Merry Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 264
It's Friday. Boggle your brain with FFFF challenge and some old fashioned trivia. Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 264 - Christmas Edition The post Merry Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 264 appeared first on Life in the Fast Lane. (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - December 21, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dr Neil Long Tags: FFFF Awakening Baron Constantin von Economo Christmas BMJ Edrophonium Elf Elfin facies Encephalitis Lethargica Golf Ice test Man flu Myasthenia Gravis Williams syndrome Source Type: blogs

Teleneurology works. Here ’s why.
Teleneurology is the new and vastly expanding practice of neurology involving the use of technology and/or video chat to improve access to services. With an ever-increasing aging population there is and will continue to be a shortage of neurologists in the United States. Teleneurology has increased patient access to neurologists especially in rural areas but also in urban and suburban areas. Practicing as a teleneurologist for the last two years I can log on to secure video chats compliant with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). I see patients in Florida, New Hampshire, North Carolina,...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 21, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/puja-aggarwal" rel="tag" > Puja Aggarwal, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Mobile health Neurology Source Type: blogs

A medical intern ’s 3 greatest fears
A 76-year-old gentleman with a history of kidney failure, myasthenia gravis and recently diagnosed with esophageal cancer presented for evaluation of melena and hypotension. The patient was my first admission to the medicine team as an intern, and he was as near to an ICU admission without actually being admitted to the ICU as one could come. After examining the patient, I briefly staffed with the busy attending physician, placed the orders, and wrote the H&P. When I got home later that evening, I logged in remotely, re-checked the orders and re-read my note. At 2:00 a.m., I woke up in a panic — convinced I had a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/kirk-sidey" rel="tag" > Kirk Sidey, MD < /a > Tags: Education Hospital-Based Medicine Residency Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 007 Mega Malaria Extravaganza
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 007 When you think tropical medicine, malaria has to be near the top. It can be fairly complex and fortunately treatment has become a lot simpler. This post is designed to walk you through the basic principals with links to more in depth teaching if your niche is travel medicine, laboratory diagnostics or management of severe or cerebral malaria. If you stubbled on this post while drinking a cup of tea or sitting on the throne and want a fe...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 5, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine malaria Plasmodium plasmodium falciparum plasmodium knowles plasmodium malariae plasmodium ovale plasmodium vivax Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 314
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 314th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week The Bottom Line has a comprehensive review on the role of steroids in sepsis &ndas...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 199
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 199. Question 1 What does this pastry have in common with cardiology? http://www.waitrose.com + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet1872942130'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink1872942130')) The french call it a &ld...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 28, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five Bazett's formula chocolate torsade gentamicin myasthenia gravis pimped renal colic rollercoaster torsades de pointes william harvey Source Type: blogs

How Do We Understand Common Cognitive Errors Radiologists Make?
Making a diagnostic error is something that many radiologists will grapple with in their careers. According to a study from Johns Hopkins University School Medicine, nearly 75 percent of all medical malpractice suits against radiologists are pursued on the basis of diagnostic errors.    The study ’s researchers attribute overwhelming work responsibilities, increased expectations, bureaucratic protocol, and cognitive biases to diagnostic errors in the field. Cognitive errors are comprised of “faulty perception, failed heuristics, and biases.” They’re essentially shortcuts radiologists ...
Source: radRounds - March 19, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

How we do Understand Common Cognitive Errors Radiologists Make?
Making a diagnostic error is something that many radiologists will grapple with in their careers. According to a study from Johns Hopkins University School Medicine, nearly 75 percent of all medical malpractice suits against radiologists are pursued on the basis of diagnostic errors.    The study ’s researchers attribute overwhelming work responsibilities, increased expectations, bureaucratic protocol, and cognitive biases to diagnostic errors in the field. Cognitive errors are comprised of “faulty perception, failed heuristics, and biases.” They’re essentially shortcuts radiologists ...
Source: radRounds - March 1, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Notes to myself – 2
Pentobarb coma – BIS should be 10-20 and SR (suppression ratio) should be 70-80 Consider lev albuterol Should give vaccines after coiling of spleen or before if possible No calcium channel blockers post MI definitely and post op in general Toradol inhibits spine healing Don’t do endoscopes with patients in supine position don’t ambulate patients with known dvt’s. wait 2-3 days until clots get stuck. dvt’s even with filter get heparin as much as possible for post phlebitic syndrome and to retard new clot formation diffuse alveolar hemorrhage – secondary to chemo, goodpasture’s, wege...
Source: Inside Surgery - December 31, 2016 Category: Surgery Authors: Editor Tags: General Source Type: blogs

