Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 4th 2021
In conclusion, premature thymic involution and chronic inflammation greatly contribute to increased morbidity and mortality in CKD patients. Mechanisms are likely to be multiple and interlinked. Even when the quest to fountain of youth is a pipe dream, there are many scientific opportunities to prevent or to, at least in part, reverse CKD-related immune senescence. Further studies should precisely define most important pathways driving premature immune ageing in CKD patients and best therapeutic options to control them. Extending Life Without Extending Health: Vast Effort Directed to the Wrong Goals https://ww...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 3, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Senolytics as a Potential Treatment for Precancerous Lesions
It is reasonable to think that intermittent treatment with senolytics can suppress cancer incidence by killing the senescent cells that are present in precancerous lesions, whether or not they are too small to be identified by present screening techniques. This should reduce the number of cells that can potentially go on to become cancerous, and also remove the contribution of senescent cell signaling to the growth and inflammatory status of the lesion. It should not be too challenging to prove this hypothesis in animal models, but prevention of cancer in the general sense is, unfortunately, a hard sell when it comes to cl...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 29, 2021 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Nasal Endoscopy for Urgent and Complex ED Cases
​Fiberoptics and endoscopy have changed the way we treat patients in the emergency department. Endoscopes are relatively easy to use, and can aid your diagnosis and treatment plan. Endoscopy may be useful in urgent cases, such as epistaxis, nasal foreign bodies, and ear debridement. It may also be helpful when dealing with more complicated presentations and critically ill patients, such as those with Ludwig's angina, epiglottis, tracheostomies, or those who need intubation.Fiberoptic tools are not just for surgeons and consultants. The endoscope has many uses in the emergency department, and we have a few tips and tricks...
Source: The Procedural Pause - October 28, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Testing Won ’ t Get Us Where We Need to Go
Conclusions Testing is important to track the trajectory of an epidemic in a community to guide local or national efforts at mitigationThe tests we currently have for COVID have limited accuracy for the individual patientAntibody testing suggests that the fatality rate for COVID may be low in certain communities, but data from New York suggests there is the potential for significant death and morbidity in any major metropolitan areaContact tracing enabled by smart phone technology is likely unable to be effective because they do not overcome the inherent limitations of COVID testing, require widespread adoption, and may...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy Anish Koka COVID-19 testing Source Type: blogs

‘Not Just Dots On a Map’: SLPs Speak Their Truth From the COVID-19 Battlefront
Tuesday, March 10. Speech-language pathologist Fatima Warren was grocery shopping with her grandmother when she first noticed the painful body aches. Chalking it up to the rainy day and an earlier workout, she ran a hot bath. Wednesday, March 11. Warren woke up with chills, fever, and worsening aches. She drove straight to the closest ER in her hometown of Lexington, Kentucky. There, staff ran numerous tests, but not for COVID-19. The 45-year-old didn’t qualify because she hadn’t traveled outside the country and couldn’t name a contact with the virus. Thursday, March 12. Worried about infecting her 13-year-old son an...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - April 1, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Bridget Murray Law Tags: Slider Speech-Language Pathology Uncategorized acute care Cognitive Rehabilitation Dysphagia FEES Health Care MBSS personal protective equipment skilled nursing facilities Swallowing Disorders Source Type: blogs

Viral Agents of Childhood Respiratory Tract Infection in the United States
As of October, 2019 Gideon www.GideonOnline.com and the Gideon e-book series contain details of 69,204 epidemiological surveys – of which 1,107 (1.6%) are related to the prevalence of specific viral species in patients with respiratory tract infection.  [1-3] The following chronology of published studies summarizes the relative proportion of viral agents associated with non-influenza childhood respiratory infection in the United States.  Additional details and primary references are available on request. 1976 – 2001 Tennessee hMPV accounted for 20% of acute respiratory illness among children ages 0 to 5 years having ...
Source: GIDEON blog - October 25, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology ProMED Source Type: blogs

Private Health Insurance Organizations Shouldn ’t Dictate Quality of Care
By LYNLY JEANLOUIS Health insurance companies are standing in the way of many patients receiving affordable, quality healthcare. Insurance companies have been denying patient claims for medical care, all while increasing monthly premiums for most Americans. Many of the nation’s largest healthcare payers are private “for-profit” companies that are focused on generating profits through the healthcare system. Through a rigorous approval/denial system, health insurance companies can dictate the type care patients receive. In some cases, this has resulted in patients foregoing life-saving treatments or procedures. &nbs...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Policy Health insurance Lynly Jeanlouis private health insurance Quality improvement Quality of care Source Type: blogs

Where Does Blood Testing Stand Today?
The dream about a drop of blood signaling a wide range of diagnostic results was shattered with Elizabeth Holmes and the Theranos scam. The machination of the company has set back the innovation of blood testing and investment into the field for years. However, there’s always hope. The Medical Futurist looked around where blood testing stands today and what’s the future it is heading towards. Dreaming about a home laboratory Stephen just came home from walking his dog, Barney, an always smiling labrador. The 40-something got off his smart shoes, sat back on the yellow couch that he and her partner, Sara, were fighting ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - November 3, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Biotechnology Business Future of Medicine Medical Professionals Patients Portable Diagnostics Researchers blood blood draw blood test blood testing digital health health market home Innovation laboratory theranos Source Type: blogs

Precision Medicine and Public Health (from Precision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease)
Excerpted fromPrecision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human DiseaseDespite having the most advanced healthcare technology on the planet, life expectancy in the United States is not particularly high. Citizens from most of the European countries and the highly industrialized Asian countries enjoy longer life expectancies than the United States. According to the World Health Organization, the United States ranks 31st among nations, trailing behind Greece, Chile, and Costa Rica, and barely edging out Cuba [42]. Similar rankings are reported by the US Central Intelligence Agency [43]. These findings lead us to infer that acc...
Source: Specified Life - February 6, 2018 Category: Information Technology Tags: cancer cancer vaccines precision medicine prevention public health Source Type: blogs

David and Debbie Oliver's AAHPM Plenary: Comforting Others While Living With Illness
One could write pages about David and Debbie Oliver's remarkable plenary presentation Friday at the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine Annual Assembly in New Orleans.  David has stage IV nasopharyngeal carcinoma and has taken his cancer journey to the public.  Before I go any further, I'll refer you to David's book, "Exit Strategy: Depriving Death of Its Strangeness," Paul Tatum's Interview with David at Geripal from August 2012, and below, see a clip from David's Cancer Videoblog in which he talks about cancer and palliative care. Of the many themes which arose from their presentation, I was e...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - March 15, 2013 Category: Palliative Carer Workers Authors: Lyle Fettig, MD Source Type: blogs