class on the science of happiness, it became the most popular in the history of Yale, attracting more than 1,200 undergraduate enrollees that first semester. An online course based on those teachings became a global phenomenon. By latest count, 3.38 million people have enrolled to take the free Coursera.org course, called " The Science of Well Being. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Revealing the routes of the Hanseatic era online
(University of G ö ttingen) The Hanseatic League was a confederation of merchant guilds and market towns in Northwestern and Central Europe, which dominated trade in the region for 300 years. A digital platform has now been built which reveals the long-distance trade routes in Northern Europe between 1350 and 1650. The Research Center for Hanse and Baltic History, the Universities of Magdeburg, Aarhus and Nijmegen, and a team from the University of G ö ttingen worked together to make this possible. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How nonprofits can drive more giving from their current donor base
This study's data-driven insights can help nonprofits structure their giving options better. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

2021 Global Food Policy Report
(International Food Policy Research Institute) A year of evidence and analysis finds the pandemic has severely disrupted food systems and upended livelihoods, but also that responses have demonstrated the power of well-crafted policies to blunt the impact of major shocks while laying the groundwork for stronger, more resilient food systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Indicators for a new audience measurement model for streaming platforms
(Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC)) A recent study performed analysed audience behaviour and measurement systems on the Netflix streaming platform and video on demand service. Their aim was to establish a more reliable audience measurement model. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using emotion and humor to combat science misinformation
(University of Utah) Sara K. Yeo, associate professor of communication at the University of Utah, examines why it's so difficult to detect science misinformation and suggests that using humor may help combat the issue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Practicing 'mindfulness' in summer camp benefits campers and counselors alike
(Florida Atlantic University) A project shows how implementing an evidence-based mindfulness program in a summer camp setting decreases emotional distress in school age children and empowers campers and counselors alike - enhancing camper-counselor relationships. Mindfulness - a state of consciousness that fosters awareness - has the potential to help regulate emotions and behaviors. Mindful breathing, mindful bodies, and mindful listening assisted in bringing awareness to campers in the program and provided skills to address stressful experiences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New advice for medics treating high blood pressure
(National University of Ireland Galway) Researchers at NUI Galway, Johns Hopkins University and Harvard Medical School found no evidence that diastolic blood pressure - the bottom reading on a test - can be harmful to patients when reduced to levels that were previously considered to be too low. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

National narcissists likely to support greenwashing campaigns to improve nation's image
(University of Kent) New research by the University of Kent and the SWPS University has discovered that national narcissists are more likely to support greenwashing (misleading information about the environmental benefits of a product, a company or a policy) in order to improve their nation's public image. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The amount of time children spend watching screens influences their eating habits
(University of Malaga) A study conducted by the University of Malaga evidences how children and adolescents' exposure to mobile phones and video games is associated with worse adherence to the Mediterranean diet, which healthy characteristics prevent obesity (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows powered prosthetic ankles can restore a wide range of functions for amputees
(North Carolina State University) A recent case study demonstrates that, with training, neural control of a powered prosthetic ankle can restore a wide range of abilities, including standing on very challenging surfaces and squatting. The researchers are currently working with a larger group of study participants to see how broadly applicable the findings may be. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genetic predisposition to schizophrenia may increase risk of psychosis from cannabis use
(Centre for Addiction and Mental Health) New research shows that while cannabis users had higher rates of psychotic experiences than non-users across the board, the difference was especially pronounced among those with high genetic predisposition to schizophrenia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Joyful screams perceived more strongly than screams of fear or anger
(University of Zurich) The human scream signals more than fear of imminent danger or entanglement in social conflicts. Screaming can also express joy or excitement. For the first time, researchers at the University of Zurich have demonstrated that non-alarming screams are even perceived and processed by the brain more efficiently than their alarming counterparts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More exposure to political TV ads heightens anxiety
(Cornell University) Beyond attempting to move a large swath of the population to vote one way or another, the seemingly constant bombardment of negativity in the name of our democratic process is anxiety-inducing, researchers have found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

