Robot therapists need rules
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Interactions with artificial intelligence (AI) will become an increasingly common aspect of our lives. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now completed the first study of how 'embodied AI' can help treat mental illness. Their conclusion: Important ethical questions of this technology remain unanswered. There is urgent need for action on the part of governments, professional associations and researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tracking symptoms: New Regenstrief and IU tool helps providers identify underlying causes
(Regenstrief Institute) An easy to use, brief, inexpensive new tool that tracks symptoms such as pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, memory problems, anxiety and depression in older adults, developed and validated by researchers at the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University, will help healthcare providers potentially identify early onset of more complex, serious underlying issues that could otherwise go undetected. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mindfulness smoking-cessation app can change the brain
(Brown University) Brown University researchers have found that a mindfulness-based smartphone app designed to help people stop smoking was effective at reducing study participants' self-reported daily cigarette consumption. And those who reduced their cigarette consumption the most also showed decreased reactivity to smoking-related images in a brain region known to be activated when someone experiences a craving. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Faster walkers more likely to live longer
(National Institute for Health Research) People who report that they have a slower walking pace have a lower life expectancy than fast walkers, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Leicester Biomedical Research Centre -- a partnership between Leicester's Hospitals, the University of Leicester and Loughborough University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Twitter image colors and content could help identify users with depression, anxiety
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Penn study shows users who score high on a depression and anxiety survey often post photos that are less aesthetically appealing, less vivid in color or display little depth of field (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Opioid-exposed newborns may react to pain differently after birth
(Penn State) Babies exposed to opioids while their mothers were pregnant with them may need special care even before they start to experience withdrawal symptoms, according to Penn State research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Same computer password for the last 10 years? You might need a vibrating cybernudge
(University of Bath) Technology used in exercise and lifestyle apps may hold the key to answering that most difficult of challenges -- getting people to change their passwords and better protect their online privacy and data. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stoic, resourceful -- and at risk for suicide
(University of Georgia) A new study led by a University of Georgia researcher, in collaboration with epidemiologists from the Georgia Department of Public Health, has identified some common factors associated with farmer suicide that may help health providers develop strategies to reduce suicide risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Army researcher defends dissertation, pursues safeguarded technology
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) An electronics engineer at the Army's corporate research laboratory successfully defended his doctoral dissertation, while working to safeguard fielded technology for the Soldiers of today and tomorrow. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How a new father views his relationship with his partner
(Ohio State University) A new father's views on his changing relationship with his wife or partner may depend in part on how much support he feels from her when he is caring for their baby, a new study suggests.Researchers found that a first-time father tended to feel closer to the mother both as a co-parent and as a romantic partner when he believed he had her confidence when he was involved in child care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bristol academic cracks Voynich code, solving century-old mystery of medieval text
(University of Bristol) A University of Bristol academic has succeeded where countless cryptographers, linguistics scholars and computer programs have failed - by cracking the code of the 'world's most mysterious text', the Voynich manuscript. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Postpartum depression: For impoverished mothers of color, it takes a community
(University at Buffalo) Treating postpartum depression (PPD) in low-income mothers of color requires an understanding of each person's lived experience, and practitioners should consider interventions that develop broadly from a community level in order to improve outcomes for their clients, according to a University at Buffalo social work researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is piracy helping or hurting online word of mouth buzz around motion picture releases?
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) Researchers from the University of Houston and Western University in London, Ontario, published new research in the INFORMS journal Management Science that has found that the power of word of mouth (WOM) is effective at boosting demand for counterfeited copies of motion pictures, but it depends on when the copies are made available. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Coffee addicts really do wake up and smell the coffee
(University of Portsmouth) Regular coffee drinkers can sniff out even tiny amounts of coffee and are faster at recognising the aroma, which could open the door to new ways of using aversion therapy for addiction (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Treats might mask animal intelligence
(Johns Hopkins University) Rewards are necessary for learning, but may actually mask true knowledge, finds a new Johns Hopkins University study with rodents and ferrets. The findings, published May 14, 2019 in Nature Communications, show a distinction between knowledge and performance, and provide insight into how environment can affect the two. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cofilin may be early culprit in tauopathy process leading to brain cell death
(University of South Florida (USF Innovation)) Abnormal accumulations of amyloid plaques and tau neurofibrillary tangles are both needed to drive the death of brain cells, or neurons. But scientists still have a lot to learn about how amyloid impacts tau to promote widespread neurotoxicity, which destroys cognitive abilities like thinking, remembering and reasoning in patients with Alzheimer's. While investigating the molecular relationship between amyloid and tau, University of South Florida neuroscientists discovered that the Aβ-activated enzyme cofilin plays an essential intermediary role in worsening tau pathology...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Army research supports communications in smart cities
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) The US Army is researching how to leverage smart cities of the future where networks of sensors will be used to enable services for civilian and government use, such as environmental monitoring or traffic flow optimization. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Perpetuating privilege on Mexico City's golf courses
(Lehigh University) The gap between the wealthy and the poor is on a growth trajectory. In the book Privilege at Play: Class, Race, Gender, and Golf in Mexico, to be published May 24, 2019, sociologist Hugo Cer ó n-Anaya explores how this gap is perpetuated in the context of a privileged space, one in which affluent club members and impoverished workers collide: the golf courses of Mexico City. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

