Broadband internet causes sleep deprivation, a new study finds
(Bocconi University) Individuals with DSL access tend to sleep 25 minutes less than their counterparts without DSL Internet. They are significantly less likely to sleep between 7 and 9 hours, the amount recommended by the scientific community, and are less likely to be satisfied with their sleep, Bocconi University's Francesco Billari and colleagues find. The effect is largely driven by individuals that face time constraints in the morning and by the use of electronic devices in the evening (not by their use throughout the day) (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UK higher education students feel less empowered than their Irish counterparts
(University of Surrey) Professor Rachel Brooks at the University of Surrey is leading on new research which looks at the differences between the political activity of English and Irish higher education (HE) students. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists present concept for the elimination of traffic jams
(University of Cologne) A team of researchers from Cologne and New York presents proposals for the traffic management of the future. A dynamic and fair toll for road use could reduce congestion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Machine learning links dimensions of mental illness to abnormalities of brain networks
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new study using machine learning has identified brain-based dimensions of mental health disorders, an advance towards much-needed biomarkers to more accurately diagnose and treat patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Need help with your math homework? Ask these worms
(The Hebrew University of Jerusalem) Animals often rely on their sense of smell to locate food. It's a law of nature: the first one to reach a food source has a better chance of surviving than those who do not. But how exactly does their brain translate scent and then navigate towards it? (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Moral decision making is rife with internal conflict, say developmental psychologists
(University of California - Santa Cruz) A new in-depth study of moral reasoning challenges the popular notion that people are unable to think through difficult moral problems and rely primarily on automatic 'gut' reactions to make tough decisions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Google Glass helps kids with autism read facial expressions, Stanford study finds
(Stanford Medicine) Children with autism were able to improve their social skills by using a smartphone app paired with Google Glass to help them understand the emotions conveyed in people's facial expressions, according to a pilot study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Real or crocodile tears? Psychopaths may not know the difference
(Australian National University) New research has found people with high levels of psychopathic traits have difficulty telling when someone is genuinely afraid or upset, based on people's facial expressions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Behavioral nudges lead to striking drop in prescriptions of potent antipsychotic
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) Letters targeting high prescribers of Seroquel (quetiapine), an antipsychotic with potentially harmful side effects in the elderly, significantly reduced the number of prescriptions for patients in Medicare. The results showed that peer comparison letters led to statistically meaningful, persistent decreases in quetiapine prescribing, with no detected negative effects on patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ketamine has potential therapeutic role in adolescents with treatment-resistant depression
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study has shown a significant average decrease in the Children's Depression Rating Scale (42.5 percent) among adolescents with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) who were treated with intravenous ketamine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NJIT and National Student Clearinghouse collaborate to help students earn degrees
(New Jersey Institute of Technology) New Jersey community college students who transfer to the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) before earning a degree or certificate will find it easier to receive a credential retroactively under a new alliance between NJIT and the National Student Clearinghouse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BMC selects 10 communities to strengthen trauma-informed early childhood systems
(Boston Medical Center) Boston Medical Center's (BMC) Vital Village Network is working with communities across the country to expand their model of community building to promote child health and opportunity. Through a $2.2M grant supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), Vital Village has selected ten local communities to form the Networks of Opportunity for Child Wellbeing (NOW) Learning Community to address barriers and develop innovative community partnerships aimed at improving the early childhood experience. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, August 2018
(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) These are ORNL story tips: residents' shared desire for water security benefits neighborhoods; 3D printed molds for concrete facades promise lower cost, production time; ORNL engineered the edges of structures in 2D crystals; chasing runaway electrons in fusion plasmas; new tools to understand US waterways and identify potential hydropower sites; and better materials for 3D printed permanent magnets could last longer, perform better. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Muslim, Protestant scientists most likely to experience, perceive religious discrimination
(Rice University) Muslim and Protestant scientists are more likely than other US scientists to experience religious discrimination, according to new research from Rice University and West Virginia University (WVU). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Racial diversity increases student leadership skills, especially for white students
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) Universities prepare students to enter the professional workforce, but they also develop the next generation of leaders to head up organizations and drive social change. But, as the United States and its college campuses become more racially diverse, are students being trained to lead within diverse contexts? And how does diversity impact leadership development for both white and non-white students? A new study from the University of Illinois aims to find out. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rice University study: How firefighters and others take leaps of faith
(Rice University) A study of firefighters in the United States breaks new ground in understanding how groups of workers -- especially those in high-risk occupations -- are able to take leaps of faith. The study conveys what goes into a person's ability to make critical trust-related judgments. It also has relevance and managerial implications in an era of declining trust in both people and institutions, the study's authors said. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Innovation and speculation drive stock market bubble activity, according to new study
