New research: Optimize open floor plans by shuffling workstations
(Carnegie Mellon University) New research from the Tepper School of Business suggests that changing work spaces pushes people out of their comfort zones, allowing employees to learn from each other and generate more innovative ideas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gender gap in spatial reasoning starts in elementary school, meta-analysis finds
(Emory Health Sciences) Males gain a slight advantage in mental-rotation performance during the first years of formal schooling, and this advantage slowly grows with age, tripling in size by the end of adolescence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UC Davis designer receives STEM grant from Johnson & Johnson
(University of California - Davis) Professor Katia Vega melds computing, chemistry, biotech, anatomy, human behavior, electronics and design in her work. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Industry leaders honored for research partnerships with UMass Lowell
(University of Massachusetts Lowell) UMass Lowell recently recognized Kronos and Raytheon for their commitment to the success of the university with its first-ever Preferred Partners honors. The companies were presented with awards for demonstrating their exceptional support of UMass Lowell's students, research, academics and athletics at the university's first Celebration of Industry Partners on April 5. The event was attended by members of the UMass Lowell community along with more than 90 industry partners from across New England, including 22 that were recognized as Strategic Partners. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Mindreading' neurons simulate decisions of social partners
(University of Cambridge) Scientists have identified special types of brain cells that may allow us to simulate the decision-making processes of others, thereby reconstructing their state of mind and predicting their intentions. Dysfunction in these 'simulation neurons' may help explain difficulties with social interactions in conditions such as autism and social anxiety. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rapid urbanization increasing pressure on rural water supplies globally
(University of Oxford) An international team of researchers has carried out the first systematic global review of water reallocation from rural to urban regions -- the practice of transferring water from rural areas to cities to meet demand from growing urban populations. They found that 69 cities with a population of 383 million people receive approximately 16 billion cubic meters of reallocated water per year -- almost the annual flow of the Colorado River. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People with a sense of oneness experience greater life satisfaction
(American Psychological Association) People who believe in oneness -- the idea that everything in the world is connected and interdependent -- appear to have greater life satisfaction than those who don't, regardless of whether they belong to a religion or don't, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Kidney Health Atlas reveals global burden of disease and inequities in access
(Tania Ewing and Associates) A global study of the burden of kidney disease will be released at the World Congress of Nephrology in Melbourne, Australia. It reveals that by 2030 14.5 million people will have end-stage kidney disease (ESKD); yet, only 5.4 million will receive treatment due to economic, social, and political factors. More than 2 million people die every year worldwide because of little or no access to dialysis or kidney transplantation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rutgers scientists discover new role for sensory signals in the brain
(Rutgers University) Learning how to tie a shoe or shoot a basketball isn't easy, but the brain somehow integrates sensory signals that are critical to coordinating movements so you can get it right. Now, Rutgers scientists have discovered that sensory signals in the brain's cerebral cortex, which plays a key role in controlling movement and other functions, have a different pattern of connections between nerve cells and different effects on behavior than motor signals. The motor area of the cortex sends signals to stimulate muscles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Arkansas project makes a difference for low-income youth with disabilities
(University of Arkansas) A new report finds that a University of Arkansas project called Arkansas PROMISE has succeeded in increasing services, training, employment and income for low-income youth with disabilities. Researchers will present their results in Washington, D.C., and via webcast. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Groundbreaking € 50 million digital monitoring project to prevent disease
(Newcastle University) A pioneering European project aims to develop a system using small sensors worn on the body so that how well you walk, a vital sign of health and wellbeing, can be monitored and assessed as you go about your daily routine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Texts like networks: How many words are sufficient to recognize the author?
