Save-the-Date: Acoustics in Focus, June 8-10, offers new presentation options
(Acoustical Society of America) The Acoustical Society of America will hold its 180th meeting June 8-10. To ensure the safety of attendees, volunteers, and ASA staff, the June meeting, " Acoustics in Focus, " will be hosted entirely online with new features to ensure an exciting experience for attendees. Reporters are invited to attend the meeting at no cost and participate in a series of virtual press conferences featuring a selection of newsworthy research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Businesses have a moral duty to explain how algorithms make decisions that affect people
(Carnegie Mellon University) Do users, customers, employees, and others have a right to know how companies that use algorithms make their decisions? In a new analysis, researchers explore the moral and ethical foundations to such a right. They conclude that the right to such an explanation is a moral right, then address how companies might do so. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gimmicky or effective? The effects of imaginative displays on customers' purchase behavior
(American Marketing Association) Imaginative displays can increase customers' purchase behavior, sales, and ROI. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Organic, printable device could restore sight to the blind
(University of Sydney) A Sydney engineer is developing a low-cost, 3-D printed electrical device that uses absorbed light to fire the neurons that transmit signals from the eyes to the brain, acting as an artificial retina for those who have lost this capacity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Virtual reality warps your sense of time
(University of California - Santa Cruz) Psychology researchers at UC Santa Cruz found that playing games in virtual reality creates an effect called " time compression, " where time goes by faster than you think. The research team compared time perception during gameplay using conventional monitors and virtual reality to determine that this effect is uniquely linked to the virtual reality format. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Understanding how people make sense of the news they consume
(University of Missouri-Columbia) How people consume news and take actions based on what they read, hear or see, is different than how human brains process other types of information on a daily basis, according to researchers at the University of Missouri School of Journalism. While the current state of the newspaper industry is in flux, these journalism experts discovered people still love reading newspapers, and they believe a newspaper's physical layout and structure could help curators of digital news platforms enhance their users' experiences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Count your blessings: Short gratitude intervention can increase academic motivation
(Ritsumeikan University) Our dynamically changing lifestyle can make it hard for many to stay motivated on work and study, which calls for new intervention strategies. In a recent study published in BMC Psychology, researchers explore how nurturing feelings of gratitude can enhance motivation among college students. Their results show that a keeping a daily gratitude journal for only two weeks has a positive impact on academic motivations that can last months. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Orangutan finding highlights need to protect habitat
(Rutgers University) Wild orangutans are known for their ability to survive food shortages, but scientists have made a surprising finding that highlights the need to protect the habitat of these critically endangered primates, which face rapid habitat destruction and threats linked to climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Health effects of prenatal exposure to 1994 genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda
(Dartmouth College) Twenty-seven years ago, more than 1 million Rwandans were killed during the genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda (April 7-July 4, 1994). It is estimated that 100,000 to 250,000 women were raped during the genocide, and that 10,000 children were born as a result. A new study finds that Rwandans who were conceived by mothers who survived this genocide have poorer adult health outcomes than those who were conceived by Rwandan mothers living outside the country at that time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new approach to identify genetic boundaries of species could also impact policy
(San Diego State University) A new approach to genomic species delineation could impact policy and lend clarity to legislation for designating a species as endangered or at risk. Evolutionary biologists model the process of speciation, which follows population formation, improving on current species delineation methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study reveals where memories of familiar places are stored in the brain
(Dartmouth College) As we move through the world, what we see is seamlessly integrated with our memory of the broader spatial environment. How does the brain accomplish this feat? A new study from Dartmouth College reveals that three regions of the brain in the posterior cerebral cortex, which the researchers call " place-memory areas, " form a link between the brain's perceptual and memory systems. The findings are published in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Columbia Public Health establishes Jennifer Schlecht Memorial Fund to support careers in sexual and reproductive health
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) The Heilbrunn Department of Population and Family Health at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health announced today the creation of the Jennifer Schlecht Memorial Scholarship for Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) Justice in Fragile Settings which will be awarded annually as part of the Jennifer Schlecht Memorial Fund, hosted by Family Planning 2030 (FP2030) at the United Nations Foundation. The Scholarship's mission is to honor Jennifer's memory and her professional accomplishments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pandemic stigma: Foreigners, doctors wrongly targeted for COVID-19 spread in India
