Muscle memory discovery ends 'use it or lose it' dogma
(Frontiers) Exercise physiologists agree: muscle memory is real. But how are these 'memories' stored? A review published in Frontiers in Physiology has a simple answer: nuclei gained during training persist even when muscle cells shrink due to disuse or start to break down. This means we can 'bank' nuclei in our youth to prevent frailty in old age -- and makes steroid use in competitive sport a perfect but irredeemable crime. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neanderthal hunting spears could kill at a distance
(University College London) Neanderthals have been imagined as the inferior cousins of modern humans, but a new study by archaeologists at UCL reveals for the first time that they produced weaponry advanced enough to kill at a distance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Morris Animal Foundation awards $1 million for new canine and feline health studies
(Morris Animal Foundation) Worth more than a few happy barks and meows, Morris Animal Foundation announced it awarded nearly $1 million in grants for nine canine and feline research projects. The studies will help veterinary scientists improve the health and quality of life of cats and dogs suffering from deadly and debilitating diseases including cancer, chronic upper respiratory disease and osteoarthritis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First confirmed cases of rabbit virus found in UK hares
(University of East Anglia) New research from the University of East Anglia confirms cases of a rabbit virus found in hares. The first UK cases of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus type 2 (RHDV2) have been detected in dead hares found in two locations -- Essex and Dorset. RHDV2 normally affects rabbits, but the disease is known to have jumped to European brown hares in Italy, Spain, France and Australia. This is the first time that RHDV2 has been found in hares in the UK. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Computer analysis shows that popular music lyrics become angrier and sadder over time
(Lawrence Technological University) A scientific analysis of the sentiment of popular music lyrics from the 1950s to 2016 showed that the expression of anger and sadness in popular music has increased gradually over time, while the expression of joy has declined. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Kids prefer friends who talk like they do
(American Psychological Association) Children tend to prefer to be friends with other children who speak with the same local accent as they have, even if they grow up in a diverse community and are regularly exposed to a variety of accents, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New kidney research sheds light on harms of certain drugs
(University of Bristol) Scientists have identified an enzyme that is a 'master regulator' of kidney function that if excessively suppressed, can trigger renal failure. Their findings have implications for the use of existing drugs and the development of new pharmaceuticals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

United Nations, World Economic Forum and partners unite to address e-waste
(Terry Collins Assoc) Seven UN entities have come together, supported by the World Economic Forum and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development to address e-waste.A new joint report shows that the world now discards approximately 50 million tons of electronic and electrical waste (e-waste) per year, greater in weight than all of the commercial airliners ever made; only 20 percent is formally recycled. If nothing changes, United Nations University predicts e-waste could nearly triple to 120 million tonnes by 2050. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Cascade of Care' framework aims to reduce opioid deaths
(Columbia University Irving Medical Center) In a paper out today in The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, Columbia researchers present an expanded model to reduce opioid overdose and death by addressing gaps in addiction care and by monitoring treatment outcomes. A group of researchers led by Arthur Robin Williams, MD, MBE, at Columbia University's Division on Substance Use Disorders, developed a 'Cascade of Care' model for treating individuals with opioid use disorder based on lessons learned in the HIV/AIDS field. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Milken Institute assesses economic impact of tech and research on US cities
(Milken Institute) Utah's Provo-Orem metropolitan area took the No. 1 spot in the Milken Institute's Best-Performing Cities index for a second consecutive year, reflecting the robust growth of high-tech industries outside the coastal enclaves that launched the digital revolution. Published annually since 1999, Best-Performing Cities: Where America's Jobs are Created and Sustained (www.best-cities.org) measures the economic vitality of 200 large metros and 201 small cities. Metrics include growth in jobs, wages and salaries, and technology output. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Patenting a device for the random selection of people
(Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) Researchers from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) have patented a device for the selection of people which, unlike other methods, ensures the randomness of the entire process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Copy number variants contribute to risk of 'schizophrenia-like' bipolar disorder subtype
(Elsevier) A form of rare genomic structural variation called copy number variants (CNVs) may be more closely associated with schizophrenia than bipolar disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Teens' same-gender friendships key to later satisfaction in romantic relationships
(Society for Research in Child Development) A new longitudinal study sought to identify the factors in adolescence that best predicted who would and would not have a satisfying romantic life in their late 20s. The study found that the skills teens learn in friendships with peers of the same gender were the strongest predictors of later romantic satisfaction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Natural disaster affects children's schooling years later
(Society for Research in Child Development) A new study looked at changes in children's academic performance after major bushfires in Australia. The study concluded that children in regions affected significantly by bushfires demonstrated poorer academic outcomes in some subjects than children in regions that were less severely affected by the fires. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