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) A group of data scientists conducted an in-depth analysis of major innovations and stock market bubbles from 1825 through 2000 and came away with novel takeaways of their own as they found some very distinctive patterns in the occurrence of bubbles over 175 years.The study, " Two Centuries of Innovations and Stock Market Bubbles, " will be published in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Politicization and prioritization in the judiciary
(University of Chicago Press Journals) In " The Politics of Selecting the Bench from the Bar: The Legal Profession and Partisan Incentives to Introduce Ideology into Judicial Selection, " published in the Journal of Law and Economics, Adam Bonica and Maya Sen analyze how and why American courts become politicized. The authors present a theory of strategic selection in which politicians appoint judges with specific ideological backgrounds in order to advance political agendas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Financial checkup should be part of health screenings for childhood cancer survivors
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) Adult survivors of childhood cancer should be screened for financial problems that might cause them to delay or skip medical care or to suffer psychological distress. The recommendation from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital researchers followed an analysis that found 65 percent of survivors reported financial challenges related to their childhood cancer diagnoses.More than half of survivors (51.1 percent) indicated they worried about paying for care, and 33 percent said finances kept them from seeking medical care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Baby talk words build infants' language skills, study shows
(University of Edinburgh) The more baby talk words that infants are exposed to the quicker they grasp language, a study suggests.Assessments of nine-month-old children suggest that those who hear words such as bunny or choo-choo more frequently are faster at picking up new words between nine and 21 months. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sharing parenting leads to healthier young, beetle study finds
(University of Edinburgh) Animals who share the burden of raising young tend to have healthier offspring than animals who do so alone (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

India needs 'giant leap' to meet 2030 targets in reducing child mortality rates
(International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) IIASA researchers have found that almost half of the districts in India are not on track to reduce the mortality rates of newborns and meet the target set out under Sustainable Development Goal 3 (SDG3) for 2030, while a third will not meet the target for under-five mortality rates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Women seeing baby animals have a reduced appetite for meat
(Lancaster University) Images of baby animals reduces people's appetite for meat say researchers, who found that the effect is much stronger for women than for men.The findings may reflect women's greater emotional attunement towards babies and, by extension, their tendency to empathise more with baby animals. Also, meat is associated with masculinity and images of tough men who consume meat for muscle building protein, along with prehistoric ideas of the male as hunter. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NYSCF partners with TOOLGEN, NSAGE to integrate gene editing and stem cell technologies
(New York Stem Cell Foundation) The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) Research Institute today announced a strategic partnership with Korean firms ToolGen, Inc., and nSAGE, Inc.. In a Memorandum of Understanding, the organizations agreed to collaborate in the development of innovative therapeutics by leveraging cutting-edge gene editing and stem cell technologies. NYSCF will be a strategic partner to a new company being created for this purpose by ToolGen and nSAGE. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Prayer makes families connected, unified and bonded with less relational tension
(Brigham Young University) In a recently-published study in the Journal of Family Psychology, BYU researchers explored how family prayer influences family relationships, finding a connection between prayer and a number of benefits for families. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research suggests coffee consumption associated with reduced risk of death
(Kaizo) A new roundtable report from the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC) titled 'Coffee, caffeine, mortality and life expectancy' highlights the potential role of coffee consumption on all-cause mortality, examining both published and yet-to-be published research to date. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Eat high-fiber foods to reduce effects of stress on gut and behavior
(The Physiological Society) Eating high-fiber foods may reduce the effects of stress on our gut and behavior, according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Differences in social status and politics encourage paranoid thinking
(University College London) Differences in social status and political belief increase paranoid interpretations of other people's actions, finds a new UCL experimental study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The competitive edge: Dietary competition played a key role in the evolution of early primates
(Grand Valley State University) New research published online today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B -Biological Sciences confirms the critical role that dietary adaptations played in the survival and diversification of North American euprimates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Methadone linked to lower death rates among convicted offenders with opioid dependence
(PLOS) Among convicted offenders, receiving methadone is associated with lower rates of death from external and non-external causes, according to new research published this week in PLOS Medicine by Angela Russolillo of Simon Fraser University, Canada, and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Soccer heading worse for women's brains than for men's
(Albert Einstein College of Medicine) Women's brains are much more vulnerable than men's to injury from repeated soccer heading, according to a new study by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore. The study found that regions of damaged brain tissue were five times more extensive in female soccer players than in males, suggesting that sex-specific guidelines may be warranted for preventing soccer-related head injuries. The results were published online today in Radiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ESC Congress 2018 -- Hot Science tips from the programme chairperson
(European Society of Cardiology) Covering a wide range of topics, from nutrition to late breaking clinical trials that will change practice, ESC Congress 2018 has a hot story for everyone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heat therapy boosts mitochondrial function in muscles
(American Physiological Society) A new study finds that long-term heat therapy may increase mitochondrial function in the muscles. The discovery could lead to new treatments for people with chronic illness or disease. The study--the first of its kind in humans--is published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Survey of Sexual Medicine Society members reveals only half ask for patients' sexual orientation
