Pofatu: A new database for geochemical 'fingerprints' of artefacts
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) Due to the improvement and increased use of geochemical fingerprinting techniques during the last 25 years, the archaeological compositional data of stone tools has grown exponentially. The Pofatu Database is a large-scale collaborative project that enables curation and data sharing. The database also provides instrumental details, analytical procedures and reference standards used for calibration purposes or quality control. Thus, Pofatu ensures reproducibility and comparability between provenance studies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Oink, oink makes the pig
(Technische Universit ä t Dresden) In a new study, neuroscientists at TU Dresden demonstrated that the use of gestures and pictures makes foreign language teaching in primary schools more effective and sustainable. They thus provide important fundamental findings for the development of modern teaching methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Secure land rights essential to protect biodiversity and cultures within indigenous lands
(University of East Anglia) New research argues that legally protected large territories in Brazil are crucial to protect biodiversity and provide essential conditions for indigenous populations to maintain their traditional livelihoods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Excess coffee consumption a culprit for poor health
(University of South Australia) Cappuccino, latte or short black, coffee is one of the most commonly consumed drinks in the world. But whether it's good or bad for your health can be clarified by genetics, as a world-first study from the University of South Australia's Australian Centre for Precision Health shows that excess coffee consumption can cause poor health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Expandable foam for 3D printing large objects (video)
(American Chemical Society) It's a frustrating limitation of 3D printing: Printed objects must be smaller than the machine making them. Huge machines are impractical for printing large parts because they take up too much space and require excessive time to print. Now, a new material reported in ACS Applied Materials& Interfaces can be used to 3D print small objects that expand upon heating. The foam could find applications in architecture, aerospace and biomedicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chemistry job seekers face tough outlook during pandemic
(American Chemical Society) Even though it's been over a decade, the 2008 recession and its effects still loom over the chemistry enterprise. And now with the COVID-19 pandemic shutting down labs and universities across the world, chemistry students and professionals are again facing hiring freezes, reduced pay and other career obstacles.Chemical& Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, spoke with chemists about how they're navigating the current economic downturn. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

WPI awarded NSF grant to study impact of stress on student learning during pandemic
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) An interdisciplinary group of researchers at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) will use a $199,999 RAPID grant from the National Science Foundation to study how stress and learning environments impact college students who are attending remote classes during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scarcity reduces consumers' concerns about prices, even during a pandemic, research shows
(Indiana University) New research published in the Journal of Consumer Marketing Research finds that scarcity actually decreases consumers' tendency to use price to judge a product's quality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Older, larger companies benefit from not investing in worker safety, study finds
(Oregon State University) Companies best equipped to provide safe workplaces are the least likely to do so, because they benefit financially from forgoing the cost of enacting workplace safety practices, a recent study found. In some cases, companies with worker injury claims were more than 50% more likely to survive than their safer counterparts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New imaging tool helps researchers see extent of Alzheimer's early damage
(Yale University) New imaging technology allows scientists to see the widespread loss of brain synapses in early stages of Alzheimer's disease, a finding that one day may help aid in drug development, according to a new Yale University study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blockchain: forget the criminal record, it might just save your life -- new study
(University of Bath) Blockchain is set to become a friend to consumers, protecting them from tainted food, fake medicine, fraud and products with illegal or unethical origins (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Soybean seeding rates and risk
(American Society of Agronomy) Broad study helps define optimal soybean seeding rates in North America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Beauty and the beast: Why both can win at social selling
(American Marketing Association) Consumers tend to make judgments of a seller's sociability, competence, and credibility based on facial attractiveness. Interestingly, the " premium " works at both ends of the spectrum in that attractive and unattractive sellers do better than people with ordinary faces. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Acute stress may slow down the spread of fears
(University of Konstanz) Psychologists from the University of Konstanz in Southern Germany find that we are less likely to amplify fears in social exchange if we are stressed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A hidden history of artificial intelligence in primary care
