It's not about money -- why academic scientists engage in commercial activities
(ESMT Berlin) For scientists, engaging in commercial activities such as patenting and starting new ventures can be much more lucrative than relying on pure academic work. However, according to new research by ESMT Berlin, money is not the main reason why scientists choose to work on commercial activities. Motives such as social impact seem more important. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Not smoking and being socially active keys to longevity
(University of Otago) University of Otago researchers have discovered some of the secrets to longevity with new research revealing not smoking and being social engaged throughout older age are common traits of New Zealand centenarians. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Virtual demolition
(Osaka University) Scientists at Osaka University show how buildings and moving objects can be virtually removed from real-time images in a process of " diminished reality. " This work can be beneficial for urban and campus planners. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH-funded study links endometriosis to DNA changes
(NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) DNA from uterine cells of women with endometriosis has different chemical modifications, compared to the DNA of women who do not have the condition, according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health. The changes involve DNA methylation--the binding of compounds known as methyl groups to DNA--which can alter gene activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Combination of healthy lifestyle traits may substantially reduce Alzheimer's disease risk
(NIH/National Institute on Aging) Data from two NIH studies shows that combining four or five healthy lifestyle behaviors -- physical activity, not smoking, light-to-moderate alcohol consumption, a high-quality diet, and cognitive activities -- may lower risk of Alzheimer's disease by 60%. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

C-Path's Transplant Therapeutics Consortium Letter of Intent accepted by FDA
(Critical Path Institute (C-Path)) Critical Path Institute (C-Path) announced today that its Transplant Therapeutics Consortium (TTC) has received a positive response to its Letter of Intent (LOI) from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) detailing the decision to accept the Composite Biomarker Panel (iBox Scoring System) into the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER) Biomarker Qualification Program (BQP). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new study on rare 'split brain' patients sheds light on feature of human sleep
(IMT School for Advanced Studies Lucca) A new study of researchers at IMT School for Advanced Study Lucca demonstrates for the first time that the slow waves of NREM-sleep travel and propagate in the brain through " anatomical highways " . The scientists have investigated in particular the role of the corpus callosum, the bundle of nervous fibers that connects the two brain emispheres, by enrolling in the research a group of " split brain " patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why do so many of us feel guilty about taking a lunch break?
(Staffordshire University) New research from health psychologists at Staffordshire University explores why some employees feel guilty about taking their legally entitled breaks.The paper's lead author Dr Mike Oliver explained: " The legally required minimum time for a lunch break at work is 20 minutes, however there is a growing trend nationally for large numbers of people not to take breaks at work, with surveys reporting that between 66% and 82% of workers don't always take their breaks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Art and science in dialogue: Schaufler Residency@TU Dresden 2021
(Technische Universit ä t Dresden) Starting in January 2021, the New York artist Anton Ginzburg will begin his six-month residency at TU Dresden as the second fellowship recipient in the Schaufler Lab@TU Dresdens artist-in-residence programme. Ginzburg will follow the Viennese artist Christian Kosmas Mayer, who is the artist in residence at the Lab from September 2020 to February 2021. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can artificial intelligence lead scientific discoveries?
