Model created to help life insurers calculate breast cancer survivors' risk of death
(ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation) As early detection and treatment of breast cancer improves, more and more women are surviving the disease. However, they still face challenges, which include determining the moment when it might be reasonable to state they are 'cured' of the disease, and obtaining life insurance. At the European Breast Cancer Conference Dutch researchers describe how they have created a model to help life insurers calculate breast cancer survivors' risk of death more accurately (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH-supported international team confirms new genetic mutation link to ALS
(NIH/National Institute on Aging) Kinesin family member 5A (KIF5A), a gene previously linked to two rare neurodegenerative disorders, has been definitively connected to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) by an NIH-supported international team from several of the world's top ALS research labs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flood protection is everyone's responsibility
(Vienna University of Technology) Scientists in Vienna have studied the complex interplay between flooding events and economic decisions. Private businesses should not shoulder the responsibility for flood protection alone. In prosperous countries in particular, it makes sense for central government to establish the necessary infrastructure for flood protection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pregnancy and motherhood during surgical training: Results of a nationwide survey
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) Research reveals significant cultural challenges and infrastructure shortcomings that led respondents to seriously consider leaving residency and report they would advise against pursuing a career in surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New technologies and computing power to help strengthen population data
(University of Southampton) Research led by the University of Southampton is helping governments in low-income countries strengthen their capacity to build and use population maps, to plan for the future and respond to emergencies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Konstanz researcher receives research fellowship in the field of acoustics
(University of Konstanz) The Acoustical Society of America has selected Dr Yuning Guo of the University of Konstanz as its 2018-2019 Frederick V. Hunt Postdoctoral Research Fellow in Acoustics. Her successful research proposal entitled " Terahertz coherent phonons in thermal conduction modulation " will help advance research in the field of physical acoustics by providing useful insights into how to manipulate heat in non-metallic materials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New interactive map shows climate change everywhere in world
(University of Cincinnati) University of Cincinnati geography professor Tomasz Stepinski created a new interactive map that allows students or researchers to compare the climates of places anywhere in the world. The map draws on five decades of public meteorological data recorded from 50,000 international weather stations around the Earth. And it uses prediction models to display which parts of the globe will experience the most or least climate change in the next 50 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new angle on gerrymanders
(University of Vermont) A University of Vermont mathematician has developed a new tool to identify gerrymandered voting districts. The research shows Pennsylvania, Ohio and North Carolina strongly gerrymandered for Republicans, while Maryland's and California's voting districts have been strongly tipped in favor of Democrats. The new tool could be important in the wake of two Supreme Court cases now being considered that might outlaw certain partisan gerrymanders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Online tech is changing the dynamics of gift-giving
(Cornell University) Online gift-giving is spreading in social networks and causing people to give more gifts -- online and in person -- according to a new study led by Ren é Kizilcec, Cornell University assistant professor of information science. About half of these gifts were unlikely to have occurred offline or via another online channel. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Do young children learn anything from YouTube videos?
(Wiley) In a new Acta Paediatrica study, children up to 2 years of age could be entertained and kept busy by their parents showing them YouTube clips on smartphones, but they did not learn anything from the videos. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sex workers need workplace regulations to improve safety: Study
(University of British Columbia) Canada's sex workers, many of whom work indoors, are enterprising and vigilant when it comes to protecting themselves against exploitation, assault or robbery. They set a relaxing atmosphere, insist on a no-drugs rule, keep self-defence tools at the ready and maintain good relationships with landlords in order to avoid eviction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Good motor skills may enhance reading skills in obese children
(University of Eastern Finland) Excess body weight has been linked to poor academic performance in children in several previous studies. A new Finnish study now shows that a high body fat percentage is associated with poor reading skills in 6- to 8-year-old boys. However, these associations are largely explained by poor motor skills. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pressing a button is more challenging than appears
(Aalto University) Pressing a button appears easy, but the brain needs a probabilistic internal model to control a press. A new theory exposes significant improvements to button design that help gamers and musicians. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New publication helps us understand how narratives expand our sense of the possible
(University of Turku) Cultural models of sense-making shape our views about who we are and who we could be -- what is possible for us as individuals and as communities. Hanna Meretoja's new book, The Ethics of Storytelling, provides us with tools for analyzing cultural narrative models and understanding the power of literary narratives to expand our sense of the possible. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dogs with noise sensitivity should be routinely assessed for pain by vets
(University of Lincoln) Dogs which show fear or anxiety when faced with loud or sudden noises should be routinely assessed for pain by veterinarians, according to new research from the UK and Brazil. Researchers believe that pain, which could be undiagnosed, could be exacerbated when a noise makes the dogs tense up or 'start,' putting extra stress on muscles or joints which are already inflamed leading to an associated with a loud or startling noise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why do some people 'hear' silent flashes?
