Same Symptoms, Different Care for Women and Men With Heart Disease
Contact: Sarah AveryPhone: 919-660-1306Email: sarah.avery@duke.eduhttps://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Wednesday, March 23, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Despite messages to the contrary, most women being seen by a doctor for the first time with suspected heart disease actually experience the same classic symptoms as men, notably chest pain and shortness of breath, according to a study led by the Duke Clinical Research Institute. But other differences between the sexes are evident in the diagnosis and risk assessment for coronary artery disease, according to findings published online March 23 in the Journal of the A...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - March 23, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Adding Stress Management to Cardiac Rehab Cuts New Incidents in Half
Contact: Samiha Khanna Phone: 919-419-5069 Email: samiha.khanna@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 4 p.m. (ET) on Monday, March 21, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Patients recovering from heart attacks or other heart trouble could cut their risk of another heart incident by half if they incorporate stress management into their treatment, according to research from Duke Health. The findings, published March 21 in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, are the result of a randomized clinical trial of 151 outpatients with coronary heart disease who were enrolled in cardiac rehabilitation d...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - March 22, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Duke Cancer Researcher Receives Outstanding Investigator Award
Contact: Samiha Khanna Phone: 919-419-5069 Email: samiha.khanna@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Thursday, March 17, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- The National Cancer Institute has awarded a prestigious Outstanding Investigator Award to David G. Kirsch, M.D., Ph.D., professor in the departments of Radiation Oncology and Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke Health. The $6.6 million award, covering seven years, will fund ongoing research in Kirsch’s lab to improve the efficacy and safety of radiation therapy for people with cancer. Kirsch joins approximately 60 recipients nationwide who have been ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - March 19, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Need Your Thyroid Removed? Seek A Surgeon With 25+ Cases a Year
Contact: Samiha Khanna Phone: 919-419-5069 Email: samiha.khanna@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Monday, March 14 DURHAM, N.C. -- A new study from Duke Health suggests that patients who need to have their thyroid gland removed should seek surgeons who perform 25 or more thyroidectomies a year for the least risk of complications. Thyroidectomy is one of the most common operations performed in the U.S, often due to cancer, over-activity, or enlargement of the gland, which is located at the base of the throat and produces hormones that regulate metabolism. But most consumers would be surprised to l...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - March 16, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Duke Health Launches Star Rating for Doctors, Expands Access to Records
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Tuesday, March 8, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Patients and consumers now have the ability to see how most Duke Health providers score on a new five-star rating scale that is part of a physician’s public profile at dukehealth.org.   Star ratings for each health care provider, along with verbatim patient comments, are based on feedback to a national, standardized survey known as the Clinician and Group Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CG CAHPS), which is provided to patien...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - March 9, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Where Prostate Cancer Spreads In the Body Affects Survival Time
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 4 p.m. (ET) on Monday, March 7, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Patients with lymph-only metastasis have the longest overall survival, while those with liver involvement fare worst. Lung and bone metastasis fall in the middle. “Smaller studies had given doctors and patients indications that the site of metastasis in prostate cancer affects survival, but prevalence rates in organ sites were small, so it was difficult to provide good guidance,” said Susan Halabi, Ph.D., professor of biostatistics ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - March 8, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Quality of Life Not Notably Better for Women Choosing Double Mastectomy
This study supports what has concerned many of us -- that women are not benefiting as greatly from CPM as they expect they will,” Hwang said. “Unless a woman has a gene mutation that places her at significantly increased risk of a new cancer in the other breast, CPM doesn’t prolong life and our study shows that it doesn’t make for a notably better quality of life.”  Hwang said it’s important for women to have a clearer understanding of the risks and benefits of the choices they are facing.  “The key to having long term satisfaction with treatment decisions is to review al...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - March 7, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Researchers Unravel Pathways of Potent Antibodies that Fight HIV Infection
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 12 p.m. noon (ET) on Thursday, March 3, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. – One of the most crucial and elusive goals of an effective HIV vaccine is to stimulate antibodies that can attack the virus even as it relentlessly mutates. Now a research team, led by investigators at the Duke Human Vaccine Institute and the Vaccine Research Center of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), has tracked rare potent antibodies in an HIV-infected individual and determined sequential structures th...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - March 5, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Mapping Family History Can Lead More At-Risk Patients to Timely Screening
Contact: Samiha Khanna Phone: 919-419-5069 Email: samiha.khanna@duke.edu https://www.dukemedicine.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE at 11 a.m. (ET) on Thursday, March 3, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Most doctors and nurses review a patient’s family history to identify risk factors for heart disease and cancer, often through a paper checklist or brief interview. But more deliberate efforts to map a patient’s family tree could identify additional risks and drive patients to more timely screenings, according to a new study from Duke Health. The study, published March 3 in the journal Genetics in Medicine, recruited 488 patients a...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - March 3, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Monkeys Drive Wheelchairs Using Only Their Thoughts
Contact: Samiha KhannaPhone: 919-419-5069Email: samiha.khanna@duke.eduhttps://www.dukemedicine.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 9 a.m. (ET) on Thursday, March 3, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Neuroscientists at Duke Health have developed a brain-machine interface (BMI) that allows primates to use only their thoughts to navigate a robotic wheelchair.   The BMI uses signals from hundreds of neurons recorded simultaneously in two regions of the monkeys’ brains that are involved in movement and sensation. As the animals think about moving toward their goal -- in this case, a bowl containing fresh grapes -- computers tran...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - March 3, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Job market lures more physician assistants to specialties over primary care
Contact: Samiha Khanna Phone: 919-419-5069 Email: samiha.khanna@duke.edu https://www.dukemedicine.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Tuesday, March 1, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- The job market is luring more physician assistants, or PAs, to jobs in specialty care rather than primary care practices such as family medicine and general pediatrics, according to new research from Duke Health. PAs are seen as a partial solution to an expected shortage in the primary care workforce in the coming years due to an aging population, rising rates of chronic disease and increased access to health care, said Perri Morgan, Ph.D., director of researc...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - March 2, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Study Suggests Sildenafil May Relieve Severe Form of Edema in Swimmers
This study received funding from the Divers Alert Network and U.S. Naval Sea Systems Command Contracts (N61331-03-C-0015, N0463A-07-C-0002). (Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features)
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - February 18, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Meditation Eases Pain, Anxiety and Fatigue During Breast Cancer Biopsy
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 9 a.m. (ET) on Thursday, Feb. 4, 2015 Hear audio of meditation. DURHAM, N.C. -- Meditation eases anxiety, fatigue and pain for women undergoing breast cancer biopsies, according to researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute. They also found that music is effective, but to a lesser extent. The researchers note that adopting these simple, inexpensive interventions could be especially helpful in light of recent reports citing anxiety and pain as potential harms from breast cancer screenings and testing. &l...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - February 8, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Study Aims to Resolve How To Manage Pre-Cancers of the Breast
This study will provide so many answers to questions that are critical to resolve,” Hwang said. “One of the key features is the assessment of patient-reported outcomes with each approach, as we believe how patients view their disease and their care must be central to any advances in cancer treatment.” The funding award for the DCIS study has been approved pending completion of a business and programmatic review by PCORI staff and issuance of a formal award contract. PHOTO: Shelley Hwang, M.D., Duke Cancer Institute and Duke Department of Surgery. CREDIT: Duke Health. (Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features)
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - February 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Duke Cancer Institute Joins National Endorsement of HPV Vaccination
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016  DURHAM, N.C. – In response to low national vaccination rates for the human papillomavirus (HPV), the Duke Cancer Institute has joined all 68 other top U.S. cancer centers in issuing a statement urging increased HPV vaccinations to prevent cancer.  These institutions collectively recognize insufficient vaccination as a public health threat and call upon the nations’ physicians, parents and young adults to take advantage of a rare opportunity to prevent many ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - January 28, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Survival Period for Esophageal Cancer Is Tied to Race and Income
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukehealth.org FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. – African-American patients with esophageal cancer survive fewer months after diagnosis than white patients, but only if they also have low incomes, according to a new study from Duke Health researchers. The researchers analyzed data from the National Cancer Data Base to assess what effect the combination of race and low socio-economic status has on cancer survival. They focused on esophageal cancer because it historically has had higher death rates among blacks ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - January 26, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Under the weather? A blood test can tell if antibiotics are needed
Dr. Ephraim Tsalik assesses Charles Watts for a respiratoryinfection in the ER at the Durham VA Medical Center. DURHAM, N.C. -- Researchers at Duke Health are fine-tuning a test that can determine whether a respiratory illness is caused by infection from a virus or bacteria so that antibiotics can be more precisely prescribed. The team of infectious disease and genomics experts at Duke has developed what they call gene signatures, patterns that reflect which of a patient’s genes are turned on or off, to indicate whether someone is fighting infection from a virus or bacteria. Results can be derived from a small sample...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - January 20, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Immunity Genes Could Protect Some From E. Coli While Others Fall Ill
DURHAM, N.C. -- When a child comes home from preschool with a stomach bug that threatens to sideline the whole family for days, why do some members of the family get sick while others are unscathed? According to a Duke Health study published January 19 in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, a person’s resistance to certain germs, specifically E. coli bacteria, could come down to their very DNA. Researchers exposed 30 healthy adults to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, one of the world’s leading causes of bacteria-induced diarrhea and a common cause of so-called ‘traveler’s diarrhe...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - January 19, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

