Getting policy right: why fisheries management is plagued by the panacea mindset
(Dartmouth College) Fisheries management has often been characterized by regulatory policies that result in panaceas -- broad based policy solutions that are expected to address several problems, which result in unintended consequences. An international research team shows how one size fits all policies like individual transferable quotas may be doomed from the onset, as these policies perpetuate 'the panacea mindset.' The team calls for a more customized policy approach in a new piece that will be published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Childhood brain tumor treatment impairs new memory formation
(Society for Neuroscience) Young people who received radiation therapy for the most common pediatric brain tumor struggle to create new memories about specific events, according to a study of children and adolescents published in JNeurosci. Their ability to recall events prior to treatment, however, remains intact. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Core thinking error underlies belief in creationism, conspiracy theories
(Cell Press) It's not uncommon to hear someone say that 'everything happens for a reason' or that something that happened was 'meant to be.' Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Aug. 20 have found that this kind of teleological thinking is linked to two seemingly unrelated beliefs: creationism, the belief that life on Earth was created by a supernatural agent, and conspiracism, the tendency to explain events in terms of secret conspiracies or conspiracy theories. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Teens today spend more time on digital media, less time reading
(American Psychological Association) If you can't remember the last time you saw a teenager reading a book, newspaper or magazine, you're not alone. In recent years, less than 20 percent of US teens report reading a book, magazine or newspaper daily for pleasure, while more than 80 percent say they use social media every day, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children with brain tumors who undergo radiation less likely to recall recent events
(Baylor University) Children with certain types of brain tumors who undergo radiation treatment are less likely to recall the specifics of events they experienced after radiation than to remember pre-treatment happenings, according to a Baylor University study comparing them to children with healthy brains. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Taking the brain apart to put it all together again
(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) A new Organ Chip system from the Wyss Institute has fluidically linked a Brain Chip with two blood-brain barrier (BBB) Chips to recapitulate the interactions between the brain and its blood vessels. This system reacts to methamphetamine exposure just like a human brain, and has allowed scientists to make new discoveries about just how important our blood vessels are for our mental function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nearly 2 in 5 teen drivers text while driving
(Nationwide Children's Hospital) The study examined individual- and state-level factors associated with texting while driving among teens from 35 states. Researchers found that nearly 2 in 5 teen drivers age 14 years and older had texted while driving at least once in the month prior to the survey. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study identifies strategies in US climate litigation
(George Washington University) Researchers at the George Washington University have published a study in Nature Climate Change that for the first time analyzes all US climate change lawsuits over a 26-year period. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Frequency of prenatal marijuana use for nausea, vomiting in pregnancy
(JAMA Network) Is prenatal marijuana use higher among women diagnosed with nausea and vomiting in pregnancy? A new research letter used data from Kaiser Permanente Northern California, which screens pregnant women for marijuana use through self-report and urine toxicology tests, to examine more than 220,000 pregnancies from 2009 through 2016. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Adolescents' concern over societal discrimination associated with worse behavioral health
(JAMA Network) Many southern California high school students report being concerned that discrimination is increasing in society and that concern appears to be associated with behavioral health problems a year later, including more frequent substance use and higher odds of depression and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists discover intricacies of serotonin receptor crucial for better therapeutics
(University of North Carolina Health Care) For the first time, scientists have figured out why drugs that aim to treat Parkinson's disease, migraines, pituitary tumors, and obesity activate the serotonin receptor 5-HT2B to cause life-threatening heart problems. Published in Nature Structure& Molecular Biology, this research provides drug developers with much needed insights into serotonin receptors -- insights that should help scientists create safer more effective drugs, not just for the aforementioned conditions, but also depression, anxiety, and schizophrenia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Understanding urban issues through credit cards
(University College London) Digital traces from credit card and mobile phone usage can be used to map urban lifestyles and understand human mobility, according to a report led by UCL, MIT and UC Berkeley. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Feeling and Norm': University of Halle organises International Congress for Pietism Studies
