Safe pregnancies for displaced mothers as mobile clinics reach deep into Kachin camps
MYITKYINA, Myanmar - When Ja Htoi Lu was pregnant with her second child, she felt fine, and didn ’t see much point in taking time from her chores to go for antenatal visits.  (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: csantamaria Source Type: news

Tuesday ’s Daily Brief: prizewinning journalists freed in Myanmar, new tracking tool for suspected terrorists, and a global bid to stop snakebite deaths
This Tuesday, we cover: the release of two Reuters journalists in Myanmar; how to detect and disrupt terrorist travel; escalation in Syria fighting; an update from the World Food Programme on Yemen; and how the UN is working to reduce snakebite deaths. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - May 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tuesday ’s Daily Brief: prize-winning journalists freed in Myanmar, new tracking tool for suspected terrorists, and a global bid to stop snakebite deaths
This Tuesday, we cover: the release of two Reuters journalists in Myanmar; how to detect and disrupt terrorist travel; escalation in Syria fighting; an update from the World Food Programme on Yemen; and how the UN is working to reduce snakebite deaths. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - May 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Africa: Death By Diet - the Race to Transform the World's Bad Food Habits
[Thomson Reuters Foundation] Rome -Half a century ago farmers grew rice, sesame and pulses on the land around Myint Soe's village in Myanmar. Now only paddy fields remain. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 30, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Thursday ’s Daily Brief: Malaria Day, women in tech, updates on Mozambique, the Sahel, Myanmar, Israel and Syria
This Thursday, we cover: where we stand on tackling malaria; bracing up for a new storm in Mozambique; the need to make more room for women in tech; boosting resilience in the Sahel; a resurgence of violence in Syria; and human rights in Myanmar and Israel. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - April 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Measles Cases Are Still Rising in the U.S. But They ’re Even Higher Globally
The number of measles cases reported around the world has roughly tripled since last year, according to preliminary data from the World Health Organization (WHO). More than 112,000 measles cases in 170 countries have been reported to the WHO so far this year. By contrast, about 28,000 measles cases in 163 countries were reported at this time last year, the WHO says. There are likely many more cases that have gone unreported, the WHO says, but the data provides a good sense of global disease trends. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Monday also released updated figures for domestic cases of measles. Th...
Source: TIME: Health - April 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Protective factors and biological sex differentiate profiles of teen substance users in Myanmar - Kliewer W, Wan NMA, Parham B, Ring Z.
This study investigated protective factors and biological... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Overlooked No More: S.N. Goenka, Who Brought Mindfulness to the West
He gave up life as a successful Burmese businessman to teach meditation in India, and played a significant role in the explosion of interest in meditation as we know it today. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Goenka, Satya Narayan (1924-2013) Meditation Myanmar India Biographical Information Past Tense Source Type: news

Violence and mortality in the Northern Rakhine State of Myanmar, 2017: results of a quantitative survey of surviving community leaders in Bangladesh - Parmar PK, Leigh J, Venters H, Nelson T.
BACKGROUND: In August, 2017, Myanmar security forces initiated a widespread response against the Rohingya ethnic minority in Northern Rakhine State, displacing thousands of people to Bangladesh. This attack was purportedly in response to attacks committed ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Characteristics and relative numbers of lethal snake bite cases in medicolegal practice in central Myanmar - A five year study - Thein CM, Byard RW.
Clinical and pathological case files of lethal snakebites were reviewed from the XXXX, Magway, Myanmar, over a five-year period (January 2013 December 2017). A total of 2069 postmortem examinations were performed which included 84 cases of lethal snake bit... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Sex differences in personality traits in Asian elephants
(University of Turku) Scientists from the University of Turku, Finland, have found that male and female Asian elephants differ in their personality. Previous work on a timber elephant population from Myanmar has shown that Asian elephants have three personality factors: attentiveness, sociability and aggressiveness. The new study demonstrates that male elephants score higher on the aggressiveness trait than females, whereas female elephants score higher on the sociability trait than males. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nobi, 42 – Testimony of Rohingya
As I walked with him through the camp, we could hear the residents call: “Nobi vai!” (Brother Nobi!). Nobi is undoubtedly very popular in the area. As a leader among Doctors of the World’s volunteers, he is also a major pillar in community work. Nevertheless, his gestures and words are humble, smart, and calm. He discusses quietly about the need for a clinic for the inhabitants, but then he wells up as he starts to talk about his 2-year-old son. Being a father, a community leader, and a community worker is a heavy burden. His warm human nature feels like a healing energy for the inhabitants of the camp wh...
Source: Doctors of the World News - February 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Martina Villa Tags: Uncategorised Source Type: news