US children show clear evidence of bias at the intersection of race and gender
(Northwestern University) A new Northwestern University study provides strong and consistent evidence of bias at the intersection of race and gender in 4-year-old children. The researchers examined 4-year-old children's responses to images of other children who varied both in race -- black and white -- and gender -- female and male. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People think and behave differently in virtual reality than they do in real life
(University of British Columbia) By studying the phenomenon of contagious yawning, the researchers learned that people's reactions in virtual reality can be quite different from what they are in actual reality. They found that contagious yawning happens in VR, but people's tendency to suppress yawns when they have company or feel they're being watched don't apply in the VR environment. Further, when people immersed in VR are aware of an actual person in the room, they do stifle their yawns. Actual reality supersedes virtual reality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cannabis use disorder: The policy climate matters
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) Adolescents and young adults living in states with more liberal policies reported higher average rates of past-year cannabis use than those in states with more conservative policies. However, the rates of cannabis use disorder -- abuse or dependence on the drug -- were significantly lower in states with more liberal policies compared to states with more conservative policies. The study is one of the first to assess the relationship between policy liberalism and health outcomes, and specifically cannabis use-related outcomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Smoking linked to higher risk of peripheral artery disease in African-Americans
(NIH/National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute) African-Americans who smoke appear to be at greater risk for peripheral artery disease, or PAD, new research has found. Additionally, the findings suggest that smoking intensity -- how many cigarettes a day and for how many years -- also affects the likelihood of getting the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mice transmit acquired adaptability to their offspring
(University of G ö ttingen) If mice grow up in a stimulating environment, their brain remains adaptable for longer. In fact, not only these mice, but also their offspring, benefit. The offspring also have increased plasticity of the brain - even if they did not grow up in this environment. This is what a team from the Collaborative Research Centre 889 " Cellular Mechanisms of Sensory Processing " at the University of G ö ttingen has discovered. Results were published in the journal eNeuro. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Overlapping genomic regions underlie canine fearfulness and human mental disorders
(University of Helsinki) Researchers in the University of Helsinki have identified two novel anxiety-related genomic regions in German Shepherd dogs. The region associated with fearfulness corresponds with the locus of human chromosome 18, which is associated with various psychiatric disorders, while the region associated with noise sensitivity includes several genes related to human and canine behaviour and mental disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Copy cats: When is a bobcat not a bobcat?
(University of British Columbia Okanagan campus) Two UBC Okanagan biologists, who have publicly solicited images of wild cats for their research, have answered that question. Their recently published study explains how hard it can be when it comes to wildlife classification -- even experts have difficulty agreeing on whether a cat in a picture is a bobcat or a lynx. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study establishes link between climate change, conflict, and migration
(University of East Anglia) Research involving a University of East Anglia (UEA) academic has established a link between climate change, conflict, and migration for the first time.It found that in specific circumstances, climate conditions do lead to increased migration, but indirectly, through causing conflict. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

