LSUHSC research finds inflammation linked to obesity in adults may be protective in young children
(Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center) The first study of its kind, led by Melinda Sothern, Ph.D., CEP, Professor and Director of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans School of Public Health, reveals that the same pro-inflammatory proteins linked to obesity and the metabolic syndrome in adults appear to protect children prior to puberty. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 4, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

'Fat gene' could make you 'eat more and move less'
Conclusion The study furthers our understanding of the possible genes that may be involved in the development of obesity. It is of particular scientific interest as it involves a gene that seems to be well conserved across different animal species, with similar effects related to appetite control, energy expenditure and insulin signalling. However, it doesn't provide the whole answer. Despite the media headlines, it is not apparent how many people in the general population could have this "obesity gene", or what contribution it could be making to the obesity epidemic. There are likely to be many other genetic fa...
Source: NHS News Feed - November 22, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics/stem cells Obesity Source Type: news

Obesity and nutrition are keys to avoiding metabolic syndrome
(Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation) Data reported by the Hearts Beat Back: The Heart of New Ulm Project reinforce the positive influence of lifestyle factors in mitigating risks that potentially increase the likelihood of heart disease and other health problems. Findings based on 1,059 residents of New Ulm, Minn., underscore the importance of obesity prevention and nutrition, specifically eating more fruits and vegetables, in addressing metabolic syndrome, a common precursor to cardiovascular disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 19, 2013 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Metabolic syndrome and the risk of suicide: A community-based integrated screening samples cohort study - Chang JC, Yen AM, Lee CS, Chen SL, Chiu SY, Fann JC, Chen HH.
This study therefore in... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - November 15, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

Current BMI Cutoffs May Miss Metabolic Disease RiskCurrent BMI Cutoffs May Miss Metabolic Disease Risk
Using the widely accepted body mass index cutoff of 30 for obesity may underestimate the risk of metabolic syndrome, and gauging risk based on sedentary behavior may be misleading, a new study suggests. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

β-cell adaptation to glucocorticoids
Glucocorticoids (GCs) are stress hormones primarily responsible for mobilizing glucose in the circulation. Insulin resistance and glucose intolerance are concerns in patients with endogenous overproduction of GCs or those prescribed GC-based therapy. Fransson and colleagues report a thorough characterization of a new mouse model,  finding that the model mimics the human setting well and that it could be a valuable model for studying the complex mechanisms behind the development of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, as well as the multifaceted relations between GC excess and disease. Read the full article...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - November 14, 2013 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Heavy but healthy people still at risk of heart disease (Reuters, 12 November 2013)
A 3-4 year follow-up study from Denmark published in JAMA Internal Medicine examines development of heart problems in relation to weight and metabolic syndrome among over 70,000 adults. Full article (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - November 13, 2013 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Overweight, obesity risk factors for heart attack
COPENHAGEN, Denmark, Nov. 12 (UPI) -- Being overweight or obese are risk factors for heart attack and heart disease even if people don't have metabolic syndrome, Danish researchers say. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - November 13, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BMI Alone May Up CVD Risk, Regardless of Metabolic SyndromeBMI Alone May Up CVD Risk, Regardless of Metabolic Syndrome
In a population-based study, overweight and obesity were linked to increased risk for myocardial infarction and ischemic heart disease, regardless of the presence or absence of metabolic syndrome. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 12, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Heavy but healthy people still at risk of heart disease
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Some researchers believe people who are overweight but otherwise healthy don't have a higher-than-normal risk of heart disease. But a new report suggests extra weight can be harmful alone, regardless of whether people have a cluster of risk factors known as metabolic syndrome. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 12, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Heavy but Healthy People Still At Risk of Heart Disease
Some researchers believe people who are overweight but otherwise healthy don't have a higher-than-normal risk of heart disease. But a new report suggests extra weight can be harmful alone, regardless of whether people have a cluster of risk factors known as metabolic syndrome.Source: Reuters Health Related MedlinePlus Pages: Heart Diseases, Obesity (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - November 12, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Being overweight or obese are risk factors for heart disease regardless of metabolic syndrome
Being overweight or obese are risk factors for myocardial infarction (heart attack) and ischemic heart disease (IHD) regardless of whether individuals also have the cluster of cardiovascular risk factors known as metabolic syndrome, which includes high blood pressure, high cholesterol and high blood sugar, according to a study published by JAMA Internal Medicine, a JAMA Network publication. Being overweight or obese likely causes MI and IHD but whether co-existing metabolic syndrome is necessary for the conditions to develop is unknown, according to the study authors. Børge G... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 12, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness Source Type: news

