Human encouragement might influence how dogs solve problems
(Oregon State University) Human encouragement might influence how dogs solve problems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

You talking to me? Scientists try to unravel the mystery of 'animal conversations'
(University of York) An international team of academics undertook a large-scale review of research into turn-taking behavior in animal communication, analyzing hundreds of animal studies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology: Job strain linked to increased risk of premature death for men with cardiometabolic disease
(The Lancet) Having a demanding job and little control over it is associated with an increased risk of premature death in men with coronary heart disease, stroke, or diabetes, according to an observational study tracking more than 100000 men and women with and without cardiometabolic disease from Finland, France, Sweden, and the UK for almost 14 years, published in The Lancet Diabetes& Endocrinology journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A better statistical estimation of known Syrian war victims
(Rice University) Researchers from Rice University and Duke University are using the tools of statistics and data science in collaboration with Human Rights Data Analysis Group to accurately and efficiently estimate the number of identified victims killed in the Syrian civil war. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Older adults with asthma are happier when they have more say in their care
(American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology) It's clear an increasing number of people want a say in their medical care. A new study shows older people with asthma are among those no longer content to let their doctors be the sole decision-maker in their asthma care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Psychedelic drug use associated with reduced partner violence in men
(University of British Columbia Okanagan campus) In a new study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, researchers from UBC's Okanagan campus have discovered that men who have used psychedelic drugs in the past have a lower likelihood of engaging in violence against their intimate partners. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rules about technology use can undermine academic achievement
(University of Zurich) Parents who restrict their children's use of new media technologies may be acting counterproductively in the long run, particularly if they invoke afterschool homework time as the reason. Their children's scholastic achievements at college lag behind the academic performance of same-age peers, a University of Zurich study shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new indicator of human development at subnational level
(Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona) A subnational version of the famous Human Development Index was launched by I ñ aki Permanyer of the Centre d'Estudis Demogr à fics in Universitat Aut ò noma de Barcelona and Jeroen Smits of Radboud University. The Subnational Human Development Index (SHDI) shows for over 1600 regions within 160 countries how they have fared regarding human development between 1995 and 2015. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Religiosity plays a role in educational success of immigrant children
(University of Cologne) A new study focuses on the role religion plays for the educational success of immigrant children. In the past, such studies have focused more on ethnicity, educational level and status of these children's parents. The result: in some circumstances religious attachment can have a conducive, in others a destructive effect on these children's school achievements. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Distracted people can be 'smell blind' -- according to new University of Sussex study
(University of Sussex) 'Inattentional smell blindness,' or inattentional anosmia, has been proven to exist in a study from the University of Sussex. Just as it has previously been found that people can miss visual cues when they are busily engaged in a task, the same is true of smells. However, with smells there is only a 20-minute window before people become habituated to the smell and the opportunity to notice it has passed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Arizona work law found to affect US-Mexico migration
(Carnegie Mellon University) A new study used data from a Mexican identification-card program to find that a relatively low-cost employment-focused system can reduce unauthorized migration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Coffee helps teams work together, study suggests
(Ohio State University) Good teamwork begins with a cup of coffee for everyone, a new study suggests. Researchers found that people gave more positive reviews for their group's performance on a task -- and their own contribution -- if they drank caffeinated coffee beforehand. A second study showed that people talked more in a group setting under the influence of caffeinated coffee -- but they also were more on-topic than those who drank decaf. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Injuries and loss of life boost religious faith after disasters
(University of British Columbia) Weather-related disasters can make people more religious but it depends on the toll they inflict, suggests new UBC research. If a disaster injures a significant number of people, it can strengthen religiosity among those who are already religious. But if a disaster inflicts mostly economic damage, the opposite effect applies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mergers are good news for investors
(University of Waterloo) Shareholder value and market share improve when companies merge, confirms a new study from the University of Waterloo. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BU: Medicaid expansion increases volume and quality of care in rural areas
(Boston University School of Medicine) New study from Boston University School of Public Health finds that the first two years of Medicaid expansion were associated with increased coverage, better quality care, and more service use at rural community health centers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Functional MRI reveals memory in sleeping toddlers
(University of California - Davis) Our ability to remember past events develops rapidly in the first couple of years of life, but it's not clear exactly how this happens. Researchers at the UC Davis Center for Mind and Brain have now been able to carry out functional MRI brain scans of sleeping toddlers, and show for the first time how specific brain regions are activated during memory recall in two-year-olds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

