Is The Election Making You Sick?
So here is an interesting question: Like other life stressors, could the presidential election be making you sick?It's an important question to ask yourself --as November 8th approaches--since we know that prolonged stress can cause elevated blood pressure‎--the culprit that can lead to strokes and heart attacks, not to mention overeating, but also the feared metabolic syndrome defined by elevated cholesterol, central abdominal obesity (insulin resistance), and hypertension. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - September 18, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robert Glatter, MD Source Type: news

Metabolic Syndrome Correlates With Severity of Hypertension and Knee Osteoarthritis Symptoms
No abstract available (Source: Lippincott's Bone and Joint Newsletter)
Source: Lippincott's Bone and Joint Newsletter - September 17, 2016 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: CME Article Source Type: news

Japanese researchers find single people are twice as likely to be overweight
Researchers at Yokohama City University in Japan found married men were less likely to suffer metabolic syndrome - a combination of diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What The World’s Healthiest Diets Have In Common
To research his 2010 book The 5 Factor World Diet, celebrity trainer and nutritionist Harley Pasternak traveled to the healthiest countries around the world to learn more about what made their meals extra nourishing. He noted that Japanese people eat a wonderful variety of seaweeds, and that Chinese people tried to incorporate at least five different colors in every meal. But Pasternak also came away with some valuable observations about how different the North American way of life was compared to many other countries. For starters, we eat much bigger portions than people in other countries. We don’t prioritize eat...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 4, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What The World’s Healthiest Diets Have In Common
To research his 2010 book The 5 Factor World Diet, celebrity trainer and nutritionist Harley Pasternak traveled to the healthiest countries around the world to learn more about what made their meals extra nourishing. He noted that Japanese people eat a wonderful variety of seaweeds, and that Chinese people tried to incorporate at least five different colors in every meal. But Pasternak also came away with some valuable observations about how different the North American way of life was compared to many other countries. For starters, we eat much bigger portions than people in other countries. We don’t prioritize eat...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 4, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

In Klinefelter Syndrome Patients, What are the Common Behavioral Problems?
Discussion Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is a common genetic abnormaly with a prevalence of 1 in ~650 male births. It was first described in 1942 by Dr. Harry Klinefelter. It is associated with at least one extra X chromosome with the most common karyotype (~80% of patients) being 47 XXY. Other karyotypes are seen along with mosaicism. It is believed that although it is very prevalent, only about 25-33% of people with KS are identified. About 10% are identified before puberty with the rest usually identified because of hypogonadism and tall stature especially in teenage years or due to infertility in adulthood. KS is diagnosed...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - August 29, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

New Study Pokes Hole In The Idea Of 'Healthy Obesity'
The most current conventional wisdom among doctors and obesity researchers goes something like this: While people who are obese are at high risk for metabolic syndrome ― a constellation of symptoms that increase the risk for Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and more ― there is also a significant group of obese people who are totally healthy and will remain healthy. This so-called “healthy obese” idea has been somewhat controversial ― a departure from decades of medical science that held obesity will, more often than not, had adverse effects on health.  Now new genetic research from scientists...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 23, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

New Study Pokes Hole In The Idea Of 'Healthy Obesity'
The most current conventional wisdom among doctors and obesity researchers goes something like this: While people who are obese are at high risk for metabolic syndrome ― a constellation of symptoms that increase the risk for Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and more ― there is also a significant group of obese people who are totally healthy and will remain healthy. This so-called “healthy obese” idea has been somewhat controversial ― a departure from decades of medical science that held obesity will, more often than not, had adverse effects on health.  Now new genetic research from scientists...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Exercise In Hot Water: Gym Battles Bath For Best Health Practice
The heat is on in the world of exercise mimetics. Exercise what? Exercise mimetics, the odd but essential field focused on how to mimic the physiological effects of physical activity without the physical activity. You might say, an armchair science. Odd, because it involves highly sophisticated and costly research attempting to uncover what happens when you break a sweat, something neither sophisticated nor costly. Essential, because insufficient physical activity is now a leading cause of illness. This is good news for those folks who when they think about exercising lay down until the thought goes away. Recent research...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Africa: Metabolic Syndrome - Could You Be At Risk?
[New Times] The importance of managing the metabolic syndrome has been emphasised in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Experts also warn that the risk for heart disease, diabetes and stroke increases with the number of metabolic risk factors one has. But what is metabolic syndrome? (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - August 22, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Metabolic syndrome and its influencing factors in professional automobile drivers in a company - Huang HY, Wang W, Zhou JP, Li QL, Feng WT, Wu ZZ.
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS)in 259 professional automobile drivers, and to put forward targeted suggestions on protection. METHODS: In October 2014, 114 male bus drivers and 145 male taxi drivers in a transpor... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 20, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