IOS Press announces the relaunch of LD Connect
(IOS Press) IOS Press, an international publisher providing content and services for scientific, technical, and medical (STM) communities, is pleased to announce the relaunch of the renewed LD Connect (Linked Data Connect) website. Providing publicly available linked machine-readable metadata from all IOS Press journals and books, LD Connect has been completely rebuilt and rebranded. Located at ld.iospress.nl, it features enhanced browse and semantic search capabilities, expanded data, and new tools.It also constructs artificial intelligence (AI)-powered embeddings derived from all full text data, further unsiloing researc...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Webcam designed like a human eye: researchers question ubiquitous technology
(Saarland University) Microphones and cameras are everywhere today: in smartphones, laptops, even in refrigerators and televisions. Many people are now used to their presence and no longer see them for what they actually are - ubiquitous eyes and ears. A team of computer scientists from Saarland University uses an innovative design approach to critically question this sensory technology that has become part of everyday life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study cements age and location of hotly debated skull from early human Homo erectus
(American Museum of Natural History) A new study verifies the age and origin of one of the oldest specimens of Homo erectus--a very successful early human who roamed the world for nearly 2 million years. In doing so, the researchers also found two new specimens at the site--likely the earliest pieces of the Homo erectus skeleton yet discovered. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Finding resiliency in local, community news gathering
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Community newspapers often serve as the public's main source of accurate, local news. They also can be an important way to share the impact of major national events, such as a global pandemic. As the COVID-19 pandemic began spreading throughout the United States, journalism scholars at the University of Missouri and the University of Kansas found that community newspapers across the country began to reevaluate the way they had been doing business for decades. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mindfulness can make you selfish
(University at Buffalo) A new paper by University at Buffalo researchers demonstrates the surprising downsides of mindfulness, while offering easy ways to minimize those consequences -- both of which have practical implications for mindfulness training. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Five research-backed steps to a pro-vaccination social media campaign
(University of Pittsburgh) What can vaccine proponents, clinicians and public health communicators learn from " anti-vaxxers? " A lot, according to new guidance for pro-vaccination social media events written by University of Pittsburgh health scientists. The five-part guidelines, published today in the journal Vaccine, arose from an analysis of a grassroots pro-vaccination campaign, #DoctorsSpeakUp, organized last year. Unexpectedly, more than three-quarters of the tweets associated with the event were opposing vaccination, researchers found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Common approach to diversity in higher education reflects preferences of white Americans
(Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs) Many universities are guided by the motivation that diversity enhances student learning. This approach, however, is a view preferred by white and not Black Americans, and it also aligns with better relative outcomes for white Americans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Spanking may affect the brain development of a child
(Harvard University) Led by Harvard researchers, a new study linking spanking and child brain development shows spanking could alter a child's neural responses to their environment, in similar ways to a child experiencing more severe violence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Milken Institute, Baszucki Brain Research Fund launch fund for bipolar disorder research
(Milken Institute) Milken Institute's Center for Strategic Philanthropy and the Baszucki Brain Research Fund are launching a dedicated grant program aimed at advancing therapeutic discovery for bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder affects 2.3 million Americans and nearly 45 million people worldwide. The Fund intends to award up to 10 research grants in this cycle, providing up to $200,000 over the course of one year to support pilot research. Initial letters of intent are due May 14, 2021. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Twitch partners with University of Chichester to examine esports through scientific study
(University of Chichester) Twitch joins Chichester's new Esports degree, which is the first to study the physical and psychological impact of the esports and gaming industries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Workplace study during pandemic finds managers should talk less, listen more
(Baylor University) Workplace communication often took a back seat this past year, as employees and employers rushed to work remotely, struggled with technology barriers and adjusted to physical distancing. But the pandemic has resulted in valuable lessons for communicating on the job, according to a Baylor University study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH training grant enhances opportunities for biomedical graduate students at AU
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) Augusta University has received a $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to help support the graduate education of future scientists whose focus is cardiometabolic diseases -- like hypertension and diabetes -- which disproportionally affect minorities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Husbands still seen as the experts on their household's finances
(Ohio State University) Men were more likely to be the spouse with the most knowledge of a couple's finances in 2016 than they were in 1992 - especially in wealthy couples, a new study suggests.In 2016, 56% of husbands were designated as most knowledgeable, up from 53% in 1992 and 49% in 1995. But among households in the top 1% of net worth, the husband was designated as the most knowledgeable in 90% of the households in 2016. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Spit samples uncover genetic risk factors for paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder
(University of Calgary) University of Calgary and The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) researchers have discovered genetic risk factors for OCD that could help pave the way for earlier diagnosis and improved treatment for children and youth. Saliva samples from 5,000 kids were scanned and compared to responses using the Toronto Obsessive-Compulsive Scale. The team identified that those with a genetic variant in the gene PTPRD had a greater risk for obsessive-compulsive traits. Findings published in Translational Psychiatry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Profound loss of pleasure related to early-onset dementia
(University of Sydney) Loss of the ability to experience pleasure - or anhedonia - has been revealed as a key feature in frontotemporal dementia, in contrast to Alzheimer's disease. The findings from brain scans, believed to be a first, show grey matter deterioration in the so-called pleasure system of the brain - these regions were distinct from those implicated in depression or apathy, suggesting a possible treatment target for the early-onset dementia that affects people from 40-65 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can we end the cage age?
(Utrecht University) Between 2018 and 2020, 1,4 million EU citizens signed the petition 'End the Cage Age', with the aim of ending cage housing for farm animals in Europe. In response to this citizens initiative, the European Parliament requested a study by Utrecht University researchers on the possibilities to end cage housing. On 13 April, the scientists will present their report 'End the Cage Age - Looking for Alternatives' to the European Parliament. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Women 'risk' grey hair to feel authentic
(University of Exeter) Many women " risk " allowing natural grey hair to show in order to feel authentic, a new study shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mapping the paradigm shift of China's cancer burden for designing prevention strategies
(Cactus Communications) Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide, and the global burden of cancer continues to rise steadily and unchecked. Recently, in an article published in the Chinese Medical Journal, researchers have examined the changing profiles of cancer incidence and mortality worldwide in comparison with those in China. The findings will help scientists, healthcare professionals, and policymakers devise appropriate preventive strategies to tackle the cancer burden in the country. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study showing how the brain retrieves facts and may help people with memory problems
(University of York) A shared set of systems in the brain may play an important role in controlling the retrieval of facts and personal memories utilised in everyday life, new research shows.Scientists from the University of York say their findings may have relevance to memory disorders, including dementia, where problems remembering relevant information can impact on the daily life of patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Major risk of injury for recreational runners
(University of Gothenburg) Almost half of all recreational runners incur injuries, mostly relating to knees, calves or Achilles tendons, and the level of risk is equally high whatever your age, gender or running experience. These are the findings of a thesis within sport science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Having employees overseas helps companies reap US tax benefits
(North Carolina State University) A recent study finds US companies that have a substantial number of employees in foreign jurisdictions with lower tax rates are more likely than their peers to " artificially " locate earnings in those jurisdictions - and the Internal Revenue Service is less likely to challenge these complex tax-planning activities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UNH researchers develop software to monitor ocean soundscape especially during COVID-19
(University of New Hampshire) An international development team, led by researchers at the University of New Hampshire, has created a user-friendly software program that can process sound data collected from the world's oceans in a more standardized format that will enhance research and collaboration and help understand the global sea soundscape dynamics, including the impact of COVID-19 when travel and economic slowdowns put a halt to human activities in the ocean. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