(University of Konstanz) Study on the role of artificial intelligence in basic research - Volkswagen Foundation research grant for philosopher Professor Thomas M ü ller (University of Konstanz) and physicist Professor Hans Briegel (University of Innsbruck) (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Study from Chinese city of Guangzhou provides key insights on how COVID-19 spreads in households
(The Lancet) New modelling research, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal, suggests the coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) that causes COVID-19 may spread more easily among people living together and family members than severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) or Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). The estimates are the first of their kind to quantify symptomless transmission. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

10 percent of patients continue to use opioids three to six months after heart surgery
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Nearly 10 percent of patients who are prescribed opioid medications following heart surgery will continue to use opioids more than 90 days after the procedure, according to a new study led by researchers at Penn Medicine. The study also revealed a direct link between the dosage of opioids first prescribed following discharge and the likelihood of persistent opioid use 90 to 180 days after the procedure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How Toxoplasma parasites glide so swiftly (video)
(American Chemical Society) If you're a cat owner, you might have heard ofToxoplasma gondii, a protozoan that sometimes infects humans through contact with contaminated feces in litterboxes. Although harmless to most people,T. gondii can cause serious illness or death in immunocompromised individuals or fetuses of infected pregnant women. Now, researchers reporting inACS Nano have studied how the microorganism glides so swiftly through mammalian tissues during an infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Envy divides society
(Goethe University Frankfurt) Can class differences come about endogenously, i.e. independent of birth and education? Professor Claudius Gros from the Institute for Theoretical Physics at Goethe University pursued this issue in a game theoretical study. He was able to show that the basic human need to compare oneself with others may be the root cause of the formation of social classes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brainsourcing automatically identifies human preferences
(University of Helsinki) Researchers at the University of Helsinki have developed a technique, using artificial intelligence, to analyse opinions and draw conclusions using the brain activity of groups of people. This technique, which the researchers call " brainsourcing " , can be used to classify images or recommend content, something that has not been demonstrated before. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Food Technology: Insect Flours
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) According to estimates of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), population growth will cause the worldwide demand for animal proteins to double by 2050. Even if free agricultural areas would be used, this demand could not be covered by meat from cattle breeding alone. For this reason, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) study production of new alternative protein sources. Their goal is to develop insect flours suited for e.g. bread production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What it means when animals have beliefs
(Ruhr-University Bochum) Humans are not the only ones who have beliefs; animals do too, although it is more difficult to prove them than with humans. Dr. Tobias Starzak and Professor Albert Newen from the Institute of Philosophy II at Ruhr-Universit ä t Bochum have proposed four criteria to understand and empirically investigate animal beliefs in the journal " Mind and Language " . The article was published online on 16 June 2020. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

To make a good impression, leave cell phone alone during work meetings
(University of Kansas) New hires especially should keep their cell phones stashed away during business meetings, a new study strongly implies.Two University of Kansas researchers have just published a paper that finds viewers perceive someone who appears to be using their cell phone during a business meeting far more negatively than someone who takes notes on a pad. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Arkansas researchers develop diversity intelligence scale for organizations
(University of Arkansas) University of Arkansas researchers have developed the first-ever diversity intelligence scale to protect workers and help employers to ensure and improve diversity, inclusion and equity within their organizations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AI goes underground: root crop growth predicted with drone imagery
(International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)) Root crops like cassava, carrots and potatoes are notoriously good at hiding disease, or deficiencies which might affect their growth. While leaves may look green and healthy, farmers can face nasty surprises when they go to harvest their crop. New research using machine learning and to help predict root growth and health with aboveground imagery was published June 14 in Plant Methods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Association between morbidity and poverty reversed during early US COVID-19 epidemic
(Frontiers) In the US, counties with greater poverty, lower social mobility and life expectancy had more confirmed cases in January through March, but this trend reversed by April 1, while a higher death rate from COVID-19 remained associated with poverty throughout. These results suggest that limited testing resources may have been diverted to richer counties as the epidemic took hold. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Report finds that unionist and nationalist identities in NI became stronger in the run-up to Brexit
(Queen's University Belfast) A research study on political attitudes and identities in Northern Ireland has been released today (Wednesday 17 June) by ARK -- a joint initiative between Queen's University Belfast and Ulster University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The nexus between economic inequality and social welfare