CV Risk Markers Surge Before, During Menopause, Less So After CV Risk Markers Surge Before, During Menopause, Less So After
The effect on metabolic syndrome scores was more pronounced in black women than white women in this analysis of the ARIC cohort and points to the importance of interventions before menopause onset.Heartwire from Medscape (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - August 16, 2016 Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Georgia State researcher gets $1.8 million to study gut bacteria and obesity-related diseases
(Georgia State University) Andrew Gewirtz, a professor in the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University, has received a four-year, $1.8-million federal grant to study how changes in intestinal bacteria could lead to obesity and metabolic syndrome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 8, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Integrative Scientist Pizzorno: "Toxicity is the Primary Driver of Disease"
Regular medicine is awakening to the dumbfounding reality that clinical care accounts for just 10%-20% of the factors contributing to health. But if research recently presented by a leader in the revitalization of the naturopathic medical profession - and of the movements for functional and integrative medicine - is correct, even the most aggressive adopters of the new thinking are still missing the boat. The new thinking argues that if we want to create health, we need to address things like poverty, education, genetics and healthy behaviors. The figure describes these. Yet according to best-selling author and resear...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - August 6, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Risk factors for heart disease increase before menopause
Risk factors for heart disease, diabetes and stroke increase more quickly than expected in the years preceding menopause, according to new research, and the risk factors seem to be more prominent in black women. Metabolic syndrome describes a constellation of risk of factors that contribute to cardiovascular disease, including a large waist, high triglyceride levels, […] (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - August 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lateshia Beachum Tags: diet & nutrition environment & health heart disease wellness women's health Source Type: news

Heart Risk Factors Rise < I > Before < /I > Menopause
'Danger zone' for women earlier than thought, study finds Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Heart Disease in Women, Menopause, Metabolic Syndrome (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - August 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart Risk Factors Rise Before Menopause
'Danger zone' for women earlier than thought, study finds Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Heart Disease in Women, Menopause, Metabolic Syndrome (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - August 3, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Paternal Betel-Quid, Cigarette Use Ups Offspring's Metabolic Risk Paternal Betel-Quid, Cigarette Use Ups Offspring's Metabolic Risk
Paternal chewing of the addictive stimulant betel quid or smoking cigarettes may start children on the path to metabolic syndrome.. Heartwire from Medscape (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

11 Science-Backed Ways To Boost Metabolism
Every time we eat or drink, we can thank our metabolism for converting all those calories into energy. Our size, gender, and age all factor into our metabolic rate, but there are also ways to independently control its speed. And the faster our metabolism, the more calories we burn off, making that Krispy Kreme breakfast no longer such a big deal. (OK, the donut probably still isn't the best idea.) Here are 11 proven ways to keep that body burning strong. 1. Sleep! Almost nodding off in line at Starbucks isn't the only downside of not catching enough zzz's. Researchers have found a link between metabolism and sleep, and n...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Moringa's Health Benefits In Lowering Inflammation
Copyright: Brenda Dawson/UC Davis Moringa is known throughout the world as a miracle tree. But, what exactly is moringa and why is research buzzing about the possible health benefits of this hearty plant? Moringa is a tree that is an important crop native to India and currently grown throughout the world in Latin America, Southeast Asia and Africa. The entire tree is edible, from its roots, flowers, leaves, seeds, gum, fruits and bark. Generally, moringa is consumed by cooking the leaves or immature fruits and more recently as a dried leaf powder used as tea or sprinkled into food. Although 13 species exist in the morin...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High blood pressure, diabetes and being overweight could be to blame 
Older women with metabolic syndrome - a combination of obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure - had less sex, a University of California San Diego School of Medicine study found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 13, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Metabolic syndrome linked to sexual dysfunction in older women
Postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome report lower sexual activity, desire, and sexual satisfaction, according to a new report. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 12, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Metabolic syndrome linked to sexual dysfunction in older women
(Elsevier Health Sciences) In a new study published in The American Journal of Medicine, researchers looked at the role metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease play in postmenopausal women's sexual health. They found that metabolic syndrome was strongly associated with decreased sexual activity, desire, and sexual satisfaction and that specific cardiovascular events were linked to reduced rates of sexual activity, but not with sexual desire or satisfaction. The study also showed that coronary artery disease was more prevalent in women with low rates of sexual activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 12, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Link between stress hormone, obesity in depressed, bipolar patients
Low levels of the stress hormone cortisol are linked to obesity, high levels of fat in the blood and metabolic syndrome among patients with recurrent depressions or bipolar disorder, according to a new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 5, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Resistant starch may benefit people with metabolic syndrome
The secret ingredient is in the flour, but its impact lies within the gut. Adding resistant starch to the diets of people with metabolic syndrome can improve bacteria in the gut, according to research. These changes help lower bad cholesterol and decrease inflammation associated with obesity. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 30, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

