British Ecological Society annual meeting
(British Ecological Society) 1,200 ecologists from more than 40 countries will gather in Birmingham, UK, next month for the British Ecological Society's annual meeting. With more than 500 talks and 220 posters presented over four days, delegates will showcase and discuss the latest advances in ecological research across the whole discipline. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Crowdsourced field data shows importance of smallholder farms to global food production
(International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) A new global field size data set collected as part of a crowdsourcing citizen science project by IIASA researchers has shown that the proportion of smallholder farms may be much larger than previously thought, contributing much more to global food production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Smoking during pregnancy increases the likelihood of your baby becoming obese
(The Physiological Society) Smoking during pregnancy increases the chance that your baby will become obese. New research published in Experimental Physiology examined potential reasons for this phenomenon, using tissue which is normally discarded following birth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Snails become risk-takers when hungry
(University of Sussex) Research from the University of Sussex proves that snails take more risks when hungry, risking potentially harmful substances in order to survive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Classroom friendships may offset effects of punitive parents
(University of California - San Francisco) A study by researchers at UC San Francisco has confirmed the link between Harsh Parenting to Defiance andNoncompliance in Kids and found that kindergarten may provide a unique opportunity for these harshly parented children to retool negative behavior. The study is published in the journal Development and Psychopathology on Nov. 21, 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Musical training improves visual timing
(Society for Neuroscience) Drummers and brass players are better able to judge the timing of visual stimuli than members of the color guard, according to a naturalistic study of the world-class drum corps Bluecoats published in eNeuro. This counterintuitive finding extends previous research demonstrating superior sensory learning and memory from cross-training the brain's audio and visual systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Frequent family dinners associated with healthier youth diets no matter how well family functions
This study used data from 2,728 teenagers and young adults (14 to 24) living at home with their parents and included details on the frequency of family meals, foods eaten and levels of family functioning. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exposure to police violence reported often, associated with mental health issues
(JAMA Network) Exposure to police violence is increasingly recognized as a public health issue in the United States. In this survey study of 1,000 adults in Baltimore, Md., and New York, N.Y., exposure to police violence was reported by many residents, especially those who were racial/ethnic and sexual minorities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Orange juice, leafy greens and berries may be tied to decreased memory loss in men
(American Academy of Neurology) Eating leafy greens, dark orange and red vegetables and berry fruits, and drinking orange juice may be associated with a lower risk of memory loss over time in men, according to a study published in the Nov. 21, 2018, online issue of Neurology ® , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Typically human: Babies recognize nested structures similar to our grammar
(Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences) At a mere five months of age, babies seemingly have the ability to recognize very complex grammatical structures. That is what a research team headed by Professor Angela Friederici from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) and Professor Jutta Mueller from the University of Osnabr ü ck have now shown in a new study published in Science Advances. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Psychotic experiences could be caused by trauma in childhood
(University of Bristol) Researchers at the University of Bristol have made stronger links between psychotic experiences and different types of trauma in childhood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Family dinners improve teens' eating habits no matter how well family functions, study finds
This study used data from 2,728 teens and young adult living at home with their parents. Frequent family meals were associated with eating more fruits and vegetables and less fast food and takeout food for young people in both high-functioning and low-functioning families. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Army scientists revolutionize cybersecurity through quantum research
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) Army scientists have found a novel way to safeguard quantum information during transmission. This finding has the potential to lead to more secure and reliable communication for warfighters on the battlefield. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Consistency in core language skill stable in typically and atypically developing children
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) In a 15-year study of thousands of children, including those with dyslexia and autism spectrum disorders, researchers discovered that a so-called core language skill, as identified here, was stable from infancy to adolescence. These findings affirm that when a child's language skills are lagging, early intervention is best. As an infant, grasping a language is one (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wild coffee plants, Christmas trees and chocolate's tree are surprisingly poorly protected
(International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)) An indicator to measure plant conservation shows a wide range of wild plants used for food, medicine, shelter, fuel, livestock forage and other valuable purposes are at risk. These include wild populations of firs used for Christmas trees, the original types of kitchen-cupboard staples like vanilla, chamomile, cacao and cinnamon, wild relatives of crops like coffee, and non-cultivated plants used by bees to make honey. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Calls for businesses to better use employee benefits to support low earners
(Lancaster University) New research by the Work Foundation finds that while businesses increasingly recognize employee benefits as vital in the global race for talent, many are failing to maximize their value for low earners amongst their workforce. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How reliable are search terms for SEO and SEM results?
(Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences) With billions of dollars spent each year on search engine optimization (SEO) and search engine marketing (SEM), the power of search terms holds more value than ever. But more than a few digital marketing professionals have become frustrated over the years over the limits just how much can be assumed and predicted based on the search terms themselves. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Australian mammals at greatest risk from cats and foxes, new study
(La Trobe University) New research led by the Threatened Species Recovery Hub has revealed which Australian mammals are most vulnerable to cats and foxes, and many much-loved potoroos, bandicoots and bettongs, as well as native rodents, are at the top of the list. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reducing the impact forces of water entry
(American Physical Society) As professional divers complete what's known as a rip dive, their hands remove water in front of the body, creating a cavity that reduces the initial impact force. The rest of the body is aligned to shoot through the same cavity created by the hands. Using the hands to create cavities in the water's surface is similar to the concept behind the fluid-structure studies that researchers at Utah State University are conducting using spheres. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Low-protein high-carb diet shows promise for healthy brain aging
(University of Sydney) Low-protein high-carbohydrate diets may be the key to longevity, and healthy brain ageing in particular, according to a new mice study from the University of Sydney. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study estimates how much time adults sit, how many are physically inactive
This study used data from a nationally representative survey of about 5,900 adults to examine sitting time and leisure-time physical activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: Twitter bots had 'disproportionate' role spreading misinformation in 2016 election
(Indiana University) Indiana University computer scientists conducted an analysis of information shared on Twitter during the 2016 U.S. presidential election and found that automated accounts play a disproportionate role in spreading misinformation online. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Being fair: The benefits of early child education
(University of Montreal) Getting a jump on a low-income child's education can have a positive effect on social behavior even 40 years later, researchers find. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Effects of early education intervention on behavior persist for 4 decades
(Virginia Tech) Adults who had received early life, intensive childhood educational intervention display high levels of fairness in social interactions more than 40 years later, even when being fair comes at a high personal cost, according to a new study by Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Does Netflix's '13 Reasons Why' influence teen suicide? Survey asks at-risk youths
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) A significant proportion of suicidal teens treated in one psychiatric emergency department said that watching the Netflix series '13 Reasons Why' had increased their suicide risk, a University of Michigan study finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MRI scans shows promise in predicting dementia
(Washington University School of Medicine) Doctors may one day be able to gauge a patient's risk of dementia with an MRI scan, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Using a new technique for analyzing MRI data, researchers were able to predict who would experience cognitive decline with 89 percent accuracy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Retailers can manipulate consumer regret to beat competitors
(University of California - Riverside) Markdown retailers can survive the entry of an everyday low price retailer into a highly competitive market by manipulating price, product availability, and the regret consumers feel when they pay too much or wait till a product is unavailable to buy it, according to a new study. The results explain why markdown pricing remains ubiquitous in spite of the simplicity and marketing and operational advantages of everyday low pricing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First professorship in clinical neurotechnology
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) Prof. Dr. Surjo Soekadar's research explores how neurotechnologies can be used in the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Having been appointed Germany's first Professor of Clinical Neurotechnology, he now took up his new position at Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin. At the same time, Prof. Soekadar is also embarking on his ERC Starting Grant-funded project into the development of innovative brain-computer interfaces. Funded by the European Research Council (ERC), his project will receive approximately € 1.5 million. (Source: EurekAl...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When storing memories, brain prioritizes those experiences that are most rewarding
(Columbia University) A Columbia University study finds that overnight the brain automatically preserves memories for important events and filters out the rest, revealing new insights into the processes that guide decision making and behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Personality and mood affect brain response to personal choice
(Elsevier) Personality traits and mental health affect how people value personal control in decision making, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Economist calls for creation of global tax authority to tackle inequality
(City University London) An economist has called for the creation of a global tax authority as a way of tackling worldwide wealth inequality. In a new book, Professor Photis Lysandrou of City, University of London argues a powerful international body is essential because the current financial system is geared towards more wealth concentration and further financial crises. The book is titled Commodity: The Global Commodity System in the 21st Century. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First-of-its-kind study finds loss of local media worsens political polarization
(Louisiana State University) Changes to the media environment have increased polarized voting in America through both addition and subtraction. We argue that the decline of local newspapers has contributed to the nationalization of American politics: as local newspapers close, Americans rely more heavily on available national news or partisan heuristics to make political decisions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Smart car technologies save drivers $6.2 billion on fuel costs each year
(Stevens Institute of Technology) In the first study to assess the energy impact of smart technology in cars, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology have put a number on the potential fuel-cost savings alone: $6.2 billion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When it comes to love: Personality matters: QUT research
(Queensland University of Technology) Throughout history, competitive advantages have helped men and women achieve increased success in their occupation, sport, artistic endeavors, their ability to acquire and secure resources, and ultimately, their survival. Now a study from Australia's QUT shows the same can be said for sex and procreation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

White matter pathway and individual variability in human stereoacuity