(American Academy of Family Physicians) Artificial intelligence methods are being utilized in radiology, cardiology and other medical specialty fields to quickly and accurately process large quantities of health data to improve the diagnostic and treatment power of health care teams. Compared to other medical specialty fields, primary care physicians deal with a very broad spectrum of illnesses, taking a person-centric approach to care, with fewer diagnostic instruments or tests available. The nature of primary care may pose unique challenges to the meaningful application of AI. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trouble getting a doctor's appointment may drive Medicaid enrollees to opt for the ER
(American Academy of Family Physicians) The expansion of Medi-Cal, California's Medicaid program, gave millions of low-income Californians access to health insurance, but this study conducted in Northern California found that new patients may have to wait up up to a month for an appointment with a participating primary care provider, depending on their county of residence. It is not uncommon for Medi-Cal enrollees to visit emergency rooms if they require more immediate care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins: What we can't see can help us find things
(Johns Hopkins University) Anyone who's ever tried to find something in a hurry knows how helpful it is to think about the lost item's color, size and shape. But surprisingly, traits of an object that you can't see also come into play during a search, Johns Hopkins University researchers found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

#Thisisourlane: How physicians can take action to reduce gun violence
(American Academy of Family Physicians) As strategies to curb gun violence at the federal level have stalled, leaders in primary care and health policy have identified the role doctors can play in national gun safety efforts and the prevention of firearm suicide. In this pair of recommendation papers, clinicians place themselves at the front lines of this public health issue and offer a call to action for the medical community. Both papers lay out a grassroots course of action to help physicians engage with their patients and policy makers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

OU professor examines the fifty shades phenomenon
(University of Oklahoma) In a new study, Meredith G. F. Worthen, professor of sociology at the University of Oklahoma, and Trenton M. Haltom (Ph.D. candidate, University of Nebraska and OU alumnus) investigate how identifying as a member of the leather community is related to attitudes toward women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Not all psychopaths are violent; a new study may explain why some are 'successful' instead
(Virginia Commonwealth University) Psychopathy is widely recognized as a risk factor for violent behavior, but many psychopathic individuals refrain from antisocial or criminal acts. Understanding what leads these psychopaths to be 'successful' has been a mystery.A new study conducted by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University sheds light on the mechanisms underlying the formation of this 'successful' phenotype. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is pulmonary rehab after hospitalization for COPD associated with better survival?
(JAMA Network) Claims data for nearly 200,000 Medicare patients were used to examine the association between starting pulmonary rehabilitation within 90 days of being hospitalized for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and survival after one year. Pulmonary rehabilitation involves exercise training and self-management education. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Comparing changes in rates of cardiovascular deaths in urban, rural areas in US
(JAMA Network) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data were used to examine changes in rates of deaths attributed to cardiovascular disease from 1999 to 2017 in urban and rural areas of the US overall and by age, sex and race/ethnicity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Examining association of prenatal alcohol, tobacco exposure with newborn brain activity
(JAMA Network) Researchers looked at the association between prenatal alcohol and tobacco smoking exposure and brain activity in 1,700 newborns measured during sleep. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists show MRI predicts the efficacy of a stem cell therapy for brain injury
(Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute) Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute and Loma Linda University Health have demonstrated the promise of applying magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to predict the efficacy of using human neural stem cells to treat a brain injury -- a first-ever 'biomarker' for regenerative medicine that could help personalize stem cell treatments for neurological disorders and improve efficacy. The study was published in Cell Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and Elsevier announce new publishing partnership
(Elsevier) The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) and Elsevier, a global information analytics business specializing in science and health, are delighted to announce a new partnership to publish the ASBMB's Journal of Biological Chemistry (JBC), Molecular& Cellular Proteomics (MCP) and Journal of Lipid Research (JLR). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Presence of spouse alters how parents' brains react to children stimuli, finds NTU Singapore study