Excess Weight Hikes Cardiac Risk All on Its Own (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Being overweight or obese were risk factors for myocardial infarction and ischemic heart disease, even in the absence of metabolic syndrome, researchers found. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - November 11, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Aerobic exercise may trump resistance training in health benefits for obese teen girls
Obesity has more than doubled in children and tripled in adolescents in the United States in the past 30 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The growing rate of childhood obesity is a major health concern since overweight and obese youth are at increased risk of developing several diseases once considered reserved for adults. These new pediatric diseases include type-2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, a condition in which fat builds up in the liver, potentially impairing its function over time... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness Source Type: news

Insulin Responsiveness After Cycle TrainingInsulin Responsiveness After Cycle Training
What effect, if any, does cycle training have on insulin resistance in patients with metabolic syndrome? Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Orthopaedics Journal Article Source Type: news

Overweight, obese are risks for heart disease regardless of metabolic syndrome
(The JAMA Network Journals) Being overweight or obese are risk factors for myocardial infarction (heart attack) and ischemic heart disease regardless of whether individuals also have the cluster of cardiovascular risk factors known as metabolic syndrome, which includes high blood pressure, high cholesterol and high blood sugar, according to a study published by JAMA Internal Medicine, a JAMA Network publication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 11, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Metabolic syndrome components signal resistant hypertension
Chinese patients with hypertension that is difficult to treat often have poor cardiometabolic profiles, shows an analysis of the HOT-CHINA study. (Source: MedWire News - Hypertension)
Source: MedWire News - Hypertension - November 11, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Coffee Consumption, the Metabolic Syndrome, and NAFLDCoffee Consumption, the Metabolic Syndrome, and NAFLD
Could coffee consumption help to modulate the risk of both NAFLD and the metabolic syndrome? This new study explores the latest research. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology Journal Article Source Type: news

New study confirms health benefits of wild blueberries
Wild blueberries are a rich source of phytochemicals called polyphenols, which have been reported by a growing number of studies to exert a wide array of protective health benefits. A new study by researchers at the University of Maine adds to this growing body of evidence. This new research, published in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, shows that regular long-term wild blueberry diets may help improve or prevent pathologies associated with the metabolic syndrome, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 8, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

ANH-Intl News Alert
Magnesium and metabolic syndrome, UK ‘smart’ meters rollout and universal supplementation for UK kids (Source: Alliance for Natural Health)
Source: Alliance for Natural Health - November 6, 2013 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Sophie Tags: Dame Sally Davies diabetes europe George Osborne health claims heart disease international Magnesium metabolic syndrome smart meters stop smart meters! UK UK Chancellor of the Exchequer UK Chief Medical Officer Which? Source Type: news

Could eating blueberries add years to your life? Daily bowlful could protect against obesity, heart disease and diabetes
Regular consumption of the berries can improve or prevent metabolic syndrome, say researchers from the University of Maine. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 6, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health benefits of wild blueberries abound: Study
(Canadian Science Publishing (NRC Research Press)) New research published today in the journal Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, shows that regular long-term wild blueberry diets may help improve or prevent pathologies associated with the metabolic syndrome, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 6, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Association between metabolic syndrome and depression in elderly - Ciucurel C, Iconaru EI.
During the last decade the incidence of both metabolic syndrome (MS) and depression have been increased in elderly. The aim of this study was to examine the association between MS and the depression in a group of old people. We ascertained that MS is direc... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - November 1, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Metabolic Syndrome Ups Risk of Lung Problems After SurgeryMetabolic Syndrome Ups Risk of Lung Problems After Surgery
In a large bariatric-surgery population, pneumonia and other pulmonary complications occur more often in patients who have multiple cardiometabolic risk factors. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Anesthesiology News Source Type: news

