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Prepared for the unexpected: How Henri beat C. diff
Henri and his sister, Lucienne From the time he was born, Henri has been very reactive — to everything. As a baby, he was allergic to milk and soy, which led to weeping eczema all over his body. His allergies meant frequent ear infections and sinus infections. As a toddler, he was anemic and underweight. He had two urinary tract infections (UTIs) with fevers. At age 3, he had a circumcision because of the repeated UTIs. At age 4, a sinus infection spread to his eye orbit. Every sunscreen on the market gave him (and still gives him) a rash. At age 5, a bug bite on his ear led to a cartilage infection that required ant...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 29, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Marie Vedder Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories C-diff fecal transplant gastroenterology Lori Zimmerman Sonia Ballal Source Type: news

What Causes Microcephaly?
Patient Presentation A 5-month-old male came to clinic for his health supervision visit and followup from his neonatal intensive care stay. He was born prematurely at 28 weeks gestation and his stay was complicated by a right sided Grade III intraventricular hemorrhage, a left-sided Grade IV intraventricular hemorrhage, neonatal seizures, respiratory distress and bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity, acute kidney injury that had resolved, possible necrotizing enterocolitis incidents x 2, and herpes simplex encephalitis. He was on home oxygen, a nasogastric feeding tube because of aspiration risk and mult...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - September 25, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Advocating for Bridget: Coping with Hirschsprung ’s disease
On June 20, Bridget Landry celebrated a very special day with a hearty steak dinner. But it wasn’t her birthday. Instead, the 10-year-old and her family were marking the sixth anniversary of the day her ostomy bag was removed. As she enjoyed her meal, her parents, Carl and Laura, marveled at just how far their daughter had come. “For her first birthday, she couldn’t even take a bite of cake,” remembers Carl. Bridget’s first few months of life were similar to those of most infants: She had a typical birth, nursed and met all her milestones. Yet at six months, her parents began to notice somethi...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 31, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation Dr. Samuel Nurko Dr. Tom Jaksic Hirschsprung's disease Motility and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders Center Source Type: news

FDA Drug Safety Communication: Serious medication errors from intravenous administration of nimodipine oral capsules
[08-02-2010] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is alerting healthcare professionals that nimodipine capsules should be given ONLY by mouth or through a feeding tube (nasogastric tube). (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - August 3, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Making progress: Eli is thriving after laryngeal cleft repair
Eli Bustard is pretty laid back for a 3-year-old — until he sees a picture of a dinosaur. “He’s obsessed,” laughs his mother, Nicole, who reports that Eli has been poring over a library book about these prehistoric beasts. Some of his other favorite pastimes: playing with trucks, caring for his Boston terrier and climbing up and down the musical stairs at Boston Children’s Hospital, which play a cheerful melody with every step. A native of Bangor, Maine, Eli first came to Boston Children’s when he was just a few months old. Although he was born about three weeks early, he appeared to be ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - May 30, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Center for Airway Disorders Dr. Reza Rahbar laryngeal cleft Source Type: news

Draft nurse education plans include over 70 technical skills
More than 70 technical skills that newly qualified nurses should be competent in, including nasogastric tube insertion, injection of intravenous drugs, and urinary catheterisation, have been laid out in draft education plans being developed by the Nursing and Midwifery Council. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - March 15, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

All bleeding stops — but does idarucizumab (Praxbind) make it stop faster?
3.5 out of 5 stars Persistent life-threatening hemorrhage after administration of idarucizumab. Alhashem HM et al. Am J Emerg Med 2016 June 30 [Epub ahead of print] Reference Dabigatran (Pradaxa) is a direct thrombin inhibitor approved for stroke and embolism prophylaxis in patients with non-valve-related atrial fibrillation. When it was first released in 2008, a major disincentive to widespread use was the lack of a reliable reversal agent to treat major bleeds, or to administer before necessary invasive procedures. In October 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved idarucizumab (Praxbind), a monocl...
Source: The Poison Review - July 27, 2016 Category: Toxicology Authors: Leon Gussow Tags: Medical anticoagulant hemorrhage idarucizumab pradaxa praxbind reversal agent Source Type: news