For people with strong life purpose, making healthier choices may take less effort
(University of Pennsylvania) Why do some people easily meet their fitness goals and love eating healthy foods while others struggle to do either? New research from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania indicates that people with a stronger sense of life purpose are more likely to respond positively to health messages and experience less activity in brain regions associated with conflict processing when exposed to these messages. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Women's leadership potential for top jobs overlooked in favor of men
(University of Kent) The potential of women for leadership roles is being overlooked, while men benefit from the perception that they will grow into the role, new research from the University of Kent shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The (evolving) art of war
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) In new book, MIT political scientist Taylor Fravel uncovers the modern history of Chinese military strategy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

From counseling to the commissary, how the private sector shapes 'offender-funded justice'
(University of Washington) An article by University of Washington sociology professor Alexes Harris focuses on the role of the private sector in collecting court-imposed fines and fees. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Escaped pet parrots are now naturalized in 23 US states, study finds
(University of Chicago Medical Center) Research data on bird sightings finds that 56 different parrot species have been spotted in 43 states, and 25 of those species are now breeding in the wild in 23 different states. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

US journalism has become more subjective
(RAND Corporation) US-based journalism has gradually shifted away from objective news and offers more opinion-based content that appeals to emotion and relies heavily on argumentation and advocacy, according to a new RAND Corporation report. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Colonial policies can result in economic growth
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in the Review of Economic Studies suggests that areas where Dutch colonizers built sugar factories in the 19th century are more developed today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Want to expand your toddler's vocabulary? Find another child
(Acoustical Society of America) Children glean all kinds of information from the people around them. In particular, children mimic and learn speech patterns from their family. Previous work has shown that infants attend selectively to their mother's voice over another female's voice. But new research suggests that children learn new words best from other children. Yuanyuan Wang will present research findings from a collaborative work with Amanda Seidl from Purdue University at the 177th ASA Meeting, May 13-17, 2019. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Perceived union support buoys 'meaningfulness of work' measures
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) When employees think of their labor union as supportive and caring, says new research co-written by U. of I. labor professor M. Teresa Cardador, they are more likely to rate their union as fulfilling their psychological needs for autonomy, competence and relatedness - all of which are related to enhanced work meaningfulness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Domestic policy driven by intergovernmental bodies not citizens, research finds
(Binghamton University) Citizens are increasingly being marginalized by intergovernmental organizations for the attention of national politicians and influence over domestic policies, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Being bullied as a teen is associated with growing up in areas of income inequality
(Bar-Ilan University) Growing up in areas with income inequality is associated with being bullied, according to a new study, which surveyed approximately 874,000 children in 40 medium and high income countries in Europe, North America and Israel. According to the study country level income inequality during the first four years of a child's life (rather than school age years) was associated with later bully victimization. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Political controversies about marginalized groups increase bullying in youths
(University of Texas at Austin) Scientists have uncovered new evidence that heated political discourse over proposed laws involving marginalized groups, such as debates about the rights of LGBT people, can contribute to an increase in bullying linked to students' identity in schools. It is the largest study to date to examine the link. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How acoustics detected artillery in WWI
(Acoustical Society of America) During WWI, William Lawrence Bragg led the development of an acoustic method to locate enemy artillery, work that was so successful that it was soon used widely throughout the British army. The method, known as sound ranging, was also adopted by the US Army when they joined the war, and earned Bragg a military decoration from the British armed forces. Bragg's story will be presented at the 177th ASA Meeting, May 13-17, 2019. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