NEJM Paper on CPAP-Metabolic Syndrome Retracted
(MedPage Today) -- A 2011 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine had shown that CPAP partially reverses metabolic syndrome, but the paper is being retracted because of errors. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - October 30, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Can DIY and gardening help you live longer?
Conclusion This study found that in a population-based sample of older adults (aged 60), high levels of non-exercise physical activity, or ‘an active daily life’ was associated with better levels of cardiovascular risk factors. When followed over time, it was found an active daily life was associated with approximately 30% reduced risk of both a cardiovascular event (stroke, angina, heart attack) and death from any cause. These associations were seen after adjusting for regular exercise, and for a number of other factors that could explain the association seen (confounders). This study was a cross-sectional an...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 29, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Testosterone Therapy Ameliorates Met Syn in Hypogonadal MenTestosterone Therapy Ameliorates Met Syn in Hypogonadal Men
Testosterone-replacement therapy given to hypogonadal men for 5 years resulted in improvements in a number of components of the metabolic syndrome, including lipids, BP, and HbA1c. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 28, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Testosterone therapy for men may reduce risk of cardiovascular disease
Research from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) suggests that testosterone treatment in hypogonadal (testosterone deficient) men restores normal lipid profiles and may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. These finding currently appear online in the International Journal of Clinical Practice. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. There is a strong association between MetS and testosterone deficiency... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 25, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

U.S. adults eat too little fiber, lack of fiber ups heart risk
BOSTON, Oct. 23 (UPI) -- There is a significant association between eating a low-fiber diet and increased heart risks including metabolic syndrome and obesity, U.S. researchers say. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 24, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Surgery Tops for Weight Loss, Study Affirms (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Bariatric surgery leads to significantly greater weight loss and resolution of diabetes and metabolic syndrome as compared with nonsurgical approaches to obesity, a meta-analysis of randomized trials showed. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - October 23, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Saturated fat link with heart disease questioned
This article is one doctor's opinion based on his own knowledge, research and experience. However, it is fair to say there is an ongoing debate about how far cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease, especially in people who are otherwise healthy. There is also a similar debate about the use of statins in people who have no evidence of cardiovascular disease. This is alongside ongoing research into the components of LDL and the different types of lipoproteins known to increase risk the most. None of this relevant new evidence is covered by the news reporting.   What should you eat? There is no need to change cu...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 23, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Food/diet QA articles Source Type: news

Weight loss surgery 'more effective than diet and exercise'
To maintain a healthy weight, medical professionals emphasize that diet and exercise are key. But a new study suggests that for those who are obese, weight-loss surgery is more effective at reducing body weight, compared with non-surgical methods. The findings, published in the BMJ, suggest that weight-loss surgery also increases remission rates of obese patients with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows weight loss surgery is gaining popularity... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 23, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness Source Type: news

Study: Metformin for breast cancer less effective at higher glucose concentrations
(University of Colorado Denver) A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published online this month in the journal Cell Cycle shows that breast cancer cell growth, motility and aggression is promoted by excess glucose, as experienced by patients with diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The study also showed that patients with high glucose may require higher doses of the drug metformin to achieve the same anti-cancer activity as patients with normal glucose levels. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 23, 2013 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Sugar, Uric Acid, and the Etiology of Diabetes and ObesitySugar, Uric Acid, and the Etiology of Diabetes and Obesity
More bad news for fructose? Read how fructose metabolism may contribute to metabolic syndrome and fat accumulation. Diabetes (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology Journal Article Source Type: news

Metabolic Syndrome and CRP Linked to Cognitive Decline Metabolic Syndrome and CRP Linked to Cognitive Decline
In those over age 60 in the NHANES database, large waist circumference and elevated blood pressure and glucose significantly increased the risk for cognitive decline. C-reactive protein expression seemed to enhance the risk. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Study strengthens link between low dietary fiber intake and increased cardiovascular risk
(Elsevier Health Sciences) A new study published in the December issue of The American Journal of Medicine shows a significant association between low dietary fiber intake and cardiometabolic risks including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular inflammation, and obesity. Surveillance data from 23,168 subjects in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2010 was used to examine the role dietary fiber plays in heart health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 18, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

