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Life expectancy significantly worse in deprived areas
(City University London) Life expectancy and health outcomes worsen the more deprived an area or population is, new research from Cass Business School has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study says charisma trumped narcissism for voters in 2016 US presidential election
(Florida Atlantic University) A new study of the 2016 US presidential election suggests that narcissism and charisma are both important predictors of voter choice. Researchers found that attributed charisma may serve as a balance to narcissism. Thus, followers of a candidate potentially look beyond negative leadership qualities to select those leaders who they perceive to have redeeming positive attributes and values. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sign of the times: Another powerhouse FI partners with UAlberta scientists
(University of Alberta) From artificial intelligence (AI) to data science to mathematical finance, ATB Financial has its eyes on the future for its clients, Albertans and the tech sector.Following a red hot 2017, with multiple announcements of collaborations and partnerships, University of Alberta scientists have just received another green stamp of approval from the financial sector with the announcement of a new collaboration with ATB Financial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Marriage reduces depression in couples earning less than $60,000 per year, study finds
(Georgia State University) People who are married and earning less than $60,000 per year in total household income have fewer symptoms of depression than comparable earning unmarried people, but for couples earning more, marriage doesn't show the same mental health benefits, according to a study co-authored by a Georgia State University researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cohesive neighborhoods, less spanking result in fewer child welfare visits
(University of Michigan) The child welfare system is more likely to intervene in households in 'less neighborly' neighborhoods and in which parents spank their kids, a new study shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Experience of black doctoral students underscores need for diversity in STEM
(Iowa State University) The danger and risk of riding out a storm is symbolic of the decision black men make to pursue a graduate degree in engineering. They do so knowing they will face challenges, but the barriers described by black men who shared their experiences as part of a six-year study show how race was a greater obstacle than they expected. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UEA research paints underwater pictures with sound
(University of East Anglia) Silent marine robots that record sounds underwater are allowing researchers to listen to the oceans as never before.While pilot whales make whistles, buzzes and clicks, pods of hunting dolphins create high-pitched echolocation clicks and larger species such as sperm whales make louder, slower clicks.As well as eavesdropping on marine life, the recordings can be used to measure sea-surface wind speed and monitor storms. The research will be presented at the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union, Vienna. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gender gap in academic medicine has negative impact, but there are simple solutions
(St. Michael's Hospital) Existing gender gaps in academic medicine may have a negative impact on workplace culture and organizational effectiveness, but there are simple, systems-based solutions, suggests a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Spoken language reveals how people develop and mature
(Florida Atlantic University) Examining 44,000 brief text samples collected over 25 years, a study of ego level and language sheds light on ego development, its relationship with other models of personality and individual differences, and its utility in characterizing people, texts and cultural contexts. If ego development can be scored from everyday language, then text from Twitter feeds to political speeches, and from children's stories to strategic plans, may provide new insights into the state of moral, social and cognitive development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Increased risk of unnatural death to people with epilepsy found
(University of Manchester) A new study has shown that people diagnosed with epilepsy in England and Wales are at increased risk of dying from suicide and accidents.Though the risks of unnatural death for people with epilepsy are still low, they are significantly higher than the general population says Dr. Hayley Gorton from The University of Manchester. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ALS, rare dementia share genetic link
(Washington University School of Medicine) Studying data from more than 125,000 individuals, an international team of researchers led by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified genetic links between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia. The link between the seemingly unrelated disorders suggests that some drugs developed to treat ALS also may work against frontotemporal dementia and vice versa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Prominent academics, including Salk's Thomas Albright, call for more science in forensic science
(Salk Institute) Six scientists who recently served on the National Commission on Forensic Science are calling on the scientific community at large to advocate for increased research and financial support of forensic science as well as the introduction of empirical testing requirements to ensure the validity of outcomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Controlling blood pressure even when older can prevent dementia in African-Americans
(Regenstrief Institute) Controlling blood pressure with any of the commonly prescribed antihypertensive medications (beta blockers, ACE inhibitors, calcium channel blocks, and diuretics) can prevent dementia in older African-Americans with hypertension according to a new study from Regenstrief Institute researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Imitation is the most sincere form of flattery, unless you are an app developer
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) One out of two mobile apps released is a clone of an existing app. However, new research in the INFORMS journal Information Systems Research shows the success of the original app is not always adversely affected by these clone apps. The study, which was conducted by Carnegie Mellon University researchers, found that whether the copycat app increases or decreases the number of downloads of the original is dependent upon the quality of the copy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Intergenerational trauma evident in offspring caring for Holocaust survivor parents
(Bar-Ilan University) More than 70 years since the end of World War II, there are still signs of intergenerational transmission of Holocaust trauma that are manifested in the way adult offspring of Holocaust survivors care for their elderly parents, according to a new study by researchers at Bar-Ilan University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Media deserts project creates searchable media access research atlas
(Ohio University) Ohio University's new Media Access Research Atlas maps the circulation of daily newspapers in the United States and how much of the population in that area is subscribing to the newspaper. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality releases early findings from EvidenceNOW
