Reviewing the Clinical Evidence for NAD+ Upregulation
I recently collaborated on a review paper covering the history of clinical work on upregulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) as an approach to therapy. This is of interest to the aging research community because NAD is important to mitochondrial function. NAD levels diminish with age, alongside a loss of mitochondrial function that is known to contribute to the onset and progression of many age-related conditions. Animal studies and a few clinical trials have indicated that increased NAD levels may improve, for example, cardiovascular function in older individuals, as a result of improved mitochondrial functi...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 22, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Dysfunction of the Blood-Brain Barrier as an Early Stage in the Progression to Dementia
The blood-brain barrier is a lining of specialized cells that surrounds blood vessels passing through the brain. The barrier permits only certain molecules and cells to pass, isolating the tissue environment of the brain from that of the result of the body. When the blood-brain barrier leaks, an immediate consequence is inflammation in brain tissue, the result of the brain's immune cells reacting to the presence of inappropriate molecules. Unfortunately the integrity of the blood-brain barrier degrades with age and the accumulation of molecular damage, as is the case for all other tissues. The resulting inflammation is an ...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 11, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 17th 2020
In this study, we sought to elucidate the role of VRK-1 in regulation of adult life span in C. elegans. We found that overexpression of VRK-1::GFP (green fluorescent protein), which was detected in the nuclei of cells in multiple somatic tissues, including the intestine, increased life span. Conversely, genetic inhibition of vrk-1 decreased life span. We further showed that vrk-1 was essential for the increased life span of mitochondrial respiratory mutants. We demonstrated that VRK-1 was responsible for increasing the level of active and phosphorylated form of AMPK, thus promoting longevity. A Fisetin Variant, C...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 16, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Reviewing Associations Between Physical Activity and Loss of Average Telomere Length with Age
Telomeres are repeated DNA sequences at the ends of chromosomes. With each cell division a little telomere length is lost, and this is an important part of the countdown mechanism that limits replication of somatic cells. Somatic cells with short telomeres become senescent or self-destruct. Stem cells, on the other hand, use telomerase to lengthen their telomeres, and thus produce daughter somatic cells with long telomeres throughout a lifetime. This two-tier system of privileged stem cells and limited somatic cells, present in near all animals, keeps the risk of cancer low enough for evolutionary success, while still allo...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 13, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Exercise May Aid in Resisting Frailty and Cognitive Decline in Part via Effects on the Gut Microbiome
The gut microbiome is influential on long-term health, and its quality declines with age. Microbial populations that produce beneficial metabolites such as butyrate or propionate decline in number, replaced by microbial populations that invade tissue and cause chronic inflammation. Physical exercise influences health and the gut microbiome, but as noted here, the evidence for exercise to beneficially regulate these microbial populations largely results from animal studies. Data in humans is still comparatively lacking, even though epidemiological studies strongly suggest a relationship between exercise and a better gut mic...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 13, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 3rd 2020
In this study, we examined the effects of oxytocin on the Aβ-induced impairment of synaptic plasticity in mice. To investigate the effect of oxytocin on synaptic plasticity, we prepared acute hippocampal slices for extracellular recording and assessed long-term potentiation (LTP) with perfusion of the Aβ active fragment (Aβ25-35) in the absence and presence of oxytocin. We found that oxytocin reversed the impairment of LTP induced by Aβ25-35 perfusion in the mouse hippocampus. These effects were blocked by pretreatment with the selective oxytocin receptor antagonist L-368,899. Furthermore, the tr...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 2, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Eating Ourselves into Shorter, Less Healthy Lives
We humans have not evolved for optimal function given a continually high calorie intake. We, and all other species, evolved in an environment characterized by periods of feast and famine: we desire food constantly, but nonetheless need some amount of hunger in order to be healthy. Periods of low calorie intake spur increased activity of tissue maintenance mechanisms throughout the body. A lower overall calorie intake minimizes excess visceral fat tissue that causes chronic inflammation and metabolic disease. In this modern society of comfort and cheap calories, all too many people are eating themselves into shorter, less h...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 30, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 27th 2020
In this study, we applied a well studied prediction model developed on data from five CpG sites, to increase the practicability of these tests. We have determined the biological age of the heart, specifically of the right atrium (RA) and left atrium (LA), and of peripheral blood leucocytes, by measuring the mitotic telomere length (TL) and the non-mitotic epigenetic age (DNAmAge). We found that DNAmAge, of both atrial tissues (RA and LA), was younger in respect to the chronological age (-12 years). Furthermore, no significant difference existed between RA and LA, suggesting that, although anatomically diverse and ex...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 26, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Eating a Plant Based Diet Correlates with Better Health and Lower Mortality