How bariatric surgery impacts health depends on type of surgery, patient characteristics
The impact of bariatric surgery on risk factors for cardiovascular disease depends on a variety of factors, including the type of surgery, sex of the patient, ethnic background, and pre-surgery body mass index, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published in Annals of Surgery. Researchers examined the electronic health records of more than 4,000 Kaiser Permanente patients in Southern California who had bariatric surgery for weight loss between 2009 and 2011 to determine what factors led to remission - or reduction - of metabolic syndrome after surgery... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 16, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness Source Type: news

Association of C-reactive protein with metabolic syndrome and depressive symptoms in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing - Au B.
INTRODUCTION: The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors comprised of elevated fasting plasma glucose and insulin resistance, central obesity, low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension. Depression i... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - October 10, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

Post-traumatic stress disorder increases risk of metabolic syndrome
People suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) face a greater risk of cardiovascular disease and death. A new study involving a comprehensive review of the medical literature shows that PTSD also increases an individual's risk of metabolic syndrome. What links these two disorders is not clear, according to a study published in Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available on the Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders website... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Anxiety / Stress Source Type: news

Does post-traumatic stress disorder increase the risk of metabolic syndrome?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study involving a comprehensive review of the medical literature shows that PTSD also increases an individual's risk of metabolic syndrome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 2, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Multiple health risks in adulthood can stem from abuse, lack of parental warmth in childhood
The effects of childhood abuse and lack of parental affection can last a lifetime, taking a toll both emotionally and physically. There are many reports assessing the psychological damage resulting from childhood abuse, and the effects on physical health have also been well documented. For instance, this "toxic" stress has been linked to elevated cholesterol, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome and other physical conditions posing a significant health risk. The research into the physical effects of abuse, however, has focused on separate, individual systems... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 1, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychology / Psychiatry Source Type: news

Lack of parental warmth, abuse in childhood linked to multiple health risks in adulthood
This study was also supported by the MacArthur Research Network on Socioeconomic Status and Health through grants from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and by grant T32-MH19925 and the Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology at the UCLA.   The UCLA Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology encompasses an interdisciplinary network of scientists working to advance the understanding of psychoneuroimmunology by linking basic and clinical research programs and by translating findings into clinical practice. The center is affiliated with the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior and the David...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 1, 2013 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Binge Eating More Likely to Lead to Metabolic Syndrome in MenBinge Eating More Likely to Lead to Metabolic Syndrome in Men
Obese men with binge eating disorder are much more likely than women with the disorder to develop metabolic syndrome. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - September 26, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

Diabetes biomarker linked to lifestyle and demographic
Scientists say they have discovered a definitive link between certain lifestyle and demographic factors and a potential biomarker to determine the risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the journal Clinical Chemistry. Researchers from the US and Japan say their latest research builds on previous studies that show how low levels of a protein called sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) can be an indication of increased risk for metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes years in advance. For the study, led by Dr... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 23, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes Source Type: news

Scientists creating new diagnostic and bioinformatics tools for psychotic disorders
(VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland) A new EU project, METSY, develops and applies neuroimaging and bioinformatics tools to study how lipid metabolism is connected to psychotic disorders and metabolic co-morbidities such as metabolic syndrome and diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 16, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Does Fructose Promote Metabolic Disorder? (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- The production of fructose from glucose in the liver contributes to metabolic syndrome in mice, says a report in Nature Communications. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - September 14, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Protein May Hold Key to Metabolic Syndrome (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Inactivation of a protein -- Ecscr -- that regulates endothelial cell signaling enhanced insulin sensitivity in mice and could represent a new therapeutic strategy for treating metabolic syndrome and possibly obesity, researchers reported. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - September 13, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Fat Plus SNP Fights Metabolic Syndrome (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Patients with metabolic syndrome who have a certain gene variant may benefit more from a high-fat diet than a low-fat one, researchers found. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - September 8, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Epicardial Fat Tied to RA Risk (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- The volume of epicardial adipose tissue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) correlated with the presence of metabolic syndrome and cardiometabolic risk factors, which may help explain why they're at risk for premature atherosclerosis, researchers reported. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - August 29, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Neck Circumference as Predictor of Cardio-Metabolic SyndromeNeck Circumference as Predictor of Cardio-Metabolic Syndrome
Does neck circumference predict cardiometabolic risk better than other anthropometric indices? Cardiovascular Diabetology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology Journal Article Source Type: news