HIV study reveals new group of men at risk of infection
(University of Edinburgh) A study of HIV infection has identified a distinct group of men at risk of infection who have sex with other men, but are not open about their sexuality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Easter Islanders used rope, ramps to put giant hats on famous statues
(Binghamton University) The ancient people of Easter Island, or Rapa Nui, were able to move massive stone hats and place them on top of statues with little effort and resources, using a parbuckling technique, according to new research from a collaboration that included investigators from Binghamton University, State University at New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preschool and school-age irritability predict reward-related brain function
(Elsevier) Preschool irritability and concurrent irritability were uniquely associated with aberrant patterns of reward-related brain connectivity, highlighting the importance of developmental timing of irritability for brain function, finds a study published in the June 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Exercise mitigates genetic effects of obesity later in life
(University at Buffalo) A new study suggests, for the first time in women over age 70, that working up a sweat can reduce the influence one's genes have on obesity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Does negative political advertising actually work?
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) While many may dread campaign season because of pervasiveness of negative political advertising, a new study in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science has found that negative political advertising actually works, but perhaps not in the way that many may assume. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Announcement of the 2018 ALBERT EINSTEIN World Award of Science
(Institut Pasteur) Professor Jean-Pierre Changeux, Emeritus Professor of Neuroscience at the Institut Pasteur and Coll è ge de France, where he was Chair of Cellular Communications from 1976 to 2006, and at the International Faculty, Kavli Institute for Brain& Mind, University of California (San Diego), has been selected as the winner of the 2018 ALBERT EINSTEIN World Award of Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An abusive boss today might mean a better boss tomorrow
(Michigan State University) When bosses yell at you, your day can be ruined. It can also ruin theirs, though, and lead to major behavioral changes that flip their attitudes at work. New research from Michigan State University took prior workplace studies, which focused primarily on the impact abusive bosses have on their employees, and refocused the lens to see how the bosses respond to their own abusive behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Try togetherness: Study promotes cooperative weed management to curb herbicide resistance
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) In the fight against herbicide resistance, farmers are working with a shrinking toolkit. Waterhemp, a weedy nemesis of corn and soybean farmers, has developed resistance to multiple herbicide modes of action, often in the same plant. Even farmers using the latest recommendations for tank mixtures are fighting an uphill battle, with long-distance movement of pollen and seeds bringing the potential for new types of resistance into their fields each year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A sense of disgust in bonobos?
(Kyoto University) Kyoto University researchers investigate the adaptive system of disgust in bonobos to further understand the origins of it in humans. A bonobo's curiosity transforms into caution when food is presented with or near feces, soil, or bad smells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Transformative technology
(University of California - Davis Health System) UC Davis neuroscientists have developed fluorescence sensors that are opening a new era for the optical recording of dopamine activity in the living brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Yale study tracks Title IX use across US colleges and universities
(Yale University) Title IX -- the US civil rights law passed in 1972 that prohibits sex discrimination in federally funded education programs -- has been widely recognized as a crucial step toward gender equality in America. A new Yale study tracks the changing use of Title IX over time in response to perceived gender disparities, and for the first time, systematically analyzes how the law has been mobilized at the federal level through complaints filed against four-year non-profit colleges and universities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wait for it: Serotonin and confidence at the root of patience in new study
(Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University) Serotonin keeps mice hanging on if they are sure of getting rewards, but not sure when. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

One in every 5 deaths in young adults is opioid-related in the United States: Study
(St. Michael's Hospital) One out of every five deaths among young adults in the United States is related to opioids, suggests a study led by researchers in Canada. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dieting associated with risky behaviors in teenage girls
(University of Waterloo) Teenage girls who diet are more likely to engage in other health-compromising behaviours, including smoking, binge drinking, and skipping breakfast, a University of Waterloo study recently found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sweden commits to open science with new open-access publishing deal
(Frontiers) A new national agreement between Frontiers and the National Library of Sweden allows Swedish researchers to publish their articles in Frontiers' Open Access journals through a simplified process that covers publishing fees. The first Nordic agreement of its kind, it underscores the commitment of the Swedish research community to make research freely available in an unrestricted manner to researchers, students and all citizens worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study explores how emotions in facial expressions are understood
(University of East Anglia) New research by academics at the University of East Anglia (UEA) reveals how well fearful facial expressions are perceived in peripheral vision.Although human vision has the highest resolution when we look directly at something, we see a much wider view of the visual world in our lower resolution peripheral vision. In fact, detecting signals of potential danger in our periphery - especially moving ones - is something our visual system is well adapted for. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New perspectives on African migration
(European Commission Joint Research Centre) Scientists at the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, analyze past and present migration patterns from and within Africa, and the drivers behind them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dieting associated with risky behaviours in teenage girls
(University of Waterloo) Teenage girls who diet are more likely to engage in other health-compromising behaviours, including smoking, binge drinking, and skipping breakfast, a University of Waterloo study recently found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Memory depends on protein 'off-switch,' researchers find
(University of Warwick) Memory, learning and cognitive flexibility depend on a protein 'off-switch' in the brain, according to a breakthrough discovery made by an international research collaboration co-led by the University of Warwick. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gun violence research gets $50 million support fund
(RAND Corporation) Funding for research about guns and gun violence has been sparse since the passage of the Dickey Amendment, which limited government support for such work. Today philanthropists announced plans to create a $50 million fund to support research about gun violence. The Houston-based Laura and John Arnold Foundation has committed $20 million to the effort and will seek an additional $30 million from other philanthropic groups. The nonprofit RAND Corporation will help administer the fund. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Federal home visiting program can be improved to better meet needs of families
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Compared with other countries, the United States often falls short on many maternal and child health outcomes. A federal program known as Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) is designed to give pregnant women and families resources to help them raise healthy children. However, a team led by researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine examined an aspect of the initiative and found areas that could be strengthened. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