Neuropathology History: Sir Edward Farquhar Buzzard (1871-1945)
" Born in London... Became Regius Professor of Medicine at Oxford University, and consulting physician at St. Thomas's Hospital (1928). In the field of neuropathology, he is well known for his textbook in collaboration with Greenfield (1921)... Important also were his studies on myasthenia gravis (to which he contributed the term'lymphorrhages') (1905), chronic progressive cerebral softening (1906),... delayed traumatic apoplexy (1909), and epidemic encephalitis (1919). "Sir Edward Farquhar Buzzard (1871-1945)Source: Haymaker, Webb (Army Institute of Pathology). Guide to the exhibit on the history of neuropatholo...
Source: neuropathology blog - December 6, 2016 Category: Radiology Tags: history Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 157
Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 157 Question 1 Jon Snow may “have known nothing” but his relative invented something revolutionary to public health. What was it? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet1754064442'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink1754064442')) The toilet John Harrington was Kit Harrington’s great grandfather and invented the flushing toilet, not Mr Crapper (who was a plumber ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - September 2, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five arthritis break bone fever cracking knuckles Crapper david and goliath dengue fever Donald Unger ice test Ig Nobel John harrington Jon Snow Kit harrington myasthenia gravis pituitary adenoma toilet Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 61-year-old man with generalized weakness
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 61-year-old man is evaluated for a 10-month history of generalized weakness. He reports no pain or myalgia. History is significant for hypercholesterolemia treated with a stable dose of simvastatin for the past 3 years. On physical examination, temperature is normal, blood pressure is 138/74 mm Hg, pulse rate is 70/min, and respiration rate is 16/min. BMI is 27. There is symmetric weakness of the arm and thigh muscles with slightly reduced grip and power of the finger flexors. No muscle tenderness is n...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 20, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Neurology Source Type: blogs

Wheat Belly: Self-Directed Health?
Director chair, film slate and load horn. Here’s a proposal for you: If, by following the Wheat Belly lifestyle, a long list of conditions are reduced or reversed at no risk, almost no cost, reversing even chronic and potentially fatal conditions . . . does that mean that the notion of self-directed health might be on the horizon, i.e., putting control over health back in our own hands? I think it does. No, we will never implant our own defibrillators or take out our own gallbladders. But so many chronic health conditions afflicting modern humans recede that I believe that it is entirely reasonable to start talking a...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 16, 2016 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle arthritis autoimmune diabetes eating disorder gluten grains Inflammation joint Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 61-year-old man with generalized weakness
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 61-year-old man is evaluated for a 10-month history of generalized weakness. He reports no pain or myalgia. History is significant for hypercholesterolemia treated with a stable dose of simvastatin for the past 3 years. On physical examination, temperature is normal, blood pressure is 138/74 mm Hg, pulse rate is 70/min, and respiration rate is 16/min. BMI is 27. There is symmetric weakness of the arm and thigh muscles with slightly reduced grip and power of the finger flexors. No muscle tenderness is n...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 13, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Conditions Neurology Source Type: blogs

Myasthenia gravis in remission and 18 pounds lost in 3 weeks
Cheryl shared her first few week experience with myasthenia gravis on adopting the Wheat Belly lifestyle after having been on a gluten-free diet for several years: “I am three weeks into being grain-free, low-carb, and high in good fats. My myasthenia gravis is in remission. I’ve had this autoimmune disease for 22 years, double vision and my right eye half closed. By the second week of being grain-free, I no longer have double vision. This morning for the first time in many years I woke to find my right eye completely open. The eye lid being open did not last but a few hours, but it opened and seems to be showi...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - September 20, 2015 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle autoimmune eyelid droop gluten grains myasthenia gravis Source Type: blogs

The LITFL Review 154
The LITFL Review is your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chuck of FOAM. Welcome to the 154th edition, brought to you by: Anand Swaminathan [AS] (EM Lyceum, iTeachEM) Brent Thoma [BT] (BoringEM and Academic Life in EM) Chris Connolly [CC] Chris Nickson [CN] ( iTeachEM, RAGE, INTENSIVE and SMACC) Joe-Anthony Rotella [JAR]...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - October 28, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Anand Swaminathan Tags: Education LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

Rejuvenation Biotechnology Update for September 2014
In this study, the researchers used a genetic switch to induce FOXN1 expression in the thymic epithelial cells of mice, and compared them with mice that did not have FOXN1 induced. They observed that with FOXN1 induction, the thymus was regenerated from progenitor thymic epithelial cells that were still present in the aged thymus. They found that when FOXN1 was induced, the size of the thymus was larger, the expression of genes associated with a young, active thymus was increased, and the production of native T cells was boosted. Thymic involution is one of the main contributors to declining immune system function with ag...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 3, 2014 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Almost Alike: A Medical Cautionary Tale
Medical bracelet that says “Adrenal Insufficiency”. I’ve been thinking about medical stuff a lot lately, so apologies if my posts tend towards the medical for a little while.  It’s what happens when you suddenly realize how lucky you are to be alive, and how close you came to death.  My father’s cancer has me thinking about life and death and medical care a lot, too. In my dealings with doctors, I have found that they like the solutions to their problems to be neat and tidy.  In particular, they want there to be one diagnosis that explains all the symptoms they’re observin...
Source: Ballastexistenz - August 26, 2014 Category: Autism Authors: Mel Baggs Tags: Adrenal insufficiency Aspiration pneumonia Bronchiectasis Communication Death Developmental disability Family Feeding tube Gastroparesis Genetics Long & detailed Medical Medical stuff Neglect Pain Perception Physical disabi Source Type: blogs