News Tip: The best way to eat is to start meals and snacks from scratch, nutrition expert says
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Thursday, Jan. 7, 2016 Elisabetta Politi, nutrition director at the Duke Diet & Fitness Center, comments on the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, released today by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Currently, more than half the daily intake for the average American comes from mixed dishes, snacks, sweets and drinks. The new guidelines push for more plant-based foods and reducing reliance on quick and cheap processed snacks. Quotes: “The 2015 dietary guidelines focus on healthy eating habits and less on including or eliminating ind...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - January 7, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Early Trial Shows Injectable Agent Illuminates Cancer During Surgery
Contact: Samiha KhannaPhone: 919-419-5069Email: samiha.khanna@duke.eduhttps://www.dukemedicine.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 2 p.m. (ET) Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2016 DURHAM, N.C. -- Doctors at Duke Medicine have tested a new injectable agent that causes cancer cells in a tumor to fluoresce, potentially increasing a surgeon’s ability to locate and remove all of a cancerous tumor on the first attempt. The imaging technology was developed through collaboration with scientists at Duke, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Lumicell Inc. According to findings published January 6 in Science Translational Medicin...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - January 6, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Brain Regions of PTSD Patients Show Differences During Fear Responses
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu https://www.dukemedicine.org EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE until 10am (ET) on Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015 DURHAM, N.C. -- Regions of the brain function differently among people with post-traumatic stress disorder, causing them to generalize non-threatening events as if they were the original trauma, according to new research from Duke Medicine and the Durham VA Medical Center. Using functional MRI, the researchers detected unusual activity in several regions of the brain when people with PTSD were shown images that were only vaguely similar to the trauma underlying t...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - December 15, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Older Breast Cancer Patients Defy Survival Models
Contact: Sarah Avery Phone: 919-660-1306 Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2015 DURHAM, N.C. – Older women with early-stage, invasive breast cancer had better survival rates than what was estimated by a popular online tool for predicting survival, according to researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute. The finding provides a stronger rationale for women over the age of 70 -- even those who have additional minor health concerns -- to undergo aggressive treatments such as chemotherapy to prevent their cancer from returning. “When making decisions about whether or not to use pote...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - December 8, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Research yields potential treatment approach for glycogen storage disease
Contact: Sarah AveryPhone: 919-660-1306Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2015 DURHAM, N.C. and SINGAPORE – Researchers from the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore (Duke-NUS) and Duke Medicine have identified a potential treatment strategy for an often-fatal inherited glycogen storage disease. E-published ahead of print recently in the Journal of Hepatology, the study provides much-needed hope for the management of glycogen storage disease Ia, known as GSDIa or von Gierke disease, a genetic metabolic disorder that requires lifelong dietary therapy.  Patients with the...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - November 18, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Study finds surprising links between bullies and eating disorders
Contact: Samiha Khanna Phone: 919-419-5069 Email: samiha.khanna@duke.edu DURHAM, N.C. -- Being bullied in childhood has been associated with increased risk for anxiety, depression and even eating disorders. But according to new research, it’s not only the victims who could be at risk psychologically, but also the bullies themselves. Researchers at Duke Medicine and the University of North Carolina School of Medicine were surprised to find that in a study of 1,420 children, those who bullied others were twice as likely to display symptoms of bulimia, such as bingeing and purging, when compared to children who are not ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - November 16, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

