Stopping Parkinson's disease before it starts
(Osaka University) Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of people worldwide. Characterized by accumulation of the proteinα-synuclein, there is currently no cure for PD. In a new study published this month in Scientific Reports, a research team led by Osaka University designed small fragments of DNA that bind toα-synuclein mRNA, preventing it from being translated into protein. This novel treatment effectively ameliorated disease symptoms in a mouse model of PD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

blu research suggests potential breakthrough in future e-liquid classifications
(Imperial Brands) A new study by Imperial Brands, owners of vape brand blu, suggests that Genomic Allergen Rapid Detection (GARD) in-vitro assays can be used to differentiate and classify vape e-liquids, as well as detect allergens potentially present in ingredients. These assays were originally developed to assess the sensitisation potential of compounds in the chemical manufacturing industry, but this pioneering research is the first vaping-related application and demonstrates the potential to raise product standards in this area. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cardinalfish caught sneaking a bit on the side
(ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies) Scientists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies reveal the torrid, adulterous love lives of the mouth-brooding cardinalfish. The male fish of this species carries the eggs in his mouth until they are ready to hatch. Until now the species were assumed to be monogamous. However, cuckoldry goes hand-in-hand with cannibalism of the young. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lithuanian researcher created AI-based solution for measuring the emotional climate of New York
(Kaunas University of Technology) A young researcher from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania -- Domantas Didziapetris -- created an artificial intelligence based solution for measuring the emotional climate in Manhattan Island, New York. After carrying out a sentiment analysis of over 36,000 tweets, he created a scale which indicates how the residents and visitors rate emotional climate of the different Manhattan neighborhoods. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Weak upper and lower body physical performance associated with depression and anxiety
(The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)) Physical fitness is associated with a number of key health outcomes, including heart disease, cognition, mortality, and an overall feeling of well-being. A new study from Singapore now links physical performance with mental health and emotions, suggesting that weak upper and lower body fitness can cause more serious depression and anxiety in midlife women. Results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

US struggles to keep up as hemp industry grows
(American Chemical Society) US hemp production is soaring, but government oversight hasn't kept up, according to an article in Chemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. The industry is scrambling to find common ground between states, which each have a different set of rules for hemp growers and processors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reducing opioid prescriptions after C-sections
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) There's a better way to take care of patients after C-sections to help them heal faster and manage pain without increasing their risk of long-term opioid use, Michigan Medicine researchers say. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nokia Spain becomes Gold Collaborator of 5TONIC Open 5G Lab
(IMDEA Networks Institute) Nokia Spain has become Gold Collaborator of the 5TONIC Open 5G Lab headquartered at IMDEA Networks in Madrid (Spain). Together with Nokia Bell Labs site in Madrid, Nokia will collaborate with Telef ó nica in the implementation of a testbed for the use case 'Media& Entertainment: UHF Media, On-site Live Event Experience and Immersive and Integrated Media', in the context of European H2020 5G EVE project. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Telomere length unaffected by smoking
(Newcastle University) A new study has surprised the medical world, finding that smoking does not shorten the length of telomeres -- a marker at the end of our chromosomes that is widely accepted as an indicator of aging. This suggests that adult telomere length should be considered a static biomarker that changes relatively little during adult life. The authors emphasize that this does not lessen the evidence that smoking is bad for you. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Populist Eurosceptics don't gain from terrorist attacks
(University of Kent) Populist Eurosceptics don't gain from terrorist attacksResearch led by the University of Kent has found that terrorist attacks in Europe don't increase support for populist parties.In fact, people in Germany became more positive towards the EU after the 2016 Berlin Christmas market attack in that country, the researchers found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Autonomous boats can target and latch onto each other
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) The city of Amsterdam envisions a future where fleets of autonomous boats cruise its many canals to transport goods and people, collect trash, or self-assemble into floating stages and bridges. To further that vision, MIT researchers have given new capabilities to their fleet of robotic boats -- which are being developed as part of an ongoing project -- that lets them target and clasp onto each other, and keep trying if they fail. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Meltdown wins the national business book award in Canada
(University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management) A book co-authored by a professor at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management has won the National Business Book Award, which honours the most outstanding Canadian business-related book published in 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

It pays to be free: No-cost products garner strong word-of-mouth recommendations
(University of Texas at Austin) Consumers who get a web-based product or mobile app for free are more likely to give it a word-of-mouth boost than a product they buy, suggesting they feel 'one good turn deserves another.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds tie between attributing hostile intent and aggression in children and youth
(Society for Research in Child Development) Children who tend to attribute hostile motives to other people are more likely to display aggression, however, the strength of this relationship varies. A new meta-analysis sought to determine the relation between attributing hostile intent and aggressive behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Economic downturns may affect children's mental health
(Wiley) Research linking economic conditions and health often does not consider children's mental health problems. In a new Health Economics study, investigators found that US children's mental health worsened as the economy weakened. The use of special education services for emotional problems also rose when economic conditions worsened. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Lancet Psychiatry: Despite increase in rates of non-suicidal self-harm, few people receive medical or psychological support
(The Lancet) A new study of non-suicidal self-harm in England, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal, suggests that rates grew from around 2% to 6% of the population between 2000 and 2014. At the same time, the study noted no evidence of an increase in treatment contact for this group. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Deaths from falls increase among older US adults
(JAMA Network) Death rates from falls for US adults 75 or older increased from 2000 to 2016 in this study that analyzed nationally representative vital statistics data. The absolute number of deaths from falls increased from 8,613 in 2000 to 25,189 in 2016. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Could boosting the gut microbiome be the secret to healthier older age?