(The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences) We are more original than we think -- this is what is being suggested by literary text analysis carried out by a new method of stylometry proposed by scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences. The author's individuality can already be seen in connections between no more than a dozen of words in English text. It turns out that in Slavic languages authorship identification requires even fewer words and is more certain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Conservationists discover hidden diversity in ancient frog family
(University of Kent) Research scientists led by the University of Kent have uncovered hidden diversity within a type of frog found only in the Seychelles, showing that those on each island have their own distinct lineage.The family tree of sooglossid frogs dates back at least 63 million years. They are living ancestors of those frogs that survived the meteor strike on earth approximately 66 million years ago, making them a highly evolutionarily distinct group. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People turn to consumerism to confront problems, grief and feelings
(Lancaster University) People are increasingly turning to commercial settings as outlets for their emotions, confronting problems, grief and feelings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence for future agile manufacturing
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) Clients request customized solutions, product lifecycles become shorter, new business models result: Industrial production has to keep pace with these dynamic changes. At Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), an interdisciplinary group of researchers from mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, information technology, and computer science is now working on an agile production system that autonomously and dynamically adapts to changing product specifications in remanufacturing. This AgiProbot project is funded by the Carl Zeiss Foundation with€3 million. (So...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research will illuminate history of Aleutian Island peoples by analyzing their genomes
(University of Kansas) Researchers from the University of Kansas will gather and study genomic information from ancient and contemporary peoples of the Aleutian Islands to better grasp their evolutionary and cultural history. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Philadelphia hospitals responded to equivalent of 54 mass shooting-type events in 11 years
(Temple University Health System) A research team led by Temple's Dr. Jessica H. Beard, set out to calculate the number and analyze trends in the rates of firearm-injured patients (FIP) transported at clustered time intervals to Philadelphia-area hospitals over an 11-year period. They also examined FIP demographics and mortality, time of day of FIP transport and level of treating trauma center over the same study period, comparing these characteristics between FIP clusters and the overall FIP population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Protein pileup affects social behaviors through altered brain signaling
(RIKEN) Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) have discovered that when a normal cellular cleanup process is disrupted, mice start behaving in ways that resemble human symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia. They found that loss of normal autophagy influences how brain cells react to inhibitory signals from each other and contributes to the behavioral changes. This intricate signaling pathway could be a new therapeutic target for neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Association between household workload, career dissatisfaction for physician moms
This study used data from an online survey of about 1,700 physician mothers to examine how responsibilities at home are associated with career dissatisfaction and whether that differs by specialty. Nearly all of the physician mothers were partnered or married and 27 percent were in procedural specialties (defined as all surgical specialties, anesthesiologists, gastroenterologists and obstetricians-gynecologists). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Millions of children worldwide develop asthma annually due to traffic-related pollution
(George Washington University) About 4 million children worldwide develop asthma each year because of inhaling nitrogen dioxide air pollution, according to a study published today by researchers at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health (Milken Institute SPH). The study, based on data from 2010 to 2015, estimates that 64 percent of these new cases of asthma occur in urban areas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Despite more violent crimes, it's safer to be a cop today than 50 years ago
(Florida Atlantic University) Dangers of policing have dramatically declined since 1970 with a 75 percent drop in police officer line-of-duty deaths. In the context of nearly 50-year monthly trends, the study also shows a statistically significant decline in felonious killings of police following the Ferguson effect and Michael Brown's death in 2014, which directly contradicts the war on cops' theory. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More than a strip of paint needed to keep cyclists safe
(Monash University) On-road marked bicycle lanes are not the optimal solution to keeping cyclists safe, new research by Monash University has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mandatory preseason guidelines reduce heat illness among high school football players
(University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and partners have found strong evidence that rates of heat-related illnesses, such as heat cramps and heat strokes, were reduced by half in states that had mandated guidelines to reduce exertional heat illness among high school football players. This is one of the first studies examining the effectiveness of state-mandated guidelines for reducing exertional heat illness among high school football players. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers interpret Cherokee inscriptions in Alabama cave
(University of Tennessee at Knoxville) For the first time, a team of scholars and archaeologists has recorded and interpreted Cherokee inscriptions in Manitou Cave, Alabama. These inscriptions reveal evidence of secluded ceremonial activities at a time of crisis for the Cherokee, who were displaced from their ancestral lands and sent westward on the Trail of Tears in the 1830s. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Who will win the Game of Thrones?