(Nanyang Technological University) A study led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) researchers has revealed how the physical presence of spouses who are co-parenting can alter each other's brain activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Social media influencers could encourage adolescents to follow social distancing guidelines
(University of Cambridge) Public health bodies should consider incentivizing social media influencers to encourage adolescents to follow social distancing guidelines, say researchers. Many adolescents are choosing to ignore the guidelines set out by governments during the COVID-19 pandemic, and peer-to-peer campaigns are likely to be more successful in changing attitudes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The economic gap also affects the consumption of screens by children
(Universitat Pompeu Fabra - Barcelona) The presence and variety of mobile devices in Spanish households, regardless of social and economic circumstances, has been mainstream for years. Several studies focus on parental mediation in children's consumption of smart screens, although there is a lack of scientific evidence concerning how the level of training and the professional profile of mothers and fathers affect children's digital media consumption. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Winners of Russian National Award in Applied Economics -- 2020 announced
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) This year the award was bestowed on Marco Francesconi (University of Essex, UK), Fabi á n Slonimczyk and Anna Yurko (HSE University, Moscow). The team of authors was recognized for their article, which reliably proves the increased geographic mobility of high school graduates seeking to obtain a higher education following the introduction of the Unified State Exam. The award ceremony and honorary report by the winners will be held online on May 13 at 4 pm (MSK). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FDA approves ventilator designed by particle physics community
(Princeton University) In just six weeks, a massive international team of physicists and engineers led by Princeton's Cristian Galbiati brought a ventilator from concept to FDA approval. The FDA announced May 3 that the Mechanical Ventilator Milano (MVM), a low-cost ventilator designed to ease device shortages caused by COVID-19, is safe for use in the United States under the FDA's Emergency Use Authorization, which helps support public health during a crisis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Do democracies behave differently from non-democracies when it comes to foreign policy?
(Lehigh University) The question of whether democracies behave differently from non-democracies is a central, and intense, debate in the field of international relations. Two intellectual traditions -- liberalism and realism -- dominate. Liberals argue that democracies do indeed behave differently, while realists insist that regime type and ideology are of little relevance in understanding foreign policy behavior. Arman Grigoryan, a faculty member in the Department of International Relations at Lehigh University has contributed to this debate with a recent article in a top journal, International Security. (Source: EurekAle...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How handling meat leads to psychological numbness
(Lancaster University) Butchers and deli workers become desensitised to handling meat within the first two years of handling it as part of their job say psychologists. The longer our participants had worked in the meat industry, the less disgust and empathy they felt towards meat and the animals involved, and this reduced sense of empathy and disgust was observable within the first two years of work. This suggests that psychological adaptation to meat may occur fairly quickly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A 'consciousness conductor' synchronizes and connects mouse brain areas
(RIKEN) New research from the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) shows that slow-wave brain activity, a characteristic of sleep and resting states, is controlled by the claustrum. The synchronization of silent and active states across large parts of the brain by these slow waves could contribute to consciousness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sex, genes and vulnerability
(Harvard Medical School) Study offers molecular explanation for long-standing observation that certain diseases occur more often or more severely in different sexes. Complement component 4 (C4) genes protect against the autoimmune disorders lupus and Sj ö gren's syndrome while raising risk of severe schizophrenia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Loss of green space in India shown to be associated with higher cardiometabolic risk
(Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)) Study is one of the first to analyse the relationship between urban development and health in a low- or middle-income country. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New OA Journal of European Landscapes by Amsterdam University Press launched on ARPHA
(Pensoft Publishers) The open-access, peer-reviewed Journal of European Landscape was launched with the aim to bridge the gap between heritage and future-proof landscapes, between local and international perspectives, between what is and what is only in the eye of the beholder. By publishing scientific papers, project descriptions, interviews and book reviews, this new journal will document and safely store otherwise fragile research outputs, while also promoting landscape discourse across geographies. Its first issue is now out. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using self-nudging to make better choices
(Max-Planck-Gesellschaft) A behavioral science technique to improve self-control. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brief intervention could keep lower-risk drug use from becoming riskier: BU study
