Gerontologists find functional status after TAVR, SAVR linked to pre-op fragility
(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) Patients' frailty index scores prior to undergoing valve replacement procedures helped predict patients' chances of improvement, stability or decline. Post-operative delirium and major complications were also linked to declines in functional status following the procedures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers are worried that people with chronic disease are not being active enough
(University of Oxford) A study of over 96,000 UK men and women, of average age 64.5 years, has found that those with chronic conditions are spending considerably less time on physical activity than their healthy peers, so are missing out on its health management benefits. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Demand for long-acting contraception rose sharply after 2016 election
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) A new, robust study conducted by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital finds that rates of long-acting, reversible contraception went up by 21.6 percent in the 30 days after the presidential election compared to rates at the same time of year in 2015. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gap between corporate earnings, non-financial measures affects forecasting
(North Carolina State University) A recent study finds that the more a company's earnings diverge from its non-financial resources, the less likely it is to issue a forecast of its annual earnings. For companies that issue a forecast, the larger the disconnect between a company's earnings and its key non-financial measures, the more the company overestimates its actual performance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers report positive findings with dasotraline for ADHD in children ages 6-12
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study in children aged 6 to 12 years of dasotraline, a promising new treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), showed significant improvement in efficacy in the treatment of ADHD compared to placebo beginning at week 1 and continuing throughout the study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Solving global challenges starts with open data -- new report launched today
(University of Warwick) Better incentives for researchers and fewer barriers between technological systems are key to kickstarting a revolution in open data, according to 'Realising Potential,' a report released today by the Open Research Data Task Force. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Word order predicts a native speakers' working memory
(Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology) Memory plays a crucial role in our lives, and several studies have already investigated how we store and retrieve information under different conditions. Typically, stimuli presented at the beginning and at the end of a list are recalled better than stimuli from the middle. But are these findings universal and generalizable across languages and cultures? An international research team, led by Federica Amici from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, has recently investigated this question. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new approach for the fast estimation of the solar energy potential in urban environments
(Delft University of Technology) TU Delft researchers have developed a new approach for calculating fast and accurate the solar energy potential of surfaces in the urban environment. The new approach can significantly help architects and urban planners to incorporate photovoltaic (solar power) technology in their designs. The findings were presented on Feb. 4 in Nature Energy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Examining Nazi obsession with movement further reveals how they manufactured the idea of race
(University of Kansas) In a recent article in the journal American Historical Review, Denning argues that by paying attention to the Nazis' obsession with mobility, we can deepen our understanding of how they manufactured and exploited the idea of race. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Putting yourself in their shoes may make you less open to their beliefs
(Association for Psychological Science) Trying to take someone else's perspective may make you less open to their opposing views, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Peering under the hood of fake-news detectors
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) New work from MIT researchers peers under the hood of an automated fake-news detection system, revealing how machine-learning models catch subtle but consistent differences in the language of factual and false stories. The research also underscores how fake-news detectors should undergo more rigorous testing to be effective for real-world applications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Policy statements on the effects of media overlook scientific complexity
(Association for Psychological Science) As different forms of media infuse everyday life, several organizations and associations have issued public statements about the effects of media exposure. However, a scholarly review suggests that many of these statements do not accurately reflect the available evidence, offering overly simplified or one-sided accounts of the scientific research. The findings are published inAdvances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mindfulness and sleep can reduce exhaustion in entrepreneurs
(Oregon State University) When entrepreneurs are feeling exhausted but can't afford the time for adequate sleep, they may be able to replenish their energy with mindfulness exercises such as meditation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Time parents spend with children key to academic success
(Ohio State University) The time parents spend with their children has a powerful effect on their educational achievement, according to a large study with a novel approach. Researchers analyzed data on children in Israel who lost a parent through death or divorce. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Advocating for social issues at work more likely to succeed linking morality and mission, study says
(American Psychological Association) When convincing management to consider advocating for a particular social issue, employees may think it is wise to focus on the benefits to the bottom line but making a moral argument may be a better strategy, as long as it aligns with the company's values, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Caucasus: Complex interplay of genes and cultures
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) In the Bronze Age, the Caucasus Mountains region was a cultural and genetic contact zone. Here, cultures that originated in Mesopotamia interacted with local hunter-gatherers, Anatolian farmers, and steppe populations from just north of the mountain ranges. Here, pastoralism was developed and technologies such as the wheeled wagon and advanced metal weapons were spread to neighbouring cultures. A new study, examines new genetic evidence in concert with archaeological evidence to paint a more complete picture of the region. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fish and humans are alike in visual stimuli perception -- Ben-Gurion U.
