More skin in the game: Leather grown using biotechnology is about to hit the catwalk
Print section Print Rubric:  Genetic engineering can now be used to grow leather without any need to raise and kill animals Print Headline:  More skin in the game Print Fly Title:  Growing leather in factories UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Blanket repression is the wrong way to deal with political Islamists Fly Title:  More skin in the game Main image:  20170826_STP003_0.jpg LEATHERMAKI...
Source: Biotechnology - August 24, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Genetic engineering: Researchers get better at tweaking the genomes of human embryos
Print section Print Rubric:  Researchers are getting better at tweaking the genomes of human embryos Print Headline:  DNA and how to adjust it Print Fly Title:  Genetic engineering UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How to avoid nuclear war with North Korea Fly Title:  Genetic engineering Main image:  20170805_std001.jpg IT IS risky to predict who and what will win a Nobel prize. But some dis...
Source: Biotechnology - August 2, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Genetic engineering: Researchers get better at tweaking the genomes of human embryos
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Fly Title:  Genetic engineering Main image:  20170805_std001.jpg IT IS risky to predict who and what will win a Nobel prize. But some discoveries are so big that their receipt of science’s glitziest gong seems only a matter of time. One such is CRISPR-Cas9, a powerful gene-editing technique that is making the fraught and fiddly business of altering the genetic material of living organisms much easier. Biologists have taken to CRISPR-Cas9 with gusto, first w...
Source: Biotechnology - August 2, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

If human cloning happened: How the story of human cloning could unfold
Print section Print Rubric:  How the story of human cloning could unfold, and what it might reveal Print Headline:  Chips off the old block Print Fly Title:  If human cloning happened UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Liu Xiaobo’s death holds a message for China Fly Title:  If human cloning happened Location:  2050 Main image:  20170715_wid005.jpg IT HAD lo...
Source: Biotechnology - July 13, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Synthetic biology: “Disco bacteria” could churn out drugs and useful chemicals
Print section Print Rubric:  A new way to control genetically engineered cells Print Headline:  Lights, bacteria, action Print Fly Title:  Synthetic biology UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How to improve the health of the ocean Fly Title:  Synthetic biology Main image:  M.C. Escherichia M.C. Escherichia THE central idea of synthetic biology is that living cells can be programmed in the same...
Source: Biotechnology - May 25, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Synthetic biology: “Disco bacteria” could churn out drugs and useful chemicals
Print section Print Rubric:  A new way to control genetically engineered cells Print Headline:  Lights, bacteria, action Print Fly Title:  Synthetic biology UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How to improve the health of the ocean Fly Title:  Synthetic biology Main image:  M.C. Escherichia M.C. Escherichia THE central idea of synthetic biology is that living cells can be programmed in the same ...
Source: Biotechnology - May 25, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Babbage: Podcast: Anticipating terrorism
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Fly Title:  Babbage Main image:  20170527_mma902.jpg Rubric:  In the wake of the Manchester bombing, Dr Robert Wesley explains how artificial intelligence can spot extremist behaviour early. Coloured light can now be used to control how genetically-engineered organisms behave. Also, what we must to do to preserve the oceans Published:  20170524 Enabled (Source: Biotechnology)
Source: Biotechnology - May 24, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Babbage: Podcast: Anticipating terrorism
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Fly Title:  Babbage Main image:  20170527_mma902.jpg Rubric:  In the wake of the Manchester bombing, Dr Robert Wesley explains how artificial intelligence can spot extremist behaviour early. Coloured light can now be used to control how genetically-engineered organisms behave. Also, what we must to do to preserve the oceans Published:  20170524 Enabled (Source: Biotechnology)
Source: Biotechnology - May 24, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Babbage: Podcast: Soundscape of the deep ocean
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Fly Title:  Babbage Main image:  20170506_mma902.jpg Published:  20170503 Source:  Online extra Enabled (Source: Biotechnology)
Source: Biotechnology - May 3, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Babbage: Podcast: Soundscape of the deep ocean
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Fly Title:  Babbage Main image:  20170506_mma902.jpg Published:  20170503 Source:  Online extra Enabled (Source: Biotechnology)
Source: Biotechnology - May 3, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Babbage: Podcast: Soundscape of the deep ocean
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Fly Title:  Babbage Main image:  20170506_mma902.jpg Published:  20170503 Enabled (Source: Biotechnology)
Source: Biotechnology - May 3, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Biotechnology: Cell-free biotech will make for better products
Print section Print Rubric:  A new type of biological engineering promises to speed up innovation and simplify the manufacture of drugs and other chemicals Print Headline:  Primordial gloop Print Fly Title:  Biotechnology UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  The data economy demands a new approach to antitrust Fly Title:  Biotechnology Main image:  20170506_std001.jpg THE stuff of life comes wr...