DIWATA-2 successfully captures first images
(Hokkaido University) Philippine microsatellite DIWATA-2 has successfully captured initial images. Launched last autumn, it is the second microsatellite designed and developed under a collaborative project between Hokkaido University, Tohoku University, the Advanced Science and Technology Institute (DOST-ASTI), and the University of the Philippines-Diliman (UPD) (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chemists warm up to preprint servers
(American Chemical Society) Preprint servers -- online sites that post scientific manuscripts for free, prior to peer review -- are well-established in fields such as physics and biology. More recently, two chemistry preprint servers, ChemRxiv and ChemRN, were launched. Although some chemists were initially skeptical, more are now embracing the idea of sharing their discoveries with the world before peer review, according to an article in Chemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How gender inequality is reproduced on social media
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Researchers from Higher School of Economics analyzed 62 million public posts on the most popular Russian social networking site VK and found that both men and women mention sons more often than daughters. They also found that posts featuring sons receive 1.5 times more likes. The results have been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

National Academy of Sciences honors 18 for major contributions to science
(National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine) The National Academy of Sciences will honor 18 individuals with awards in recognition of their extraordinary scientific achievements in a wide range of fields spanning the physical, biological, and medical sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

White mortgage agents may charge minority borrowers higher mortgage fees
(Penn State) Mortgage seekers from minority groups may pay more in fees than similarly qualified white borrowers, according to a team of researchers.In a study, the researchers found that when minorities seek mortgages they pay about 8 percent more -- or $400 more -- than white borrowers when they seek loans from white mortgage agents. Mortgage agents can assess fees, such as the broker origination fee, which are negotiable, or can even be waived. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Michigan schools face nation's worst decline in state education funding
(Michigan State University) Funding for Michigan's public schools has fallen more sharply than any other state over the past quarter century, a new report from Michigan State University finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Suicide deaths among incarcerated youth
(MediaSource) According to a US Department of Justice survey, from 2000 to 2014, suicide rates were two to three times higher for youth in custody than those in the general population. In a new study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child& Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), researchers from Nationwide Children's Hospital looked at circumstances preceding suicide to understand better why this disparity in suicide rate exists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study establishes causal link between climate, conflict, and migration
(International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) IIASA-led research has established a causal link between climate, conflict, and migration for the first time, something which has been widely suggested in the media but for which scientific evidence is scarce. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Possible link found between cases of high blood pressure and 'unhealthy' shopping centers
(City University London) A new study using Pop-Up health check stations found a possible link between 'unhealthy' shopping centers and the number of cases of suspected or diagnosed high blood pressure recorded for people who volunteered for checks.Researchers from City, University of London set up the one-day pop-up health check stations in seven shopping centers across England. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Parental PTSD affects health behavior and aging among offspring of Holocaust survivors
(Bar-Ilan University) A new study on intergenerational transmission of trauma has found evidence that Holocaust survivors suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and their adult offspring exhibit more unhealthy behavior patterns and age less successfully in comparison to survivors with no signs of PTSD or parents who did not experience the Holocaust and their offspring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

To halt malaria transmission, more research focused on human behavior needed
(Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health) Wherever possible, researchers should not just focus on mosquito behavior when working to eliminate malaria, but must also consider how humans behave at night when the risk of being bitten by an infected mosquito is highest, new findings from the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP) suggest. CCP is based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Health literacy linked to blood pressure medication adherence among Hispanics
(New York University) Good health literacy is associated with better adherence to blood pressure medications among Hispanic individuals with high blood pressure, finds a study by NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and Columbia University School of Nursing. However, the majority of this population lacks health literary and has poor adherence to their medications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study looks at ranger motivation in dangerous African park
(Wildlife Conservation Society) A new study looks at the job satisfaction of front line conservation rangers working in challenging conditions at a national park in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and identifies ways to improve motivation to make them more effective at enforcing the law. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How psychological science is benefiting the world
(Association for Psychological Science) Technological advances have allowed psychological scientists to measure everything from cognitive impairments to everyday decision-making. Now, the scientists are using their research to inform tools, programs, and interventions that are helping to cultivate a healthier, happier, and more sustainable world. More than 25 psychological researchers address this question in a special issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science. The scientists write about expanding their research beyond academic articles to applying them to the betterment of society and the environment. (Source: EurekA...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Erasing memories associated with cocaine use reduces drug seeking behavior
(University of Pittsburgh) Researchers identified the brain circuits that form memories associating environmental cues with cocaine use. Targeting these memories may improve the success of exposure therapy to prevent relapse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

