White mass shooters receive sympathetic media treatment
(Ohio State University) White mass shooters receive much more sympathetic treatment in the media than black shooters, according to a new study that analyzed coverage of 219 attacks. Findings showed that white shooters were 95 percent more likely to be described as 'mentally ill' than black shooters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What psychological science can offer to reducing climate change
(Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) The consequences of climate change are immense, and believed by many experts to be largely irreversible (and exponential), causing threats coming from heat waves, flooding, declines in agriculture, and decreasing biodiversity, to name a few. Given that climate change, at least in part, is rooted in human behavior, an obvious question to ask is: Can psychological science offer evidence-based solutions to climate change? (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Who made the error? The brain distinguishes causes of errors to perform adaptation
(Osaka University) Osaka University scientists examined positions to detect motor and target errors and whether error signals from these positions were used for learning, finding that the parietal lobe detected causes of motor errors in arm reaching and provided signals to compensate for errors. They also revealed that Brodmann area 5 detected the self-generated motor error and that Brodmann area 7 detected target error caused by target movements, both providing error signals for adaptation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

One million euros for narrative research
(University of Freiburg) The German Research Foundation supports the work of a University of Freiburg English language and literature specialist with a Reinhart Koselleck Project. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Health and safety at work
(Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) DFG submits list to German Federal Labor Minister / 95 supplements and new entries / MAK value for polytetrafluoroethylene / List now also available in Spanish (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Immigrants and their children are more likely to be profiled for citizenship
(Springer) Law enforcement official are most likely to ask first- or second-generation Latinos for papers proving their right to be in the US. This is according to a study published in Springer's journal Race and Social Problems. Lead author, Maria Cristina Morales of the University of Texas at El Paso in the US, says the findings are important given that US law enforcement officers are increasingly required to make distinctions between citizens and non-citizens living along the border with Mexico. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SunTrust Foundation awards $300,000 grant to UTIA for financial literacy program
(University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture) The SunTrust Foundation will expand its existing partnership with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture with a $300,000 grant to further support UT Extension's On My Own program which promotes financial literacy education in Tennessee schools. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Black children subjected to higher discipline rates than peers
(University of Michigan) Elementary school discipline policies that rely on expulsions or suspensions as punishment may be fostering childhood inequality, a new study shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Solutions to water challenges reside at the interface
(American Institute of Physics) Leading Argonne National Laboratory researcher Seth Darling describes the most advanced research innovations that could address global clean water accessibility. His comprehensive paper focuses on understanding and controlling the interfaces between materials and water. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What is the meaning of life? Ask a conservative
(University of Southern California) A deep analysis of a series of surveys across 16 countries that spanned several years shows that people who are on the conservative end of the political spectrum believe their lives are meaningful while those on the liberal end continue to search for meaning. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA regional assessment shows segregation, challenges
(University of Texas at Arlington) After extensively analyzing fair housing in North Texas, UTA researchers have discovered that in many cases, segregation and associated problems are becoming more pronounced. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using driving simulation to understand driver complacency at passive rail level crossings
(Human Factors and Ergonomics Society) The study replicates and extends prior research on the effectiveness of using driving simulators to detect and mitigate risky behaviors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Paper: Email incivility has a ripple effect on households
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) The negative repercussions of email incivility extend beyond the workplace, and can even negatively affect a domestic partner's attitude toward their own work, says a new paper from YoungAh Park, a professor of labor and employment relations at Illinois. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An immigrant workforce leads to innovation, according to new UC San Diego research
(University of California - San Diego) New federal restrictions on the temporary H-1B visa, which allows high-skilled foreign workers to be employed by U.S. companies, have increased debate on the economic impacts of the program, but little is known about its effect on product innovation -- until now. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SF State researcher explores how information enters our brains
(San Francisco State University) A new study by SF State Associate Professor of Psychology Ezequiel Morsella suggests that we have less control over our conscious thoughts than previously assumed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Self-control and obesity: Gender matters in children
(Ohio State University) A toddler's self-regulation -- the ability to change behavior in different social situations -- may predict whether he or she will be obese come kindergarten, but the connection appears to be much different for girls than for boys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Yale-developed test for Alzheimer's disease directly measures synaptic loss
(Yale University) Yale researchers have tested a new method for directly measuring synaptic loss in individuals with Alzheimer's disease. The method, which uses PET imaging technology to scan for a specific protein in the brain linked to synapses, has the potential to accelerate research for new Alzheimer's treatments, the researchers said. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flipping the switch: Making use of carbon price dollars for health and education
(Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)) A switch from subsidizing fossil fuel to pricing CO2-emissions would not only help to meet global climate targets but also create additional domestic public revenues.These revenues could finance expenses towards sustainable development, improving health-care, education and infrastructure for energy, transportation or clean water. India could cover more than 90 percent of its needs to finance progress towards these sustainability goals. This could also be an attractive option for countries like Nigeria, Burundi and Senegal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Professor Sarah Kang awarded with Kamide Award