(City University London) Up to one in five people may show signs of a synesthesia-like phenomenon in which they 'hear' silent flashes or movement, according to a new study from City, University of London. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pro-environmental programs should take the factors that motivate each gender into consideration
(University of the Basque Country) A piece of research carried out by lecturers at the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Economics and Business has explored, from the gender perspective, the pro-environmental behavior of university students on the UPV/EHU's Bizkaia campus. The results suggest that the set of variables affecting pro-environmental behavior differs according to gender, but that the degree of intensity that each factor exerts on this behavior also differs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why it doesn't pay to be just nice -- you also need to be intelligent
(University of Bristol) New research has revealed how people's intelligence, rather than their personality traits, leads to success. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study IDs important role for specific gene in 16p11.2 deletion autism
(Picower Institute at MIT) New findings in mice suggest that the lack of a copy of the gene MVP may contribute to the symptoms of 16p11.2 deletion syndrome because it is needed for brain circuits to incorporate changes driven by experience. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTSA researcher maps San Antonio's music scene
(University of Texas at San Antonio) The University of Texas at San Antonio's music marketing coordinator and his undergraduate students are using geographic information system (GIS) technology to map the scale and scope of the live music scene in San Antonio. Stan Renard, in the UTSA Department of Music, has developed an app to capture, store, analyze, manage and present music-centric geographic data for San Antonio. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Parenting and personality work together to affect baby's weight gain
(Penn State) The more mothers use food to soothe their babies, the more weight certain babies gained, according to researchers. The effect was only seen in babies with a surgent temperament -- characterized by being more outgoing, active and drawn to new things and people, putting these children at a risk for obesity later on. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Living abroad leads to a clearer sense of self
(Rice University) Living abroad can clarify your sense of self, according to new research by a team of social scientists at Rice University, Columbia University and the University of North Carolina. They found living abroad increases 'self-concept clarity,' the extent to which individuals' beliefs about themselves are clearly and confidently defined and consistent and stable over time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How GDP affects success in eSports
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Per capita GDP can make a difference in a country's performance in competitive computer gaming, according to a study conducted by researchers at the Higher School of Economics (HSE University, Perm). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mainz University Library joins Open Library of Humanities platform
(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) The Open Library of Humanities (OLH) is an academic-led, gold open-access publisher with no author-facing charges. The University Library of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz now joins the Open Library of Humanities platform. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

US children now draw female scientists more than ever
(Northwestern University) When drawing scientists, US children now depict female scientists more often than ever, according to new Northwestern University research, which analyzed five decades of 'Draw-A-Scientist' studies conducted since the 1960s. This change suggests that children's stereotypes linking science with men have weakened over time, said the researchers, consistent with more women becoming scientists and children's media depicting more female scientists on television shows, magazines and other media. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In drawing tests, US children draw female scientists more today than in previous decades
(Society for Research in Child Development) The participation of women in science has risen significantly in the United States since the 1960s. A new meta-analysis reviewed five decades of 'Draw a Scientist' tests to determine whether children's drawings have mirrored that change. The study found that US children and adolescents today draw female scientists more often than in earlier decades, but overall, female scientists are still depicted much less frequently than males in children's and youths' drawings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study identifies effective parenting strategies to reduce disruptive behavior in children
(Society for Research in Child Development) Most parenting programs aim to teach parents how to reduce their children's disruptive behavior. New research looked at more than 150 studies of these programs, finding differences in what works best according to whether or not children already showed behavior problems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Young at wrong end of deprivation gap, finds study
(University of Manchester) The under thirties have endured most the marked increase in relative deprivation of any age group in England, according to a 11-year study of data from the Office of National Statistics (ONS).Led by University of Manchester data scientists, the analysis from 2004-2015 also found that over the same period, deprivation fell for the over-60s, who are also less likely to live in deprived neighborhoods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Robocalls improve diabetes eye screening among low-income minorities
(The Endocrine Society) Automated reminder calls may be an effective tool to improve screening for diabetic eye disease among low-income minority patients, especially African Americans, a new study finds. The study results will be presented Monday at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Society's 100th annual meeting in Chicago, Ill. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Oral micronized progesterone may decrease perimenopausal hot flashes, night sweats
(The Endocrine Society) Oral micronized progesterone (OMP) may diminish hot flashes and night sweats in perimenopausal women, new research from Canada reports. The results will be presented on Monday, March 19 at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New EHRA Practical Guide on non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants launched
(European Society of Cardiology) A new version of the EHRA Practical Guide on the use of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) in patients with atrial fibrillation is published online today in European Heart Journal and an executive summary in EP Europace, and presented at EHRA 2018, a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress.1-3 The guide, now in its third edition with more than 400,000 copies of previous versions distributed worldwide, was produced by the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), a branch of the ESC. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Siblings of cot death victims have four-fold cot death risk