Ethnic conflict and violence in Myanmar: the exodus of stateless Rohingya people - Mithun MB.
Since independence, different minority groups in Myanmar have experienced ethnic conflicts and violence. Among them, the Rohingya community face the worst challenges. Due to government-imposed restrictions and the denial of the government to grant them cit... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Social Etiologies and Disparities Source Type: news

Modern mahouts taking care of elephants in Myanmar are younger and less experienced
(University of Turku) Traditional elephant handling worldwide is rapidly changing. Researchers discovered that mahouts in Myanmar are only 22 years old on average, with an average experience of three years working with elephants, and they are changing elephants yearly preventing the development of long-term bonds between elephants and mahouts. These shifts contrast the traditional elephant-keeping system of skills being accumulated over a lifetime of working with the same elephant before being taught to the younger generation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Testimony of Rohingya
On August 25, 2017, Myanmar Army conducted violent raids in Rakhine State (Western Myanmar). The number of people who fled to Bangladesh exceeded 700,000, crossing the border from Western Rakhine State, where Rohingya live, to Bangladesh. 700,000 people escaped a large-scale sweeping operation to save their lives. They became refugees, leaving behind their past and present life, for a future that is mostly uncertain. Girls never talk about their future dreams, they do not even grasp the meaning of the question. Women who underwent big trauma are still frightened. Men tormented because they cannot protect their family from ...
Source: Doctors of the World News - February 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Martina Villa Tags: Uncategorised Source Type: news

Patterns of motorcycle helmet use - a naturalistic observation study in Myanmar - Siebert FW, Albers D, Naing UA, Perego P, Santikarn C.
Developing countries are subject to increased motorization, particularly in the number of motorcycles. As helmet use is critical to the safety of motorcycle riders, the goal of this study was to identify observable patterns of helmet use, which allow a mor... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Video games can turn university graduates into better employees | Matthew Barr
Video games improve communication, adaptibility and critical thinking – just the attributes that employers are looking forIn recent years, Boris Johnson has excelled at making ignorant pronouncements and illiterate blunders. Fromoffensive remarks on burqas toreciting Kipling in Myanmar and hisludicrous statements on Brexit, Johnson has perfected the art of getting it wrong. It feels like he ’s managed to offend just about everyone. For video game educators like myself, that moment arrived way back in 2006, when Johnson attacked video games as a learning tool.“They [young people] become like blinking lizar...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 16, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Matthew Barr Tags: Universities Education Higher education Games Games consoles Students Lecturers Academics Science Source Type: news

“Why me?” – Stigma, lack of information leave Myanmar youth in the dark on HIV
YANGON, Myanmar –“If I had known about safe sex in my teens, my life would never have turned out this way,” 21-year-old Sithu* told UNFPA. He contracted HIV two years ago.Sithu had always dreamed of working abroad to support his parents. He enrolled in university, and things looked promising – until he learned he was HIV positive.“The first thing that came to my mind was to take my own life,” Sithu said. “I could not believe that this was happening to me. Why me?” (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - January 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: zerzan Source Type: news

Gul, 63 – Testimony of Rohingya
As soon as she started talking, tears came to her eyes. If it is too painful, if it brings bad memories to you, you do not have to talk. When I told her these words, she said she wanted to talk, she wanted to bear witness. She works as a TBA (Traditional Birth Attendant) for an INGO. As a Rohingya woman she has less opportunities to go outside than men, but she has a strong will. In her own words she explained what the Rohingya Identity is.   Everyone got scattered on that day. I do not know where my family is. I ran away with my neighbours to Bangladesh. And, Ah, my son and father-in-law were killed by the army and ...
Source: Doctors of the World News - January 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Martina Villa Tags: Uncategorised Source Type: news