(Babraham Institute) Fecal transplants from young to aged mice can stimulate the gut microbiome and revive the gut immune system, a study by immunologists at the Babraham Institute, Cambridge, UK, has shown. The study, published in Nature Communications, suggest that the gut microbiome could be a target for the treatment of a range of age-associated symptoms to facilitate healthy ageing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mathematicians work out how to predict success in show business
(Queen Mary University of London) Mathematicians from Queen Mary University of London have found a way to predict whether an actor's career has peaked or if their most successful days lie ahead. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exercise fine-tunes brain's connections, eases autism spectrum disorder in mouse model
(University of Tokyo) A mouse model of autism has revealed how exercise changes the structure of the brain by eliminating the excess connections between neurons characteristic of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). After one month of voluntary running on a wheel, behavioral differences disappeared and structural differences in ASD model mice's brains were reduced. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tolerance to stress is a 'trade-off' as fruit flies age
(Florida Atlantic University) With the help of the common fruit fly (D. melanogaster), which ages quickly because it only lives about 60 days, FAU neuroscientists provide insights into healthy aging by investigating the effects of a foraging gene on age and stress tolerance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Companies battling shareholder complaints have a potent weapon-advertising
(American Marketing Association) A new study in the Journal of Marketing explores how firms can configure advertising investments to respond to shareholder complaints and limit the damage of these public battles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NUS named top contributor for green building research
(National University of Singapore) NUS has been named the top contributing institution in the world for research on green building projects (GBPs) in a bibliometric review published in prestigious journal Building& Environment, achieving global recognition for its extensive studies in the field. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Physical inactivity proved risky for children and pre-teens
(Universit é de Gen è ve) At what age do children lose the desire to exercise? Researchers (UNIGE) followed 1,200 pupils and found out that from the age of 9, the positive reasons for exercising begin to be replaced by displaced incentives: to get a good mark or improve your image with others. These results call for a more detailed analysis of how PE is taught in schools to counter physical inactivity leading to a sedentary lifestyle from an early age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Psychological model of defectologist's readiness for professional development
(Kazan Federal University) In this new paper, the researchers theorize that professional competences of a defectologist (a Russian term for educators engaged in assisted teaching for disabled individuals) rely on their psychological readiness for such a profession. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is there a demographic need for migration in Europe?
(International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) A European Commission-IIASA flagship report has found that an increase in the EU population aged 65+ is certain -- regardless of higher fertility or migration. However, raising labor force participation (particularly for women) and improved education of natives and migrants have the power to nullify aging-related worries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sexual violence is a driver of women's political mobilization
(University of Gothenburg) Sexual violence in armed conflict does not necessarily silence women. On the contrary, sexual violence can be a driver of women's political mobilization for peace and women's rights, a dissertation from the University of Gothenburg shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Opioids are not sleep aids, and can actually worsen sleep research finds
(University of Warwick) Evidence that taking opioids will help people with chronic pain to sleep better is limited and of poor quality, according to an interdisciplinary team of psychologists and medics from the University of Warwick in partnership with Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Would you eat genetically modified food if you understood the science behind it?