PCI reduces need for additional drug even when blockages remain
This study does provide an important message for people who have residual disease following angioplasty,” said lead author Karen Alexander, M.D., professor of medicine at Duke and director of safety surveillance at the DCRI. “For patients who had angina prior to angioplasty, they were mostly asymptomatic following the angioplasty even though coronary blockages remained.” Alexander and colleagues had set out to address whether the drug ranolazine, when added to standard medications in this population, would reduce symptoms along with hospitalizations and procedures over time. Ranolazine works at the heart ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - November 10, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Women cardiologists do different work, make less money than men
Contact: Sarah AveryPhone: 919-660-1306Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Sunday, Nov. 8, 2015  DURHAM, N.C. -- Despite efforts to increase gender diversity in cardiology, major differences in job characteristics and pay persist between men and women who treat heart patients, according to a Duke Medicine-led study presented at the annual American Heart Association meeting. The researchers found that the ranks of women cardiologists remain disproportionally small compared to those in medicine overall; women who choose the field are much less likely to specialize in higher-paying interventional procedu...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - November 9, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Cellular stress process identified in cardiovascular disease
Contact: Sarah AveryPhone: 919-660-1306Email: sarah.avery@duke.edu FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE on Friday, Nov. 6, 2015 DURHAM, N.C. – Combining the investigative tools of genetics, transcriptomics, epigenetics and metabolomics, a Duke Medicine research team has identified a new molecular pathway involved in heart attacks and death from heart disease. The researchers, publishing online in the journal PLOS Genetics, found that stress on a component of cells called the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is associated with risk of future heart events, and it can be detected in bits of molecular detritus circulating in the blood. &ldqu...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - November 6, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Used alone, weight loss apps might not help overweight young adults
Contact: Samiha KhannaPhone: 919-419-5069Email: samiha.khanna@duke.edu FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE at 10 a.m. (ET) on Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2015 DURHAM, N.C. -- Used alone, a cell phone app that tracks exercise, calories and weight loss goals is, on average, not enough to create meaningful weight loss in young adults, according to new research from Duke Medicine. The study was published online November 4 by the journal Obesity and offers a sober insight about the complexities of weight loss and potential limitations of an app-based approach. The inexpensive and easily accessed tool was aimed at tech-savvy adults ages 18 to 35. ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - November 4, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Source Type: news