We are more envious of things that haven't happened yet
(Association for Psychological Science) We are more envious of someone else's covetable experience before it happens than after it has passed, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Doing science,' rather than 'being scientists,' more encouraging to those underrepresented in the field
(New York University) Over the course of a school year, elementary school children lose confidence that they can 'be scientists,' but remain more confident that they can 'do science.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows people fail to recognise male postnatal depression
(Anglia Ruskin University) A new study shows that people are almost twice as likely to correctly identify signs of postnatal depression in women than in men. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Teachers predict pupil success just as well as exam scores
(King's College London) New research from King's College London finds that teacher assessments are equally as reliable as standardised exams at predicting educational success. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Opioid doctor and pharmacy 'shoppers' may also shop at home, study finds
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) As states crack down on doctor and pharmacy 'shopping' by people who misuse opioids, a new study reveals how often those individuals may still be able to find opioids to misuse in their family medicine cabinets. For every 200 patients prescribed opioids, one had a family member whose opioid-misuse problem led them to seek the drugs from multiple prescribers and multiple pharmacies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What is association of age with risk of death for ICU patients?
This study of nearly 134,000 patients admitted to intensive care units in France examined the association of age with risk of death in the hospital and then three months and three years after discharge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study shows scientists who selfie garner more public trust
(Louisiana State University) Many scientists today have embraced social media as tools to communicate their research and to engage broader audiences in scientific discovery and its outcomes. But the rise of the 'social media scientist' has also led communicators and scholars to ask an important and often overlooked question: do people trust the scientists who show up in their social media feeds? (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

E-cigarette use by young adults linked to childhood maltreatment
(Virginia Commonwealth University) A new study led by VCU researchers finds young adults with a history of childhood abuse or neglect are more prone to using e-cigarettes during the transition to adulthood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can recreational sports really make you a better student?
(Michigan State University) A new Michigan State University study adds to growing evidence that participating in recreational sports not only can help improve grades while attending college, but it also can help students return for another year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New UM study highlights fundamental challenges of living with wildfire
(The University of Montana) Wildfires can have dramatic impacts on Western landscapes and communities, but human values determine whether the changes caused by fire are desired or dreaded. This is the simple - but often overlooked - message from a collaborative team of 23 researchers led by University of Montana faculty in a study published in the May issue of the journal BioScience. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Location and brand affect people's trust in cloud services
(Penn State) People's stereotypes regarding different locations around the world influence whether they feel secure in storing their data in cloud service centers in those locations, according to researchers at Penn State, who also found that stereotypes regarding brand authority influence people's trust in cloud services. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds Wi-Fi location affects online privacy behavior
(Penn State) Does sitting in a coffee shop versus at home influence a person's willingness to disclose private information online? Does the on-screen appearance of a public location's online 'terms and conditions' have an effect? According to researchers at Penn State, the answer to both questions is 'yes,' especially if the user has a tendency to instinctively distrust public wireless networks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Eat or be eaten: Street food vendors resist and adapt to changing society
(Kanazawa University) Research from Japan's Kanazawa University examined various ways in which Indonesian street food vendors try to survive and adapt amid urbanization. State-led plans often seek to prohibit or relocate vendors, seeing them as a liability. The study found the vendors resist in subtle ways. They forge reciprocal relationships and seek informal protection. Additionally, some vendors work daytime office jobs and uses skills such as social media to support nighttime food stalls. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tech-saavy people more likely to trust digital doctors
(Penn State) Would you trust a robot to diagnose your cancer? According to researchers at Penn State, people with high confidence in machine performance and also in their own technological capabilities are more likely to accept and use digital healthcare services and providers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Believing machines can out-do people may fuel acceptance of self-driving cars
(Penn State) In order for self-driving cars to hit the streets, more people may need to concede that machines can outperform humans, at least in some tasks, according to Penn State researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People more likely to trust machines than humans with their private information
(Penn State) Not everyone fears our machine overlords. In fact, according to Penn State researchers, when it comes to private information and access to financial data, people tend to trust machines more than people, which could lead to both positive and negative online behaviors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Meditation needs more research: Study finds 25% suffer unpleasant experiences
(University College London) More than a quarter of people who regularly meditate have had a 'particularly unpleasant' psychological experience related to the practice, including feelings of fear and distorted emotions, a UCL-led study has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

THE SIGNS study by Duke-NUS researchers identify factors affecting active and productive ageing
This study is termed the 'Transitions in Health, Employment, Social Engagement, and Intergenerational Transfers in Singapore Study' (THE SIGNS Study) that was done in partnership with the Ministry of Health (MOH). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists find link between digital media use and depression in Chinese adolescents
(Elsevier) Adolescents in China who either spend more time on screen activities, such as watching TV or surfing the Web, or less time on non-screen activities, including physical activity, are at risk and significantly more likely to experience depression, according to a new study in the journal Heliyon, published by Elsevier. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news