(Monash University) Accurate and focused information about COVID-19 from credible sources reduces stigmatisation and stress, according to a world-first study led by Monash University. Foreigners, minorities, police and frontline workers were blamed for spreading the virus in India. The study was conducted during the first wave of the virus. Researchers say elements of stigmatisation are still valid as India battles a tragic second wave. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pregnant Aussie mums denied nausea and vomiting medications
(Flinders University) Pregnant Aussie mums are being denied access to medications which treat severe nausea and vomiting by pharmacists and medical practitioners because of misleading labels and a lack of awareness about clinical guidelines.A new study surveyed 249 Australian women who suffered from severe nausea and vomiting during pregnancy (NVP) or hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) and examined their experiences in accessing medications during pregnancy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Surrey develops new app to support palliative care in Ethiopia
(University of Surrey) A mobile phone app has been developed at the University of Surrey to support patients needing end of life care in Ethiopia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New academic-industry collaboration to tackle global challenges in sustainability
(University of Bath) The University of Bath is coordinating a major new collaboration with academia and industry to use sustainable chemical technologies to accelerate the UK's transition to net zero carbon emissions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Market report: Rising stock wealth does boost spending, employment
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A study co-authored by MIT economist Alp Simsek shows that increases in stock market wealth do translate into more consumer spending and employment in areas where portfolios have increased. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research reveals negative effects of hotel app adoption on customer spending
(University of Maryland) A study from the University of Maryland shows higher app adoption among hotel chains could be linked to lower spending among lower-level loyalty customers, who are more likely to use apps to get the best deals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

We need herd immunity against COVID-19 vaccine misinformation
(University of New South Wales) A new study published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE led by researchers at UNSW Sydney revealed over 103 million people globally liked, shared, retweeted or reacted with an emoji to misinformation and conspiracy theories about COVID-19 vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

On the road to smart cities: Where smart vehicles stand and where they're going
(Chinese Association of Automation) With rapid advancements in network connectivity technology, such as 5G and 6G, intelligent vehicles with AI-enabled technology and an internet-of-vehicles could soon replace ad-hoc smart vehicular networks. However, the successful integration of smart vehicles with society requires adequate computing frameworks. Now, a global team of computer scientists takes stock of computing paradigms for vehicular environments, highlighting strengths, challenges, and future directions for research in this field. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

10 years after obesity surgery: How did life turn out?
(Lund University) In a new study from Lund University and the University of Gothenburg, patients were interviewed about their experiences ten years after undergoing obesity surgery. The results show that the effect on eating and weight regulation persisted, whereas other problems, such as feelings of guilt about still not being healthy enough, remained. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Young adults vastly more affected by COVID pandemic in Ireland than older adults
(Trinity College Dublin) A new study from Trinity College Dublin investigating the impact of the COVID pandemic on young adults finds that they are vastly more affected than older people, and the reverberations of the disruption to some will last decades. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Interactive typeface for digital text
(Technische Universitat Darmstadt) A team of researchers at the Centre for Cognitive Science at TU Darmstadt has developed a computer font that adapts its appearance based on the user's interaction with the text. " AdaptiFont " measures a user's reading speed and interactively changes the font's shape seamlessly and continuously to allow the user to read text more easily. By employing an artificial intelligence algorithm, new personalized fonts are generated on the fly in such a way that they increase an individual reader's reading speed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Violinmaking meets artificial intelligence
(Politecnico di Milano) How to predict the sound produced by a tonewood block once carved into the shape of a violin plate? What is the best shape for the best sound? Artificial Intelligence offer answers to these questions. These are the conclusions that researchers of the Musical Acoustics Lab of Politecnico di Milano presented in a study that was recently published on Nature Scientific Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Integration through in ­ ter ­ cul ­ tural music col ­ lab ­ o ­ ra ­ tion
(University of the Arts Helsinki) Higher education institutions in the field of music have the potential to take an active role in the integration and participation of musicians with a refugee background in the receiving country according to a doctoral dissertation by Katja Thomson from Sibelius Academy, University of the Arts Helsinki. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Empathic and altruistic or cold and individualistic: our brains reveal the truth
(Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati) Are you empathic and altruistic? In short, do you possess that specific personality trait defined as " agreeableness " ? New research sheds light on brain mechanisms underlying this trait. The study showed that individualistic subjects seem to process information associated with social and non-social contexts in similar ways, whereas in more agreeable subjects the activation patterns arising show more differences. This suggests that individuals with high levels of agreeableness can discern social contents that are important for achieving successful interactions ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Online museum exhibitions will be more prominent post COVID-19
(University of Warwick) When Museums closed their doors in March 2020 for the first COVID-19 lockdown in the UK a majority moved their activities online to keep their audiences interested. Researchers from WMG, University of Warwick have worked with OUMNH, to analyse the success of the exhibitions, and say the way Museums operate will change forever. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Asian scientists grapple with belonging
(American Chemical Society) Asian students and faculty have long been a cornerstone of science in the U.S., drawn by the promise of collaboration and cutting-edge research. However, the Asian community is facing increased racist attacks and scrutiny from the government. A cover story inChemical& Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores how Asian scientists are reassessing their futures in the US. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

RIO Journal 5 years on: over 300 published outcomes from all around the research cycle
(Pensoft Publishers) In a new editorial, the team behind the journal Research Ideas and Outcomes (RIO) takes a look at how the community has engaged with the research it has published over five years. Motivated by the encouraging uptake, RIO is further sharpening its profile as a facilitator of open science. It has also updated its review process and implemented a new workflow that assists projects, conferences and institutions in preserving and publicly sharing their academic outputs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research reveals new approach to understanding our wellbeing
(Swansea University) The ability to connect and feel a sense of belonging are basic human needs but new Swansea University research has examined how these are determined by more than just our personal relationships.Research led by psychologist Professor Andrew Kemp highlights the importance of taking a wider approach to wellbeing and how it can be influenced by issues such as inequality and anthropogenic climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Youths with diverse gender identities bullied up to three times more than peers
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) Transgender and other youths with diverse gender identities are victimized up to three times more than their peers, according to a study by a team at the University of Illinois. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fighting food insecurity by building better beans
(Michigan State University) As climate change heats up the air and land making them hotter and dryer, warmer nighttime temperatures make it more difficult to grow beans -- the number one source of protein and nutrients for many people living in Central America and Africa. Researchers at Michigan State University are building better beans by tapping into the genetics of the more heat-resistant tepary bean. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UNH research estimates 1.4 million children have yearly violence-related medical visits
(University of New Hampshire) A national report from the University of New Hampshire shows close to one and a half million children each year visit a doctor, emergency room or medical facility as a result of an assault, abuse, crime or other form of violence. This is four times higher than previous estimates based only on data from U.S. emergency rooms for violence-related treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Previously unknown letter reveals Einstein's thinking on bees, birds and physics
(RMIT University) Could bees and birds help us understand the principles of physics? Albert Einstein thought so, according to a long-lost letter that reveals he predicted a link between physics and biology seven decades before the evidence emerged. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gold leaf could help diagnose viral infections in low-resource settings
(American Chemical Society) Gold leaf -- gold metal hammered into thin sheets -- is used by artists and crafters to gild picture frames, artwork and clothing. Despite its luxurious appearance, the material is affordable and available at most craft stores. Now, researchers reporting inACS Central Science have developed gold leaf electrodes that, in combination with a CRISPR-based assay, could sensitively detect human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in human samples. The method also could be modified to diagnose other viral infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Residential coal use in China results in many premature deaths, models indicate
(American Chemical Society) Coal combustion by power plants and industry pollutes the air, causing many governments to implement mitigation actions and encourage cleaner forms of energy. Now, a new study in ACS'Environmental Science& Technology indicates that in China, indoor air pollution from residential coal burning causes a disproportionate number of premature deaths from exposure to tiny, inhalable pollutants known as PM2.5. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancestors may have created 'iconic' sounds as bridge to first languages
(University of Birmingham) The 'missing link' that helped our ancestors to begin communicating with each other through language may have been iconic sounds, rather than charades-like gestures - giving rise to the unique human power to coin new words describing the world around us, a new study reveals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Petting therapy dogs enhances thinking skills of stressed college students
(Washington State University) Programs exclusively focused on petting therapy dogs improved stressed-out students' thinking and planning skills more effectively than programs that included traditional stress-management information, according to new Washington State University research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pandemic screen time tops 6 hours a day for some kindergartners