Source: Biotechnology - May 3, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Biotechnology: Cell-free biotech will make for better products
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Fly Title:  Biotechnology Main image:  20170506_std001.jpg THE stuff of life comes wrapped in tiny bags called cells. Inside are DNA molecules that carry the instructions for how to run the cell, to make it grow, and to cause it, ultimately, to divide into two cells, if that is to be its fate. Messages made of a slightly different molecule, RNA, carry these instructions to molecular machines called ribosomes. A ribosome’s job is to read the RNA messages and tra...
Source: Biotechnology - May 3, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Babbage: Podcast: The new world of voice cloning
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Fly Title:  Babbage Main image:  20170422_mma904.jpg   Published:  20170419 Enabled (Source: Biotechnology)
Source: Biotechnology - April 19, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Babbage: Podcast: The new world of voice cloning
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Fly Title:  Babbage Main image:  20170422_mma904.jpg   Published:  20170419 Enabled (Source: Biotechnology)
Source: Biotechnology - April 19, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Synthetic biology: A big step towards an artificial yeast genome
Print section Print Rubric:  An international consortium is trying to make an artificial yeast genome. Success would usher in true genetic engineering Print Headline:  Something’s brewing Print Fly Title:  Synthetic biology UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Quantum leaps Fly Title:  Synthetic biology Main image:  20170311_STD001_0.jpg BIOLOGY’S biggest division is not between pla...
Source: Biotechnology - March 8, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Synthetic biology: A big step towards an artificial yeast genome
Print section Print Rubric:  An international consortium is trying to make an artificial yeast genome. Success would usher in true genetic engineering Print Headline:  Something’s brewing Print Fly Title:  Synthetic biology UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Quantum leaps Fly Title:  Synthetic biology Main image:  20170311_STD001_0.jpg BIOLOGY’S biggest division is not between plan...
Source: Biotechnology - March 8, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Daily chart: The sheep that changed the world
Main image:  TWENTY years ago Dolly the sheep, the first animal clone, was revealed to the world. She caused a sensation. Many scientists had believed cloning animals was impossible. Dolly’s creation showed that DNA in a differentiated cell could be repurposed through nuclear transfer, opening up two new possibilities. One, “reproductive cloning”, was the copying of individual animals. The other was the creation of embryonic stem cells (ES cells) capable of being turned into other types of cells. Various ailments are caused by a lack of specific types of differentiated cel...
Source: Biotechnology - February 17, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Daily chart: The sheep that changed the world
Main image:  TWENTY years ago Dolly the sheep, the first animal clone, was revealed to the world. She caused a sensation. Many scientists had believed cloning animals was impossible. Dolly’s creation showed that DNA in a differentiated cell could be repurposed through nuclear transfer, opening up two new possibilities. One, “reproductive cloning”, was the copying of individual animals. The other was the creation of embryonic stem cells (ES cells) capable of being turned into other types of cells. Various ailments are caused by a lack of specific types of differentiated cell...
Source: Biotechnology - February 17, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Clones: Hello, again, Dolly
Print section Print Rubric:  What happened after Dolly was revealed to the world 20 years ago as the first animal clone—and what didn’t Print Headline:  The sheep of things to come Print Fly Title:  Cloning UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Gene editing, clones and the science of making babies Fly Title:  Clones Main image:  20170218_FBD001_3.jpg IN THE summer of 1996 Karen Mycoc...