(American Academy of Family Physicians) The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality today released early findings from EvidenceNOW, a multi-million dollar initiative to help primary care practices across the country more rapidly improve the heart health of Americans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hospital ownership of practice may reduce physician burnout
(American Academy of Family Physicians) Among staff in small- to medium-sized primary care practices, hospital ownership is associated with positive perceptions of work environment and lower burnout. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

There's no such thing as oversharing in conservation
(Michigan State University) Social gadflies in an organization are the new superheroes of conservation, according to a study in this month's Nature Sustainability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Who are the best gift-givers? Not who you'd think, says Baylor marketing research
(Baylor University) New research shows that people who are " secure " in interpersonal settings are most likely to engage in social projection (making choices on behalf of others based on their own preferences). Those who are " anxious " are less likely to assume others share their preferences and less likely to make choices for others based on their personal attitudes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Two Penn professors named Guggenheim Fellows
(University of Pennsylvania) University of Pennsylvania sociology professor Charles L. Bosk and Charles Yang, professor of linguistics and computer science, have been awarded 2018 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation fellowships. They are among 173 scholars, artists, and scientists selected from nearly 3,000 applicants in the United States and Canada, chosen on the basis of prior achievement and exceptional promise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genetics of the modern heirs of the Incas shed new lights about their origins and lineages
(Universidad de San Martin de Porres) A study of the Inka origins and their lineages was performed in twelve contemporary families with presumed patrilineal lineage to Inka monarchs. A comparison of Y-chromosome and mtDNA markers of these descendants with a database of about 2400 South American native individuals of Peru, Bolivia, Brasil and Ecuador showed two distinct patrilineal clusters, and a very diverse matrilineal origin. In addition they show great affinity to areas South of Cusco including the Lake Titicaca. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Optimism remains in chickens in enriched environments despite exposure to stress
(Link ö ping University) Chickens that grow up in an environment that they perceive as more diverse and manageable, retain an optimistic view of life and cope with stress better than individuals that grow up in more sterile surroundings, according to a new study published in Scientific Reports. A team of researchers lead by researchers from Link ö ping University, Sweden, measured how optimism in chickens is affected by stress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Pan-European electronic invoicing in the healthcare sector
(Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) A European group of scientists, technologists and providers of e-invoicing services, in which Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) researchers participate, have developed a new electronic invoicing system among different European countries for the public and private healthcare sector that automates, enhances and expedites the relation with public and private suppliers from different European countries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

School lunch decisions made by the child and not the parent
(Elsevier) While school lunches in the UK are subject to food standards, the contents of packed lunches are not as closely scrutinized, and studies have raised concern regarding the nutritional quality of packed lunches. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that children, not their parents, are often the primary decision maker of whether they will eat a school lunch or what is packed for their lunch. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genetics of the modern heirs of the Inkas shed new lights about their origins and lineages
(Universidad de San Martin de Porres) A study of the Inka origins and their lineages was performed in twelve contemporary families with presumed patrilineal lineage to Inka monarchs. A comparison of Y-chromosome and mtDNA markers of these descendants with a database of about 2400 South American native individuals of Peru, Bolivia, Brasil and Ecuador showed two distinct patrilineal clusters, and a very diverse matrilineal origin. In addition they show great affinity to areas South of Cusco including the Lake Titicaca. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

$3.2 million grant supports SF State University study of childhood obesity disparities
(San Francisco State University) SF State University's Department of Health Education has received a $3.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the effects of state and federal nutrition policies and community environments on childhood health and obesity disparities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Legal barriers hindering ASEAN trade: Report
(Singapore Managment University) ASEAN's legal frameworks must keep pace with how businesses use technology today, say Singapore Management University researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When health care hurts: High-deductible plans raise financial risk
(University of Southern California) This marks the latest study in a series to show that consumers on high-deductible plans are not making wiser, cost-saving choices than are o ffered by traditional plans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Animal study suggests common diabetes drug may also help with nicotine withdrawal
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) In a mouse study, a drug that has helped millions of people around the world manage their diabetes might also help people ready to kick their nicotine habits (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A heavy working memory load may sink brainwave 'synch'
(Picower Institute at MIT) When working memory load exceeds capacity, a new study finds, feedback coupling of the prefrontal cortex with other involved regions shuts down. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NTU Singapore and SERI invent new scope to diagnose glaucoma
(Nanyang Technological University) A new 'pen camera' has been developed jointly by scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and the Singapore Eye Research Institute (SERI) to diagnose the glaucoma type in a cheaper, more efficient manner. Currently, an eye specialist has to press a glass scope against a patient's eye to make a diagnosis. As this process is time-consuming and requires a skilled eye specialist, it is not done as often as required during eye checks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The traits of fast typists discovered by analyzing 136 million keystrokes