(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) Professor in the School of Urban and Environmental Engineering at South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has received the 2018 AOGS Kamide Award, becoming the the first Korean-American scientist to earn the prestigious award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Underworked' victims of modern slavery endure extra exploitation
(University of Bath) People trapped in modern slavery can be 'underworked' by ruthless employers, to increase their debt bondage and provide revenue from living costs. The assumption that victims of exploitation are worked like 'slaves' is shielding extra layers of exploitation, shows research led by the University of Bath's School of Management, published by the Academy of Management. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Friendlier fish may be quicker to take the bait
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) The bluegill on your dinner plate might have been more social than the rest of its group, according to a new study from the University of Illinois, and its removal from the lake could mean major changes for the remaining population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NYU study uncovers connections between early childhood program and teenage outcomes
(New York University) A new study published in PLOS ONE by researchers from New York University's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development examined the long-term impacts of an early childhood program called the Chicago School Readiness Project (CSRP) and found evidence suggesting that the program positively affected children's executive function and academic achievement during adolescence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Implications of unmet promise of a miracle drug for Alzheimer's disease
(Regenstrief Institute) In 'The Unmet Promise of a Miracle Drug for Alzheimer's Disease: Implications for Practice, Policy, and Research,' the authors lament the unmet promise of a miracle drug for Alzheimer disease but are heartened by what they see as encouraging improvements in care (care transformation) for a growing population of older adults, many with dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Community colleges can boost access to primary care and physician diversity
(University of California - Davis Health System) Medical school graduates who attended community college are more likely to select family medicine for their residency training and to be from groups traditionally underrepresented in medicine, new UC Davis Health research shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Deaths from cardiovascular disease rising in India, study finds
(St. Michael's Hospital) Death due to cardiovascular disease is on the rise in India, causing more than one quarter of all deaths in the country in 2015 and affecting rural populations and young adults the most, suggests a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Expert panel compares opioid epidemic to early days of HIV epidemic
(American College of Physicians) Experts are drawing on lessons learned from the early days of the HIV epidemic to address the current opioid epidemic. As a result of widespread opioid abuse, new epidemics of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and HIV infection have arisen and hospitalizations for related infections have increased. An expert panel convened by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) recommends five crucial steps for clinicians treating patients affected by opioid addiction and these intersecting infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study examines prenatal depression in 2 generations of pregnant mothers
(JAMA Network) A study of two generations of women in England examined how common depression during pregnancy (prenatal depression) is in young mothers now compared with their mothers' generation. Depressed mood was measured using self-reported surveys in both generations and analysis of the data suggests depression in young pregnant women may be higher now than among their mothers' generation in the 1990s. Researchers acknowledge a number of plausible explanations for their findings requiring further study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reducing Australia's cancer death rate
(La Trobe University) New research has revealed for the first time what impact cutting back on drinking and smoking as a population would have on Australia's cancer death rate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CNRS' first overseas subsidiary: CNRS@CREATE, Singapore
(CNRS) The CNRS will be setting up CNRS@CREATE, its first overseas subsidiary, in Singapore. Its objective will be to manage Franco-Singaporean research activities as part of the Singaporean ecosystem. An agreement to establish CNRS@CREATE was formalized on July 13, 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How looking at the big picture can lead to better decisions
(Ohio State University) New research suggests how distancing yourself from a decision may help you make the choice that produces the most benefit for you and others affected. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Journalists view co-workers as more ethical than peers
(University of Texas at Dallas) The University of Texas at Dallas' Dr. Angela Lee explored journalists' opinions about one another -- both their co-workers and their peers. As it turns out, they act much like the general public by trusting the actions of professionals working with them more than journalists at other outlets. The research was published online May 30 in the journal Journalism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Schizophrenia researcher seeks complex answers with basic question
(University of Texas at Dallas) As the mental health community pursues new ways to improve the lives of the severely ill, a University of Texas at Dallas researcher is focusing on what can be learned from patients' answers to a simple question: 'How do you think you are doing?' The multi-university study recently received more than $2.8 million from the National Institutes of Health for its nearly four-year duration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NTU Singapore partners the CEA to develop innovative e-waste recycling technologies
(Nanyang Technological University) Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) is partnering the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) to develop innovative and energy-efficient solutions in the recycling and recovery of resources from electrical and electronic waste (e-waste). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Army researchers suggest uncertainty may be key in battlefield decision making
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) Army researchers have discovered that being initially uncertain when faced with making critical mission-related decisions based on various forms of information may lead to better overall results in the end. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In search of dark matter
(University of California - Riverside) An international team of scientists that includes UC Riverside physicist Hai-Bo Yu has imposed conditions on how dark matter may interact with ordinary matter. In the search for direct detection of dark matter, the experimental focus has been on WIMPs, or weakly interacting massive particles, the hypothetical particles thought to make up dark matter. But the research team invokes a different theory to challenge the WIMP paradigm: the self-interacting dark matter model, or SIDM. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists on Twitter: Preaching to the choir or singing from the rooftops?