Source: Biotechnology - February 15, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Clones: Hello, again, Dolly
Print section Print Rubric:  What happened after Dolly was revealed to the world 20 years ago as the first animal clone—and what didn’t Print Headline:  The sheep of things to come Print Fly Title:  Cloning UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Gene editing, clones and the science of making babies Fly Title:  Clones Main image:  20170218_FBD001_3.jpg IN THE summer of 1996 Karen Mycock...
Source: Biotechnology - February 15, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Podcast: Babbage: Cloning time
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Fly Title:  Podcast: Babbage Main image:  20170218_mma903.jpg   Published:  20170214 Source:  Online extra Enabled (Source: Biotechnology)
Source: Biotechnology - February 14, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Podcast: Babbage: Cloning time
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Fly Title:  Podcast: Babbage Main image:  20170218_mma903.jpg   Published:  20170214 Source:  Online extra Enabled (Source: Biotechnology)
Source: Biotechnology - February 14, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

A tissue of truths: Printed human body parts could soon be available for transplant
Print section Print Rubric:  The routine printing of human body parts may not be far away Print Headline:  A tissue of truths Print Fly Title:  Regenerative medicine UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  The multinational company is in trouble Fly Title:  A tissue of truths Main image:  Aye, aye! What’s this ear? Aye, aye! What’s this ear? EVERY year about 120,000 organs, mostly kidne...
Source: Biotechnology - January 25, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

A tissue of truths: Printed human body parts could soon be available for transplant
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Fly Title:  A tissue of truths Main image:  20170128_stp004.jpg EVERY year about 120,000 organs, mostly kidneys, are transplanted from one human being to another. Sometimes the donor is a living volunteer. Usually, though, he or she is the victim of an accident, stroke, heart attack or similar sudden event that has terminated the life of an otherwise healthy individual. But a lack of suitable donors, particularly as cars get safer and first-aid becomes more effective...
Source: Biotechnology - January 25, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Letters to the editor: On Turkish politics, Brexit, GM crops, Airbnb, trade, autism, cricket
Print section Print Headline:  On Turkish politics, Brexit, GM crops, Airbnb, trade, cricket Print Fly Title:  Letters to the editor UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Climate change in the era of Trump Fly Title:  Letters to the editor Turkish politics “Turkey locks up dissidents” (November 12th) seriously understates the extent of the problem Turkey faces from the Gulenist terror organisation, FETO. This has been a recurring theme in Europe...
Source: Biotechnology - November 24, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Letters to the editor: On Turkish politics, Brexit, GM crops, Airbnb, trade, autism, cricket
Print section Print Fly Title:  On Brexit, GM crops, Airbnb, trade, cricket UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Climate change in the era of Trump Fly Title:  Letters to the editor Turkish politics “Turkey locks up dissidents” (November 12th) seriously understates the extent of the problem Turkey faces from the Gulenist terror organisation, FETO. This has been a recurring theme in European media, which perhaps also reflects why Turkey’s NATO allies were so slow to sh...
Source: Biotechnology - November 24, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Letters to the editor: On Brexit, GM crops, Airbnb, trade, autism, cricket
Print section Print Fly Title:  On Brexit, GM crops, Airbnb, trade, cricket UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Climate change in the era of Trump Fly Title:  Letters to the editor Rethinking Brexit I welcome your general stance on the Brexit referendum, but you go too far in saying it was a clear result to leave the European Union and that MPs therefore should not vote against the government triggering Article 50 (“The way forward”, November 12th). There is no establ...
Source: Biotechnology - November 24, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Letters to the editor: On Turkey, Brexit, GM crops, Airbnb, trade, autism, cricket
Print section Print Fly Title:  On Turkey, Brexit, GM crops, Airbnb, trade, cricket UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Climate change in the era of Trump Fly Title:  Letters to the editor Turkish politics “Turkey locks up dissidents” (November 12th) seriously understates the extent of the problem Turkey faces from the Gulenist terror organisation, FETO. This has been a recurring theme in European media, which perhaps also reflects why Turkey’s NATO allies were ...