(European Society of Cardiology) Siblings of cot death victims have a four-fold higher risk of cot death, according to research presented today at EHRA 2018, a European Society of Cardiology congress.1 The 38-year study in nearly 2.5 million infants suggests that autopsies should be carried out on SIDS victims and that family members should have cardiology tests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds association between mother's larger waist size, child's autism risk
(The Endocrine Society) A new study finds children born to mothers who had a larger waist size before pregnancy may be more likely to have autism than those whose mothers had a smaller pre-pregnancy waist. The research results will be presented Monday, March 19, at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

European Society of Cardiology guidelines on syncope launched today at EHRA 2018
(European Society of Cardiology) European Society of Cardiology guidelines on syncope were launched today at EHRA 2018 and published online in the European Heart Journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds the heart can terminate atrial fibrillation itself after local gene therapy
(European Society of Cardiology) The heart is capable of terminating arrhythmias itself after local gene therapy, potentially avoiding the need for patients to undergo painful electric shocks, according to a proof-of-concept study presented today at EHRA 2018, a European Society of Cardiology congress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Suicide risk for youth sharply higher in the months after self-harm
(Columbia University Medical Center) A study led by Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC) revealed that young Americans had a sharply higher risk of suicide in the months after surviving a deliberate self-harm attempt. The authors say the findings, published online today in Pediatrics, underscore the need to direct clinical interventions toward youth who survive such attempts during this critical period. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More people miss NHS appointments when clocks go forward
(University of York) The numbers of missed hospital outpatient appointments increases following the clock change in the spring, researchers have shown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Interest rate hikes 'pose mental health threat to people in debt'
(University of Stirling) Interest rate hikes by central banks can impact on the mental health of people in debt, a new study led by University of Stirling experts has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wives of many prostate cancer sufferers made ill or feel undermined by the disease
This study, is amongst the first carried out on how prostate cancer affects the partners of sufferers. It was presented yesterday at the EAU conference in Copenhagen. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In children with obesity, impulsivity may be linked with greater weight loss when treated
(The Endocrine Society) Children with obesity may be more impulsive than those with normal weight, but during family-based behavioral treatment (FBT), the more impulsive of children with obesity may lose more weight, a new study suggests. The results of the study will be presented in a poster on Sunday, March 18, at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society in Chicago, Ill. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Prostate MRI reveals more treatable cancers, reduces overdiagnosis than standard biopsy
(European Association of Urology) A large international study has shown that an MRI scan can reduce the number of invasive prostate biopsies by up to 28 percent. The PRECISION trial shows that using MRI to target prostate biopsies leads to more of the harmful prostate cancers, and fewer harmless cancers being diagnosed. The authors believe that this work could change clinical practice. The results are presented at the European Association of Urology Congress, with simultaneous publication in the New England Journal of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research into letter-spacing could help improve children's reading
(Binghamton University) Increased letter spacing helps individuals read faster, but not due to visual processing, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Muslims face high rates of discrimination in Canada
(University of Waterloo) One in five Muslim Canadians say they have experienced discrimination due to their religion, ethnicity or culture at least once in the past five years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Eliminating injustice imposed by the death penalty
This article defends the two central contentions in the movement's abolitionist stance: first, that US capital punishment practices represent a wrong to black communities, and second, that the most defensible remedy for this wrong is the abolition of the death penalty. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Historians to climate researchers: Let's talk
(Princeton University) Ours is not the first society to be confronted by massive environmental change. Over the course of history, some societies have been destroyed by natural disasters, like Pompeii, while others have learned how to accommodate floods, droughts, volcanic eruptions and other natural hazards. The key is how a society plans for and interacts with the stress from nature, say Princeton University historians John Haldon and Lee Mordechai. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What is the cost of interrupting a radiologist?
(University of Utah) A first of its kind study shows typical interruptions experienced by on-call radiologists do not reduce diagnostic accuracy but do change what they look at and increase the amount of time spent on a case. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

So close, yet so far: Making climate impacts feel nearby may not inspire action
(Cornell University) Jonathon Schuldt, assistant professor of communication at Cornell University, says it is possible to make faraway climate impacts feel closer. But that doesn't automatically inspire the American public to express greater support for policies that address it. The paper appeared in the Journal of Environmental Psychology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: One-third of young adults have ridden with an impaired driver
(Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs) A new study led by a Colorado State University researcher indicates that riding with an impaired driver is prevalent among emerging adults, with 33 percent of recent high school grads reporting the risky behavior at least once in the previous year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Adults' political leanings linked with early personality traits
(Association for Psychological Science) Our political attitudes in adulthood have roots in early childhood temperament, according to new findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. Analyses of data from more than 16,000 participants in two longitudinal studies in the United Kingdom reveal links between conduct problems at ages 5 and 7 and economic and political discontent 25 years later. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Volcanic eruption influenced Iceland's conversion to Christianity
(University of Cambridge) Memories of the largest lava flood in the history of Iceland, recorded in an apocalyptic medieval poem, were used to drive the island's conversion to Christianity, new research suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news