Write with heat, cool and then repeat with rewritable paper
(American Chemical Society) Even in this digital age, paper is still everywhere. Often, printed materials get used once and are then discarded, creating waste and potentially pollution. Now, scientists report in ACS Applied Materials& Interfaces the development of an easy-to-make 'rewritable' paper that can be drawn or printed on over and over again. The messages can last more than half a year, compared to other rewritable papers whose messages fade after a few days or a few months. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Extreme ethnic inequalities in the care system
(University of Huddersfield) 'White British' children are ten times more likely to be in care than 'Asian Indian' children. 'Black Caribbean' children are 20 times more likely (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Peace, not war, responsible for deforestation in armed conflict zones
(University of Waterloo) Rates of deforestation in war zones increase dramatically once peace is declared, according to a study from the University of Waterloo. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Narcissists less likely to support democracy
(University of Kent) New research suggests that people with a narcissistic self-view are more likely to demonstrate lower support for democracy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New butterfly named for pioneering 17th-century entomologist Maria Sibylla Merian
(Florida Museum of Natural History) More than two centuries before initiatives to increase the number of women in STEM fields, Maria Sibylla Merian was a professional artist and naturalist whose close observations and illustrations were the first to accurately portray the metamorphosis of butterflies and moths and emphasize the intimate relationship between insects and their host plants.Now, a new Central American butterfly species has been named in her honor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Does where students grow up influence where they go to college?
(Wiley) A new Population, Space and Place study explores how the ethnic composition of where students grow up is linked to where they attend university. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Turning climate change from a 'tragedy of the commons' to positive action
(University of Exeter) Climate change must no longer be viewed as a 'tragedy of the commons', researchers say. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bringing La Buvette d'Evian back to life
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) In a new book, EPFL researchers trace the history of La Buvette d'Evian -- a former lakeside refreshment area that is also an icon of modern architecture. With some light renovation work, La Buvette could reinvigorate the entire region. Graf and Marino's book is being published by Infolio. The official launch in France will take place in January. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Increasing crop insurances adoption in developing countries
(University of Zurich) Farmers in developing countries often rely heavily on their yearly harvest to feed their families. A bad crop can have severe consequences for their livelihood. Despite the significant advantages crop insurances would offer in alleviating this risk, only a small percentage of farmers insure their crops. A simple but effective solution tested by researchers from the University of Zurich has increased insurance adoption to over 70 percent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Black Americans' life expectancy decreasing due to firearms
(Boston University School of Medicine) While it is well known that gun deaths are a major public health problem, a new study quantifies the significance of substantially higher gun homicide rates in driving down life expectancy among black Americans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Eliminating microglia prevents heightened immune sensitivity after stress
(Elsevier) Using an animal model of chronic stress, researchers at The Ohio State University have shown that the immune cells of the brain, called microglia, hold unique signatures of chronic stress that leave the animal more sensitive to future stressful experiences, evident by increased anxiety and immune responses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How microbial interactions shape our lives
(Carnegie Institution for Science) The interactions that take place between the species of microbes living in the gastrointestinal system often have large and unpredicted effects on health, according to new work from a team led by Carnegie's Will Ludington. Working with fruit flies, the team found that the interactions that take place between the microbial populations are as important to a fly's physiology as which individual species are present. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Negative views of flexible working prevalent, especially among men
(University of Kent) Flexible working often leads to negative views from other employees, with 1/3 of all UK workers believing those who work flexibly create more work for others, while a similar proportion believe their career will suffer if they use flexible working arrangements, according to new research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

African maroon resistance at Hispaniola heavily challenged European conquest
(University of Kansas) In a new study, Robert Schwaller, KU associate professor history, argues that Spanish colonial records reveal that resistance by indigenous and African maroons, who were runaway slaves, not only tested Spanish economic and labor arrangements but also challenged European conquest itself. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sex-specific effects of DHEA on bone mineral density and body composition
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) Women 55 and older have an increased risk of bone and muscle loss but therapy with the hormone Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) may help prevent bone loss and increase muscle mass in older women, according to a new study led by Catherine M. Jankowski, PhD, FACSM, an exercise physiologist and associate professor at the University of Colorado College of Nursing at the Anschutz Medical Campus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Yumanity Therapeutics announces publication of paper in Cell Reports
(W2O Group) Yumanity Therapeutics, a company focused on discovering transformative therapies to treat neurodegenerative diseases, today announced the publication of study results describing a potential new target for therapeutic intervention in Parkinson's disease and other related disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers look to see how elevated housing in Florida stood up to Hurricane Michael
(University of Kansas) A researcher from the University of Kansas is investigating elevated residential buildings in the aftermath of Hurricane Michael's impact of the Florida panhandle, where recorded wind speeds reached and exceeded design wind loads along the coast. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vaping cannabis produces stronger effects than smoking cannabis for infrequent users
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) In a small study of infrequent cannabis users, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have shown that, compared with smoking cannabis, vaping it increased the rate of short-term anxiety, paranoia, memory loss and distraction when doses were the same. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nine honored by Society for Risk Analysis
(Society for Risk Analysis) The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) awarded six prestigious scholarly and service awards and named three new Fellows at its Annual Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana. These awards recognize nine individuals for their outstanding contributions to the society and to the science of risk analysis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How young women view men affects how they imagine their future selves
(University of Arizona) When young women believe more men are becoming stay-at-home dads, they are more likely to imagine themselves as the financial providers for their future families. When they don't think men's roles are changing, they are more likely to see themselves as their future families' primary caregivers, researchers found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flint, Michigan lead crisis should have buried the city in water bottles. So, why didn't it?
