Study settles the score on whether the modern world is less violent
(University of York) A study, by mathematicians at the University of York, has used new techniques to address the long-running debate over whether battle deaths have been declining globally since the end of the Second World War. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers: Homes of North Zealand's elite are most likely to be preserved
(University of Copenhagen) Since 1945, the vast majority of historically preserved dwellings in Denmark are architect-designed gems located in North Zealand, according to a study conducted by, among others, a University of Copenhagen researcher. The researchers point out that this contradicts the legal requirement for historical preservation to reflect the population as a whole, not just the elite. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds depression associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease
(Simon Fraser University) A new study co-led by Simon Fraser University health sciences professor Scott Lear provides further evidence of the link between depressive symptoms and an increased risk of heart disease and early death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Redesigning hand sanitizer and donating 7,000 gallons to fight COVID-19
(Georgia Institute of Technology) Ever notice how hand sanitizer has made a comeback to market shelves? It was running out, but this charitable initiative helped revive it for the entire US by tapping into ethanol and a special FDA status. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When board members get involved, corporate tax burden goes down
(North Carolina State University) New research finds that corporate tax-planning practices improve when a company's board takes an interest -- and better planning results in both less tax uncertainty and a lower tax burden. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

$1.77M award gives Temple researchers chance to investigate therapy for cocaine addiction
(Temple University Health System) Researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have received a new $1.77M grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse that will allow them to explore whether a drug called clavulanic acid can help patients recover from cocaine use disorder. Clavulanic acid is part of an existing therapy known as Augmentin. Augmentin combines clavulanic acid with the penicillin-related antibiotic amoxicillin and is used for the treatment of bacterial infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Food systems experts to study Denver supply chain impacts from COVID-19
(Colorado State University) With a supplemental grant from the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research, CSU researchers will investigate social, economic and environmental effects of a shift to more localized food procurement in Denver, Colorado. They will investigate impacts on Colorado producers resulting from increased local demand related to supply chain disruptions during COVID-related closures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research delves into causes of nightmares that shadow female survivors of sexual trauma
(University of Kansas) A new study from psychologists at the University of Kansas attempts to shed light on triggers of post-trauma nightmare occurrences -- a topic that has received scant study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ethnic minorities' employment prospects lag behind white majority
(SAGE) The employment prospects of some ethnic minorities in the UK have improved since the 1970s but still lag behind the white majority because of 'persistent racism', a major new study says. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How teachers are adapting to COVID-19 disruptions is subject of new CSU study
(Colorado State University) For Colorado State University researchers, the pandemic-related environment of disruption across the country's public schools provides a new opportunity to take a deep dive into what makes teachers resilient. Colorado State University researchers have received National Science Foundation support to study how novice STEM teachers are responding to the COVID-19 outbreak. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Addressing the safety of high folate levels in the older population and implications for fortification in Ireland
(Trinity College Dublin) A new study from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) at Trinity College challenges claims from some international scientific circles, that having high blood levels of folate (folic acid) increases the risk of poor cognition in older adults, especially in those with low levels of vitamin B12. On the contrary the study found that having higher folate seemed to be associated with better cognitive function in these older adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In virtual presentation, geriatrics research addresses key concern: medications
(American Geriatrics Society) New insights on a host of factors impacting medication use for older adults will anchor a special research presentation hosted by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) on June 24 from 3-4pm ET. Originally scheduled as part of the AGS 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting canceled due to COVID-19, data presentations from the three top studies comprising the meeting's prestigious Plenary Paper Session will instead be delivered during a virtual conference session. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SIOP 2020 Virtual Conference opens June 16
(Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology) As part of its commitment to its 10,000 members, the Society for Industrial and Organization Psychology shifted this year's annual conference to a virtual format. In a few short months, the SIOP 2020 Virtual Conference, a comprehensive, online conference featuring almost 500 sessions, was built for more than 2,000 registrants, providing an opportunity for attendees to explore the future of work and the role I-O psychology can play in meeting workplace challenges today and beyond. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New analysis of human portraits reveals shift in culture, cognition