Ali 43, Shobeer 30, Dil 63 -Testimony of Rohingya
Three men. As we were discussing how Rohingya people had been deprived of their identity, their calm and gentle expression changed completely. They started to get very talkative and everyone was talking at the same time. About half a month after listening to their story, there was a demonstration aiming to put the name Rohingya on the ID issued for the camp. “Rohingya people”. The name is now denied by both Bangladesh and the international community. Demonstrations are manifestations of their anger.   Ali, 43 I am grateful to the government of Bangladesh. Nobody was there to help those who helped me when ...
Source: Doctors of the World News - December 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Martina Villa Tags: Uncategorised Source Type: news

Husson, 30 – Testimony of Rohingya
On his way to Bangladesh, Husson saw a crying boy whose parents had just been killed. He looked after the boy with his family all the way to Bangladesh. The boy is said to have become an important member of the family now. It is hard to believe that Husson has faced such unimaginable violence and persecution. But occasionally, angry feelings mix up with his tranquil appearance and gentle talk.   I have been working as a volunteer for Doctors of the World since January this year. Now, what we need in the camp here is a school, as education for children is particularly necessary. There are places to play and study where...
Source: Doctors of the World News - December 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Martina Villa Tags: Uncategorised Source Type: news

Muhammad, 11 – Testimony of Rohingya
While listening to the story of an 11-year-old boy who never showed a smile, I wondered if he was at the age when a teen’s voice changes, as his voice sounded hoarse. To questions, he would spend time thinking before answering. His father was shot dead in front of him, and the boy himself had to shoot bullets before escaping and running away to Bangladesh. In what state of mind did he cross the river and the mountains? At the camp he looks after his 6 young brothers, because there are no more adult men in his family. The shelter where they live is nothing more than that of other families, they live in extreme pover...
Source: Doctors of the World News - December 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Martina Villa Tags: Uncategorised Source Type: news

Jahida, 17 – Testimony of Rohingya
It is said that half of the camps refugees are children. Minors who lost their parents and families or got lost. She is 17 years old, and still has a little girls’ voice. To the question: What kind of job would like to do? She answers joyfully: “I would want to work in any kind of field, as long as the opportunity presents itself I would do anything. But I really like clothes so if it could be possible I would like to work with clothes”   I arrived in Bangladesh in December 2017. My father died before August 25, 2017 and my mother was killed during the riots last August. I do not know who killed her,...
Source: Doctors of the World News - December 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Martina Villa Tags: Uncategorised Source Type: news

Testimony of Rohingya
On August 25, 2017, Myanmar Army conducted violent raids in Rakhine State (Western Myanmar). The number of people who fled to Bangladesh exceeded 700,000, crossing the border from Western Rakhine State, where Rohingya live, to Bangladesh. 700,000 people escaped a large-scale sweeping operation to save their lives.   They became refugees, leaving behind their past and present life, for a future that is mostly uncertain. Girls never talk about their future dreams, they do not even grasp the meaning of the question. Women who underwent big trauma are still frightened. Men tormented because they cannot protect their famil...
Source: Doctors of the World News - December 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Martina Villa Tags: Uncategorised Source Type: news

Top 12 Global Health Moments of 2018
By The Editorial Team, IntraHealth InternationalDecember 14, 2018A month-by-month guide to the moments that captivated us most throughout the year.As 2018 comes to an end, we ’re looking back on the moments this year that filled us with joy, wonder, sorrow, and fear.These are some of the ones we won ’t forget:January: A mother and daughter assassinated in Pakistan for delivering polio vaccinesThis was the year we were supposed to eradicate polio, according to thePolio Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan 2013 –2018. But there were27 new cases of wild poliovirus this year and it remains endemic in Afgh...
Source: IntraHealth International - December 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Tags: Capacity Building for Fistula Treatment and Prevention in Mali (Fistula Mali) Family Planning & Reproductive Health Infectious Diseases Ebola obstetric fistula technology Policy Advocacy Health Workforce Systems Primary Health Care Source Type: news