Halyard Health buys CORPAK MedSystems
Halyard Health Inc. (NYSE: HYH) will buy privately held CORPAK MedSystems for $174 million in cash from Linden Capital. The deal is expected to close in the second quarter of 2016. Buffalo Grove, Ill.-based Corpak develops, makes and sells a branded enteral access devices. It generated $54 million in sales in 2015. Its portfolio of nasogastric tubes complements Alpharetta, Ga.-based Halyard’s enteral feeding products and creates a complete offering of enteral feeding products. “We are excited… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 12, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Halyard Health picks up Corpak Medsystems
Halyard Health (NYSE:HYH) said today it picked up enternal access solutions company Corpak MedSystems for $174 million. Corpak, a Linden Capital Partners portfolio company, develops, manufactures and markets a range of branded enternal access devices, Halyard Health said. The acquisition was funded through a combination of Alpharetta, Ga.-based Halyard Health’s on-hand cash and revolving credit facility and is slated to close in the 2nd quarter. “We are excited to integrate Corpak’s innovative products into our market-leading enteral feeding portfolio enabling us to serve our doctors and their patien...
Source: Mass Device - April 11, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Mergers & Acquisitions Halyard Health Source Type: news

FDA Drug Safety Communication: Serious medication errors from intravenous administration of nimodipine oral capsules
[08-02-2010] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is alerting healthcare professionals that nimodipine capsules should be given ONLY by mouth or through a feeding tube (nasogastric tube). (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - March 25, 2016 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Annabel’s journey: The story behind the movie “Miracles from Heaven”
Eight-year-old Annabel Beam was on a quest to find the perfect gift. During a 2010 trip from her Texas home to Boston Children’s Hospital, she asked her Mom to stop at the airport gift shop before boarding the plane. Annabel perused the aisles, examining each item in the hope of finding a token of appreciation for her gastroenterologist, Dr. Samuel Nurko, director of the Motility and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders Center. Annabel spotted a cuddly teddy bear wearing blue doctors’ scrubs. She reached for the bear, squeezed its arm, and a musical rendition of “Doctor, Doctor, give me the news&hel...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - March 14, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Anna Beam Jennifer Garner Miracles from Heaven Motility and Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders Center pseudo-obstruction Samuel Nurko Source Type: news

Hands On Product Reviews February 2016
Ready for a Premie? When was the last time you assisted with the delivery of a newborn? How confident are you in your ability to resuscitate a preterm newborn? The new Premature Anne Task Trainer from Laerdal is a realistically proportioned, 25-week gestation, preterm manikin developed in collaboration with the American Academy of Pediatrics that provides the opportunity to practice the skills, procedures, communications and teamwork necessary for a successful outcome in these high-stress situations. Anne’s features include: an anatomically accurate airway for manual ventilation, endotracheal tube insertion, suctioni...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 18, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Fran Hildwine, BS, NREMT-P, CCEMT-P Tags: Product Reviews Equipment & Gear Columns Source Type: news

Must-read: review of single-dose activated charcoal
wikipedia.org 4 out of 5 stars Activated charcoal for acute overdose: a reappraisal. Juurlink D. Br J Clin Pharmacol 2015 Sep 26 [Epub ahead of print] Abstract The British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology seems to be publishing a series of articles on basic management of the poisoned patient. Several weeks ago we reviewed (and highly recommended) Marco Sivilotti’s excellent discussion of flumazenil, naloxone and the coma cocktail. This current article looking at single-dose activated charcoal (SDAC) is similarly well done, and essential reading. The author points out that although most poisons bin...
Source: The Poison Review - November 17, 2015 Category: Toxicology Authors: Leon Tags: Best of TPR Medical gastric emptying management of poisoned patient Review single dose activated charcoal Source Type: news