BP Trajectories in Pregnancy Tied to Metabolic Syndrome Risk (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Early prehypertension and subsequent rise associated with risk in Chinese study (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - June 28, 2016 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Metabolic Syndrome in Children and Adolescents With HIVMetabolic Syndrome in Children and Adolescents With HIV
What is the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected children? The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal (Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hiv-Aids Headlines - June 28, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Pediatrics Journal Article Source Type: news

Prehypertension in Pregnancy Linked to Postpartum Metabolic Syndrome (FREE)
By Amy Orciari Herman Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH, and Jaye Elizabeth Hefner, MD Pregnant women whose diastolic blood pressure indicates prehypertension face increased risk for the metabolic syndrome after … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - June 28, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Blood Pressure Problems During Pregnancy, Heart Trouble Later?
Spotting risk early may help women make healthy lifestyle changes sooner, study author says Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy, Metabolic Syndrome (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - June 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Blood Pressure Problems During Pregnancy, Heart Trouble Later?
MONDAY, June 27, 2016 -- Pregnant women who have blood pressure in the high-normal range may have an increased risk for metabolic syndrome after they give birth, a new study indicates. Metabolic syndrome -- which increases the risk of heart disease... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 27, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Life style of bus drivers in 2014-2015 - Souri A, Delpisheh A, Sayehmiri K.
Background and Objectives: Drivers due to their working conditions such as job stress, lack of exercises, working time and dietary habits are more at risk for heart diseases, especially metabolic syndrome and its components. this study was aimed to investi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 23, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

Metabolic Syndrome
(Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - June 21, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Association between depressive symptoms, use of antidepressant medication and the metabolic syndrome: the Maine-Syracuse Study - Crichton GE, Elias MF, Robbins MA.
BACKGROUND: Both depression and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) are two major public health issues. The aim of this study was to examine associations between depressive symptoms, the use of antidepressant medications, and the prevalence of MetS. METH... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 20, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Ask JJ: Type 2 Diabetes
Dear JJ: My doctor just diagnosed me with pre-diabetes. Type 2 diabetes runs in my family, but I will not accept it as my fate. You've written about sugar's detrimental impact, so how can I get this under control so it doesn't blow up into full-blown diabetes? Diabetes doesn't happen overnight or linearly, but when your metabolic machinery breaks, serious havoc ensues. The massive repercussions can become deadly. Every time you eat, you raise blood sugar, which triggers your pancreas to release a hormone called insulin. Every food raises blood sugar, but high-sugar impact foods do it big time. Your pancreas "secre...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Muffin Study: Mono- vs. polyunsaturated fats in patients with metabolic syndrome
A batch of muffins, made with a special recipe formulated by the US Department of Agriculture, yielded unexpected health benefits in patients with metabolic syndrome during a first-of-its-kind clinical study. The study compared polyunsaturated fats with monounsaturated fats as a substitute for saturated fats. Muffins made with polyunsaturated fats were more effective for dietary management in the metabolic syndrome. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study Reveals That Eating 'In Moderation' Is A Fool's Errand
"Everything in moderation" is a common piece of healthy eating advice from slim and sexy celebs, dietitians and other lifestyle gurus. It's a call that's thousands of years old: The ancient Greek poet Hesiod wrote the phrase “moderation is best in all things” in his poem Work and Days, written around 700 BCE, and other philosophers and writers have echoed the maxim ever since.  But just because it’s a saying that has persisted throughout history doesn’t mean it’s right, helpful or useful.  While it sounds like wise advice for anyone who wants a low-key approach to heal...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 9, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Marijuana-smokers harm gums; other physical effects slight
A study of nearly 1,000 New Zealanders from birth to age 38 has found marijuana smokers have more gum disease, but otherwise do not show worse physical health on a dozen measures including lung function, systemic inflammation, and several measures of metabolic syndrome, including waist circumference, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, glucose control and body mass index. Earlier research from this group however, has shown psychological effects of cannabis use. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Pot-smokers harm gums; other physical effects slight
(Duke University) A study of nearly 1,000 New Zealanders from birth to age 38 has found marijuana smokers have more gum disease, but otherwise do not show worse physical health on a dozen measures including lung function, systemic inflammation, and several measures of metabolic syndrome, including waist circumference, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, glucose control and body mass index. Earlier research from this group however, has shown psychological effects of cannabis use. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Bariatric Surgery Improves Metabolic Syndrome for PCOS
(MedPage Today) -- Small cohort with obesity and PCOS saw improvement (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - May 31, 2016 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Light Alcohol Consumption: Predictor of Fatty Liver in MetSLight Alcohol Consumption: Predictor of Fatty Liver in MetS
New research studies whether minimal alcohol intake is protective against fatty liver in women with metabolic syndrome. BMC Gastroenterology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology Journal Article Source Type: news