(Martin-Luther-Universit ä t Halle-Wittenberg) Was a pious Christian in the 18th century allowed to simply feel or were there limits to what he could feel -- a kind of emotional police or norm that intervened when he felt too much or the wrong thing? Did feeling and norm contradict one another? The Congress for Pietism Studies, which will take place in Halle from Aug. 26-29, 2018, is devoted to these and other topics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lehigh research team to investigate a 'Google for research data'
(Lehigh University) An interdisciplinary research team at Lehigh University is envisioning a 'dataset search engine' that can ultimately assist many kinds of scientists in locating data that they can use to perform exploratory analysis and test hypotheses. The team has won more than $500,000 in support from NSF in this endeavor, which formally launched on August 1, 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

DNA analysis of 6,500-year-old human remains in Israel points to origin of ancient culture
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) An international team of researchers from Tel Aviv University, the Israel Antiquities Authority and Harvard University has discovered that waves of migration from Anatolia and the Zagros mountains to the Levant helped develop the Chalcolithic culture that existed in Israel's Upper Galilee region some 6,500 years ago. The study is one of the largest ancient DNA studies ever conducted in Israel. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More women running for political office may hurt chances for down-ballot candidates
(Iowa State University) Gender stereotypes and biases still influence voters, especially in elections with more than one woman on the ballot. New research from Iowa State University found gender had the greatest effect on down-ballot races, in which women were running for a legislative office and another woman appeared on the ballot for a higher office, such as governor or president. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Simple score to diagnose heart attacks is safer, faster than current methods
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) An international team of researchers has developed a simple laboratory score that is safer and faster at diagnosing patients who visit the emergency department with heart attack symptoms. The score, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), can also identify patients at risk of subsequent heart issues after discharge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Instruction from experts on how to become an excellent journal reviewer in social sciences
(Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology) An open-access virtual training -- The Introductory Reviewer Developmental Workshop -- hosted by the Society for Industrial-Organizational Psychology (SIOP) and the Consortium for the Advancement of Research Methods and Analysis (CARMA) has been announced to take place on August 22nd. The workshop is designed to help social scientists improve their peer-review skills. Participants will have an opportunity to obtain certification upon completing the training. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

That stinks! 1 American in 15 smells odors that aren't there
(NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders) A new study finds that one in 15 Americans (or 6.5 percent) over the age of 40 experiences phantom odors. The study, published in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, is the first in the US to use nationally representative data to examine the prevalence of and risk factors for phantom odor perception. The study could inform future research aiming to unlock the mysteries of phantom odors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cells agree: What doesn't kill you makes you stronger
(Salk Institute) Brief exposures to stressors can be beneficial by prompting cells to trigger sustained production of antioxidants, molecules that help get rid of toxic cellular buildup related to normal metabolism -- findings with potential relevance for age-related diseases like cancer, Alzheimer's and heart disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Microbial activity in the mouth may differentiate children with autism spectrum disorder
(Bioscribe) Research suggests that shifts in bacterial populations within a child's mouth could provide objective biomarkers for identifying autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The findings catalyze development of a novel, saliva-based panel to aid clinicians in earlier diagnosis of ASD. Five ratios of oral microbes distinguished ASD from typically developing children (79.5 percent accuracy), three distinguished ASD from developmentally delayed, non-autistic (76.5 percent accuracy), and three distinguished ASD children with/without GI disturbance (85.7 percent accuracy). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Expecting to learn: Language acquisition in toddlers improved by predictable situations
(Arizona State University) Two year-old children were taught novel words in predictable and unpredictable situations. Children learned words significantly better in predictable situations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dominant men make decisions faster
(Ecole Polytechnique F é d é rale de Lausanne) Men who exhibit high social dominance make faster decisions than low-dominance men even outside a social context, finds a large behavioral study from EPFL. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stress during pregnancy increases risk of mood disorders for female offspring
(Elsevier) High maternal levels of the stress hormone cortisol during pregnancy increase anxious and depressive-like behaviors in female offspring at the age of 2, reports a new study in Biological Psychiatry. The effect of elevated maternal cortisol on the negative offspring behavior appeared to result from patterns of stronger communication between brain regions important for sensory and emotion processing. The findings emphasize the importance of prenatal conditions for susceptibility of later mental health problems in offspring. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Resistance training and exercise-motivation go hand-in-hand