100 Bold ideas to improve women and children's health and rights in the developing world
(Grand Challenges Canada) 100 projects will each receive grants of $100,000 to develop and test innovations aimed at addressing persistent challenges in women's and children's health in low- and middle-income countries.Africa: 49 projects (17 countries), Indian sub-continent: 22 projects (3 countries), Asia: 13 projects (7 countries), Americas: 7 projects (6 countries), Middle East: 7 projects, Europe: 2 projects.44 of the projects address sexual and reproductive health and rights, putting Canada's Feminist International Assistance Policy into action. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

One in four intensive care patients return to hospital, study shows
(University of Edinburgh) A quarter of intensive care patients are readmitted to hospital shortly after returning home and some of these readmissions are avoidable, research suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Two genetic stories of human migration into Iceland and the Americas
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Two separate studies -- both benefiting from ancient DNA -- paint detailed pictures of the founding, migration, and evolution of human populations in Iceland and the Americas, respectively. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds two ancient populations that diverged later 'reconverged' in the Americas
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) A new genetic study of ancient individuals in the Americas and their contemporary descendants finds that two populations that diverged from one another 18,000 to 15,000 years ago remained apart for millennia before mixing again. This historic ;reconvergence; occurred before or during their expansion to the southern continent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers document another cost of 2016 election: Shorter Thanksgiving visits
(Washington State University) Scientists at UCLA and Washington State University are seeing America's polarization play out at the family dinner table, with Thanksgiving visits that were 30 to 50 minutes shorter after the presidential election of 2016.Economists Keith Chen and Ryne Rohla also saw that visits were even shorter for travelers from media markets with intense political advertising. Their findings appear in the latest journal Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flexible organic electronics mimic biological mechanosensory nerves
(Seoul National University) Researchers at Seoul National University and Stanford University developed artificial mechanosensory nerves using flexible organic devices to emulate biological sensory afferent nerves. They used the artificial mechanosensory nerves to control a disabled insect leg and distinguish braille characters. The research describes artificial mechanosensory nerves based on flexible organic devices to emulate biological mechanosensory nerves. Devices that mimic the signal processing and functionality of biological systems can simplify the design of bioinspired system or reduce power consumption. (Source: ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Conflicting guidance on opioid prescribing can jeopardize pain mgmt for patients with cancer
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Persistent pain and recurrent episodes of pain are common for those who are living with cancer, or for those undergoing cancer treatment. When used properly, prescription opioids have long been known to help combat pain experienced by people with cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

For American Indian youth, risk is higher for alcohol, drug use, say CSU researchers
(Colorado State University) Since 1975, Colorado State University social scientists have studied rates of drug and alcohol use among American Indian youths living on or near reservations. Their latest published results underscore a trend that has persisted over many decades: Native adolescents are more likely to use alcohol and illicit drugs than non-Native adolescents in the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Respiratory societies warn about electronic cigarette use in youth
(American College of Chest Physicians) The Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS), of which the American College of Chest Physicians (CHEST) is a founding member, announced a new position paper on electronic cigarettes and youth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Got an appetite that won't subside? You've got hungry peptides
(University of Southern California) The brain's sewer system is a channel of communication that tells you when you are hungry, scientists find. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cocaine use alters gene expression in brain reward circuits
(Elsevier) A study in Biological Psychiatry has identified unique genetic changes in the brain's reward circuitry that are associated with cocaine use, including first-time use, withdrawal, and re-exposure to the drug after prolonged withdrawal. The findings reveal important information on how cocaine addiction reprograms gene expression and provide insight into the molecular basis of cocaine addiction in unprecedented detail. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Number of wild mountain gorillas exceeds 1,000
(Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology) A recent census of the critically endangered mountain gorillas conducted in the Virunga Volcanoes found a minimum of 604 individuals. In combination with the 400 individuals living in the only other population in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda, these new results push the total number of wild mountain gorillas in the world to over 1000. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

For patients with prostate cancer, dysfunction due to treatment side effects results in increased emotional distress -- and vice versa
(Elsevier) A new study published in The Journal of Urology reports that men with prostate cancer who had worse urinary, bowel, and sexual function after surgery or radiotherapy than others experienced more emotional distress. Interestingly, the reverse was also true as experiencing more distress led to worse function. The likelihood of this reciprocal relationship highlights the importance of greater investment in psychosocial care to mitigate treatment side effects in prostate cancer survivors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news