(Purdue University) The Flint, Michigan lead crisis should have buried the city in waste. A Purdue University case study investigates why not and proposes solutions for future water disasters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Society for Risk Analysis announces 2018 winners for Best Journal Papers and Best Research Posters
(Society for Risk Analysis) The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) is pleased to announce the winners for best papers in Risk Analysis: An International Journal and the best research posters for 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Understanding the current rise of the far right using Marx and Lacan
(De Gruyter) The article posits several arguments suggesting that we must turn to thinkers Marx and Lacan and the philosophical concepts they coined to understand the rise of the far right. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mothers whose responses to infants' facial cues increase report stronger bonds with babies
(Society for Research in Child Development) A new study forthcoming in the journal Child Development examined whether pregnancy changes mothers' neural sensitivity to infants' facial cues, and whether such changes affect mother-infant bonding. The study found that increases in cortical responses to infants' faces from the prenatal to the postnatal period in individual mothers were associated with more positive relationships with the baby (as reported by the mothers) after birth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The powerful impact of real-world learning experiences for kids
(Ohio State University) Real-world learning experiences, like summer camps, can significantly improve children's knowledge in a matter of just days, a new study suggests. Researchers found that 4- to 9-year-old kids knew more about how animals are classified after a four-day camp at a zoo.It wasn't that children who attended just knew more facts about animals, the researchers noted. The camp actually improved how they organized what they knew -- a key component of learning. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

For large health systems, telehealth programs mean challenges and results
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Increasingly, major health systems throughout the country are implementing telehealth programs in an effort to increase access and improve patient experiences. This move is made possible by more support from insurance payers, including the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, who recently announced a proposal to expand telehealth access for Medicare recipients. However, as a new report in the December issue of Health Affairs details, incorporating video visits and other forms of telehealth into current practice can be fraught with challenges. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Requests for emergency contraception could be an important sign of abuse
(University of Bristol) Women who experience domestic violence and abuse (DVA) are more than twice as likely to seek emergency contraception as other women, according to a study by National Institute for Health Research-funded researchers at the University of Bristol and Queen Mary University of London, suggesting that requests for emergency contraception could be an important sign of abuse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds bad bosses could turn you into a great boss
(University of Central Florida) A new University of Central Florida study suggests abuse and mistreatment by those at the top of an organization do not necessarily lead to abusive behavior by lower-level leaders. When offered leadership opportunities, prior victims of workplace abuse are more likely to treat their own subordinates better by learning from the bad behavior of their bosses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Young, hip farmers: Coming to a city near you
(Purdue University) The population of American farmers is aging, but a study in the journal Rural Sociology shows a new generation of farmers is flocking to cities with large populations, farmers markets and the purchasing power to support a market for niche goods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Clark University researchers: Development threatens tropical forests
(Clark University) While infrastructure expansion has been broadly investigated as a driver of deforestation, the impacts of extractive industry and its interactions with infrastructure investment on forest cover are less well studied. These challenges are urgent given growing pressure for infrastructure investment and resource extraction. The authors use geospatial and qualitative data from Amazonia, Indonesia, and Mesoamerica to explain how infrastructure and extractive industry lead directly and indirectly to deforestation, forest degradation, and increasingly precarious rights for forest peoples. (Source: EurekAlert! -...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How common is Autism spectrum disorder and do kids receive treatment?