(CMCC Foundation - Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change) A new interpretation of the concept of inequity - in the sense of unequal distributions across individuals, time and states of the world -- and a new, general measure of welfare from a study just published in the Journal of Economic Surveys, with the contribution of the CMCC Foundation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Classes set by ability are hitting children's self-confidence, study finds
(Taylor& Francis Group) The way a vast amount of schools are setup, with classes grouping children based on their ability, is severely affecting pupil's self-confidence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Teens who say their parents are overcontrolling struggle with relationships, educational goals as adults
(Society for Research in Child Development) A new longitudinal study sought to determine the long-term impact on youth of parenting that is psychologically controlling. Although the study did not establish causation, it found that overbearing and overcontrolling tactics by parents when children were 13 years old were associated with difficulties in social relationships and educational attainment by the time the teens reached age 32. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Effect of high-deductible insurance use in bipolar disorder
(Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute) A new study led by the Department of Population Medicine finds that individuals with bipolar disorder who switched to high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) experienced a moderate decrease in nonpsychiatrist mental health outpatient visits, but rates of psychiatrist visits, medication use, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations did not change. The study, 'Effect of High-deductible Insurance on Healthcare Use in Bipolar Disorder' appears in The American Journal of Managed Care on June 16. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Asthma among children with developmental disabilities
(JAMA Network) How common asthma was among children with various developmental disabilities (including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder and vision, hearing or speech delay) was compared to children without disabilities in this survey study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Traits associated with increased risk of gun use among high-risk adolescents
(American Psychiatric Association) Research out today identifies traits among high-risk adolescents associated with increased risk for gun use. Among high-risk adolescents, those with greater callous-unemotional traits were more likely to carry a gun and to use a gun during a crime over a four-year period following an initial arrest, according to a study published online in the American Journal of Psychiatry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Yale scientists propose explanation for baffling form of childhood OCD
(Yale University) Yale scientists may have found a cause for the sudden onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in some children, they report. Pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders, or PANDAS, were first proposed in the 1990s. Thought to be triggered by streptococcal infections, they account for an unknown portion of youth OCD cases. But the biology underpinning this disorder has baffled scientists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How does our brain trigger different sighs? New findings could provide answers
(University of Michigan) One group of neurons controls various types of sighing, but they receive their instructions from different areas of the brain depending on the reason for the sigh, according to a study scheduled to publish June 16, 2020 in the journal Cell Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exercise offers 'profound' benefits for Friedreich's ataxia, research suggests
(University of Virginia Health System) Well-timed exercise programs may slow the progression of Friedreich's ataxia, which robs patients of their ability to walk, new research suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researcher builds solution to work-from-home cloud-computing 'storms'
(University of Texas at San Antonio) As more companies migrate their operations to a virtual world, cloud environments will experience additional service disruptions. Now, a computer science researcher at UTSA has helped develop Orchestra, an algorithm that keeps up with the demand of cloud computing to reduce spikes in such resource 'storms.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tomography studies of coins shed light on the history of Volga Bulgaria
(Kazan Federal University) Kazan Federal University, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia), and Khalikov Institute of Archeology (Tatarstan Academy of Sciences, Kazan, Russia) are working together to study the physical properties of the coins found on the territory of former Volga Bulgaria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Kudos and Impact Science partner to offer communications services to research stakeholders
(Cactus Communications) Kudos, the award-winning networking and communications tracking service, has today announced a partnership with Impact Science, a Cactus Communications brand that offers solutions for science dissemination and engagement. Researchers and multiple key stakeholders can improve the visibility of their work by disseminating them through high-engagement formats such as videos, infographics, visual abstracts, and smart posters, and can access Kudos' tools for measuring the performance of their publications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study settles the score on whether the modern world is less violent
(University of York) A study, by mathematicians at the University of York, has used new techniques to address the long-running debate over whether battle deaths have been declining globally since the end of the Second World War. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers: Homes of North Zealand's elite are most likely to be preserved