Tenet and Duke LifePoint reach definitive agreement for the sale of Tenet's N.C. hospitals and related operations
DALLAS AND BRENTWOOD, TENN. – November 3, 2015 – Tenet Healthcare Corporation (NYSE:THC) and Duke LifePoint Healthcare have entered into a definitive agreement for the sale of Tenet’s North Carolina hospitals and related operations. The transaction is subject to customary regulatory approvals and other closing conditions, and is expected to be completed between late in the fourth quarter to middle of the first quarter. “Tenet has long enjoyed serving the Sanford and Hickory communities through our network of trusted hospitals and caregivers,” said Keith Pitts, vice chairman of Tenet Healthcare...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - November 3, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Labor Induction and Augmentation: Q&A with Chad Grotegut, MD
Chad Grotegut, MD, an ob/gyn at Duke Medicine, discusses labor induction and augmentation, and breaks down new research on labor practices and autism risk.  What is labor induction and labor augmentation?Labor induction is the process in which we stimulate contractions using medications or other procedures to help a woman go into labor if she hadn’t previously been in labor. In augmented labor, a woman is already in labor and having contractions, but her cervix is not changing and her labor is not progressing, so we use medications or procedures to make these contractions more frequent and longer to progress th...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - August 13, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Medicine Gynecology Source Type: news