From toilet to brickyard: Recycling biosolids to make sustainable bricks
(RMIT University) Around 30 percent of the world's biosolids are stockpiled or sent to landfill each year, while over 3 billion cubic meters of clay soil is dug up for the global brickmaking industry. Using biosolids in bricks offers an innovative solution to these environmental challenges. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Internet of Things Collaborative caps successful first year with additional $2.2M grant
(Case Western Reserve University) To continue building on the Internet of Things Collaborative's early successes, the Cleveland Foundation has awarded another $2.2 million, one-year grant to the collaborative, which was created in 2017 to position Cleveland as a leader in digital innovation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antiepileptic drugs linked to accumulation of hospital days in persons with Alzheimer's disease
(University of Eastern Finland) People with Alzheimer's disease who used antiepileptic drugs had a higher number of accumulated hospital days than people with Alzheimer's disease who did not use antiepileptics, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. People with Alzheimer's disease who used antiepileptic drugs had a higher number of accumulated hospital days than people with Alzheimer's disease who did not use antiepileptics, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Evolution of national policy determines the degree of Spanish citizens' trust in the EU
(Universitat Pompeu Fabra - Barcelona) Since 2008, political trust in European institutions has greatly deteriorated in many member states, including Spain, and has given rise to increasing research into its causes. This debate has focused on the economic and social evolution resulting from the austerity policies encouraged by the European institutions themselves and on their clear lack of response to citizens' growing demands. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study identifies new genes associated with the leading cause of blindness
(University of Liverpool) A new study, published in Clinical Epigenetics, identifies genes associated with Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) that could represent new targets for future drug development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Frequent use of aspirin can lead to increased bleeding
(King's College London) A new study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has found that taking aspirin on a regular basis to prevent heart attacks and strokes, can lead to an increase risk of almost 50 percent in major bleeding episodes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Increasing skepticism against robots
(University of W ü rzburg) In Europe, people are more reserved regarding robots than they were five years ago. This is shown in a new study published by scientists from Linz and W ü rzburg. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Surveillance in our schools
(University of South Australia) ClassDojo is one of the most popular education apps in the world. Its company estimates it is used by millions of teachers and children across 180 countries. Beneath its friendly exterior lie disturbing implications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lehigh University computer scientist wins 2019 NSF CAREER Award
(Lehigh University) The National Science Foundation recently awarded Eric P.S. Baumer of Lehigh University a grant to make technology more humane. Baumer will develop participatory methods for human-centered design of algorithmic systems. The methods will be deployed in two nonprofits, AEquitas and ProPublica. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Inability to integrate reward info contributes to undervalued rewards in schizophrenia
(Elsevier) People with schizophrenia have a hard time integrating information about a reward -- the size of the reward and the probability of receiving it -- when assessing its value, according to a study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Racial discrimination increases activism in black young adults
(North Carolina State University) A recent study finds that experiencing racial discrimination makes black teens and young adults more likely to engage in social and political activism on issues that are important to black communities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why you should be concerned about Oprah Winfrey when introducing an innovation
(Bocconi University) New research by Bocconi University's Paola Cillo and Gaia Rubera with Texas A&M's David Griffith asserts that the reaction of large individual investors to innovation is an important component of stock returns, their reaction to innovation depends on their national culture, and there is a way to segment large individual investors and pitch innovation to them accordingly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Emerging significance of gammaherpesvirus and morbillivirus infections in cats
(SAGE) Emerging infectious diseases comprise a substantial fraction of important human infections, with potentially devastating global health and economic impacts. A 2008 paper in Nature described the emergence of no fewer than 335 infectious diseases in the global human population between 1940 and 2004. In the veterinary field, just as in the medical field, advanced molecular techniques and sophisticated computer-based algorithms for genetic sequence assembly and analysis have revolutionized infectious disease research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news