Source: Biotechnology - November 24, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

The Economist explains: Why gene-therapy drugs are so expensive
ON AUGUST 3rd the British pharmaceutical company GSK said that it would charge €594,000 ($665,000) for a gene-therapy cure for ADA-SCID—a severe immune disorder that is usually fatal in the first few years of life. A child born with ADA-SCID is unable to fight off everyday infections; Strimvelis has cured this in each of the 18 children it has been tested on over 15 years. Gene therapies work by delivering correct versions of DNA, usually using a virus as a vector. Once DNA is inside the cell, it produces the protein that was missing and the fault is fixed. Scientists have been trying to develop gene therapies f...
Source: Biotechnology - August 4, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Rare diseases: Fixing fate
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  The new political divide Fly Title:  Rare diseases Location:  MILAN Main image:  20160730_wbp503.jpg WHEN families leave the genetic institute at the San Raffaele Hospital in Milan, they are still anxious. Later, many will come to see the day their children received gene therapy as a blessed new start. Youngsters who had been sentenced to short lives, full of suffering caused by faulty DNA, get better...
Source: Biotechnology - July 28, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Rare diseases: Fixing fate
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  The new political divide Fly Title:  Rare diseases Location:  MILAN Main image:  20160730_wbp503.jpg Rubric:  New medical cures may mean changes in drugmakers’ business models WHEN families leave the genetic institute at the San Raffaele Hospital in Milan, they are still anxiou...
Source: Biotechnology - July 28, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Genetically modified crops: Gene-policy transfer
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Can she fix it? Fly Title:  Genetically modified crops Location:  BEIJING AFTER years of fierce debate in China about whether to allow widespread growing of genetically modified (GM) food crops, a strong signal emerged in 2013 that the leadership wanted to push ahead. It was given in a speech on agricultural policy by President Xi Jinping. In it he recounted his own experience of hunger during China’s great famine in the ea...
Source: Biotechnology - April 21, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Genetically modified crops: Gene-policy transfer
UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Can she fix it? Fly Title:  Genetically modified crops Location:  BEIJING Rubric:  China may relax its almost total ban on growing GM food AFTER years of fierce debate in China about whether to allow widespread growing of genetically modified (GM) food crops, a strong signal emerged in 2013 that the leadership wanted to push ahead. It was given in a speech on agricultural...
Source: Biotechnology - April 21, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Biotechnology: Cutting remarks
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  The Saudi blueprint Fly Title:  Biotechnology Main image:  20160109_WBD001_0.jpg AS DIFFICULT sales pitches go, this one is hard to beat. This biotech company has burned through $75m in the past few years and has not yet started clinical work on a drug candidate. It says it will be many years, “if ever”, before it has something ready to commercialise. If this were not enough, not only is there a thorny patent thicket ...
Source: Biotechnology - January 7, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Biotechnology: Cutting remarks
UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  The Saudi blueprint Fly Title:  Biotechnology Rubric:  A gene-editing company files for an IPO Main image:  20160109_WBD001_0.jpg AS DIFFICULT sales pitches go, this one is hard to beat. This biotech company has burned through $75m in the past few years and has not yet started clinical work on a drug candidate. It says it will be many years, “if ever”, before ...
Source: Biotechnology - January 7, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Genome editing: The age of the red pen
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Editing humanity Fly Title:  Genome editing Main image:  20150822_FBD001_0.jpg IN THE summer of 2005 Karen Aiach and her husband received heartbreaking news about their four-month-old daughter, Ornella: she had a rare disorder known as Sanfilippo syndrome. The prognosis was that, from about the age of three, the disorder would gradually rob her of most of her cognitive abilities. She would probably develop a severe sleep disorder...
Source: Biotechnology - August 20, 2015 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Genome editing: The age of the red pen
UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Editing humanity Fly Title:  Genome editing Rubric:  It is now easy to edit the genomes of plants, animals and humans Main image:  20150822_FBD001_0.jpg IN THE summer of 2005 Karen Aiach and her husband received heartbreaking news about their four-month-old daughter, Ornella: she had a rare disorder known as Sanfilippo syndrome. The prognosis was that, from about the age ...