Put a Healthy Spin on School Lunch
The start of the school year is a great time to give a second thought to your kids’ lunches. Many kids rush through breakfast to get to school on time, and participate in after-school activities well into the evening. Having a healthy lunch that combines complex carbohydrates, lean protein, dairy, fruits, and vegetables is the only way they’ll get the energy they need to make it through their busy days. “When lunch includes the right nutritional balance, it gives kids the energy they need to focus on their afternoon studies and enjoy their after-school activities,” says Namrata Shidhaye, MD, a famil...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - July 27, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Children's Health Children's Primary Care Duke Primary Care Primary Care Services Source Type: news

Fertility in Focus
Sarah Goldman and her husband wanted to start a suggests couples talk to their physicians and consider that a family, but because of his spinal cord injury, they less-aggressive, nontraditional option—called mild/minimal- knew they wouldn’t be able to conceive tradition- stimulation in vitro fertilization—might be right for them. The Greenville, North Carolina, family looked at fertility clinics close to home, but after asking around they chose the Duke Fertility Center and infertility specialist Tom Price, MD. “Even though it’s a two-hour drive, we thought it was definitely worth it,” G...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - July 16, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Fertility Source Type: news

What You Need to Know About Your Colon
No one likes to discuss colon health. But it’s serious business, and learning about it—and what you can do to take care of your colon—can help ensure you and your loved ones lead healthier lives. Here, Benjamin Hopkins, MD, a Duke Medicine colon and rectal surgeon, touches every condition you don’t want to talk about – from hemorrhoids, and fecal incontinence to anal pain and diverticulitis. Q. What’s the most important thing to do for colorectal health? A. The best approach to good colorectal health is to maintain a high-fiber diet and drink plenty of water. Eight glasses of water ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - June 11, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Colorectal Cancer Duke Primary Care Source Type: news

The Dos and Don'ts of Summer Fun
The school year may be almost over, but that doesn’t mean you should adopt a school’s-out attitude when it comes to your health. Regardless of your plans, heed these simple dos and don’ts to ensure you get a passing grade. At the Park DO outsmart the bugs. Wear light-colored, breathable clothing—you’ll be less attractive to bees, which like bright colors. Light colors also make it easier to spot ticks. If you’re planning to be outside for an extended time, spray your clothes, not your skin, with a bug repellent that contains DEET. If you are stung or plagued with insect bites, ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - June 4, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Primary Care Source Type: news

Exercise Isn’t Optional; It’s Mandatory for Good Health
Some people speak of a “runner’s high”—an intoxicating feeling derived from going the distance and pushing your limits. And then there are those for whom exercise is a chore, an item to be checked off a to-do list. Matthew Hayes, DO, of Duke Primary Care Waverly Place believes everyone can—and must—exercise, and that there’s some kind of exercise out there for everybody and every body. He takes exercise so seriously that he gives each of his patients a prescription for it. “I prescribe specific ways to exercise— running, lifting, tennis, and more— based on what my...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - May 11, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Primary Care Source Type: news

Spring 2013 Duke Med Magazine
Click here to download the Spring 2013 DukeMed Magazine or view it online. (Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features)
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - May 10, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Why All The Buzz About Gluten-Free
Today, gluten-free products and diets are all the rage. In fact, a recent study finds as many as 1.6 million Americans avoid gluten, even though they haven’t been diagnosed with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity. Although there is no harm in eliminating gluten from your diet, doctors say there is no reason to avoid it—unless you’re one of the two million people who cannot tolerate the proteins. “Gluten is bad for some people, but certainly not all,” explains Michelle Nacouzi, MD, a primary care physician at Duke Primary Care Brier Creek. “So unless you’ve been diagnosed with ce...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - May 4, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Primary Care Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Helping Your Children Grow into Healthy Teens
Toddlers become teenagers way too fast, and many parents worry about what their adorable child will become. Most teens do very well, especially when supported by parents who play an important role in helping their children mature. Research shows that teens thrive when they have strong relationships with supportive adults. Healthy relationships develop over years and their foundation is effective communication. Here, Richard Chung, MD, an expert in adolescent medicine at Duke, explains how you can open the lines of communication, and foster that strong relationship with your child now and as they become teenagers. •...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - April 25, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Children's Health Source Type: news