(Ohio State University) Kindergartners from low-income families spent more than six hours a day in front of screens during two early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, a small Ohio study suggests.That is nearly double the screen time found before the pandemic in similar children, according to other research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gout treatment success doubled by combining two drugs, study finds
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) If left untreated, gout can cause severe disability. But unlike rheumatoid arthritis, there are only a handful of ways to treat it. Researchers say a combination of two existing drugs disrupts antibody production and doubles treatment efficacy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Online CBT effective against OCD symptoms in the young
(Karolinska Institutet) Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in children and adolescents is associated with impaired education and worse general health later in life. Access to specialist treatment is often limited. According to a study from Centre for Psychiatry Research at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Region Stockholm, internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can be as effective as conventional CBT. The study, published in the prestigious journal JAMA, can help make treatment for OCD more widely accessible. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hope: The Dream We Carry
(Springer) The new Palgrave Macmillan book, Hope, by Tia De Nora provides a concise, interdisciplinary perspective on the emotion and practice of 'hope'. Based on the idea that hope is a dream that we carry in different ways, the five chapters draw on the author's original research and align it with literature on the sociology of culture and emotion, to explore the concept in relation to cultural and community practices and mental health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Global literary studies: Key concepts
(Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC)) The International Symposium on Global Literary Studies: Key Concepts gathers international scholars with expertise in various areas of research to reflect on the current and future paths of global literary studies from an interdisciplinary perspective. This symposium will be held on May 20th and 21st, 2021, and is organized by Global Literary Studies Research Lab (Open University of Catalonia - Spain) and the project Social Networks of the Past. Mapping Hispanic and Lusophone Literary Modernity, 1898-1959 funded by the European Research Council (Grant Agreement: 803860). (Source: Eur...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Temple scientists poised to gain insight into underpinnings of Alzheimer's thanks to grant
(Temple University Health System) Thanks to a new three-year, $2.27 million grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Dr. John Elrod and colleagues are poised to gain novel insight into biological mechanisms that may be driving or worsening neurodegeneration. The researchers will investigate potential mechanisms using mouse models of Alzheimer's disease and a systems biology approach. The work could help identify new drug targets and therapeutic opportunities for Alzheimer's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Markedly poor physical functioning status of people experiencing homelessness
(Trinity College Dublin) A Trinity College study demonstrates an extremely high burden of physical and mobility problems experienced by people who are homeless and were admitted for inpatient care to an acute hospital in Dublin and Overall the study provided visible evidence of accelerated physical ageing among this cohort relative to the general population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Students with disabilities show resilience that could guide post-pandemic education
(University of Kansas) A study from the University of Kansas interviewed students with disabilities about their experiences with pandemic education. They found the students relied on their own resilience, and advocated for themselves, displaying a strengths-based approach that could serve as a model for all students following the pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

May/June 2021 Annals of Family Medicine tip sheet
(American Academy of Family Physicians) Annals of Family Medicine is a peer-reviewed, indexed research journal that provides a cross-disciplinary forum for new, evidence-based information affecting the primary care disciplines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Social isolation has a profound and increasingly negative impact on physical functioning in older adults
(Elsevier) Social isolation among older adults is associated with poor health and premature mortality, but the connection between social isolation and physical functioning is poorly understood. New research generates more robust evidence about the associations between social isolation and physical functioning and how this accelerates over time, reports the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier. It also highlights the importance of incorporating strategies to reduce social isolation and promote successful aging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tanzanian farmers boost diets with sustainable methods
(Cornell University) Diversity of children's diets and food security improved for households after Tanzanian farmers learned about sustainable crop-growing methods, gender equity, nutrition and climate change from peer mentors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Best practices to prevent the federal government from blowing its technology budget
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) With the US federal government investing billions of taxpayer dollars in executing technology programs, wouldn't you like to know where this money is going? A new study has identified ways to reduce federal spending in the execution of these taxpayer-funded technology programs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news