Health Tip: Managing Metabolic Syndrome
-- Metabolic syndrome is a collection of factors that boost your risk for heart disease, stroke and diabetes. The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute suggests these measures to lower your risk of metabolic syndrome: Following a... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 21, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Health Tip: Managing Metabolic Syndrome
Title: Health Tip: Managing Metabolic SyndromeCategory: Health NewsCreated: 3/21/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 3/21/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - March 21, 2017 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

GDM Linked to Metabolic Syndrome Long After Pregnancy (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Certain risk factors were associated with MetS 7 years after pregnancy (Source: MedPage Today Endocrinology)
Source: MedPage Today Endocrinology - March 20, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

No Strong Connection Between Metabolic Syndrome and OA (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- But association may exist for MetS component of high blood pressure, especially diastolic (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - March 16, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Research team advances research on metabolic syndrome
Building on their recent research focusing on a peptide designed to block the oxidant amplifying function of the cellular sodium-potassium pump, researchers have successfully demonstrated that pNaKtide, can attenuate the development of experimental nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and atherosclerosis. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 15, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Marshall School of Medicine team advances research on metabolic syndrome
(Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine) Building on their recent research focusing on a peptide designed to block the oxidant amplifying function of the cellular sodium-potassium pump, researchers at Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine have successfully demonstrated that pNaKtide, can attenuate the development of experimental nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and atherosclerosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 15, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Interleukin-1 Antagonist May Curb HPA Activation in Obese Individuals Interleukin-1 Antagonist May Curb HPA Activation in Obese Individuals
Blocking interleukin-1 (IL-1) may reduce hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis activation in obese individuals with metabolic syndrome, according to new research.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

1 in 7 Obese People Has Normal Blood Pressure, Cholesterol
But that doesn't mean the excess weight is harmless, researchers saySource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Metabolic Syndrome, Obesity (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - March 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Physical inactivity and sedentary behaviors associated with cardiometabolic risk factors
(Universitat Rovira i Virgili) Greater time spent in physical activities with moderate-high intensity and less time devoted to sedentary activities, such as watching television, are associated with a lower presence of cardiometabolic risk factors including obesity, diabetes and certain individual components of metabolic syndrome, according to the first results published from the multicentric study PREDIMED-PLUS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 8, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Metabolic syndrome: Toxicology's next patient
A rise in caloric consumption combined with a decrease in physical activity has contributed to a boom of metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 6, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Virus and Heart Disease, Diabetes in Some Women
CMV associated with increased chances of metabolic syndrome in those of normal weight (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Common Virus May Be Linked to Heart Disease, Diabetes in Some Women
CMV associated with increased chances of metabolic syndrome in those of normal weight Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Cytomegalovirus Infections, Metabolic Syndrome, Women's Health (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - February 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Breastfeeding may reduce risk of metabolic syndrome: Study
Amy WallaceFeb. 16 (UPI) -- A study of more than 4,700 Korean women has found a link between longer duration of breastfeeding and a lower risk of metabolic syndrome. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can breastfeeding reduce a woman's risk of metabolic syndrome?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study shows that women who spend a longer time breastfeeding during their lifetimes may be able to lower their risk of metabolic syndrome and related disorders included elevated blood pressure, glucose, and triglyceride levels. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 16, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Metabolic Syndrome Poses Significant Risk Factor for Premature...
Dr. David Samadi provides his expertise on a recent study investigating the relationship between metabolic syndrome and premature ejaculation and why there appears to be a significant association...(PRWeb February 14, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/02/prweb14067232.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - February 14, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Don ’t Fat Shame: You’re Doing More Harm Than Good
“Scale” by mojzagrebinfo is licensed under CC0. Making fun of a person’s weight, often called “fat shaming,” is probably not going to motivate a person to lose weight. In fact, it will most likely raise their risk of heart disease and other health problems. Rebecca Pearl, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine and study leader, said that the more self-blame and devaluation a person feels when stigmatized, the more likely they are to have health issues. Previous research has linked weight stigmatization with weight gain and emoti...
Source: Network News - February 7, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: NN/LM South Central Region Tags: Consumer Health Data Mental Health Public Health Source Type: news