Why are many scientists calling the Burmese grape the next superfood?
(Natural News) During the Hindu festival of Rathayatra, also referred to as the Chariot festival, one of the main highlights of the procession is when devotees offer Burmese grapes in tribute to their deity Jagannath (which literally means “Lord of the Universe”) as a symbol of abundance, luck, and fortune. Modern research, however, has found that... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Joint External Evaluation of IHR (International Health Regulations) Core Capacities of the Republic of the Union Myanmar: Mission Report: 3-9 May, 2017
Discussions and recommendations are provided in chapters about Prevent, Detect, Respond, and Other IHR-Related Hazards and Points of Entry. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - November 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA researchers find genomic evidence of rapid adaptation of invasive Burmese pythons in Florida
(University of Texas at Arlington) UTA researchers set out to determine whether pythons could have adapted to an extreme Florida freeze event in 2010. They generated data for dozens of samples before and after the freeze event. By scanning regions of the Burmese python genome, they identified parts of the genome that changed significantly between the two time periods, providing clear evidence of evolution occurring over a very short time scale in this population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fossils reveal diverse Mesozoic pollinating lacewings
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) A research group led by professor WANG Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology has provided new insight into the niche diversity, chemical communication, and defense mechanisms of Mesozoic pollinating insects. They reported 27 well-preserved kalligrammatids from late Cretaceous Burmese amber (99 Ma) and Chinese Early Cretaceous (125 Ma) and Middle Jurassic (165 Ma) compression rocks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Collaboration Is Essential to Improving Maternal and Newborn Health in Indonesia
September 14, 2018It'll  take a nation to change the numbers for Indonesia's  moms and babies.As Indonesia celebrates its 73rd year of independence, most people are aware of the country ’s impressive economic development over the past few years. But perhaps fewer are aware that, every hour, across this massive archipelago, two mothers and eight newborns die.The country still faces unacceptably high levels of maternal and newborn mortality. This is a multi-faceted and complex issue, which requires collaboration between all elements of society to ensure effective measures are taken to improve maternal and new...
Source: IntraHealth International - September 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Understanding violence, strategising protection: perspectives from Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh - Guhathakurta M.
Northern Rakhine State in Myanmar is inhabited by a majority Arakanese Muslim population and a minority Rakhine Buddhist population, in a state that is largely Buddhist and authoritarian. The recent history of exclusionary citizenship policies and conseque... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Social Etiologies and Disparities Source Type: news

Suu Kyi ’s Denials Will Not Erase Crimes against Humanity Committed by Myanmar Military
PHR today denounced the refusal by the Myanmar leadership to accept responsibility for its part in the brutal and systematic killing and displacement of thousands of Rohingya Muslims in Rakhine state. (Source: PHR Press Releases)
Source: PHR Press Releases - September 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Report Documents Scope, Scale, and Patterns of Anti-Rohingya Violence in Myanmar
In the final weeks before the 2017 Rohingya exodus from Myanmar, a new report indicates that the vast majority of Rohingya settlements suffered violence, often extreme, at the hands of Myanmar security forces and civilians. (Source: PHR Press Releases)
Source: PHR Press Releases - August 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Damning U.N. Report Outlines Crimes Against Rohingya As Children Suffer from Trauma One Year Later
A damning reporting by the United Nations on the Myanmar’s army crimes against the Rohingya may come too late for these Rohingya children, many of whom remain traumatised as witnesses of the genocide. Credit: Farid Ahmed/IPSBy Farid AhmedDHAKA, Aug 27 2018 (IPS)At 12, Mohammed* is an orphan. He watched his parents being killed by Myanmar government soldiers a year ago. And he is one of an estimated half a million Rohingya children who have survived and been witness to what the United Nations has called genocide.According to accounts in a U.N. fact-finding report released today, the children were likely witnesses to t...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Farid Ahmed Tags: Aid Armed Conflicts Asia-Pacific Crime & Justice Development & Aid Editors' Choice Education Featured Gender Gender Violence Global Governance Globalisation Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies IPS UN: Ins Source Type: news