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Shortly before the curtain drops on the hit HBO show Game of Thrones (GoT), students attending a computer science seminar at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) embarked on an unusual scientific mission: predicting which character has the best chance to sit the coveted Iron Throne. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ASHG launches Human Genetics Scholars Initiative
(American Society of Human Genetics) ASHG is pleased to announce the creation of the Human Genetics Scholars Initiative to increase and support workforce diversity in the human genetics and genomics research community. Over the course of the planned five-year program, the Human Genetics Scholars Initiative will provide a two-year, intensive mentoring and skill-building experience for up to 40 promising US trainees and early career scientists from underrepresented backgrounds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The heartland always a place of global connection, not isolation, author says
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A persistent heartland myth paints the rural and small town Midwest as local, insular and isolationist, but the author of a new book says its history shows a far different reality. University of Illinois historian Kristin Hoganson dug into local history and found a region formed by numerous far-flung global relationships, many connected with agriculture. The result is " The Heartland: An American History, " being published this month. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds noncompete clauses affect how employees behave, to benefit of employers
(University of Kansas) Gjergji Cici of the KU School of Business co-authored a study that is among the first to see how noncompete clauses influence those work under them, instead of the debate about their role in economic development or profits. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Online virtual world training, interactions empowers kids with social learning deficits
(Center for BrainHealth) After five years of proven success with Charisma(TM) for Youth -- an evidence-based virtual training program to learn and practice social skills in real time with trained clinicians -- the Brain Performance Institute at the Center for BrainHealth ® has taken the program online. Regardless of where they live, kids struggling socially can now access this science-based social skills training. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New technology to empower Parkinson's patients
(University of Plymouth) People with Parkinson's could see their care transformed thanks to a new service involving wearable technology. The project, entitled Developing Home-based Parkinson's Care, is led by the University of Plymouth and University Hospitals Plymouth NHS Trust (UHPNT), and will see patients use a wrist-worn device known as a Personal Kinetigraph (PKG ® ) to help them and a specialist team monitor their condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neurostimulation for chronic pain, bladder conditions, and movement disorders
(International Neuromodulation Society) Australian media personality and general practitioner Dr. Sally Cockburn will emcee presentations by physicians and patients prior to the International Neuromodulation Society 14th World Congress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers reveal novel therapeutic strategy for ALS
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Researchers from the Institute of Neuroscience and their collaborators revealed a new cellular mechanism for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), suggested a novel therapeutic strategy targeting the RNA degradation pathway, and identified an asthma drug as a potential medication for ALS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new way of finding compounds that prevent aging
(Karolinska Institutet) Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed a new method for identifying compounds that prevent aging. The method is based on a new way of determining age in cultured human cells and is reported in a study in the journal Cell Reports. Using the method, the researchers found a group of substances that they predict to rejuvenate human cells, and that extend the lifespan and improve the health of the model organism C. elegans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Medication treatment reduces arrests among people with opioid use disorder
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) When it comes to addressing the national opioid crisis, most of the research has focused on the physical health risks faced by people with opioid use disorder, such as overdose and infectious disease. For the first time, a University of Massachusetts Amherst public health scientist studied the impact of treating opioid use disorder on the risk for arrest and incarceration, comparing the effects of two different medications approved for the condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genetic breakthrough on tropical grass could help develop climate-friendly cattle farms
(International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)) Researchers at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) have shown that Brachiaria grass species can reduce greenhouse gas emissions from cattle and increase productivity -- and breeding improved varieties can potentially augment the environmental and economic benefits. A breakthrough on Brachiaria's complex genome may make breeding much more efficient, and potentially increase the speed with which new grasses begin benefiting cattle farmers and the environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Teen series continue to feature stereotyped characters that perpetuate gender differences
(Universitat Pompeu Fabra - Barcelona) A study has sought to identify and analyse adolescents' favourite kind of character in Spanish teen series. Teen series are fictional and feature characters that specifically target teenagers and a younger audience. The work by the researchers Mar í a Jos é Masanet, of the Department of Communication at UPF, and Maddalena Fedele, of Ramon Llull University, was published in Palabra Clave in April. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Empathy and cooperation go hand in hand