Let’s Get Stronger Together
Art, Jazz, Food and Health Screenings at Health Fair May 3 and 4 My name is Kathy Kastan. I survived a bypass when I was 42.  I know the unique challenges faced by women living with heart disease, and I’ve made advocating for women’s health my passion. As the director of the Duke Women's Health Initiative, I share my passion with women across the region and beyond. Women have unique health concerns, and need to work together to demand accurate diagnosis, proper treatment and exceptional care. That is why I encourage you to join me May 3 and 4 for an unprecedented series of events. Stronger Together: Fight...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - April 17, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Women's Health Women's Heart Care Source Type: news

Why Does My Nose Run - And Other Common Allergy Questions
Allergies got you down? Wondering how to get relief? Namrata Shidhaye, MD, a family physician at Duke Primary Care Waverly Place, helps sort out the causes and cures for your annoying runny nose. The older I get, the more my nose runs. Can you develop seasonal allergies as an adult that you didn’t have as a child?
Yes, adults can develop environmental allergies at any age. Asthma can develop during adulthood as well. A runny nose isn’t always a sign of allergies, though. Older individuals may experience runny nose due to age-related physical changes—some people, as they age, develop overactive tear duct...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - April 11, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Primary Care Source Type: news

Spring into Physical Activity as a Family
If your kids are bored and you don't know what to do, it's the perfect time to get the whole family moving! Exercising as a family is a great way to spend quality time together, enjoy the warm weather, and show your children that staying fit is an important priority at every age. “We, as parents, need to be good role models, if we want our children to view physical activity as important,” said Azra Shaikh, MD, a physician in Apex at Duke Primary Care Peak Family Medicine. “Being active benefits the entire family, and creates a special bond you simply can’t achieve by watching TV together.” The...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - April 10, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Primary Care Source Type: news

Podcast: Terry Kim, MD, on Eye Health Screenings
In this podcast, Terry Kim, MD, the Duke Men's Basketball team physician, discusses the vision and eye health screenings he performs for the team and how it helps their performance on the court. Listen to the Podcast (Download audio) Podcast Transcript: Radio Announcer:  We’ve got a lot to cover on today’s show. We’re going to begin with a special guest who’s joining us up here in our “Crow’s Nest” position overlooking Coach K Court.  He’s Dr. Terry Kim who’s a professor of ophthalmology at the Duke Eye Center here on campus. Dr. Kim, I know you’re ...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - March 22, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Eye Center Source Type: news

How Doctors Stay Healthy Year-Round and How You Can Too
Nobody likes being around people coughing and sneezing from colds and flu yet that’s what doctors do. Every day they are on the front lines, listening compassionately to complaints ranging from aches and pain to fever and persistent coughs. Yet they rarely get sick. How do they do it? Here, Matt Hayes, DO, at Duke Primary Care Waverly Place, reviews the top 10 ways he and his colleagues stay healthy throughout the year, and how you can too: Wash hands frequently. “It’s the most effective preventive measure,” says Hayes. Use hand sanitizer or soap and water frequently during the day. Don’t tou...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - March 15, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Primary Care Source Type: news

Lose Weight While You Sleep? Yes, Sleep is That Powerful
Late-night munchies can wreck havoc on your diet plans so the next time they strike, hit the sack instead. The more sleep you get, the less likely you are to succumb to delicious temptation, and the faster you’ll lose weight. More studies are showing a link between sleep deprivation and weight gain, says Meredith Barbour, MD, a family medicine physician at Duke Primary Care Brier Creek. “Lack of sleep triggers the release of hormones that stimulate hunger and appetite, especially for those high-calorie, carbohydrate-dense foods like cookies, chips and ice cream,” she says. Going to sleep is the best way t...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - February 23, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Primary Care Weight Management Source Type: news