(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) 'The experiments tested archerfish performance in visual-search tasks where a target was defined by color, size, orientation, or motion,' says Professor Ronen Segev, head of the BGU Neural Code Lab, and a member of the Department of Life Sciences and Zlotowski Center for Neuroscience. 'We found, for the first time, that archerfish process these four features in much the same way humans identify a target amidst distracting shapes and colors.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Announcing 7 new GA4GH Driver Projects for 2019
(Global Alliance for Genomics and Health) GEnome Medical alliance Japan (GEM Japan), H3Africa, Swiss Personalised Health Network (SPHN), the Autism Sharing Initiative, EpiShare, EUCANCan, and the European Joint Programme on Rare Diseases (EJP RD) have been named 2019 GA4GH Driver Projects -- leading international genomic data initiatives that help develop and pilot standards for sharing data. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Monthly wages are an important step towards economic development
(University of Zurich) Across developing economies, most workers and agricultural producers are paid are paid on a daily basis. This has a negative impact on their ability to generate savings for large expenses. Researchers from UZH show dairy farmers and agricultural workers prefer to be paid once at the end of the month, rather then daily, because monthly payments schemes are an efficient tool to increase saving. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Infertility treatment linked with slightly higher risk of pregnancy complications
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) Women who have undergone infertility treatment, such as in vitro fertilization, are more likely to experience severe pregnancy complications, according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New technologies for renewable energy to be developed in NE England
(Northumbria University) The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council has awarded £ 5.2 million to Northumbria, Newcastle and Durham Universities to open a new national Centre for Doctoral Training in renewable energies (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The dangers of hidden fat: Exercise is your best defense against deep abdominal fat
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) Researchers analyzed two types of interventions -- lifestyle modification (exercise) and pharmacological (medicine) -- to learn how best to defeat fat lying deep in the belly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Suicide can't be predicted by asking about suicidal thoughts, major Australian study shows
(University of New South Wales) A major Australian study from UNSW Sydney shows that most people who died of suicide dismissed expressing suicidal thoughts to health professionals, prompting calls to review the way treatment is managed and resourced. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Everything in moderation
(University of California - Santa Barbara) In efforts to curb our use of greenhouse gas-generating fossil fuels, plant-based biofuels are among the top contenders as alternative liquid energy sources for transportation. However, strategies to produce high yields of biomass for fuels are not a one-size-fits-all proposition, according to a study led by UC Santa Barbara professor of ecology David Tilman. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Educated migrants bring wages closer together in regions
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Experts from the Higher School of Economics have determined that domestic migration increases the speed at which Russia's regions approach one another in terms of salary levels. Further, the impact of migration on this process depends on migrants' education level. The results of the HSE study were published in the jour-nal Issues in Economics (Voprosy ekonomiki). https://voprecotest.elpub.ru/jour/article/view/1836 (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Adaptive models capture complexity of the brain and behavior
(Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University) Scientists reveal rich details of dynamical systems by breaking them down into simpler components which change over time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'More work needed' for new IVF technique
(University of Leeds) Treating male infertility using a new IVF technique called PICSI, which is already offered in some private clinics, does not increase the likelihood of having a baby, according to the results of a randomized controlled trial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A correlation found between psychiatric disorders and events during the prenatal stage
(Aarhus University) Particular genetic variants in the human genome that are important for the development of the brain early in the life of the foetus are frequently found in psychiatric disorders. This is shown by a study carried out by iPSYCH. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Working rich' prevail among today's top earners
(Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs) Many blame idle millionaires for the rise in income inequality, but today's top earners are actually the 'working rich,' according to a new working paper co-authored by Princeton University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Army scientists win award for research on reducing risk for soldiers
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) Researchers from the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command's Army Research Laboratory, the Army's corporate research laboratory, have been awarded the Publication Award from the International Test and Evaluation Association for their contributions to test and evaluation, or T&E, procedures that will better equip and protect soldiers in combat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pinpointing the cells that control the brain's memory flow
(The Zuckerman Institute at Columbia University) From the cab driver heading for Times Square to the commuter returning home on the freeway, we all carry maps in our head labeled with important locations. And a new Columbia study in mice shows that, by directing the delicate ebb-and-flow of brain activity, a small cluster of cells helps the brain's internal GPS remember which places matter most. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discovery points to innovative new way to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy
(The Ottawa Hospital) Researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa have discovered a new way to treat the loss of muscle function caused by Duchenne muscular dystrophy in animal models of the disease. As reported in Cell Stem Cell, the team restored muscle stem cell function that is impaired in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, resulting in efficient regeneration of the muscle and preventing the progressive loss of muscle strength characteristic of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Learning new vocabulary during deep sleep
(University of Bern) Researchers of the University of Bern, Switzerland, showed that we can acquire the vocabulary of a new language during distinct phases of slow-wave sleep and that the sleep-learned vocabulary could be retrieved unconsciously following waking. Memory formation appeared to be mediated by the same brain structures that also mediate wake vocabulary learning. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers uncover intracellular longevity pathway
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers discovered an intracellular pathway that promotes health and longevity in the worm C. elegans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UN University compares technologies that remove arsenic from groundwater