(Aalto University) An online study with 168,000 people shows large variation in typing speeds and styles. The dataset is the largest ever on everyday typing and exposed several factors that differentiate fast vs. slow typists. In addition to making less errors, the researchers found that fastest typists rely on so-called 'rollover' where a letter key is typed already before the previous one is released. The data is published and free to use for research purposes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ten researchers to receive Germany's most important award for early career researchers
(Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) This year 10 researchers -- five women and five men -- will receive the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Prize, the most important award for early career researchers in Germany. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

270 million visits made to English coastlines each year
(University of Exeter) Research has revealed for the first time that around 271 million recreational visits are made to marine and coastal environments in England. Conducted by the University of Exeter Medical School and published in the journal Marine Policy, the research found that the most common activity on these visits is walking.The study also revealed that most people head to these 'blue' environments for relaxation and social reasons. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dr. Patricia K. Coyle, multiple sclerosis clinician and researcher to lecture on DMTs
(Consortium of MS Centers) Optimal use of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) may be one of the single most important clinical decisions made in treating multiple sclerosis (MS). Currently, there are numerous DMT options and selection can be a complex issue for the clinician and patient. Patricia K. Coyle, M.D., FAAN, FANA, Director, MS Comprehensive Care Center, Stony Brook University Medical Center, will present the Donald Paty Memorial Lecture at the CMSC Annual Meeting on 'DMT-Debates - Stopping, Switching, Re-starting.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Class clowns: Playful boys viewed more negatively than playful girls, study finds
(Frontiers) New research finds that boys with a playful disposition in kindergarten are viewed as rebellious and disruptive by teachers, as opposed to playful girls who are not labeled this way. Teachers disregard for these 'class clowns' -- and their active discouragement of expressions of playful behavior -- is assimilated by the boys themselves as well as their peers, leading to more negative perceptions of the boys and decreasing their self-esteem. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New in the Hastings Center Report, March-April 2018
(The Hastings Center) Daniel Callahan on Steven Pinker's new book, rethinking the right to know incidental findings, mental illness and gun control, and more in the March-April 2018 issue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nicotine-imbibing teenage rats show an increased risk for drinking alcohol as adults
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Rats who were dosed with nicotine during their adolescence grew up to drink alcohol more often than those who weren't exposed to nicotine or were only exposed to it during adulthood. Exposure to nicotine at a young age changed the neuronal circuitry in the rat brain's reward pathways (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Amid outcry over Facebook's privacy issues, new approaches are needed to protect consumers
(Indiana University) Facebook's current privacy crisis and questions about how Google gathers, uses and stores our personal information demonstrate an urgent need to review and replace inadequate and outdated ways to regulate data and information, according to research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why do children tattle?
(Wiley) When young children see a peer cause harm, they often tattle to a caregiver. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Regular stretching shown to improve muscles in elderly
(The Physiological Society) Daily muscle stretching could bring health benefits to elderly people with reduced mobility, according to new research published today in the Journal of Physiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows how moms' brains are hard-wired to gather young
(NYU Langone Health / NYU School of Medicine) A mother's 'basic instinct' to grab her wandering offspring and return them to the nest depends on a specific set of brain cell signals, a new study in mice finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pulling valuable metals from e-waste makes financial sense
(American Chemical Society) Electronic waste -- including discarded televisions, computers and mobile phones -- is one of the fastest-growing waste categories worldwide. For years, recyclers have gleaned usable parts, including metals, from this waste stream. That makes sense from a sustainability perspective, but it's been unclear whether it's reasonable from an economic viewpoint. Now researchers report in ACS' journal Environmental Science& Technology that recovering gold, copper and other metals from e-waste is cheaper than obtaining these metals from mines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are people with Parkinson's disease depressed or demoralized?
(American Academy of Neurology) People with Parkinson's disease who show signs of depression may actually have a condition called demoralization, according to a study published in the April 4, 2018, online issue of Neurology ® , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. That study found demoralization may be common in Parkinson's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Diabetes awareness 'major concern' for UK Asians
(Anglia Ruskin University) South Asians living in the UK feel cut off and excluded from education or self-help programmes, preventing them from managing their diabetes properly, according to new research published in the journal Ethnicity and Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mental disorder rates differ by immigration status and ethnicity of American adolescents
(Elsevier) Immigrant youth from specific racial-ethnic groups in the USA tend to have lower rates of certain mental disorders compared to their non-immigrant peers, reports a study published in the April 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tough situation after giving birth for women with type-1 diabetes
(University of Gothenburg) Holding a newborn baby -- and, at the same time, dealing with a blood sugar level that is fluctuating like never before. For some women with type-1 diabetes, the situation right after giving birth is overwhelming, and they need more support, according to research at Sahlgrenska Academy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study examines prescribing antipsychotic medication for children with autism
(Swansea University) A new study by Swansea University has suggested that children with intellectual difficulty or autism are more likely to be given antipsychotic medication from a younger age than those without intellectual disability and have higher rates of hospitalisation for depression and for injury and also are at risk of other medical side effects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Robotics takes mass spec to the third dimension for forensics, pharma applications
(American Chemical Society) Within the past decade, many advancements have been made in the 3-D market from printing to movies. Now scientists report in ACS' Analytical Chemistry that by combining a robotic arm and mass spectrometry, they can analyze the surface of irregularly shaped 3-D objects, potentially opening up new branches of forensics and pharmaceutics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news