(Santa Fe Institute) Human cognition and cultural norms have changed the composition of human portraits, according to a new analysis of European paintings from the 15th to the 20th century. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Higher parental stress linked to low screen-time enforcement, research finds
(University of Guelph) When parents are under stress, household rules about screen time often get abandoned, new University of Guelph research finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study reveals racial disparities in fear of police brutality
(University of South Florida (USF Innovation)) Nationwide survey shows minorities are five times more likely than white people to worry about police brutality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists introduce rating system to assess quality of evidence for policy
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) The COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the critical need for robust scientific evidence to support policy decisions. Yet this need arises at a time of growing misinformation and poorly vetted facts repeated by influential sources. To address this gap, a group of scientists led by Kai Ruggeri, a professor at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, and James Green, chief scientist at NASA, has introduced a new framework to help set standards for the quality of evidence used in policymaking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Even 'low-risk' drinking can be harmful
(Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs) It's not just heavy drinking that's a problem -- even consuming alcohol within weekly low-risk drinking guidelines can result in hospitalization and death, according to a new study published in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discovery of oldest bow and arrow technology in Eurasia
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) The origins of human innovation have traditionally been sought in the grasslands and coasts of Africa or the temperate environments of Europe. More extreme environments, such as the tropical rainforests of Asia, have been largely overlooked, despite their deep history of human occupation. A new study provides the earliest evidence for bow-and-arrow use, and perhaps the making of clothes, outside of Africa ~48-45,000 years ago -in the tropics of Sri Lanka. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cash me outside: Transfers to the poor linked to eco-benefits
(Johns Hopkins University) In a new study, researchers recently discovered that Indonesia's national anti-poverty program reduced deforestation by about 30%. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mixture and migration brought food production to sub-Saharan Africa
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) A new interdisciplinary study published in the journal Science Advances reports on 20 newly sequenced ancient genomes from sub-Saharan Africa, including the first genomes from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Botswana, and Uganda. The study documents the coexistence, movements, interactions and admixture of diverse human groups during the spread of food production in sub-Saharan Africa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research links personality traits to toilet paper stockpiling
(PLOS) People who feel more threatened by COVID-19 and rank highly on scales of emotionality and conscientiousness were most likely to stockpile toilet paper in March 2020, according to a new study published June 12, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Lisa Garbe (University of Saint Gallen, Switzerland), Richard Rau (Westfalische Wilhelms-Universitat Munster, Germany), and Theo Toppe (the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Changes in frequency of sex among US adults
(JAMA Network) This survey study of US adults ages 18 to 44 looked at changes in the reported frequency of sexual activity, the number of sexual partners and factors associated with frequency and numbers of partners. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study identifies mechanism affecting X chromosome that could lead to new disease therapies
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Learning how to inactivate and reactivate an X chromosome would have important implications for medicine. A notable category of beneficiaries could be people with certain congenital diseases known as X-linked disorders, which are caused by mutations in genes on the X chromosome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Royal Marsden trial leads to practice changing milestone for advanced anal cancer
(The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust) Results from the first ever randomised clinical trial in advanced anal cancer patients, led and supported by The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Cancer Research UK, in collaboration with colleagues in the US, Norway and Australia, has led to a practice changing milestone with a new approach to treatment which is safer and more effective than previously recommended treatments for this group of patients. Published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology today, (Friday 12th June 2020). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Steering new mobility in the right direction
(Portland State University) The latest report from the National Institute for Transportation and Communities (NITC), by Marc Schlossberg and Heather Brinton of the University of Oregon, is a guide for city staff and leadership on adopting local policy and code to respond to the emergence of emerging transportation technologies and encourage their responsible use. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