Gastroparesis Awareness Month: A Day In The Life
This is my second post for Gastroparesis Awareness Month.  Read my first post, Tube Love, here.  My first post was a love poem to my feeding tube.  :-)  My second one is a little more serious and a lot longer.  I apologize for the length.  I have trouble reading lengthy posts myself.  But sometimes I’m incapable of summarizing myself, so I have to write posts that are too long for even me to read.  I hope you’ll at least be able to skim through the important parts.  I’ve tried to break up the text with lots of photos, to see if that helps any. A DAY IN THE LIFE...
Source: Ballastexistenz - August 23, 2014 Category: Autism Authors: Mel Baggs Tags: Adrenal insufficiency Aspiration pneumonia Bronchiectasis Education Feeding tube Food Gastroparesis Life Skills Medical Medical stuff Personal history Treatment adult tubie adult tubies awareness awareness months bipap ce Source Type: blogs

Phenocopy Diseases: Their Relationship to Rare Diseases and Common Diseases
In June, 2014, my book, entitled Rare Diseases and Orphan Drugs: Keys to Understanding and Treating the Common Diseases was published by Elsevier. The book builds the argument that our best chance of curing the common diseases will come from studying and curing the rare diseases. Phenocopy diseases are medical conditions that closely mimic a genetic disease, but are caused or triggered by an environmental factor. In many cases, phenocopy diseases are non-hereditary and acute. In some cases, the phenocopy disease is reversible when the environmental trigger is removed or when an appropriate treatment is applied. Here is jus...
Source: Specified Life - July 5, 2014 Category: Pathologists Tags: arrhythmia common disease complex disease disease biology genetic disease heart block orphan disease orphan drugs pathogenesis phenocopy disease rare disease Source Type: blogs

Notes to myself – 2
Pentobarb coma – BIS should be 10-20 and SR (suppression ratio) should be 70-80 Consider lev albuterol Should give vaccines after coiling of spleen or before if possible No calcium channel blockers post MI definitely and post op in general Toradol inhibits spine healing Don’t do endoscopes with patients in supine position don’t ambulate patients with known dvt’s. wait 2-3 days until clots get stuck. dvt’s even with filter get heparin as much as possible for post phlebitic syndrome and to retard new clot formation diffuse alveolar hemorrhage – secondary to chemo, goodpasture’s, wege...
Source: Inside Surgery - December 31, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: General Source Type: blogs

Head drop in neurologic disease: differential and pearls
var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E")); Clinical: typically occurs in women over age 65neck extensor weakness is usually subacute and associated with proximal arm weaknessEMG abnormal (myopathic or denervating) in cervical or thoracic paraspinal muscles but normal in limb musclesImmunomodulators don't affect prognosisdifferential:polymyositisALS  (usually not isolated finding)MG   ( ...
Source: neurologyminutiae - December 24, 2013 Category: Neurologists Source Type: blogs

Catalyst Pharma Fights Greed Charges Over An Orphan Drug
For the past month, shares in a small developer of novel drugs called Catalyst Pharmaceutical Partners have given up roughly half their value amid an unusual public relations war with a privately held drugmaker over a potentially lucrative market for an orphan medication. But the tale has some twists that include a decommissioned nuclear reactor and free dosing for existing patients. Here is the situation: Catalyst licensed a drug from Biomarin Pharmaceuticals called Firdapse to treatment Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome, or LEMS, a rare autoimmune disorder that is characterized by muscle weakness and often associated wit...
Source: Pharmalot - November 6, 2013 Category: Pharma Commentators Authors: esilverman Source Type: blogs

Catalyst Pharmaceuticals And Their Business Plan
The orphan-drug model is a popular one in the biopharma business these days. But like every other style of business, it has something-for-nothing artists waiting around it. Take a look at this article by Adam Feuerstein on Catalyst Pharmaceuticals, and see what category you think they belong in. They're developing a compound called Firdapse for Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome (LEMS), a rare neuromuscular disorder. It's caused by an autoimmune response to one set of voltage-gated calcium channels in the peripheral nervous system. Right now, the treatments for the condition that seem to provide much benefit are intravenou...
Source: In the Pipeline - October 21, 2013 Category: Chemists Tags: Regulatory Affairs Source Type: blogs

USMLE Questions – Characteristic Disease Findings
The United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) is designed to emphasize knowledge of clinical scenarios and clinical pearls, even on Step I. Listed below are some commonly encountered disease findings and characteristics. Feature Disease 45, X chromosome Turner’s syndrome 5-HIAA increased in urine Carcinoid syndrome Aganglionic rectum Hirschsrpung’s disease Apple-core sign on barium enema Colon cancer Arched back (opisthotonos) Tetanus Argyll-Robertson pupil Syphilis Ash leaf on forehead Tuberous sclerosis Auer rods  Acute myelogenous leukemia Austin Flint murmur Aortic r...
Source: Inside Surgery - January 18, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Surgpedia USMLE diseases findings VMA water hammer pulse Source Type: blogs