Heart Attack Symptoms Women Need to Know
Chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness. Those are the well-known signs of heart attack. But what about the not so obvious signs? Many women experience heart attacks differently then men, and knowing the subtle differences may one day save your life. According to Radha Kachhy, MD, a cardiologist with Duke Cardiology of Raleigh, women are less likely to experience the crushing chest pain that some men describe as an elephant sitting on their chest. Instead, they may feel a persistent pain in their back, neck, jaw or even in their shoulder blades. “Where the pain is located is not as important as when it occurs,&rdq...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - February 18, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Heart Services Women's Health Women's Heart Care Source Type: news

Good Posture Is Important But It Won’t Prevent Scoliosis
Remember when your parents told you to sit up straight? Slouching among adolescents hasn’t gone out of style and neither has the popular refrain. Sitting and standing tall remains important because it lengthens the spine, and strengthens the back, neck and shoulder muscles. But can good posture prevent the curving of the spine known as scoliosis? Unfortunately, it won’t, says Robert Lark, MD, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon with Duke Orthopaedics. “Scoliosis is not preventable,” he says, “but once we diagnose it, there are things we can do to prevent progression of the curve.” Scoliosis i...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - February 14, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Orthopaedics Source Type: news

Kids Stash the Darndest Things
On occasion, one of my kids will present me with a particularly challenging problem, and I know exactly what to do. So rare and so perfect are these moments that I remember them with great detail for long after. Like the time nearly two years ago when my son, then three years old, came to me with a popcorn kernel lodged too far up his nose to grab. I didn’t hesitate. "Let’s do this,” I said to him, as I pinched closed the unaffected nostril, placed my mouth over his, and blew a sharp puff of air. I’m not sure why my son erupted into giggles a second later. It could have been that this medical m...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - February 1, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Children's Health Children's Primary Care Source Type: news

Could that Juice Box Increase Your Child’s Risk for Diabetes?
The next time you hand your child a juice box, consider this: are you increasing their risk for diabetes? Sugary drinks are unhealthy food choices, advises Matthew Mathias, MD, medical director at Triangle Family Practice, a Duke Primary Care practice in Durham. When combined with a sedentary lifestyle, they are one of the main reasons why more children in the U.S. are considered at risk for obesity, and they are partly to blame for the rise in type 2 diabetes. But the prevalence of bad lifestyle habits can’t explain why type 1 diabetes is being diagnosed more frequently as well. “We’ve also seen a 3 to 5...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - January 25, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Children's Health Children's Primary Care Duke Primary Care Source Type: news

Take a Stand: Why Sitting Too Much Is Bad for Your Health
Do you sit too much? Many parents do. Whether you’re sitting on the sidelines while your kids enjoy playtime, or spending your workday sitting at your desk, research shows that too much sitting is not only bad for your health, it also decreases your life expectancy. “When you sit for a long time there is a loss of blood flow to your lower extremities,” said Ismael Tamba, DO, MPH, at Duke Primary Care in Wake Forest “Sitting for longer than six hours increases the risk of blood clots, obesity, kidney disease, and heart disease. It also leads to a sedentary lifestyle.” How can you start taking a...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - January 15, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Duke Primary Care Source Type: news

The Flu Shot Trifecta: Protects Mom, Fetus and Infant
If you’re pregnant and haven’t gotten a flu shot it’s time to get one, says Geeta Swamy, MD, a Duke Medicine obstetrician/gynecologist who recommends pregnant women get the vaccine before, during and even after the flu season peaks. “Maternal immunizations protect the mother, but have an even greater potential impact on your baby,” says Swamy, a nationally recognized expert on immunizations during pregnancy. “It’s only one vaccine but it has three very important benefits – it protects the mom, it protects the fetus by preventing the risks of preterm delivery and low birth wei...
Source: DukeHealth.org: Duke Health Features - January 14, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Children's Health Women's Health Source Type: news