In a few recent scientific publications, the authors examined the differences in incidence of age-related disease and mortality in populations with differing levels of plant versus animal dietary protein intake. The closer to a vegan diet one approaches, the lower the risk of disease and mortality. There is already plenty of evidence for this outcome in the literature, although, as in all such things, the outstanding questions revolve around which of the possible mechanisms are the important ones. For example, it should be expected that a lesser intake of animal protein will lower inflammation throughout the body. B...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 21, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 20th 2020
This study was the first to demonstrate a causal relationship between glial senescence and neurodegeneration. In this study, accumulations of senescent astrocytes and microglia were found in tau-associated neurodegenerative disease model mice. Elimination of these senescent cells via a genetic approach can reduce tau deposition and prevent the degeneration of cortical and hippocampal neurons. Most recently, it was shown that clearance of senescent oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in AD model mice with senolytic agents could lessen the Aβ plaque load, reduce neuroinflammation, and ameliorate cognitive deficits. ...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 19, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Metabolic syndrome is on the rise: What it is and why it matters
Metabolic syndrome may be the most common and serious condition you’ve never heard of. (At least that’s what I found out when I asked friends and relatives about it.) Worse, a study published recently in JAMA shows that it’s on the rise. Let’s start with the name, according to Merriam-Webster: Metabolic: Relating to the chemical changes in living cells by which energy is provided for vital processes and activities and new material is assimilated Syndrome: A group of signs and symptoms that occur together and characterize a particular abnormality or condition. So now you know what metabolic syndrome ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Coronavirus and COVID-19 Diabetes Health Health care disparities Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Source Type: blogs

Lipocalin 2 as a Link Between Metabolic Syndrome and Neuroinflammation
Obesity and its immediate consequences, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes, are associated with greater neuroinflammation and risk of dementia. Excess visceral fat tissue does its part to produce chronic inflammation throughout the body, but here researchers focus on a specific metabolic dysregulation in the liver that produces inflammation in the brain. That inflammation in turn drives a faster progression towards neurodegenerative conditions. The lesson here, as in so much of this research: don't get fat, don't stay fat. You won't like the consequences. Researchers have revealed the ca...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 14, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The Everyday Drink That Doubles Weight Loss
The drink may also be protective against type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. → Support PsyBlog for just $5 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - July 5, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 18th 2020
This study provides direct evidence for the contribution of gut microbiota to the cognitive decline during normal aging and suggests that restoring microbiota homeostasis in the elderly may improve cognitive function. On Nutraceutical Senolytics https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/05/on-nutraceutical-senolytics/ Nutraceuticals are compounds derived from foods, usually plants. In principle one can find useful therapies in the natural world, taking the approach of identifying interesting molecules and refining them to a greater potency than naturally occurs in order to produce a usefully large therape...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 17, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Early Life Epigenetic Changes can Set the Stage for Later Life Metabolic Dysfunction
Epigenetic markers on DNA determine the pace and timing of protein production, and are thus one of the important influences on cell and tissue function. Cells adjust their epigenetic programs in response to the surrounding environment, but alterations can be lasting. It is thought that environmental influences on epigenetic programming of cellular behavior that occur in childhood set the stage for faster or slower onset of metabolic dysfunction in later life, once cell and tissue damage starts to accumulate. Researchers here provide a proof of principle of this process in rats. Environmental exposures during early...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 15, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Physical Activity Slows the Consequences of Aging
We live in a world in which most people do not undertake anywhere near the level of physical activity that is optimal. Thus adding greater physical activity as a lifestyle choice appears very beneficial. There is a great deficiency, one that has serious consequences to health, and fixing that deficiency is touted as a successful intervention. But in reality, the situation is one in which most people harm their long term health through a form of self-neglect. This era of cheap calories and comfort is a time of vast benefits for humanity - but it has a few downsides, and this is one of them. This meta-analysis showe...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 12, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Are sugar substitutes too sweet to be true?