Source: Biotechnology - August 20, 2015 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Biotechnology and fish farming: Gas guzzlers
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Europe’s boat people Fly Title:  Biotechnology and fish farming SOMETHING called Methylococcus capsulatus might not sound an appetising ingredient for a meal. Methylococcus is a methanotroph, a bacterium that metabolises methane. Fortunately, salmon are not fussy eaters. They will happily consume pelletised protein made from these bugs. And that could be handy for fish farmers—at least it will be if Alan Shaw, boss of Calysta, a biotechnology firm in ...
Source: Biotechnology - April 23, 2015 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Biotechnology and fish farming: Gas guzzlers
UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Europe’s boat people Fly Title:  Biotechnology and fish farming Rubric:  Feeding farmed salmon with protein made from methane SOMETHING called Methylococcus capsulatus might not sound an appetising ingredient for a meal. Methylococcus is a methanotroph, a bacterium that metabolises methane. Fortunately, salmon are not fussy eaters. They will happily consume pelletised protein made from these bugs. And that could ...
Source: Biotechnology - April 23, 2015 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Europe and GMOs: Gently modified
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Seize the day Fly Title:  Europe and GMOs EUROPE has long been defiantly GM-free. The Americas and most of Asia grows the stuff without fuss. But crops whose genes have been modified in some way may not (with a few exceptions) be grown in the European Union. Until now. On January 13th the European Parliament lifted the EU-wide ban, instead allowing national governments to impose their own restrictions. The plan has already been approved by governments, so the cha...
Source: Biotechnology - January 15, 2015 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Europe and GMOs: Gently modified
UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Seize the day Fly Title:  Europe and GMOs Rubric:  The EU lifts its ban on GM crops EUROPE has long been defiantly GM-free. The Americas and most of Asia grows the stuff without fuss. But crops whose genes have been modified in some way may not (with a few exceptions) be grown in the European Union. Until now. On January 13th the European Parliament lifted the EU-wide ban, instead allowing national governments to impos...
Source: Biotechnology - January 15, 2015 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Pharmaceuticals: Going large
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Workers on tap Fly Title:  Pharmaceuticals Location:  CHICAGO Main image:  20150103_WBD001_0.jpg IN PHARMACEUTICALS, the 20th century was the era of the small molecule. The industry thrived by identifying a steady stream of relatively simple compounds that treated lots of people, patenting them and making a fortune. In the early 21st century it has become harder for drugmakers to find new cures quickl...
Source: Biotechnology - December 30, 2014 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Pharmaceuticals: Going large
UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Workers on tap Fly Title:  Pharmaceuticals Rubric:  A wave of new medicines known as biologics will be good for drugmakers, but may not be so good for health budgets Location:  CHICAGO Main image:  20150103_WBD001_0.jpg IN PHARMACEUTICALS, the 20th century was the era of the small molecule. The industry thrived by identifying a s...
Source: Biotechnology - December 30, 2014 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Charlemagne: The battle of the scientists
Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Past and future tense Fly Title:  Charlemagne Main image:  20141220_EUD000_0.jpg AT THE end of a hard year Europe’s leaders are grappling with familiar problems—how to revive gasping economies, what to do about the Russian menace. But a quieter source of discontent is also bubbling up: Europe’s scientists. The continent of Galileo and Darwin is not about to cast off its glorious heritage. But the boffins have tw...
Source: Biotechnology - December 17, 2014 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Charlemagne: The battle of the scientists
UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  Past and future tense Fly Title:  Charlemagne Rubric:  Are Europeans becoming more hostile to science and technology? Main image:  20141220_EUD000_0.jpg AT THE end of a hard year Europe’s leaders are grappling with familiar problems—how to revive gasping economies, what to do about the Russian menace. But a quieter source of discontent is also bubbling up: Eur...
Source: Biotechnology - December 17, 2014 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Genetically modified food: Frankenfine
Print section UK Only Article:  UK article only Issue:  Should digital monopolies be broken up? Fly Title:  Genetically modified food Main image:  No! Don’t! No! Don’t! ON a damp Sunday afternoon shoppers at Tesco, a supermarket, in south London seem uninterested in discussing genetically modified (GM) food. Several shrug at the idea, or profess ignorance. One insists she only buys organic stuff, but only if it is not too expensive. Their apparent indifference is striking. B...
Source: Biotechnology - November 27, 2014 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news