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say their small survey of nearly 100 health care practitioners who are members of the Sexual Medicine Society of North America revealed that only half routinely ask their patients directly about their sexual orientation. In addition, the survey found, of those who do not ask, more than 40 percent say that sexual orientation is irrelevant to patients' care, a position contrary to longstanding clinical evidence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hate speech from women is judged harsher than that from men
(Springer) Women who make hateful remarks on social media are likely to be judged more severely than men who make the same comments. This is also true for reactions to hate speech (counter speech) which when made by women are less accepted than counter speech from men. This is according to a study published in Springer's journal Sex Roles by Claudia Wilhelm and Sven Joeckel of the University of Erfurt in Germany. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Engaging with interactive media may be a sequence of actions, assessments
(Penn State) The way people engage with interactive media is usually portrayed as a single act -- users either click on the content, or they do not. However, a team of researchers suggest that online engagement is not a single act, after all, but rather a sequence of assessments and interactions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Juvenile justice practices in Europe can inform practices in the United States
(Crime and Justice Research Alliance) New research examined juvenile justice in Europe, where most countries have special laws or procedures for 18- to 25-year-olds; the findings can inform US policymakers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How time affects learning
(Society for Neuroscience) Associations between neutral stimuli and monetary rewards are strengthened over the course of weeks, according to a human study published in JNeurosci that investigated learning over an extended period of time. The research may have implications for the study of addiction, in which learned associations between drug and reward are acquired gradually. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What keeps the brain awake
(Society for Neuroscience) A study of fruit flies has identified a pathway in the brain that keeps the animals from falling asleep during the day. The research, published in eNeuro, may have implications for understanding the sleep/wake cycle in mammals, which shares similar features. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The heritability of anxiety
(Society for Neuroscience) Individual differences in the connectivity between regions of the brain involved in fear and anxiety are heritable, according to a large study of hundreds of related monkeys published in JNeurosci. The research provides new insights into the risk and development of anxiety disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How do young people feel about guns, gun regulation in US?
(JAMA Network) National polls track adult opinions about guns and gun regulation but how do young feel about that? A new research letter describes youth opinions on guns and gun regulation that were drawn from themes in text message survey responses. The majority of the 772 survey respondents were white females with an average age of 18. Most survey respondents reported the belief that gun control laws could help reduce mass shootings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mortality rates among homeless adults in Boston who avoid shelters, known as 'rough sleepers'
(JAMA Network) A group of unsheltered homeless adults in Boston known as 'rough sleepers' because they avoid shelters and instead sleep on park benches, in alleyways, train stations and abandoned cars had much higher mortality rates than homeless adults who slept in emergency shelters and the Massachusetts adult population in general. This 10-year observational study of 445 unsheltered homeless adults (of whom 134 died during the study period) was an attempt to understand more about this unique subpopulation of homeless adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Diversity and education influence India's population growth
(International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) Differences within India's population influence population projections for years to come, according to research conducted by IIASA and the Asian Demographic Research Institute. This information could help India and its workforce to catch up to more developed Asian countries with higher GDP per capita. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

$2.99 or $3.00? Will the difference of a penny get you to the checkout counter?
(Baylor University) The Baylor University study reveals that marketers might experience more success in price-setting if they focus their efforts on identifying -- and even modifying -- the thinking styles of their target consumers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discuss religion, spirituality when treating young adults with severe mental illness
(Baylor University) A majority of young adults with severe mental illness -- bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or major depression -- consider religion and spirituality relevant to their mental health, according to a new study from Baylor University's Diana R. Garland School of Social Work. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UB psychologist proposes whales use song as sonar
(University at Buffalo) A University at Buffalo psychologist has proposed in a newly published paper that humpback whales may use song for long-range sonar. It's the singing whale, not the listening whale who is doing most of the analysis, according to Eduardo Mercado III. If he's right, Mercado says his model should change the direction of how we study whales. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Smaller plates don't help you eat less when you're hungry -- Ben-Gurion U. research
(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) The new study, published in Appetite, debunks the popular diet trick based on the Delbouef illusion that predicts people will identify sizes differently when they are placed within a larger or smaller object. The classic experiment shows that people perceive a similar black circle is smaller when it embedded in a larger circle than when it is embedded in a smaller one. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Diet matters less than evolutionary relationships in shaping gut microbiome
(Northwestern University) In the largest published comparative dataset of non-human primate gut microbiomes to date, a new Northwestern University study set out to find whether leaf-eating primates have similar gut microbes that help them break down their leafy diet, which is full of fiber and toxins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Student loans hamper wealth accumulation among black, Hispanic adults
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Graduating college with student loan debt hampers wealth accumulation and asset building among black, Hispanic adults much longer than previously thought -- at least until age 30, University of Illinois social work professor Min Zhan found in a new study co-written with Illinois alumna Xiaoling Xiang, now a professor of social work at the University of Michigan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NJIT expands offering of IBM Skills Academy workshops, launches Skills Academy Consortium
(New Jersey Institute of Technology) Program educates students and professionals for today's digital economy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news