Kaleb’s journey: Treating C-diff with fecal microbiota transplantation
Bath time and bubbles, snuggling with Mom and playing hockey with his big brother are just a few of Kaleb’s favorite things. But for the bright-eyed three-year-old from Massachusetts, things weren’t always so carefree. Kaleb’s health changes: Battling ear infections and diarrhea As an infant, Kaleb was a healthy baby boy. He was eating well and growing by leaps and bounds. At six months, his health began to change. Multiple ear infections followed by numerous antibiotic treatments became a painful part of Kaleb’s young life. As his first birthday approached, a second, unrelated condition emerged. Bo...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - October 27, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: All posts Diseases & conditions Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) fecal transplant gastroenterology George Russell Mark Volk Poop pill Source Type: news

Catching up with Carrick: When the hospital becomes home
When Crista and Patrick Wood left their Adams, MA home for Southwestern Vermont Medical Center for their son’s birth on July 4, 2014, they expected to be gone for two days. But Carrick was born with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Immediately, he was rushed to Albany Medical Center and then to Dana Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. His chances of survival hovered near 30 percent. Making the hospital home “We never went home. We spent all of Carrick’s first holidays—my birthday, our anniversary, our older son’s birthday, Thanksgiving—in the hospital,&rdquo...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 21, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: Diseases & conditions Our patients’ stories Cancer leukemia Source Type: news

Should Ondansetron Be Used for Acute Gastroenteritis?
Discussion Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a common illness worldwide and is “…defined as a decrease in the consistency of stools (loose or liquid) and/or an increase in the frequency of evacuations with or without fever or vomiting….” It is one of the most common reasons for seeking medical care and hospitalizations. In Europe, rotavirus and noroviruses are two of the most frequent viral agents causing AGE and Campylobacter and Salmonella are the most common bacterial AGE causes. For parasitic infections Giardia, and Crytosporidium are most common parasitic infections in Europe. Recommendations f...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - August 24, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Marissa’s story: “Esophageal atresia is never going to define me”
Marissa Waite lives in the smallest town in Massachusetts, but she has a big story to tell. When her mother Vicky was pregnant with Marissa 13 years ago, an ultrasound detected esophageal atresia (EA), a condition where the esophagus isn’t connected to the stomach. Vicky was admitted to Brigham and Women’s Hospital for the remainder of her pregnancy. “I’m a take-charge kind of person. When I was pregnant, I thought, ‘I’ll make all the decisions for my baby.’ But when complications arose, I realized I couldn’t make these kinds of decisions alone,” she says. At that point...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - August 13, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: All posts Our patients’ stories esophageal atresia GERD Steven Fishman VSD Wayne Tworetzky Source Type: news

What is the Epidemiology of SMA Syndrome?
Discussion Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is caused by the compression of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) against the 3rd part of the duodenum creating a proximal intestinal obstruction. It is relatively rare and can be hard to distinguish from other causes of intestinal obstruction. Normally the SMA arises from the anterior aorta around the L1 vertebra. It extends anteriorly and caudally into the mesentery of the small bowel. The angle between the SMA and aorta is called the aortomesenteric angle and is usually 38-65°. The distance between the SMA and aorta is usually 10-20 mm. Within the aortomesent...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - June 1, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Hope for People with IBD and Those at Risk
Marla Dubinsky, MD Chief, Pediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology, and Co-Director of the Susan and Leonard Feinstein Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical Center Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hope for People with IBD and Those at Risk Up to 1.3 million Americans have inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a complex disorder of the immune system that results in uncontrolled inflammation of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the two most common forms of IBD, causing severe GI symptoms, such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, and rectal bleeding, that can wreak havoc with everyday...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 22, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Are Risk Factors for Progression To Severe Disease with Bronchiolitis?
Discussion Bronchiolitis is a clinical disease with following features: begins usually with rhinitis and cough that may progress to also having tachypnea, rales, wheezing and increased work of breathing shown by nasal flaring and/or accessory muscle use. The increased work of breathing may cause problems with feeding and hydration and also with mental status changes. It is usually seen in infants and children
Source: PediatricEducation.org - December 15, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Oral capsule as effective as invasive procedures for delivery of fecal transplant
A noninvasive method of delivering a promising therapy for persistent Clostridium difficile infection appears to be as effective as treatment via colonoscopy or through a nasogastric tube. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 11, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Oral capsule as effective as invasive procedures for delivery of fecal transplant
(Massachusetts General Hospital) A noninvasive method of delivering a promising therapy for persistent Clostridium difficile infection appears to be as effective as treatment via colonoscopy or through a nasogastric tube. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 11, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Preterm Newborn With Abdominal Distention, Altered Nasogastric Aspirates, and Hematochezia
(Source: NeoReviews recent issues)
Source: NeoReviews recent issues - October 1, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Shridhar, G., Thukral, A., Deorari, A. Tags: Visual Diagnosis Source Type: news