(University of Copenhagen) Since 1945, the vast majority of historically preserved dwellings in Denmark are architect-designed gems located in North Zealand, according to a study conducted by, among others, a University of Copenhagen researcher. The researchers point out that this contradicts the legal requirement for historical preservation to reflect the population as a whole, not just the elite. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds depression associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease
(Simon Fraser University) A new study co-led by Simon Fraser University health sciences professor Scott Lear provides further evidence of the link between depressive symptoms and an increased risk of heart disease and early death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Redesigning hand sanitizer and donating 7,000 gallons to fight COVID-19
(Georgia Institute of Technology) Ever notice how hand sanitizer has made a comeback to market shelves? It was running out, but this charitable initiative helped revive it for the entire US by tapping into ethanol and a special FDA status. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When board members get involved, corporate tax burden goes down
(North Carolina State University) New research finds that corporate tax-planning practices improve when a company's board takes an interest -- and better planning results in both less tax uncertainty and a lower tax burden. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

$1.77M award gives Temple researchers chance to investigate therapy for cocaine addiction
(Temple University Health System) Researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have received a new $1.77M grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse that will allow them to explore whether a drug called clavulanic acid can help patients recover from cocaine use disorder. Clavulanic acid is part of an existing therapy known as Augmentin. Augmentin combines clavulanic acid with the penicillin-related antibiotic amoxicillin and is used for the treatment of bacterial infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Food systems experts to study Denver supply chain impacts from COVID-19
(Colorado State University) With a supplemental grant from the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research, CSU researchers will investigate social, economic and environmental effects of a shift to more localized food procurement in Denver, Colorado. They will investigate impacts on Colorado producers resulting from increased local demand related to supply chain disruptions during COVID-related closures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research delves into causes of nightmares that shadow female survivors of sexual trauma
(University of Kansas) A new study from psychologists at the University of Kansas attempts to shed light on triggers of post-trauma nightmare occurrences -- a topic that has received scant study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ethnic minorities' employment prospects lag behind white majority
(SAGE) The employment prospects of some ethnic minorities in the UK have improved since the 1970s but still lag behind the white majority because of 'persistent racism', a major new study says. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How teachers are adapting to COVID-19 disruptions is subject of new CSU study
(Colorado State University) For Colorado State University researchers, the pandemic-related environment of disruption across the country's public schools provides a new opportunity to take a deep dive into what makes teachers resilient. Colorado State University researchers have received National Science Foundation support to study how novice STEM teachers are responding to the COVID-19 outbreak. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Addressing the safety of high folate levels in the older population and implications for fortification in Ireland
(Trinity College Dublin) A new study from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) at Trinity College challenges claims from some international scientific circles, that having high blood levels of folate (folic acid) increases the risk of poor cognition in older adults, especially in those with low levels of vitamin B12. On the contrary the study found that having higher folate seemed to be associated with better cognitive function in these older adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In virtual presentation, geriatrics research addresses key concern: medications
(American Geriatrics Society) New insights on a host of factors impacting medication use for older adults will anchor a special research presentation hosted by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) on June 24 from 3-4pm ET. Originally scheduled as part of the AGS 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting canceled due to COVID-19, data presentations from the three top studies comprising the meeting's prestigious Plenary Paper Session will instead be delivered during a virtual conference session. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SIOP 2020 Virtual Conference opens June 16
(Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology) As part of its commitment to its 10,000 members, the Society for Industrial and Organization Psychology shifted this year's annual conference to a virtual format. In a few short months, the SIOP 2020 Virtual Conference, a comprehensive, online conference featuring almost 500 sessions, was built for more than 2,000 registrants, providing an opportunity for attendees to explore the future of work and the role I-O psychology can play in meeting workplace challenges today and beyond. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New analysis of human portraits reveals shift in culture, cognition
(Santa Fe Institute) Human cognition and cultural norms have changed the composition of human portraits, according to a new analysis of European paintings from the 15th to the 20th century. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Higher parental stress linked to low screen-time enforcement, research finds
(University of Guelph) When parents are under stress, household rules about screen time often get abandoned, new University of Guelph research finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study reveals racial disparities in fear of police brutality
(University of South Florida (USF Innovation)) Nationwide survey shows minorities are five times more likely than white people to worry about police brutality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news