Fat Shaming Can Literally Break Your Heart
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.   Sarah DiGiulio is The Huffington Post’s sleep reporter. You can contact her at sarah.digiulio@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fat Shaming Can Literally Break Your Heart
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.   Sarah DiGiulio is The Huffington Post’s sleep reporter. You can contact her at sarah.digiulio@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 4, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Fat Shaming Tied to Increased Risk of Metabolic Problems Fat Shaming Tied to Increased Risk of Metabolic Problems
Obese people who feel stigmatized about their size may be at increased risk for metabolic syndrome, a new study suggests. (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

The Shame of'Fat Shaming '
Those affected by weight bias more likely to have heart disease risk factors, study suggestsSource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Metabolic Syndrome, Obesity (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - January 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Late Metabolic Effects Common in Testicular Cancer Survivors Late Metabolic Effects Common in Testicular Cancer Survivors
Testicular cancer survivors treated with platinum-based chemotherapy face a 20% risk of developing metabolic syndrome.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

High-altitude living decreases the risk of heart disease
This new research is the first to to link living at high altitudes and the risk to initially healthy people developing all the criteria that make up the metabolic syndrome, a combination of high blood pressure, sugar and cholesterol levels, as well as excess body fat around the waist, that contributes to serious health problems. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 30, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

High-altitude living decreases the risk of heart disease
(Frontiers) This new research is the first to to link living at high altitudes and the risk to initially healthy people developing all the criteria that make up the metabolic syndrome, a combination of high blood pressure, sugar and cholesterol levels, as well as excess body fat around the waist, that contributes to serious health problems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 30, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Obesity: Self-stigma may raise risk of metabolic syndrome
The risk of metabolic syndrome may be higher for obese individuals who apply negative stereotypes about weight to themselves, new research finds. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness Source Type: news

Blocking Peripheral Cannabinoid Receptors Cuts Gorging -- in Mice Blocking Peripheral Cannabinoid Receptors Cuts Gorging -- in Mice
CB1-receptor antagonists that don't cross the blood-brain barrier may be useful to treat metabolic syndrome, without the harmful psychiatric side effects seen with rimonabant, preclinical work suggests.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Millions with metabolic syndrome not getting the vitamin E they need
Amy WallaceJan. 17 (UPI) -- A study from Oregon State University shows that people with metabolic syndrome may not be getting sufficient amounts of vitamin E. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - January 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Millions of people with metabolic syndrome may need more vitamin E
(Oregon State University) New research has shown that people with metabolic syndrome need significantly more vitamin E -- which could be a serious public health concern, in light of the millions of people who have this condition that's often related to obesity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 17, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New study examines the health benefits of blue corn
A new study shows that a rat model of metabolic syndrome fed a high-sugar and high-cholesterol diet and given blue maize extract showed significant improvement in systolic blood pressure, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglyceride levels compared to those not given the extract. The natural antioxidants present in blue maize may help protect against metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer, (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - January 16, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Metabolic syndrome and depressive symptoms among rural Northeast general population in China - Yu S, Yang H, Guo X, Zheng L, Sun Y.
BACKGROUND: Previous researches aiming to estimate the association between metabolic syndrome and depressive symptoms come out with inconsistent results. Besides, most of them are conducted in the developed areas. There is lack of the data from rural China... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 14, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Blue corn may help prevent, treat metabolic syndrome
A new study in rats suggests that adding blue corn to a high-sugar, high-cholesterol diet may help prevent some of the risk factors for metabolic syndrome. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