About 40% of adults use low-calorie sweeteners, and most of those people do so at least once daily. While these sugar substitutes are most commonly consumed in beverages, they’re also eaten in foods and used in place of sugar to stir into coffee or sprinkle over cereal. The presence of such sweeteners in our foods isn’t always apparent, though phrases like “light,” “no sugar added,” “sugar-free,” or “low-calorie” mean there’s a good chance they contain a sugar substitute. People are often unsure about whether to consume these items, and for good reason. An a...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Gelsomin, MLA, RD, LDN Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Weight loss can help head off lasting damage caused by fatty liver
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of liver disease in the United States, and is estimated to affect up to a quarter of adults in the world. It is defined by excess fat accumulating in the liver and usually occurs in people with obesity, high blood sugars (diabetes), abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels, or high blood pressure. These disorders often run together and as a group are called metabolic syndrome. The “non-alcoholic” part of “non-alcoholic fatty liver disease” is important to distinguish it from alcohol-related liver disease, which can also cause excess liver...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Irun Bhan, MD Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Digestive Disorders Source Type: blogs

Role of aldosterone in obesity
Role of aldosterone in obesity: Excessive aldosterone is produced by adrenal glands and adipose tissue in obesity. This explains the sensitivity of heart failure (HF) in obesity to mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRA) [1]. Epicardial fat thickness has been shown to be increased in primary hyperaldosteronism [2]. So aldosterone secretion enhances fat deposition and fat deposits enhance aldosterone secretion. Primary hyperaldosteronism is associated with increased left ventricular mass and cardiovascular risk. Transition of epicardial fat from a nourishing tissue to proinflammatory tissue is mediated by aldosterone....
Source: Cardiophile MD - April 29, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 9th 2020
In this study, we intravenously administrated the young mitochondria into aged mice to evaluate whether energy production increase in aged tissues or age-related behaviors improved after the mitochondrial transplantation. The results showed that heterozygous mitochondrial DNA of both aged and young mouse coexisted in tissues of aged mice after mitochondrial administration, and meanwhile, ATP content in tissues increased while reactive oxygen species (ROS) level reduced. Besides, the mitotherapy significantly improved cognitive and motor performance of aged mice. Our study, at the first report in aged animals, not only prov...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 8, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

In Rats, Calorie Restriction Started in Later Life Prevents Many Age-Related Changes in Gene Expression
Researchers here apply modern genomics approaches to assessing the ability of calorie restriction to slow the progression of aging. As is usually the case, beyond greater understanding of the complexities of the metabolic response to calorie restriction, the goal is to find potential points of intervention that have as yet gone unremarked. Single genes where expression might be changed in order to mimic some fraction of the response to a lower calorie intake. Taken more broadly, exploration that might lead to the development of novel calorie restriction mimetics represents a sizable fraction of all present work on interven...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 5, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Deacetylation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome as a Way to Control Chronic Inflammation
Chronic inflammation is an important component of degenerative aging. Excessive inflammatory signaling and activation of the immune system arises due to a combination of many factors, of which some are more important than others, such as the presence of lingering senescent cells. Most of the research focused on controlling inflammation is more interested in sabotaging the mechanisms of control than in removing root causes, however. The work here is an example of the type, in which scientists identify an important feature of the regulatory system controlling inflammation. Forcing a sizable reduction of inflammation via this...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 13, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 13th 2020
In this study, we investigated the link between AF and senescence markers through the assessment of protein expression in the tissue lysates of human appendages from patients in AF, including paroxysmal (PAF) or permanent AF (PmAF), and in sinus rhythm (SR). The major findings of the study indicated that the progression of AF is strongly related to the human atrial senescence burden as determined by p53 and p16 expression. The stepwise increase of senescence (p53, p16), prothrombotic (TF), and proremodeling (MMP-9) markers observed in the right atrial appendages of patients in SR, PAF, and PmAF points toward multiple inter...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 12, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Mitochondrially Targeted Antioxidant SS-31 Reduces Mitochondrial Proton Leak and Dysfunction in a Mouse Model of Heart Failure
In this report we investigated the effect and underlying mechanism of action of SS-31 on aged cardiomyocytes, especially on the mitochondrial proton leak. Using the naturally aged rodent model we provided direct evidence of increased proton leak as the primary energetic change in aged mitochondria. We further show that the inner membrane protein ANT1 mediates the augmented proton entry in the old mitochondria. Most significantly, we demonstrate that SS-31 prevents the proton entry and rejuvenates mitochondrial function through direct association with ANT1 and stabilization of the ATP synthasome. (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - January 10, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 23rd 2019
In this study, by adenovirus-mediated delivery and inducible transgenic mouse models, we demonstrate the proliferation of both HCs and SCs by combined Notch1 and Myc activation in in vitro and in vivo inner ear adult mouse models. These proliferating mature SCs and HCs maintain their respective identities. Moreover, when presented with HC induction signals, reprogrammed adult SCs transdifferentiate into HC-like cells both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, our data suggest that regenerated HC-like cells likely possess functional transduction channels and are able to form connections with adult auditory neurons. Epige...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 22, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Immunization Against Flagellin as a Way to Beneficially Alter Aging Gut Microbiota Populations
The microbial populations of the gut make a significant contribution to health via secreted metabolites and interactions with the immune system. Starting in mid-life, these populations alter for the worse, and this is thought to influence the progression of aging - perhaps primarily as a contributing cause of chronic inflammation. How this effect size compares with those resulting from dietary and exercise choices is an open question, but it isn't unreasonable to suggest it to be in the same ballpark as exercise. What can be done to improve this situation? Supplementation with metabolites produced in larger amounts ...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 18, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Psoriasis and cancer: What ’s the link?