(JAMA Network) National survey data for 43,000 U.S. children suggests an estimated 2.8 percent have ever been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 2.5 percent currently have ASD. Among 1,115 children with current ASD, almost 30 percent aren't treated with behavioral therapies or medication.   ASD is a neurodevelopmental disorder marked by social impairments, communication difficulties, repetitive behaviors and restricted interests. Symptoms of ASD are often treated with behavioral therapies and medications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Opioid prescriptions from dentists linked to youth addiction risk, Stanford study finds
(Stanford Medicine) Teens and young adults who receive their initial opioid prescriptions from their dentists or oral surgeons are at increased risk for opioid addiction in the following year, a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neuroscientists pinpoint genes tied to dementia
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) A UCLA-led research team has identified genetic processes involved in the neurodegeneration that occurs in dementia -- an important step on the path toward developing therapies that could slow or halt the course of the disease. The findings appear Dec. 3 in the journal Nature Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children perform better when parents are involved in school life
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) A family's involvement in a child's education acts as a source of social mobility, according to a study by experts from the HSE Centre of Social and Economic School Development, Mikhail Goshin and Tatyana Mertsalova http://doi.org/10.17323/1814-9545-2018-3-68-90. Lower income parents who actively participate in their children's school life open up more opportunities for their children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The science of team sports
(Vienna University of Technology) Joint successes in the past increase the chances of winning. This has now been statistically proven in a variety of different team sports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence tracks biological age at every level and rewinds the aging clock
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Artificial Intelligence for Aging and Longevity Research: Recent Advances and Perspectives " in Ageing Research Reviews. The paper introduces recent advances in deep learning for aging research and provides fair insight into the field. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research: A third of hospitalized adolescents with life-threatening anorexia are not thin
(University of Melbourne) Health workers are being urged to closely monitor adolescents losing weight after a study of patients with anorexia nervosa found 31 per cent had all the cognitive features and physical complications of the disease without being underweight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A change in marital status affects the number of daily steps
(University of Jyv ä skyl ä - Jyv ä skyl ä n yliopisto) Changes in relationships have links to physical activity. The total number of non-exercise steps was reduced during a four-year follow-up study for men who divorced. For women who found a new spouse between the measurement points, the total steps decreased significantly when compared to women married throughout the period. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence for studying the ancient human populations of Patagonia
(FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology) Argentine and Spanish researchers have used statistical techniques of automatic learning to analyze mobility patterns and technology of the hunter-gatherer groups that inhabited the Southern Cone of America, from the time they arrived about 12,000 years ago until the end of the 19th century. Big data from archaeological sites located in the extreme south of Patagonia have been used for this study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Linguistic study finds 'the I's have it' when it comes to education rates
(University of Bath) Linguistic study finds 'the I's have it' when it comes to education rates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New laboratory system allows researchers to probe the secret lives of queen bees
(Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A group of researchers at the University of Illinois has established a laboratory-based method for tracking the fertility of honey bee queens, using a laboratory set-up that would mimic the key aspects of the hive environment and allow detection of egg-laying by honey bee queens living with small groups of worker bees. The resulting system allowed them to explore the relationship between worker nutrition and queen fertility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Utility customers overestimate cost savings with energy-conservation plans
(Ohio State University) When deciding whether to participate in programs designed to conserve energy during peak hours, consumers appear to rely more on their intuition about how much money they're saving rather than on proof their bills are smaller, a new study has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The 'best prospect' for ensuring success in demanding roles
(University of Miami) Building on their past work, University of Miami Associate Professor Amishi Jha and Scott Rogers, discovered that Special Operations Forces who participated in a month-long mindfulness course could improve their attention and working memory. These are both mental capacities necessary to tone down emotional reactivity and boost problem solving skills. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can predictive analytics help banks, consumers avoid overdraft issues? New study says, yes
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) In 2012, consumers paid $32 billion in overdraft fees, which represented the single largest source of revenue for banks from demand deposit accounts, while leading to significant levels of consumer dissatisfaction and attracting attention from government regulators.In a recent study, researchers have found that it may be possible to help correct this problem through the application of sophisticated data analytics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New data dashboards launched to inform policymaking on modern slavery and child labor
(United Nations University) Delta 8.7 has released the first set of interactive data dashboards that visualize trends in forced labor, modern slavery, human trafficking, and child labor. These dashboards bring together country-level data visualizations and details on governments' efforts to address these abuses in order to inform evidence-based policymaking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Undercover investigation: Socio-economic survey of pangolin hunting in Assam, India
(Pensoft Publishers) Referred to as the world's most trafficked mammal, pangolins are not only being gradually pushed to the edge of extinction, but also made an innocent victim to huge cruelty. Having conducted a 2-year socio-economic survey of pangolin poaching in Northeast India, a research team aims to quantify and understand the drivers of the practice in the previously unstudied region in order to recommend adequate measures. Their paper is published in the open-access journal Nature Conservation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Solving 21st-century problems requires skills that few are trained in, scientists find
(Association for Psychological Science) From companies trying to resolve data security risks to coastal communities preparing for rising sea levels, solving modern problems requires teamwork that draws on a range of expertise and life experiences. Yet individuals receive little training to develop the skills that are vital to these collaborations. A new scientific report identifies the essential components of collaborative problem solving and shows how integrating knowledge from diverse fields will be essential for training these abilities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AIP receives $650,000 grant to digitize rare books
(American Institute of Physics) The American Institute of Physics announced today that it has received a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to make a unique collection of rare books in the physical sciences universally accessible. The grant will enable AIP's Niels Bohr Library& Archives to provide global, digital access to the Wenner Collection, a carefully curated repository that features 3,800 volumes, dating back nearly five centuries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

US image abroad: It's the message not the messenger
(Dartmouth College) Today's political climate in the US is often peppered with animosity from the US president towards other countries but how has the US image fared? A Dartmouth study finds that the US image abroad appears to be influenced more by policy content than by the person delivering the message, even if it is the US president. The results are published in Political Behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In vitro cell culture findings could lead to novel interventions for Schizophrenia
(McLean Hospital) A recent study has shown how using cultured cells from patients with psychotic disorders to investigate abnormalities in nerve connections in the brain could lead to new treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news