School may be the key to improvement for children in social care
(Link ö ping University) Children in social care have poorer mental health and perform worse in school than other children. But they have trust in the school staff and perform better after individual assessment at school. These are findings in a doctoral thesis from Link ö ping University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Addressing the drug problem in health and social care will produce better outcomes
(National Institute for Health and Welfare) Researchers at the Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare (THL) have evaluated the impact of decriminalization policy in different settings. The new study reviews reports, peer-review articles, and critical response papers on the topic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

TSU's Center for Justice Research launches National Police Reform Advisory Group
(Center for Justice Research at Texas Southern University) In the wake of George Floyd's tragic death and the resulting national outcry for systemic policing reforms, Texas Southern University's Center for Justice Research (CJR) has formed a National Police Reform Advisory Group. The expert-laden advisory group will help chart the national response for the sustainable improvement of police-community relations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Protecting scientific diversity
(University of G ö ttingen) The COVID-19 pandemic means that scientists face great challenges because they have to reorient, interrupt or even cancel research and teaching. A team of international scientists including the University of G ö ttingen published an international appeal highlighting the precarious situation of many scientists and calling for a collective effort by the scientific community, especially from its leadership, to protect decades of effort to build an inclusive scientific community. Their letter appeared in Nature Ecology and Evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research links personality traits to toilet paper stockpiling
(Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology) People who feel more threatened by COVID-19 and rank highly on scales of emotionality and conscientiousness were most likely to stockpile toilet paper in March 2020, according to a new study by Theo Toppe of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

State-level R & D tax credits spur growth of new businesses
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) Here's some good news for US states trying to spur an economic recovery in the years ahead: The R&D tax credit has a significant effect on entrepreneurship, according to a new study led by an MIT professor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19: Relationship between social media use and prejudice against Chinese Americans
(Frontiers) The novel coronavirus pandemic that originated in China has created a backlash in the United States against Asian Americans. Researchers in New Zealand found a strong relationship between the pandemic, social media use and prejudice. Gender appears to play a significant role in predicting whether someone reacts more intellectually or emotionally to perceived threats from a minority population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fuel walking and cycling with low carbon diets, researchers say
(University of Otago) Walking and cycling have many benefits and help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but researchers say we need to think about what people eat to fuel their walking and cycling. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to handle fraudulent reviews on online portals? Study gives tips to managers
(Carnegie Mellon University) A new study sought to determine how consumers respond to potentially fraudulent reviews and how review portals (e.g., Amazon, Expedia, TripAdvisor, Yelp) can leverage this information to design better fraud-management policies and increase consumers' trust. It found that portals that include fraudulent reviews are more likely to boost buyers' trust. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Slow down: Reduced speed limits save lives in busy cities
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) Traffic accidents are the leading cause of non-natural deaths worldwide. Lower speed limits may help prevent accidents. But speed-reduction policies can be controversial and effects are not well documented. A new study from University of Illinois shows that speed reductions in S ã o Paulo, Brazil, dramatically reduced fatal accidents and increased travel times only minimally. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

USC survey suggests the importance of clearly communicating coronavirus risk, behaviors
(University of Southern California) A newly published USC analysis of March survey data sheds light on our understanding of how perceptions of the virus impact behavior, finding individuals who perceive greater risk from COVID-19 were more likely to engage in protective behaviors like handwashing and social distancing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Place doesn't trump race as predictor of incarceration
(Cornell University) Steven Alvarado is the author of 'The Complexities of Race and Place: Childhood Neighborhood Disadvantage and Adult Incarceration for Whites, Blacks, and Latinos,' published June 1 in the journal Socius showing that for black Americans growing up in better neighborhoods doesn't diminish the likelihood of going to prison nearly as much as it does for whites or Latinos. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stiffer roadways could improve truck fuel efficiency