(University of Pennsylvania) Despite sometimes selfish instincts, cooperation abounds in human societies. Using mathematical models to explore this complex feature of social behavior, a University of Pennsylvania-led team shows that the act of taking another person's perspective -- a form of empathy -- supports the persistence of cooperation and altruism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Later school start times significantly reduce teen driving accidents
(American College of Chest Physicians) A new study to be presented at CHEST Congress 2019 Thailand in Bangkok shows a significant decrease in teen driving accidents when school start is delayed. Researchers from Farwaniya Hospital in Kuwait and Boston Children's Hospital studied the impact of a 50-minute delay in high school start times in one of the largest school districts in the US. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers discover neural patterns key to understanding disorders such as PTSD
(University of California - Irvine) Researchers have identified for the first time an imbalance in a key neural pathway between the amygdala and hippocampus that explains how some people reactivate negative emotional memories. The finding could help scientists unlock new ways to treat psychiatric disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Graphic cigarette warning labels can deter some sales
(RAND Corporation) More than 100 countries have regulations mandating that cigarette packages have graphic warning labels, but the strategy has been blocked in the US by legal actions. A new study that simulated the convenience store shopping experience shows that such labels may discourage some smokers from buying another package of cigarettes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The anxiety of exposure
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Researchers from the Higher School of Economics (Perm), in collaboration with an American colleague, confirmed the theory that impostor syndrome fully mediates the link between perfectionism and psychological distress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Criminal justice system should be cautious when approaching risk assessment
(Rice University) Imagine a parole board trying to figure out whether a previously convicted person eligible for parole poses a future threat to the community. Every day, in scenarios like this, decisionmakers in the criminal justice system use risk assessment tools in that help them determine the fate of people accused or convicted of crimes. But those decisionmakers need to be aware that the tools they're using can have problems, according to a Rice University sociologist. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How artificial intelligence can help in the fight against human trafficking
(Lehigh University) Code 8.7, a two-day conference, brought together computer science researchers and technologists with policy experts, law enforcement officials, activists and survivors involved in the fight against human trafficking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Industrial 3D printing goes skateboarding
(Michigan Technological University) Plastic pulled from the waste stream can find new use with the Gigabot X, an open source industrial 3D printer. A team from Michigan Tech shows how three Gigabot-printed sporting goods -- skateboard decks, kayak paddles and snowshoes -- can help burgeoning makerspaces and fab labs economically sustain their 3D printing centers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wipes labeled as 'flushable' wreak havoc on household plumbing and municipal sewers
(Ryerson University - Faculty of Science) Testing of 101 single-use products at Ryerson University, of which 23 being labeled as 'flushable' by the manufacturer, demonstrated that not one single wipe was able to fall apart or disperse safely through the sewer system. These products cause an estimated $250 million in maintenance and repair costs. Moreover, none of the tested products conformed with industry guidelines for labelling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New algorithm helps to detect and analyze suspicious activity in surveillance footage
(Binghamton University) New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York, could make it easier to track and process suspicious activity in surveillance footage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New intervention doubles quit rate among smokers with severe mental illness
(University of York) Research published in the Lancet Psychiatry has found a dedicated intervention to help people with severe mental illness stop smoking can double quit rates at six months compared to standard care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers find brain molecular features associated with years of education
(University of Barcelona) A study led by a team from the University of Barcelona identified greater cortical thickness in the frontal lobe in a group of old people with high levels of education. The study of the molecular architecture revealed these areas feature a relative overexpression of gene families involved in the synaptic transmission and the activation of the immune response. Results may explain how high levels of education are associated with the preserved cognitive function in the elderly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Childhood trauma has lasting effect on brain connectivity in patients with depression
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A study lead by Penn Medicine researchers found that childhood trauma is linked to abnormal connectivity in the brain in adults with major depressive disorder (MDD). The paper, published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), is the first data-driven study to show symptom-specific, system-level changes in brain network connectivity in MDD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

OHIO study: Acetaminophen can reduce positive empathy for others
(Ohio University) A new study by an Ohio University faculty member showed that acetaminophen limited positive empathy a person has for others while taking it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news