This study does not go into detail about the extent to which these comorbidities may influence the increased risk of cancer in psoriasis patients. People with severe psoriasis often do not get enough relief with topical therapies (ones applied to the skin), such as topical corticosteroids and vitamin D analogues. They may then be started on medications that target specific immune cells and proteins. Some of these medications increase the risk of infections. Previous studies have found little to no increased risk of cancer in patients receiving these therapies. Other treatments, such as phototherapy (light therapy), are kno...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dominic Wu, MD Tags: Cancer Skin and Hair Care Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 14th 2019
In conclusion, a polypharmacology approach of combining established, prolongevity drug inhibitors of specific nodes may be the most effective way to target the nutrient-sensing network to improve late-life health. Deletion of p38α in Neurons Slows Neural Stem Cell Decline and Loss of Cognitive Function in Mice https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/10/deletion-of-p38%ce%b1-in-neurons-slows-neural-stem-cell-decline-and-loss-of-cognitive-function-in-mice/ Researchers here provide evidence for p38α to be involved in the regulation of diminished neural stem cell activity with age. It is thought...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 13, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Data on Exercise as a Treatment for Age-Related Arterial Stiffness
In addition to its effect on muscle growth, exercise upregulates a range of maintenance processes, such as autophagy, that improve tissue function when maintained over the long term. Lack of exercise in later life accelerates the decline in muscle mass and strength, an issue that appears reversible to a degree that might surprise most people. A similar situation occurs with respect to stiffening of blood vessels, in that while much of this depends on mechanisms such as cross-linking and presence of senescent cells, some of the decline is a matter of being sedentary. The interesting finding in the open access study n...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 7, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Using FibroScan in The Clinic: Interview with Dr. Stephen A. Harrison
EchoSens creates non-invasive liver diagnosis medical devices. The company’s line of products, called FibroScan, work by measuring the speed of ultrasound waves as they move through liver tissue. This measurement can tell us about the state of the liver. For example, ultrasound waves move faster through fibrotic/scarred livers. EchoSens recently appointed Dominique Legros as their new global CEO, and we recently spoke about his plans for growth in a Medgadget exclusive.  To learn more about how a clinician would use the FibroScan, we spoke with Dr. Stephen A. Harrison, Medical Director of Pinnacle Clinical Re...
Source: Medgadget - September 30, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Ben Ouyang Tags: Diagnostics Exclusive GI Medicine Source Type: blogs

The Everyday Drink That Doubles Weight Loss
The drink may also be protective against type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - August 25, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Inside Schizophrenia: Childhood Schizophrenia
 In this episode of Inside Schizophrenia, our hosts tackle the topic of early onset – or childhood – schizophrenia. Host Rachel Star discusses her personal experiences with schizophrenia symptoms as an adolescent and Dr. Joseph Gonzalez-Heydrich from Harvard Medical School discusses some of the latest research. Listen in now! About Our Guest Joseph Gonzalez-Heydrich, MD is Director of the Developmental Neuropsychiatry Clinic at Boston Children’s Hospital and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the Harvard Medical School. He did his undergraduate and medical school at Johns Hopkins, his residency t...