New research shows health benefits of blue corn
Amy WallaceNEW ROCHELLE, N.Y., Jan. 11 (UPI) -- A recent study found health improvements in lab rats with metabolic syndrome that were fed diets high in sugar and cholesterol but included blue corn extract. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - January 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dos and Don'ts for Millennials That Want to Be Thin and Healthy
Millennials are the first cohort to be born into an obesogenic world - from birth, they have been surrounded by cheap, highly processed, high-calorie tempting foods, and an ever-present marketing machine that promotes them. As young adults they are fatter than their parents at the same age, and are projected to gain 35 pounds in the first 15 years after they finish high school, much earlier and faster than their parents. Once this weight is on, it's hard to shed, and it increases their risk of heart disease, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. But some in this cohort are resistant to the temptations of high-calorie foods and ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New study examines the health benefits of blue corn
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study shows that a rat model of metabolic syndrome fed a high-sugar and high-cholesterol diet and given blue maize extract showed significant improvement in systolic blood pressure, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglyceride levels compared to those not given the extract. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 11, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Study links vitamin D deficiency to metabolic syndrome in mice
(NaturalNews) One out of every four of the world’s adults suffers from metabolic syndrome. This is often a precursor to diabetes and heart problems, and it is no secret that a poor diet that is rich in the wrong kinds of fats and carbohydrates plays a role in its development. However, scientists have also found... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Want to Lose Weight? Add This One Thing to Your Diet
What are the best ways to lose weight? originally appeared on Quora - the knowledge sharing network where compelling questions are answered by people with unique insights. Answer by Keck Medicine of USC, 500+ internationally renowned doctors at a leading academic medical center, on Quora: Learn the secret to losing weight - and improve your overall health at the same time. Fiber. It's not a sexy solution, but it's one that works wonders for maintaining a healthy weight. Beans, vegetables, fruit and grains all contain fiber, which helps keep your digestive tract clean, healthy and at peak function. But, did you know that...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vitamin D improves gut flora and metabolic syndrome
A high fat diet alone is not enough to cause metabolic syndrome, a group of symptoms that pose as risk factors for diabetes and heart disease. This recent study shows it is needed in combination with vitamin D deficiency. Accordingly, vitamin D supplementation improves metabolic syndrome in mice. The next step would be to validate the results in humans. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 21, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Vitamin D improves gut flora and metabolic syndrome
(Frontiers) A high fat diet alone is not enough to cause metabolic syndrome, a group of symptoms that pose as risk factors for diabetes and heart disease. This recent study shows it is needed in combination with vitamin D deficiency. Accordingly, vitamin D supplementation improves metabolic syndrome in mice. The next step would be to validate the results in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 21, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Is Mary Jane Bad for Your Health?
This study followed more than a thousand people from Dundin, New Zealand born in 1972 or 1973 through age 38. They assessed the frequency of marijuana use and dependence at ages 18, 21, 26, 32 and 38. Physical health was measured with lab tests as well as self-reporting at ages 26 and 38. Tests assessed periodontal health, lung function, systemic inflammation, metabolic syndrome, waist circumference, HDL cholesterol levels, triglyceride levels, blood pressure, glycated hemoglobin concentration and body mass index. Marijuana use was compared to cigarette smoking and included non-smokers. Only periodontal health was found to...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Claim high-fat diets can prevent diabetes 'unproven'
Conclusions This small trial aimed to see whether there is a difference between strictly controlled low-GI diets that contain the same amount of energy, but are either predominantly fat or carbohydrate based. Overall, researchers found the diets caused both weight and fat reduction, with little difference between the two – with the exception of minor differences in certain blood sugar and cholesterol markers, the significance of which is difficult to interpret. These could just be down to chance. The researchers were careful to control the diets and other lifestyle aspects to try to ensure any observed effects ...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes Food/diet Source Type: news