One year on, Rohingya women and girls seek safety – and a chance to heal
COX ’S BAZAR, Bangladesh –25 August marks the one-year anniversary of the fastest-growing refugee crisis in the world.Over 720,000 Rohingya have fled violence in Myanmar in the past twelve months, joining some 213,000 already in Bangladesh to create the world ’s most densely populated refugee settlement.  (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - August 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: ashton Source Type: news

Study: The coralbush plant shows potent anti-influenza activity
(Natural News) The coralbush (Jatropha multifida Linn.), a medicinal plant from Myanmar, has been reported to contain antimicrobial, antimalarial, and anti-tumor activities. In the study published in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, the anti-influenza activity of coralbush was evaluated. The coralbush has been used in traditional medicine for treating various diseases. Researchers at... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Capturing elephants from the wild shortens their lives
(Forschungsverbund Berlin) Humans have captured wild Asian elephants for different purposes for more than 3,000 years. This still continues today despite the fact that the populations are declining. An international team of researchers has now analysed records of timber elephants in Myanmar to understand the effects of capture on the survival of the animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 7, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Capturing elephants from the wild shortens their lives
(University of Turku) Humans have been capturing wild Asian elephants for more than 3,000 years, and this still continues today despite the fact that the populations are declining. An international team of researchers has now analysed records of timber elephants in Myanmar to understand the effects of capture. The study shows that even years after their capture, wild-caught elephants' mortality rate remains increased, and their average life expectancy is several years shorter compared to captive-born animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Finding a role model amid confinement of Myanmar ’s Rohingya camps
RAKHINE, Myanmar –Harlee Dar, 14, does not go to school. There are no books, TV or radio in the family ’s small shelter, which is sweltering in the summer and rain-beaten during monsoon season. Asked what she does when she is not helping her mother with chores, she replies simply, “I sit. Or I lie down.” (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: zerzan Source Type: news

Estimating the population size of males who inject drugs in Myanmar: methods for obtaining township and national estimates - Johnston LG, Soe PM, Aung MY, Ammassari S.
Estimating the sizes of key populations at risk for HIV is crucial for HIV prevention and treatment. We provide findings of population size estimates (PSE) of males who inject drugs (MWID) in Myanmar, provide an intuitive method for countries to extrapolat... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

3D Printer of PEKK Implants Expanding in Asia
After receiving accreditation as a foreign medical device manufacturer by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare, Oxford Performance Materials Inc. (OPM) has forged a partnership to establish manufacturing and marketing in Japan. Known for its 3D printed PEKK OsteoFab implants, its contract manufacturing services, and its OXPEKK materials technology, OPM has partnered with Tokyo-based materials supplier JSR Corp. (JSR) to form OPM Asia. The OPM Asia license includes Japan, China, Taiwan, Korea, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam, and India. Manuf...
Source: MDDI - July 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: 3-D Printing Source Type: news

“Please Tell the World What They Have Done to Us”
A body of forensic medical evidence released today clearly indicates that Rohingya Muslims suffered grave human rights abuses at the hands of Myanmar security forces and Rakhine Buddhist civilians. Physicians for Human Rights (PHR), who issued the evidence in a new report, said the actions should be investigated as crimes against humanity. (Source: PHR Press Releases)
Source: PHR Press Releases - July 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How Do Attacks on Health Care Affect Women?
July 17, 2018When hospitals or clinics are attacked, women often become targets. But what do we know about the real impact on their health and well-being?In April 2017, 60 militia members attacked a hospital in Cinq, a city in the Kasai district of the Democratic Republic of Congo. The rebels set fire to a surgical suite, trapping 35 patients inside, and then torched most of the hospital. They sexually assaulted women and girls with sticks and firearms, including a woman who had just given birth hours before.The details of this attack are horrifying. More than 100 people died, including 90 patients and two health workers.B...
Source: IntraHealth International - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