(National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT)) Researchers in the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), and Osaka University have identified a human white matter pathway associated with individual variability in human stereoacuity. By combining neuroimaging and psychophysical measurements, we found that the neural tissue density of the white matter pathway, the vertical occipital fasciculus (VOF), correlated with the individual variability in stereoacuity. This finding is important to understand the neural basis of dysfunction in stereopsis. (Source: EurekAlert! -...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Boomeranging' back to a parents' home negatively affects young adults' mental health
(Max-Planck-Gesellschaft) The number of young adults living in their own household has dropped dramatically in the last decades in the United States, and a growing proportion of young people will move back in with their parents at some point in time. These 'boomerang' moves are associated with an increase in depressive symptoms, a recent MPIDR study suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

€ 13.6m SFI Research Centre for neurological diseases launched by Minister Humphreys
(RCSI) FutureNeuro, a € 13.6 million SFI Research Centre has been launched at RCSI, Dublin today. The Centre aims to translate breakthroughs in understanding of brain structure and function to transform the patient journey for people with neurological diseases (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A program of personalized physical exercise reverses functional decline in the over-75s
(Elhuyar Fundazioa) A program of personalized physical exercise implemented over a three-year period and involving 370 people over the age of 75 admitted to the Geriatric Service of the Hospital Complex of Navarre (CHN) has turned out to be 'safe and effective' in reversing the functional deterioration associated with hospitalization to which patients in this age group are subjected. Other aspects such as cognitive status and life quality also benefited. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insilico Medicine to present predictors of drug-induced cardiotoxicity at BioData EU 2018
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Insilico Medicine presents predictors of drug-induced cardiotoxicity at BioData EU 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bio jet fuels good for the climate, but technologies need tweaking
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) As much as 20 per cent of jet fuel burned in Norway in 2030 could be biofuel made from the country's forest residues. This alone could cut greenhouse gas emissions from Norway's aviation sector by 17 per cent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dogs know when they don't know
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) In a new study, researchers have shown that dogs possess some 'metacognitive' abilities -- specifically, they are aware of when they do not have enough information to solve a problem and will actively seek more information. The researchers created a test in which dogs had to find a reward behind one of two fences. They found that the dogs looked for additional information significantly more often when they had not seen where the reward was hidden. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Post-Soviet Union happiness lag between east and west Europe explained
(University of Kent) The upheaval caused by the collapse of the Soviet Union that left millions of workers unemployed for long periods of time could be the reason for the sizeable 'transition happiness gap' that existed for many years between east and western nations in Europe, according to new research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cannabis youth prevention strategy should target mental wellbeing
(University of Waterloo) High school students with positive mental health are less likely to consume cannabis, a recent University of Waterloo study has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Having poor vision can raise risk for falls among older adults
(American Geriatrics Society) A research team, examining information from the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS) and publishing their study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, provided up-to-date information on the frequency of falls and learned more about the fear of falling and how it might limit activity among older adults who have vision impairments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Where you go tells who you are -- and vice versa
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Mining data to analyze tracking patterns, Civil Engineering Prof Sharon Di can infer the population travel demand level in a region from the trajectories of just a portion of travelers. She found three distinct groups whose demographics she could infer based on their travel patterns: seniors, who travel to a wider variety of places in a day; workers, who stay mostly at work or at home; parents, who visit more individual places in a day. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A symposium on the brain's compass
(DZNE - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases) The sense of direction is one of the most important human abilities. From 27 to 29 November 2018, about 70 experts from Europe, Canada and the US will discuss in Magdeburg how this navigation system operates and how it alters in old age or due to dementia. The conference is organized by the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Powerful new map depicts environmental degradation across Earth
(University of Cincinnati) University of Cincinnati geography professor Tomasz Stepinski created a new world map showing dramatic changes in land use over the last quarter century. Stepinski turned high-resolution satellite images from the European Space Agency into one of the most detailed looks so far at how people are reshaping the planet. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Illinois professor recognized for passenger screening research after 9-11 attacks
(University of Illinois College of Engineering) As Professor Sheldon Jacobson watched the September 2001 terrorist attacks unfold, he was among the many Americans who realized that life was about to change. What he did not know was that a National Science Foundation-funded research project he began just days before would be part of that change, creating the groundwork for The Transportation Security Administration's PreCheck system. Precheck uses risk profiles to try to focus air security resources on higher-risk passengers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Digital offense: Anonymity dulls our moral outrage
(Society for Personality and Social Psychology) A recent study from The University of South Florida digs deeper into exactly why people react less strongly to insults online, and offers a glimpse at what might help people be more civil to each other. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Common tactics for health promotion at work may be detrimental to employees with obesity
(Frontiers) Workplace health promotion programs often emphasize personal responsibility for weight loss. However, this approach can have detrimental effects for employees with obesity. These include increased workplace weight stigma and weight discrimination. Worryingly, such programs also resulted in a catch-22 where employees feel increasingly responsible for their weight but less in control of it. Focusing on an employer's responsibility to maintain their employees' health did not produce these negative effects, and could be a viable alternative. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news