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A theoretical study by MIT researchers suggests that small changes in roadway paving practices could reduce that efficiency loss, potentially eliminating a half-percent of the total greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector, at little to no cost. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fentanyl tops list of drugs found in Baltimore overdose patients
(University of Maryland Medical Center) Hospital testing for illicit drug use does not typically include fentanyl, however, a new University of Maryland study found after expanding testing, that fentanyl, a potent synthetic opioid linked to most fatal overdoses in Maryland, tops the list of drugs detected in overdose patients at two Baltimore hospital emergency departments. The researchers suggest the addition of fentanyl to routine drug testing panels. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Experts clarify subtypes of multiple sclerosis to improve care and clinical trials
(National Multiple Sclerosis Society) An international committee has clarified previously published descriptors of courses of MS and disease activity. MS subtypes are consensus definitions rather than pathologically defined phenotypes, and easily misconstrued. The clarification was prompted in part by differences in specified indications for MS therapies recently approved by the FDA and EMA. The goal is to improve care and refine the selection of clinical trial participants so that trial outcomes can better inform clinical care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The mystery of visual stability
(Tohoku University) We move our eyes several times per second. These fast eye movements, called saccades, create large image shifts on the retina -- making our visual system work hard to maintain a stable perceptual world. Remapping the retinal image compensates for this; however, errors in actual eye movements cause image shifts, even with remapping. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Elite gamers share mental toughness with top athletes, study finds
(Queensland University of Technology) In one of the first studies to investigate mental toughness and stress and coping in high performing esports athletes, researchers have found similarities to traditional elite athletes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Projects funded to assess the economic and societal benefits of satellites
(Resources for the Future (RFF)) Satellite data can be used to make decisions that improve economic and societal outcomes. A partnership between NASA and Resources for the Future quantifies the value of satellite data along with the economic and societal benefits. This partnership -- the Consortium for the Valuation of Applications Benefits Linked to Earth Science (VALUABLES) -- has chosen three winning proposals for research quantifying the benefits of satellite data in decisions that improve socioeconomic outcomes for people and/or the environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tropical disease in medieval Europe revises the history of a pathogen related to syphilis
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) Plague was commonplace in medieval times, so finding its victims in a 15th century Lithuanian graveyard was no surprise. However, discovering one woman with a second disease, yaws -- a close relative of modern syphilis found today only in tropical settings -- was something researchers did not expect. The current study's findings are changing perspectives on the evolutionary history of a disease family thought to be out of reach for the study of ancient DNA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The brain uses minimum effort to look for key information in text
(University of Helsinki) The human brain avoids taking unnecessary effort. When a person is reading, she strives to gain as much information as possible by dedicating as little of her cognitive capacity as possible to the processing. This is a finding presented in an article by specialists in computer science and psychology at the University of Helsinki, published in Scientific Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A post-pandemic world: will populations be on the move? Study shows contagions could be catalysts for mass migration
(University of Sydney) Could the world soon be on the move again in the wake of COVID-19? Theoretical modelling by the University of Sydney's Centre for Complex Systems has shown that populations typically disperse following major global crises, including contagions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bulgaria's National Cardiac Society pioneers ARPHA's top-to-bottom bilingual publishing
(Pensoft Publishers) This month, ARPHA Platform welcomed the fourth medical academic journal to its portfolio: Bulgarian Cardiology. The scholarly outlet is also the third published on behalf of a Bulgarian institution or a society: in this case, the Bulgarian Society of Cardiology, a member of the European Society of Cardiology. With its first 2020 issue, Bulgarian Cardiology pioneers the Bulgarian-English bilingual publishing solution from ARPHA, the open-access, scholarly platform, developed by the publisher and technology provider Pensoft. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

E-health resource improves men's health behaviours with or without fitness facilities
(University of British Columbia) Men who regularly used a free web resource made significantly more health changes than men who did not, finds a new study from the University of British Columbia and Intensions Consulting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mental disorders in the family affects the treatment of people with bipolar disorder
(Aarhus University) Patients with bipolar disorder who have multiple family members with severe mental disorders, are more difficult to treat and require more medicine. But if they receive an intensive course of treatment, the effect of this is just as good as for patients who do not have a family history of severe mental disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news