(University of Jyv ä skyl ä - Jyv ä skyl ä n yliopisto) A recent study conducted in the University of Jyv ä skyl ä suggests that resistance training improves exercise motivation and contributes to making exercise planning among older adults. Exercise motivation and exercise self-efficacy are key factors in continuing resistance training. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children put on by robots
(Bielefeld University) Can robots induce the same social influence and peer pressure as humans do? A new study shows that children adopt a false claim when this is expressed by a group of robots. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cardiovascular disease related to type 2 diabetes can be reduced significantly
(University of Gothenburg) Properly composed treatment and refraining from cigarette consumption can significantly reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease resulting from type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. In some cases, the increased risks could theoretically be eliminated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Kaiser Permanente study will examine the role of opioid use in suicide risk
(Kaiser Permanente) Kaiser Permanente researchers have received a major grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse to examine the role of opioid use in suicide risk and develop better tools to help clinicians identify patients who are at highest risk. The three-year, $1.4 million study will be led by Bobbi Jo Yarborough, Psy.D., an investigator at the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research in Portland, Oregon. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Working memory might be more flexible than previously thought
(Uppsala University) Breaking with the long-held idea that working memory has fixed limits, a new study by researchers at Uppsala University and New York University suggests that these limits adapt themselves to the task that one is performing. The results are presented in the scientific journal eLife. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Oil palm: few areas in Africa reconcile high yields and primate protection
(Cirad) An international research team, including scientists from CIRAD and the European Commission Joint Research Centre, has assessed the potential impact on primates of the expansion of oil palm cultivation in Africa. The authors of the study combined information on land suitability for oil palm cultivation with primate distribution, diversity and vulnerability. They concluded that it will be very difficult to reconcile oil palm development in Africa with biodiversity conservation. These results were published today in the American journal PNAS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What Paris shows us about the history of photography
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) In a new book, MIT Prof. Catherine Clark takes a deep look at history told through photographs of Paris itself -- as a way of understanding how photography's influence on our historical imaginations has changed since its 19th-century origins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Individuals shot by police exhibit distinct patterns of recent prior hospitalizations and arrests
(Elsevier) A study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that more than 50 percent of people with assault-related or legal intervention (LI) firearm injuries due to law enforcement actions and over 25 percent of individuals with self-inflicted or unintentional firearm injuries were arrested, hospitalized, or both in the two years prior to being shot. The study's findings contribute important evidence that can be used to reduce and prevent these injuries and deaths. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First biomarker evidence of DDT-autism link
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) A study of more than 1 million pregnancies in Finland reports that elevated levels of a metabolite of the banned insecticide DDT in the blood of pregnant women are linked to increased risk for autism in the offspring. The study is the first to connect an insecticide with risk for autism using maternal biomarkers of exposure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Educational tracking creates artificial inequalities among students
(Society for Personality and Social Psychology) New research shows the structure of educational tracking can lead evaluators to favor high over low socioeconomic status students in tracking decisions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dating the ancient Minoan eruption of Thera using tree rings
(University of Arizona) New analyses that use tree rings could settle the long-standing debate about when the volcano Thera erupted by resolving discrepancies between archeological and radiocarbon methods of dating the eruption, according to new University of Arizona-led research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Robots will never replace teachers but can boost children's education
(University of Plymouth) Robots can play an important role in the education of young people but will never fully replace teachers, a new study suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Robots have power to significantly influence children's opinions
(University of Plymouth) Young children are significantly more likely than adults to have their opinions and decisions influenced by robots, according to new research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Weight gain after smoking cessation linked to increased short-term diabetes risk