Featured in NEJM Journal Watch: Management of Recurrent Clostridium difficile (FREE)
Extract Fecal microbiota transplantation was the most cost-effective therapy; use of frozen stool from screened healthy donors was efficacious whether administered by nasogastric tube or... (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - May 12, 2014 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Nasogastric Tube May Be Obsolete for GI Bleeds
CHICAGO (MedPage Today) -- Placement of a nasogastric tube for determining treatment of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding may be unnecessary since almost all these patients will eventually undergo an endoscopic procedure, researchers argued here. (Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology)
Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology - May 8, 2014 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Pilot study suggests ways to widen access to fecal transplants for C. diff infections
(Infectious Diseases Society of America) Using frozen stool from healthy, unrelated donors was safe and effective in treating patients with serious, relapsing diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile, according to a new pilot study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and available online. Known as fecal microbiota transplantation, the treatment was equally effective whether given via a colonoscope or a nasogastric tube. The findings suggest approaches that may make this promising treatment more readily available to patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 24, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Incidents spark fresh alert on nasogastric tube insertion
A patient safety alert was issued last week by NHS England on the use of placement devices for inserting nasogastric tubes. (Source: Nursing Times Breaking News)
Source: Nursing Times Breaking News - December 9, 2013 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Patient safety alert on placement devices for nasogastric tube insertion
The full alert can be read on the NHS England website. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - December 6, 2013 Category: UK Health Authors: Karen Topping Source Type: news

Patients Prefer to Insert NG Feeding Tubes Themselves: StudyPatients Prefer to Insert NG Feeding Tubes Themselves: Study
In a recent pilot study, patients on long-term enteral tube feedings at home were able to insert their nasogastric tubes at night and remove them in the morning. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Critical Care News Source Type: news

Feeding Felix: overcoming an early onset of Crohn’s disease
Felix At just 3-months-old, Felix’s stool was regularly showing traces of blood. Alarmed, his mother Jessica Hsu quickly brought her young son to see his pediatrician, who referred Felix to be seen by Boston Children’s Hospital pediatric gastroenterologist Athos Bousvaros, MD, MPH. Gastrointestinal bleeding in infants is a fairly common problem, often the result of a change in diet or possibly a food allergy. Because Felix was still in the nursing stage, Bousvaros had Jessica remove some potential allergy triggers from her diet to keep traces of them from eventually ending up in her breast milk, and in turn, i...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 27, 2013 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tripp Underwood Tags: All posts Diseases & conditions Our patients’ stories Bousvaros Inflammatory Bowel Disease Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center our patients' stories Source Type: news

Fecal Bacteriotherapy for Clostridium difficile Infections — Its Time Has Come
Abstract: Clostridium difficile treatment failures and recurrences occur at rates of 22.3% and 22.1%, respectively. For patients who have refractory/recurrent disease, there are limited treatment options. The use of a fecal suspension from a healthy donor instilled via a nasogastric tube, during colonoscopy, or by enema in a patient with recurrent or refractory C. difficile infection has shown a response rate of 75 to 100% with minimal adverse effects. There are multiple published case series that provide variations in administration procedures. The main barrier is the need for institutions and clinics to develop prot...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - July 24, 2013 Category: Microbiology Authors: Lisa Avery, Muhammad Hasan Source Type: news

Nasogastric Lavage Significant Shortcomings in GI BleedsNasogastric Lavage Significant Shortcomings in GI Bleeds
Many myths surround the usefulness of stomach pumping in the exploration of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, experts warn. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Emergency Medicine News Source Type: news