Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 23rd 2020
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 22, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Two Way Relationship Between Cellular Senescence and Cancer in Bone Marrow
Cells become senescent in response to a variety of circumstances. The vast majority are cases of replicative senescence, somatic cells reaching the Hayflick limit. Cell damage and toxic environments also produce senescence, and senescent cells are also created as a part of the wound healing process. A senescent cell ceases replication and begins to secrete inflammatory and pro-growth signals, altering the nearby extracellular matrix and behavior of surrounding cells - even encouraging them to become senescent as well. Near all senescent cells last a short time only, as they self-destruct or are removed by the immune...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 20, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 23rd 2019
In this study, by adenovirus-mediated delivery and inducible transgenic mouse models, we demonstrate the proliferation of both HCs and SCs by combined Notch1 and Myc activation in in vitro and in vivo inner ear adult mouse models. These proliferating mature SCs and HCs maintain their respective identities. Moreover, when presented with HC induction signals, reprogrammed adult SCs transdifferentiate into HC-like cells both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, our data suggest that regenerated HC-like cells likely possess functional transduction channels and are able to form connections with adult auditory neurons. Epige...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 22, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

External Versus Intrinsic Causes of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Aging
Today I'll point out a pair of open access review papers in which the authors discuss mechanisms involved in the age-related declines and detrimental altered behaviors of hematopoietic stem cells. These stem cells are responsible for generating blood and immune cells, and so are of vital importance to the function of the immune system throughout life. One paper focuses on external contributions, those arising from the surrounding environment, while the other looks at damage and change arising from the stem cells themselves. This encapsulates the divide in thinking about stem cell aging in general. At least some stem...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 17, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 18th 2019
This study showed that potential vicious cycles underlying ARDs are quite diverse and unique, triggered by diverse and unique factors that do not usually progress with age, thus casting doubts on the possibility of discovering the single molecular cause of aging and developing the single anti-aging pill. Rather, each disease appears to require an individual approach. However, it still cannot be excluded that some or all of these cycles are triggered by fundamental processes of aging, such as chronic inflammation or accumulation of senescent cells. Nevertheless, experimental data showing clear cause and effect relationships...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 17, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

CD117 Antibodies for Low-Impact Selective Destruction of Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is, in essence, a way to replace a person's immune system. These stem cells give rise to all of the immune cells in the body. There are numerous reasons why HSCT is a traumatic procedure, with a comparatively high risk of death, and thus only widely used for very severe diseases. One of them is the struggle to rebuild the immune system rapidly enough for the patient not to succumb to infection; this is particularly challenging in old patients, where the thymus is much diminished and the pace of T cell creation is slowed in comparison to youth. The thymus is where thymocytes produce...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 14, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Ben's Sucky Words
Tomorrow, I ’ll mail to the University of Southern Maine my thesis for my Master of Fine Arts in creative writing degree. Seeing it packaged and ready to go got me thinking about a gift from my first-semester advisor,Suzanne Strempek Shea. She gave me this little notebook to keep with me so my ability to write something is never far from my impulse to.I labeled my pocket-sized notebook Ben Rubenstein ’s Sucky Words to remind me that I have the freedom to write without judgement or consequence. In fact, I must always accept that any of my written work up until its final form sucks. Without that acceptance, I&rsq...
Source: cancerslayerblog - November 26, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: MFA writing/speaking Source Type: blogs

Hi There, I Write Your Stories, I Mean ‘Our Stories’
I write stories about my coworkers. Collectively known as "Our Stories," a new one publishes in my organization's newsletter every other week. Yesterday, the newsletter published a story I wrote about . . . myself. Here is that story with some redactions.* * *Every morning after waking, I prime my body and mind for the day: meditate for 20 minutes, perform 20 pull ­-ups, and then jump on a mini trampoline while singing whatever pops into my head. I then move to the kitchen where I prepare four eggs mixed with hot sauce and grated cheddar on a pan coated with butter, and pour-­over coffee. Once my breakfas...
Source: cancerslayerblog - September 7, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: life lessons writing/speaking Source Type: blogs

Younger than 76 Years-Old? Turns Out You Won ’t Die from Occupational Radiation
Safety conditions have come a long way in radiology. Back in the day, radiologists who graduated before 1940 were susceptible to increased mortality rates from diseases such as myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, melanoma, and non-Hodgkin ’s lymphoma, all conditions related to radiation exposure. Before the emerging of technical advancements in machinery and radiation protection, radiologists were more frequently exposed to low and moderate doses of radiation, and thus in danger of developing serious ailments and disorders. Yet, sa fety has greatly improved over the last half of the 20th century, say research...
Source: radRounds - February 15, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Test your medicine knowledge: 48-year-old woman with fatigue
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 48-year-old woman is evaluated for fatigue and intermittent abdominal discomfort of 2 months’ duration and occasional dark urine. Medical and family histories are unremarkable. Her only medication is an oral contraceptive pill. On physical examination, temperature is 37.2 °C (99.0 °F), blood pressure is 125/74 mm Hg, pulse rate is 68/min, and respiration rate is 13/min. Pallor is observed, and abdominal tenderness is present on palpation. No icterus, bruising, or splenomegaly is noted. La...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 17, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Hematology Source Type: blogs

It’s time for health care to stand up to medical errors. Will we?
It’s been over a year since my older sister Anna died, so I choke up less readily while speaking about it.  The raw anger is less, but the frustration of losing someone to a preventable medical mistake will always remain with me.   Anna was five years older than me, my only sister, and the one I often turned to for advice. We were close despite living 600+ miles apart.  She was smart and insightful; she was at ease in most social situations. I, on the other hand, was the nerdy kid sister who loved science, who became a physician in my early 40s. In 2012, Anna’s world turned upside down when ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 6, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Heart Malpractice Source Type: blogs