C-Path's Alzheimer's Disease Consortium expands data repository
(Critical Path Institute (C-Path)) The Critical Path Institute's Critical Path for Alzheimer's Disease Consortium today announced that it is significantly expanding its Alzheimer's disease patient-level data repository with high-quality contemporary industry clinical trial datasets, focusing on early stages of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Frontline health workers across US faced unique stressors during COVID
(University of California - San Francisco) During the acute phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, emergency department doctors, nurses and other frontline staff experienced unprecedented levels of stress and emotional exhaustion that included nightmares or insomnia, according to a UC San Francisco-led study of emergency departments across the country. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 vaccine prioritization
(JAMA Network)What The Study Did:This survey study examines wh0 U.S. adultsbelieve should be prioritized for access toCOVID-19 vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

US children, adolescents diagnosed with COVID-19
(JAMA Network)What The Study Did:In this observational study,data are used to assess the association of demographic and clinical characteristics with severe COVID-19 illness among hospitalized U.S. pediatric patients with COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Out-of-pocket health care expenses before, after Affordable Care Act
(JAMA Network) What The Study Did: Researchers analyzed changes in out-of-pocket health care expenses in the United States during the last two decades. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Childhood diet and exercise creates healthier, less anxious adults
(University of California - Riverside) Exercise and a healthy diet in childhood leads to adults with bigger brains and lower levels of anxiety, according to new UC Riverside research in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Masculine traits linked to better parenting for some dads
(Ohio State University) In some men, having traditional masculine characteristics such as competitiveness and adventurousness was linked to being better fathers to infants, a new study found. But the men in this study - highly educated and from dual-earner couples - combined those stereotypically masculine traits with the belief that they should be nurturing, highly involved fathers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chronic sinus inflammation appears to alter brain activity
(University of Washington School of Medicine/UW Medicine) The millions of people who have chronic sinusitis deal not only with stuffy noses and headaches, they also commonly struggle to focus and experience depression and other symptoms that implicate the brain's involvement in their illness. New research links sinus inflammation with alterations in brain activity, specifically with the neural networks that modulate cognition, introspection and response to external stimuli. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An atmosphere of intrafamily trust tends to prevent problematic internet use
(University of C ó rdoba) A study by the University of Cordoba finds that strong communication within the family tends to reduce " cybergossip " and the overuse of social media, two key components of virtual bullying (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Modern human brain originated in Africa around 1.7 million years ago
(University of Zurich) The human brain as we know it today is relatively young. It evolved about 1.7 million years ago when the culture of stone tools in Africa became increasingly complex. A short time later, the new Homo populations spread to Southeast Asia, researchers from the University of Zurich have now shown using computed tomography analyses of fossilized skulls. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FAIR Health unveils three new enhancements to consumer platform, including shoppable services tool
(FAIR Health) The national, independent nonprofit FAIR Health is unveiling three new enhancements to its platform of online resources to support consumers as they navigate the healthcare system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heart failure and stroke rising in men under 40
(University of Gothenburg) Heart failure and stroke are unusual diagnoses among younger people. But they are now clearly on the rise in men below the age of 40, according to a University of Gothenburg study. The scientists have found links to obesity and low fitness in the upper teens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news