(University of Rochester) While genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are considered safe by an overwhelming majority of scientists, only about one third of consumers share that view. A team of psychologists and biologists from the University of Rochester, the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, and Cardiff University in Wales, set out to discover if consumers' attitudes would change if the public understood the underlying science better. The short answer is 'yes.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Spec fic writers named 2019 Neukom Institute awards winners
(Dartmouth College) Literary award programs highlights how technology, including computational ideas, impact society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Civility still matters to some in cyberspace
(University of Texas at Austin) In the online world, where incivility is all too common, new research from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin found that being polite is golden, at least when individuals who pose questions online get to choose the " best answer. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Beta blockers reduce stress-induced irregular heart rhythm
(Yale University) Taking beta blockers -- medications that reduce blood pressure and treat many heart conditions -- can blunt the negative effects of stress and anger on people with a history of atrial fibrillation, or irregular heart rhythm, said Yale researchers. This strategy could potentially improve quality of life for many of the 2 million Americans with the condition, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sticking to sports can help kids adjust
(University of Montreal) By participating in organized physical activity from the age of 6, children will have less risk of emotional difficulties by the time they're 12, a new Canadian study finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SwRI's ActiveVision enables transportation agencies to automate traffic monitoring
(Southwest Research Institute) Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) has announced the release of ActiveVision, a machine vision tool that transportation agencies can use to autonomously detect and report traffic condition changes. ActiveVision's algorithms process camera data to provide real-time information on weather conditions and other anomalies affecting congestion. Designed for integration with intelligent transportation systems (ITS), ActiveVision can be configured with existing traffic cameras to analyze roadway conditions with no human monitoring required. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research sheds light on the importance of police trust in the public
(North Carolina State University) A recent study finds that police officers who place more trust in the public are also more likely to pursue cases on their own initiative -- termed proactive policing -- and have higher arrest rates. The finding may have implications for public safety, police training and future law enforcement research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Promoting academic and cultural exchange between Japan and Germany
(Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) DFG awards Eugen and Ilse Seibold Prize to Koichiro Agata from Waseda University and Harald Baum from MPI for Comparative and International Private Law, Hamburg. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Networking with ghosts in the machine... and speaking kettles
(Lancaster University) Imagine for just a moment that your kettle could speak? What would it say? How would it feel? More importantly, what on earth would you ask it?Now researchers at Lancaster University have done just that by conducting several 'talking head' interviews with household objects as part of an experiment to understand more about our relationship with networked technologies known as The Internet of Things (IoT). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Emotions from touch
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Touching different types of surfaces may incur certain emotions. This was the conclusion made by the psychologists from the Higher School of Economics in a recent empirical study. Previously, emotional perception was generally studied in relation to visual and audial modalities. The study's results were published in the journal Consciousness and Cognition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Law as Data' explores radical leap for legal analysis
(Santa Fe Institute) From lawyer-bots appealing parking tickets to machine learning algorithms finding the smoking gun document, change is coming to the law. 'Law as Data,' borne out of a transdisciplinary Santa Fe Institute working group, explores the new field of computational legal analysis -- the study of the law that uses legal texts as data. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The history of Arctic ecosystems as a guide to the future
(University of Konstanz) How are tundra ecosystems impacted by grazing and climate change, and how will future changes to the Arctic affect the living conditions of its residents? These questions are being addressed by an international research collaboration between environmental genomics, ecology and anthropology in a project coordinated by Junior Professor Laura Epp from the University of Konstanz. The researchers will combine ancient DNA from sediment cores with current ecological data and anthropological studies. The knowledge gained will be transferred into the communities of the studied areas. (Source: EurekAlert! - ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Remote sensing of toxic algal blooms
(King Abdullah University of Science& Technology (KAUST)) Algal blooms in the Red Sea can be detected with a new method that accounts for dust storms and aerosols. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Advancing dementia and its effect on care home relationships
(University of Chichester) New research published today in the journal Dementia by researchers from the University of Chichester focuses on the effects of behavioral change due to dementia in a residential care home setting. Its findings are based on a survey of professional care-givers who shared their own experiences of the deterioration of the carer/cared-for relationship as dementia advances. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Measuring impact of product placement
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) Researchers from Indiana University and Emory University published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science (Editor's note: The source of this research is INFORMS), which reveals the impact of product placement in television programming. The findings indicate that prominent product placement embedded in television programming does have a net positive impact on online conversations and web traffic for the brand. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In the aftermath of company scandals, auditors charge higher fees or leave
(University of Colorado Denver) CU Denver researcher predicts that auditors notice and incorporate media-provided ESG information in their risk response, which has not been examined before. Supporting this prediction, she finds that ESG-related negative media coverage of an audit client is associated with a higher likelihood of auditor resignation and increased audit fees. This response is incremental to the issues that underlie this media coverage. These findings identify an additional economic incentive for companies to avoid poor ESG practices. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lack of sleep may increase likelihood of teens engaging in risky sexual behaviors
(American Psychological Association) Teenagers who don't get enough sleep may be at an increased risk of engaging in unsafe sexual behaviors, such as not using condoms or having sex under the influence of alcohol or drugs, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

LGBTQ adolescents experiencing weight-based bullying found to have increased substance use
(UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity) Weight-based victimization among sexual and gender minority youth is associated with increased offs of alcohol use, binge drinking, marijuana use, and cigarette use. These findings persist regardless of adolescents' demographic characteristics, body weight, sexual identity, gender identity, and sexual or gender minority victimization. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lower-amp ECT appears effective against suicidal thoughts
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) Nearly half the amplitude typically used in standard electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) seems to be effective at treating suicidal thoughts, investigators report. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SMU researcher wins grant to develop sustainable man-machine interaction intelligence
(Singapore Managment University) The NRF Investigatorship grant will support SMU Professor Archan Misra's vision of a smart city where humans and devices work collaboratively on projects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SMU researcher awarded grant to study religious diversity in Singapore
(Singapore Managment University) SMU Assistant Professor Orlando Woods is studying new types of religious pluralism in Singapore -- the differences that exist not just between but also within religious groups. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Leaky pipeline: Women subject to disadvantages in career development
(Goethe University Frankfurt) A website presenting the results from a web-based tracking tool about the proportion of women working in economic research institutions in European countries was launched on Tuesday, May 28. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news