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) People who gain weight after they quit smoking may face a temporary increase in the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, with the risk directly proportional to the weight gain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How gene hunting changed the culture of science
(University of Houston) A University of Houston researcher reports that 15 years after the end of the Human Genome Project, which mapped the human genetic blueprint, the project is still making news because it forever changed the way scientists work. Among the findings, the literature published by teams of scientists fared better than those published by single authors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Perot Museum of Nature And Science and University of the Witwatersrand form partnership
(Perot Museum of Nature and Science) Months after forming an alliance with internationally renowned paleoanthropologist Professor Lee Berger, the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas has signed a MOU with the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa, providing the groundwork for future collaborations including research, exhibits, traveling exhibitions, and various projects in paleoanthropology, humanities and other academic areas. The partnership stems from the Museum's new strategic focus called the Center for the Exploration of the Human Journey. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Students' social skills flourish best in groups with similar skill levels
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that children who need assistance improving their social skills might benefit more when grouped with peers who have similar social skill levels, rather than with peers who have a similar disability or disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Forget the bling: High status-signaling deters new friendships
(Society for Personality and Social Psychology) When it comes to making new friends, status symbols actually repel people from making friends with us, according to new research published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

My counterpart determines my behavior
(Goethe University Frankfurt) Whether individuals grow up in a working-class environment or in an academic household, they take on behaviors that are typical for their class -- so goes the hypothesis. The Frankfurt social-psychologist Dr. Anna Lisa Aydin has found new evidence to support this hypothesis. Her study also shows, however, that people don't just rigidly exhibit class-specific behavior, but respond flexibly to counterparts from other social classes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: What patients really think about opioid vs. non-opioid medications for chronic pain
(Regenstrief Institute) A new study investigates pre-existing perceptions about pain medications by individuals with chronic pain and how these perceptions relate to patients' experiences with these medications. The study found that, despite strongly held beliefs about opioid and non-opioid medications, patients were often surprised by their own results from these drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Shivering in the cold? Exercise may protect against muscle fatigue
(The Physiological Society) New research published in The Journal of Physiology highlights how exercise could help people exposed to extreme temperatures protect themselves from the cold. This could be useful for people who live and work in very cold conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Potent psychedelic DMT mimics near-death experience in the brain
(Imperial College London) A powerful psychedelic compound found in ayahuasca can model near-death experiences in the brain, a study has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Traumatic brain injury may be associated with increased risk of suicide
(JAMA Network) An increased risk of suicide was associated with those residents of Denmark who sought medical attention for traumatic brain injury (TBI) compared with the general population without TBI in a study that used data from Danish national registers. A history of TBI has been associated with higher rates of self-harm, suicide and death than the general population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Poor sleep triggers viral loneliness and social rejection
(University of California - Berkeley) In a study of sleep-deprived versus well-rested individuals, UC Berkeley researchers found that the brains of those lacking sufficient sleep exhibited heightened activity in areas that deal with perceived human threats and a shutdown of areas that encourage social interaction. People shown videos of sleep-deprived individuals felt more alienated, suggesting that antisocial feelings are contagious. This is the first study to show a two-way relationship between sleep loss and becoming socially isolated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Origins and spread of Eurasian fruits traced to the ancient Silk Road
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) Studies of ancient plant remains from a medieval archaeological site in the Pamir Mountains of Uzbekistan have shown that fruits, such as apples, peaches, apricots, and melons, were cultivated in the foothills of Inner Asia. The archaeobotanical study, conducted by Robert Spengler of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, is among the first systematic analyses of medieval agricultural crops in the heart of the ancient Silk Road. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins experts create opioid prescribing guidelines for 20 common surgical procedures
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) A Johns Hopkins expert panel of health care providers and patients have announced what is, to their knowledge, the nation's first set of operation-specific opioid prescribing guidelines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news