(Terry Collins Assoc) A UN University study compares for the first time the effectiveness and costs of many different technologies designed to remove arsenic from groundwater -- a health threat to at least 140 million people in 50 countries.Released by UNU's Canadian-based Institute for Water, Environment and Health, the report draws on 31 peer-reviewed, comparable research papers published between 1996 and 2018, each describing new technologies tested in laboratories and/or in field studies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New knowledge could help predict and prevent depression
(Aarhus University) In a new study, researchers from the Danish iPSYCH project demonstrate that people with the highest genetic propensity are over two and a half times as likely to be treated in a psychiatric hospital for depression compared to people with the lowest propensity. This knowledge could be utilised to strengthen preventative efforts for those who are at risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

5TONIC lab develops open platform for multi-site NFV experimentation
(IMDEA Networks Institute) The 5TONIC co-creation laboratory in Madrid has successfully designed and deployed an open Management and Network Orchestration (MANO) platform based on ETSI's open source management solution (OSM) that is capable of deploying services across multiple sites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sleep apnea creates gaps in life memories: Study
(RMIT University) Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is estimated to affect over 936 million people worldwide, and people with OSA are known to suffer memory problems and depression. New research builds on the known links between depression and memory, finding that people with untreated OSA have problems recalling specific details about their lives. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BDNF-VEGF interplay key to rapid antidepressant actions
(Elsevier) A study by researchers at Yale University reveals a complex interplay of two different growth factors in the rapid and long-lasting antidepressant effects of ketamine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Springer Nature now offers KBART Automated Holdings Feeds for discovery services
(Springer) As of now, Springer Nature provides its customers with KBART Automation for knowledge bases and discovery services. KBART Automation is a highly beneficial service for libraries and research institutions, which helps to streamline their processes with minimum manual work involved. Springer Nature currently allows for KBART Automation of SpringerLink content to OCLC, Ex Libris' SFX and Alma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mean streets: Self-driving cars will 'cruise' to avoid paying to park
(University of California - Santa Cruz) If you think traffic in city centers is bad now, just wait until self-driving cars emerge on the scene, cruising around to avoid paying hefty downtown parking fees. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Imperceptible movements guide juvenile zebra finch song development
(Cornell University) New research from Cornell University shows zebra finches engage in socially guided vocal learning, where they learn their songs by watching their mothers' reactions to their immature songs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Risk aversion rises with violent crime
(University of Colorado Denver) Fear in the wake of violent conflicts causes people to take fewer risks, which may come at the expense of bettering their lives and the economy. University of Colorado Denver researchers looked at longitudinal survey data taken before and after the onset of the Mexican war on drugs and found a causal link between the fear of violence and its impact on the risk-taking attitudes of individuals living in affected communities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Maestro's techniques
(Wiley) Rembrandt van Rijn's paintings are renowned for their masterful representations of light and shadow and a characteristic plasticity generated by a technique called impasto. Now, scientists have analyzed impasto layers in some of Rembrandt's paintings, and the study, which is published in the journal Angewandte Chemie, reveals that the impasto unexpectedly contains a very rare lead mineral called plumbonacrite. This finding suggests that Rembrandt used a unique paint recipe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study sheds light on illegal wildlife trade in Hong Kong
(The University of Hong Kong) A study focusing on the type and volume of seizures relating to illegal wildlife trade in Hong Kong over the last five years, documented in the report, 'Trading in Extinction: The Dark Side of Hong Kong's Wildlife Trade,' illustrate the city's central role in global wildlife trafficking and the extent and nature of the associated criminality. It identifies clearly, how future policy and enforcement could be improved to provide the urgently required long-term sustainability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study shows how vegans, vegetarians and omnivores feel about eating insects
(University of Eastern Finland) Many non-vegan vegetarians and omnivores are open to including insects in their diet. For vegans, however, that is not an option, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. Researchers examined consumers' intentions to consume foods of insect origin among vegans, non-vegan vegetarians and omnivores. They examined the attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and food neophobia toward the consumption of foods of insect origin, as well as the conditions for eating insect-based foods among these dietary groups. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mental health disorders common following mild head injury
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) A new study reveals that approximately 1 in 5 individuals may experience mental health symptoms up to six months after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), suggesting the importance of follow-up care for these patients. Scientists also identified factors that may increase the risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or major depressive disorder following mild mTBI or concussion through analysis of the Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury (TRACK-TBI) study cohort. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Structural colors, without the shimmer
(American Chemical Society) Structural colors, like those found in some butterflies' wings, birds' feathers and beetles' backs, resist fading because they don't absorb light like dyes and pigments. However, the iridescence that enhances their beauty in nature is not always desirable for some applications, such as paints, color displays or printer inks. Now, researchers have developed a new method to produce structural colors that don't change with the angle of viewing. They report their results in ACS Omega. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Want healthier eating habits? Start with a workout
(University of Texas at Austin) Researchers have found that formerly sedentary young adults who were instructed to exercise regularly for several weeks started choosing healthier foods without being asked to. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Taking the bite out of snake venom
(American Chemical Society) According to the World Health Organization, about 100,000 people die from venomous snakebites every year. Many of these fatalities occur in rural areas of developing countries that lack access to antivenoms. That's why researchers are looking for new snakebite antidotes that are easier to make and deploy to remote areas, explains an article in Chemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news