(Boston University School of Medicine) A new pilot randomized trial by researchers from the Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and School of Medicine (BUSM) and Boston Medical Center (BMC) finds that a brief intervention for people with lower-risk drug use may help prevent increased and riskier use, as well as other health issues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Young migrants at risk of mental illness
(Max-Planck-Gesellschaft) Experience of trauma, abuse and poverty puts the mental health of many young refugees at risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 places added prenatal stress on mother and child that could have lasting impact
(McGill University) An international consortium of researchers have identified particular sources of prenatal stress, as experienced by mothers, that have a direct effect on a child's subsequent mental health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Eurovision voting points to more than just musical tastes
(University of Stirling) Although this year's Eurovision Song Contest has been postponed due to the COVID-19 outbreak, academics from the University of Stirling and University of Glasgow have revealed interesting patterns from previous years' public votes. Dr. Isaac Tabner, from Stirling Management School, and Dr. Antonios Siganos, from the Adam Smith Business School, have looked at how each country's votes for its favorite song can give an indication of the likelihood and nature of business exchanges across borders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Predictive models could provide more accurate detection of early-stage Parkinson's disease
(York University) neuroscientists at York University have found five different models that use these types of non-motor clinical as well as biological variables to more accurately predict early-stage Parkinson's disease.Their five-model analysis is one of the first utilizing only non-motor clinical and biologic variables. Some models performed better than others but all distinguished early stage (preclinical) Parkinson's disease from healthy, age-matched controls, with better than 80 per cent accuracy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Epic Games, maker of Fortnite, awards UCF professor grant to enhance AR and VR technology
(University of Central Florida) The company responsible for the online video game hit Fortnite has awarded a UCF assistant professor a grant to develop an immersive technology to take virtual experiences to new levels of reality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Emotional well-being while home gardening similar to other popular activities, study finds
(Princeton University) Princeton researchers found that gardening at home had a similar effect on emotional well-being (or happiness) as biking, walking or dining out. The benefits were similar across racial boundaries and between urban and suburban residents, and it was the only activity out of the 15 studied for which women and people with low incomes reported the highest emotional well-being. The results suggest that household gardens could be key to providing food security in urban areas and making cities more sustainable and livable. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Six software tools for social science research receive 2020 SAGE Ocean Concept Grants
(SAGE) SAGE Publishing has announced the winners of the 2020 SAGE Ocean Concept Grant, with £ 15,000 awarded to Knowsi, a portal for researchers and participants to manage their consent relationship in compliance with GDPR, CCPA, and PIPEDA regulations. Five further grants of £ 2,000 are awarded to early-stage software ideas that support the use of computational methods in social research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How does the brain link events to form a memory? Study reveals unexpected mental processes
(The Zuckerman Institute at Columbia University) The brain has a powerful ability to remember and connect events separated in time. And now, in a new study in mice published today in Neuron, scientists at Columbia's Zuckerman Institute have shed light on how the brain can form such enduring links. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gene therapy in mice builds muscle, reduces fat
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that gene therapy in mice helped build strength and significant muscle mass quickly, while reducing the severity of osteoarthritis. The gene therapy also prevented obesity, even when the mice were fed a high-fat diet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study to research impact of COVID-19 on people who use drugs
(University of Stirling) Understanding the health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on people who use drugs in Scotland is the focus of a new University of Stirling study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sleeter receives funding for historical simulations on diplomacy
(George Mason University) Nathan Sleeter, Research Assistant Professor, Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media (RRCHNM), is directing a project in which RRCHNM will create three classroom simulations based on events from the history of diplomacy for secondary education instructors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Burning out in silence
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Russian companies still pursue authoritarian leadership styles, and employees often avoid articulating their concerns and complaints to management. Together with chronic stress and work-family imbalance, this can often result in emotional burnout. This is the conclusion of a study by researchers from North Dakota State University and HSE University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news