(Simon Fraser University) SFU professor Isabelle Cote published a paper today in FACETS on Twitter use for scientists. They wanted to know whether whether Twitter allows scientists to promote their findings primarily to other scientists ('inreach'), or whether it can help them reach broader, non-scientific audiences ('outreach'). They show that reaching a broad audience on Twitter is a non-linear process that requires a sustained online engagement, and may only occur past a certain threshold numbers of followers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

LGBQ teens more likely than peers to use dangerous drugs
(San Diego State University) Lesbian, gay, bisexual or questioning (LGBQ) teens are at substantially higher risk of substance use than their heterosexual peers, according to a new study led by San Diego State University researchers and published in the American Journal of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Understanding the social dynamics that cause cooperation to thrive, or fail
(University of Pennsylvania) In a new report in the journal Nature Communications, Erol Ak ç ay, a biologist at the University of Pennsylvania, addresses the question of how an evolving social network influences the likelihood of cooperation in a theoretical social group. He finds that, although networks where connected individuals are closely related are more likely to cooperate, such groups can trigger a feedback loop that alters the structure of the network and leads to cooperation's collapse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bridging the gap between human memory and perception
(Society for Neuroscience) The hippocampus may relay predictions about what we expect to see based on past experience to the visual cortex, suggests a human neuroimaging published in JNeurosci. The study is among the first to examine the interaction between these two aspects of cognition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rats trail behind shrews, monkeys, and humans in visual problem solving
(Society for Neuroscience) Rats take a fundamentally different approach toward solving a simple visual discrimination task than tree shrews, monkeys, and humans, according to a comparative study of the four mammal species published in eNeuro. The work could have important implications for the translation of research in animal models to humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why the left hemisphere of the brain understands language better than the right
(Ruhr-University Bochum) Nerve cells in the brain region planum temporale have more synapses in the left hemisphere than in the right hemisphere -- which is vital for rapid processing of auditory speech, according to the report published by researchers from Ruhr-Universit ä t Bochum and Technische Universit ä t Dresden in the journal Science Advances. There has already been ample evidence of left hemisphere language dominance; however, the underlying processes on the neuroanatomical level had not yet been fully understood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Science fiction enthusiasts have a positive attitude to the digitizing of the brain
(University of Helsinki) The goal of a technology known as mind upload is to make it possible to create functional copies of the human brain on computers. The development of this technology, which involves scanning of the brain and detailed cell-specific emulation, is currently receiving billions in funding. Science fiction enthusiasts express a more positive attitude towards the technology compared to others. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Light receptors determine the behavior of flashlight fish
(Ruhr-University Bochum) Biologists at the Ruhr-Universit ä t Bochum characterized new, unknown photoreceptors from the bioluminescent flashlight fish Anomalops katoptron. The photoreceptors known as opsins allow the fish to detect light with a specific wavelength. As published on the July 11, 2018, in PLOS ONE the scientists found new opsin variants, which are specialized to detect low intensity blue light in the wavelength range of bioluminescent light emitted by the fish. The blue light can be used to influence the fish behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A gene required for addictive behavior
(Universit é libre de Bruxelles) Researchers show that mice lacking the Maged1 gene are unable to acquire cocaine addiction. This gene serves as a promising new entry point into the analysis of the mechanisms underlying drug addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study analyzes opioid overdose risk during and after pregnancy among Massachusetts women
(Massachusetts General Hospital) A study from a research team consisting of investigators from the Mass. Department of Public Health and several academic medical centers, led by a MassGeneral Hospital for Children physician, found that opioid overdose events decreased during pregnancy, reaching their lowest level during the third trimester, but then increased during the postpartum period, becoming significantly higher during the second six months after delivery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

De Gruyter partners with Code Ocean to improve research reproducibility
(Code Ocean) De Gruyter, publisher of more than 700 journals in the humanities, social sciences, law and STM and Code Ocean, a computational reproducibility platform, announce a partnership that enables journal authors to publish and share working code associated with their research so readers can immediately reproduce the results. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Airbnb benefits white neighborhoods; not so for black and Hispanic areas
(Purdue University) Tourism activity in areas with a rise in Airbnb rentals could spill over into complementary industries, such as the restaurant business, unless those neighborhoods are predominantly black or Hispanic, a new study suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Humans evolved in partially isolated populations scattered across Africa
(Cell Press) The textbook narrative of human evolution casts Homo sapiens as evolving from a single ancestral population in one region of Africa around 300,000 years ago. However, in a commentary published July 11 in the journal Trends in Ecology& Evolution, an interdisciplinary group of researchers concludes that early humans comprised a subdivided, shifting, pan-African meta-population with physical and cultural diversity. This framework better explains existing genetic, fossil, and cultural patterns and clarifies our shared ancestry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ebola survivors suffer from severe neurological problems
(University of Liverpool) Researchers have shed new light on the psychiatric and neurological problems that Ebola survivors can suffer from, and call for more specialist support for the most severely affected patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Autism spectrum disorder linked to shape of brain's cerebellum
(Columbia University Irving Medical Center) Structural differences in the cerebellum may be linked to some aspects of autism spectrum disorder, according to a neuroimaging study from Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news