Snakebite incidence in two townships in Mandalay Division, Myanmar - Mahmood MA, Halliday D, Cumming R, Thwin KT, Kyaw MMZ, White J, Alfred S, Warrell D, Bacon D, Naing W, Thein MM, Chit NN, Serhal S, Peh CA.
INTRODUCTION: The global incidence of snakebite is estimated at more than 2.5 million cases annually, with greater than 100,000 deaths. Historically, Myanmar has one of the highest incidences of venomous snakebites. In order to improve the health outcomes ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Non-Human Animals and Insects Source Type: news

Image of the Day: Going Viral
Scientists have found a previously unknown virus in Myanmar. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - July 11, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Image of the Day Source Type: news

Gender-based violence among Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh: a public health challenge - Hossain MM, Sultana A, Das A.
On August 25, 2017, the military and paramilitary forces of Myanmar launched "clearance operations" against the Rohingya population in Rakhine state of Myanmar. In the resulting humanitarian crisis, a M édecins Sans Frontières (MSF) report estimated that ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Ancient genomes document multiple waves of migration in Southeast Asian prehistory
Southeast Asia is home to rich human genetic and linguistic diversity, but the details of past population movements in the region are not well known. Here, we report genome-wide ancient DNA data from 18 Southeast Asian individuals spanning from the Neolithic period through the Iron Age (4100 to 1700 years ago). Early farmers from Man Bac in Vietnam exhibit a mixture of East Asian (southern Chinese agriculturalist) and deeply diverged eastern Eurasian (hunter-gatherer) ancestry characteristic of Austroasiatic speakers, with similar ancestry as far south as Indonesia providing evidence for an expansive initial spread of Aust...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Lipson, M., Cheronet, O., Mallick, S., Rohland, N., Oxenham, M., Pietrusewsky, M., Pryce, T. O., Willis, A., Matsumura, H., Buckley, H., Domett, K., Nguyen, G. H., Trinh, H. H., Kyaw, A. A., Win, T. T., Pradier, B., Broomandkhoshbacht, N., Candilio, F., C Tags: Anthropology, Genetics reports Source Type: news

Project Population: Addressing Asia ’s Ageing Societies
A seventy-year-old woman laughs with family members inside a grocery store in Tachilek, Myanmar. UN Photo/Kibae ParkBy Tharanga YakupitiyageUNITED NATIONS, Jun 20 2018 (IPS)While populations have seen and undergone changes since the beginning of time, one trend in particular is unfolding across the world: less children, older people. In an effort to tackle the complex issue in Asia, government officials are convening to help create a sustainable society where no one is left behind.In Mongolia’s capital of Ulaanbaatar, 40 Members of Parliament (MPs) are gathering to discuss sound policy approaches to population issues...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tharanga Yakupitiyage Tags: Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Headlines Health Population Poverty & SDGs aging Asian Population and Development Association (APDA) Population Growth Source Type: news

A quantitative study on body modification (neck ring wear) by Kayan women - 敦子, 清二.
Some Kayan women (a subgroup of the Karen People with Kayan as their native language), living in the most remote parts of Myanmar, continue the tradition of wearing very long and heavy brass coil neck rings throughout their lives. 10.6% of the female popul... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Social Etiologies and Disparities Source Type: news

Stop Neglecting African Conflicts
A group of displaced men, women, and children find refuge at a church on the outskirts of Nyunzu village in eastern Congo. Pastor Mbuyu (pictured) looks after them. Credit: NRC/Christian JepsenBy Will HigginbothamUNITED NATIONS, Jun 13 2018 (IPS)Conflicts have uprooted millions across several African nations and we must not forget them, said a human rights group.Norwegian Refugee Council’s (NRC) timely message was published through their annual list of the worlds most neglected displacement crises. “It’s a sad pattern that we are once again seeing that the crises on the African continent seldom make media...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - June 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Will Higginbotham Tags: Africa Aid Armed Conflicts Crime & Justice Featured Food & Agriculture Global Geopolitics Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Migration & Refugees Peace TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news