How Many More Annas Must Die?
It’s been over a year since my older sister Anna died, so I choke up less readily while speaking about it.  The raw anger is less, but the frustration of losing someone to a preventable medical mistake will always remain with me.   Anna was five years older than me, my only sister, and the one I often turned to for advice. We were close despite living 600+ miles apart.  She was smart and insightful; she was at ease in most social situations. I, on the other hand, was the nerdy kid sister who loved science, who became a physician in my early 40’s. In 2012, Anna’s world turned upside dow...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - September 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Advocacy Policy Publc Health Quality Source Type: blogs

The Progression of Leukemia: Most Old People Have Some of the Necessary Mutations in Blood Cells
Here is an interesting look at the progression and prevalence of DNA damage leading to leukemia, cancers of bone marrow and white blood cells. Cancer is an age-related disease because its proximate cause is DNA damage and we accumulate ever more of this damage as time goes on. DNA repair systems in our cells and destruction of precancerous cells by the immune system are highly efficient but not perfect, and falter with age due to other forms of accumulating damage. The development of a robust suite of effective cancer treatments is an essential part of progress towards effective treatments for degenerative aging, and perha...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 27, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Antitrust Lawsuit Against Celgene Over Thalomid and Revlimid Focuses on REMS Requirements
Celgene's successful cancer drugs Thalomid and Revlimid are at the center of an antitrust action. On April 3rd, Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc. filed an antitrust lawsuit against Celgene Corporation in the U.S. District Court of New Jersey, accusing Celgene of blocking generic competition from Thalomid and Revlimid. Mylan accused Celgene of abusing their FDA Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy requirements in order to monopolize the cancer drug market. As a background, in 2007, the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act (FDAAA) gave FDA the authority to require a Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) from man...
Source: Policy and Medicine - August 14, 2014 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan Source Type: blogs

Rare Diseases Hiding Among Common Diseases
In June, 2014, my book, entitled Rare Diseases and Orphan Drugs: Keys to Understanding and Treating the Common Diseases was published by Elsevier. The book builds the argument that our best chance of curing the common diseases will come from studying and curing the rare diseases. Here is an excerpt from Chapter 12:It is easy to find cases wherein a rare disease accounts for a somewhat uncommon clinical presentation of a common disease. 12.1.2 Rule—Uncommon presentations of common diseases are sometimes rare diseases, camouflaged by a common clinical phenotype. Brief Rationale—Common diseases tend to occur with ...
Source: Specified Life - July 18, 2014 Category: Pathologists Tags: common disease cryptic disease disease genetics genetics of common diseases genetics of complex disease orphan disease orphan drugs rare disease subsets of disease Source Type: blogs

Why are sometimes macrocytic RBC's seen in MDS?
by Brady Kinesia (Posted Fri Jun 21, 2013 1:04 pm)Well, "Myelodysplastic Syndrome" is not only one pathology, it is a whole range of pre-leukemic blood disorders. But generally, my understanding is: that the macrocytic red blood cells are because of defects in DNA synthesis in the cell nuclei. There can be many variations on this in the bone marrow in MDS.This causes macrocytosis (without megaloblastosis), because it delays cell division, such that the RBC membranes get out of sync with the nuclei and grow too large. (Source: Med Student Guide)
Source: Med Student Guide - June 21, 2013 Category: Medical Students Source Type: forums

Stem Cell Transplants for Leukemia Showing Improved Outcomes
Researchers recently published a set of encouraging data resulting from the use of stem cell transplants in the treatment of forms of leukemia. Once a particular new technique is adopted in medical practice, further progress is often a matter of steady incremental improvement. Here that improvement is quite considerable over the past decade, a reflection of the pace of medical science in general: Survival rates have increased significantly among patients who received blood stem cell transplants from both related and unrelated donors. [The] study authors attribute the increase to several factors, including advances in HLA ...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 30, 2013 Category: Health Medicine and Bioethics Commentators Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Patient and Family Engagement in ICUs
My father died 2 months ago and now with a bit of distance from that emotional event, it's time to further reflect on technology to support patients and families in ICUs. BIDMC has been speaking with a major foundation about creating a cross-disciplinary, multi-institutional, open source application to turn critical care data into wisdom for patients and families.How might it work?  Let me use my father as an example.My father had multiple sclerosis for 23 years, myelodysplastic syndrome for 2 years, and 3 myocardial infarctions since 2009.When I arrived at his ICU bedside in early March, I spoke with all his clinicia...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - May 21, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Source Type: blogs

Saying Goodbye to my Father
My father passed away this morning.   My mother and I were at his bedside telling him we'd be ok and care for each other.  He was 70.My parents met when they were 17 and I was born when my mother and father were 19.I've known him for nearly 51 years.The community recalls him as the kindest most giving lawyer in Southern California.To me he was a mentor, a friend, and an inspiration.He told me a story about my early childhood.   When I was two years old, I was playing in the backyard of my grandparents home in Iowa.   I fell on grass and began crying.   It was not injured in any way.   He watch...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - March 12, 2013 Category: Technology Consultants Source Type: blogs

Nora Ephron’s Final Act - NYTimes.com
At 10 p.m. on a Friday night in a private room on the 14th Floor of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital on 68th and York Avenue, my mother was lying in her bed hallucinating, in that dream space people go on their way to being gone.She spoke of seeing trees, possibly a forest. And she mentioned to Nick, my stepfather, that she had been to the theater where her play was showing and that the audience was full. In reality, she had not left the hospital in a month, and the play, "Lucky Guy," was nearly a year away from opening.My brother, Max, and I stood there in disbelief. Though it had been weeks since her blood count s...
Source: Psychology of Pain - March 9, 2013 Category: Psychiatrists and Psychologists Source Type: blogs