Why Diet Soda Could Actually Prevent You From Losing Weight
Reaching for a diet soda may actually hinder weight loss efforts, a new study done in mice suggests. In experiments, researchers found that the artificial sweetener aspartame, which is found in some diet drinks, may contribute to the development of a condition called “metabolic syndrome,” which involves a cluster of symptoms, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels and a large waist size. People with metabolic syndrome face an increased risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. The researchers found how aspartame could be linked with metabolic syndrome: Aspartame may stop a key gut enzyme ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Diet Soda Could Actually Prevent You From Losing Weight
Reaching for a diet soda may actually hinder weight loss efforts, a new study done in mice suggests. In experiments, researchers found that the artificial sweetener aspartame, which is found in some diet drinks, may contribute to the development of a condition called “metabolic syndrome,” which involves a cluster of symptoms, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels and a large waist size. People with metabolic syndrome face an increased risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes. The researchers found how aspartame could be linked with metabolic syndrome: Aspartame may stop a key gut enzyme ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 7, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Does Diet Soda Cause Weight Gain?
This study shows quite nicely that non-caloric sweeteners can alter gut microbes in mice -- a change that has negative metabolic consequences -- and provides preliminary evidence that it can happen in humans too. Unexpected consequences To further appreciate how complicated our handling of diet soda can be, here's another little example: Our intestine (or bowel) is covered with cells that secrete hormones. These cells react to the presence and composition of food by secreting peptides such as glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY) and cholecystokinin - these names are not important - that work on the brain, sig...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 7, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Does metabolic syndrome affect cognitive abilities?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study of US adolescents shows an association between metabolic syndrome and impairments in reading, attention, and working memory. Treatment can control and perhaps even reverse metabolic syndrome, which affects about 9 percent of teens in the US and 12 percent-44 percent of obese adolescents, and may help reduce the cognitive effects described in the study published in Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Aspartame may prevent, not promote, weight loss by blocking intestinal enzyme's activity
A team of investigators has found a possible mechanism explaining why use of the sugar substitute aspartame might not promote weight loss. In their report, the researchers show how the aspartame breakdown product phenylalanine interferes with the action of an enzyme previously shown to prevent metabolic syndrome - a group of symptoms associated with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 23, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Aspartame may prevent, not promote, weight loss by blocking intestinal enzyme's activity
(Massachusetts General Hospital) A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found a possible mechanism explaining why use of the sugar substitute aspartame might not promote weight loss. The researchers describe how the aspartame breakdown product phenylalanine interferes with the action of an enzyme previously shown to prevent metabolic syndrome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 22, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Immune system uses gut bacteria to control glucose metabolism
Researchers have discovered an important link between the immune system, gut bacteria and glucose metabolism -- a " cross-talk " and interaction that can lead to type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome when not functioning correctly. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 14, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Soda News: Election Results, Diabetes And The Art Of Misinformation
Election results Soda taxes were on the ballot in 4 cities on November 8th. The fact that these measures were even there is meaningful: Every time soda is discussed as a public health issue, people are reminded that the evidence tying them to obesity, diabetes and heart disease is piling up. Fifty million dollars were spent on persuasion efforts according to the New York Times, with Big Soda -- opposing the tax -- heavily outspending the tax supporters. Yet the citizens voted for the tax in all 4 cities; San Francisco, Oakland, Albany CA, and Boulder CO will join Philadelphia and Berkeley, who passed such measures recently...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA Statement on the AIM-HIGH Trial
[05-26-2011] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will conduct a comprehensive review of the results from the clinical trial called the Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome with Low HDL/High Triglyceride and Impact on Global Health Outcomes (AIM-HIGH) once they are available. (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - November 1, 2016 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

September Is Childhood Obesity Month -- Get The Facts
The obesity epidemic continues to dominate headlines--and for good reason. Obesity is a leading cause of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and stroke. Many of these conditions occur in adults but often begin in childhood. This September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month. By knowing the facts and taking steps to help your children live a healthier lifestyle, childhood obesity and its resulting complications may be prevented. The Facts According to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), one in three children in the U.S. is overweight or obese. Childhood obesity doubled in children ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Childhood muscular fitness and adult metabolic syndrome
About 20-25 percent of adults have the metabolic syndrome and have increased risk of developing both cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. In a new longitudinal study, investigators examined associations between childhood muscular fitness (strength, endurance, and power) and metabolic syndrome -- the latter assessed once they reached adulthood. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 24, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news