Ask JJ: Optimal Bone Health
Dear JJ: My doctor warned me I'm in the beginning stages of bone loss and that I need to be taking preventative measures now. My mom and grandma had osteoporosis. What steps can I take right now to reduce its impact? Decreased bone mineral density and altered bone protein are among the early warning signs of osteoporosis, the most common bone disease. While it affects everyone, older women become more susceptible than men to osteoporosis. Researchers estimate 35 percent of postmenopausal Caucasian women have hip, spine, or distal forearm osteoporosis. Regardless of gender, your risk increases with age because bones be...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sugar: Its many disguises
Increasingly, people are aware of the dangers of “too much sugar” in the diet. Consuming excess sugar can lead to a condition called metabolic syndrome, which is characterized by high blood pressure, high blood sugar, unhealthy cholesterol levels, and abdominal fat. Excess sugar also contributes to widespread inflammation and even leads to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Excess sugar intake can be bad for your brain, too. Studies have found that high sugar intake has a negative effect on cognition, and it has also been implicated in hyperactivity and inattention in children and adol...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - May 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Uma Naidoo, MD Tags: Behavioral Health Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Healthy Eating Prevention fructose sugar Source Type: news

Ask JJ: Chronic Inflammation
Dear JJ: My doctor recently said I had chronic inflammation. I thought inflammation was a natural part of healing, but she suggested it could keep me from losing weight. Since you're an expert on weight loss resistance, can you explain the connection? Redness, heat, pain, and swelling are the four classic inflammatory responses. Think of how a cut turns red and becomes warm and tender. That's called acute inflammation, and you can immediately see its impact. Inflammation should do its job and then go. Like that partygoer who won't take the hint to leave, chronic low-grade inflammation sticks around beyond its welcome. St...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pyrazole antagonists of the CB1 receptor with reduced brain penetration - Fulp A, Zhang Y, Bortoff K, Seltzman H, Snyder R, Wiethe R, Amato G, Maitra R.
Type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) antagonists might be useful for treating obesity, liver disease, metabolic syndrome, and dyslipidemias. Unfortunately, inhibition of CB1 in the central nervous system (CNS) produces adverse effects, including depression, a... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Psoriasis and obesity may share genetic source
Psoriasis often occurs alongside metabolic syndrome, obesity, and type 2 diabetes, and research now suggests that there may be a linked genetic cause. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Source Type: news

[Report] Durable coexistence of donor and recipient strains after fecal microbiota transplantation
Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has shown efficacy in treating recurrent Clostridium difficile infection and is increasingly being applied to other gastrointestinal disorders, yet the fate of native and introduced microbial strains remains largely unknown. To quantify the extent of donor microbiota colonization, we monitored strain populations in fecal samples from a recent FMT study on metabolic syndrome patients using single-nucleotide variants in metagenomes. We found extensive coexistence of donor and recipient strains, persisting 3 months after treatment. Colonization success was greater for conspecific strains...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 29, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Simone S. Li Source Type: news

Nutrition: An Opportunity to Advance Health Equity
Did you know that your zip code can be a predictor of your health? So can your place of birth, where you work and play, your income and education, and a host of other factors -- in addition to the choices you make each day about what to eat. These factors, what public health professionals recognize as "social determinants of health," are linked to the inequities in health and health care (health disparities), among racial and ethnic minorities in America. During National Minority Health Month each April, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office of Minority Health (OMH) leads the nation in r...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Black raspberry improves cardiovascular risk in metabolic syndrome
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study shows that black raspberry extract can significantly lower a key measure of arterial stiffness-an indicator of cardiovascular disease. Black raspberry intake was also associated with increased levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which help repair and regenerate damaged arteries, according to the study published in Journal of Medicinal Food. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 28, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Compound in hops may help metabolic syndrome, study says
Stephen FellerCORVALLIS, Ore., April 19 (UPI) -- A compound found in hops, an ingredient that flavors beer, may lower cholesterol and blood sugar and reduce weight gain, according to a recent study. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - April 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news