Source: World of Psychology - July 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rachel Star Withers Tags: Disorders Inside Schizophrenia Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 15th 2019
In conclusion, we show here that sEVs are responsible for mediating paracrine senescence and speculate that they could be involved in inducing bystander senescence during therapy-induced senescence or aging. In fact, when compared to soluble factors, sEVs have different biophysical and biochemical properties as they have a longer lifespan than do soluble factors and they are more resistant to protease degradation. The idea that blocking sEV secretion could be a potential therapeutic approach to alleviate senescence "spreading" during chemotherapy-induced senescence or in aging tissues presents itself as a very at...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 15, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

More Supporting Evidence for Pancreatic Fat to be the Cause of Type 2 Diabetes
Type 2 diabetes is, for the vast majority of patients, a condition caused by being significantly overweight. Age does has an influence on the risk of being overweight leading to metabolic syndrome and then type 2 diabetes; it is reasonable to say that type 2 diabetes is an age-related condition. In essence, the younger you are, the more fat tissue it requires to push your metabolism over the red line. A few years back, researchers demonstrated that it is specifically fat in the pancreas that causes type 2 diabetes. Of course the only way to put that fat into the pancreas in the normal course of affairs is to become very ov...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 9, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 1st 2019
In this study, we determine whether transient reintroduction of embryonic stem cell cycle miR-294 promotes cardiomyocyte cell cycle reentry enhancing cardiac repair after myocardial injury. A doxycycline-inducible AAV9-miR-294 vector was delivered to mice for activating miR-294 in myocytes for 14 days continuously after myocardial infarction. miR-294-treated mice significantly improved left ventricular functions together with decreased infarct size and apoptosis 8 weeks after MI. Myocyte cell cycle reentry increased in miR-294 hearts parallel to increased small myocyte number in the heart. Isolated adult myocytes from miR-...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 30, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Suggesting that Cytomegalovirus Infection Contributes to Metabolic Syndrome
Metabolic syndrome is the precursor to type 2 diabetes, and is caused by the presence of excess visceral fat tissue. Age is a factor, however, in that people become more susceptible to the harmful consequences of being overweight in later life. Why is this the case? Recent evidence points towards the creation of additional lingering senescent cells as an important mechanism linking fat tissue to chronic inflammation and disruption of metabolism. Cellular senescence is an age-related mechanism. (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - June 26, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 22nd 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 21, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Calorie Restriction Affects the Plasticity of Fat Tissue, Not Just the Amount of Fat Tissue
The practice of calorie restriction, a reduction of up to 40% below the usual ad libitum calorie intake, while still obtaining optimal levels of dietary micronutrients, is well known to slow aging and extend life in near all species and lineages tested to date. Calorie restriction produces sweeping changes in the operation of cellular metabolism, such as upregulation of a range of cellular stress responses, including the maintenance processes of autophagy. It also, however, has the obvious outcome of greatly reducing body fat, particularly the visceral fat that clusters around the organs of the abdomen. Visceral fat...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 15, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 25th 2019
This study defines a new clinically relevant concept of T-cell senescence-mediated inflammatory responses in the pathophysiology of abnormal glucose homeostasis. We also found that T-cell senescence is associated with systemic inflammation and alters hepatic glucose homeostasis. The rational modulation of T-cell senescence would be a promising avenue for the treatment or prevention of diabetes. Intron Retention via Alternative Splicing as a Signature of Aging https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/03/intron-retention-via-alternative-splicing-as-a-signature-of-aging/ In recent years researchers have inv...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 24, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A practical guide to the Mediterranean diet
The Mediterranean diet has received much attention as a healthy way to eat, and with good reason. The Mediterranean diet has been shown to reduce risk of heart disease, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, certain cancers, depression, and in older adults, a decreased risk of frailty, along with better mental and physical function. In January, US News and World Report named it the “best diet overall” for the second year running. What is the Mediterranean diet? The traditional Mediterranean diet is based on foods available in countries that border the Mediterranean Sea. The foundation for this healthy diet includes an ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

T Cell Senescence Is Involved in the Disruption of Glucose Metabolism in Type 2 Diabetes
This study defines a new clinically relevant concept of T-cell senescence-mediated inflammatory responses in the pathophysiology of abnormal glucose homeostasis. We also found that T-cell senescence is associated with systemic inflammation and alters hepatic glucose homeostasis. The rational modulation of T-cell senescence would be a promising avenue for the treatment or prevention of diabetes. (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - March 20, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

The Best Way To Lose Stomach Fat
Belly fat is linked to developing heart disease, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - March 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 11th 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 10, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

RAGE Knockout Reduces Age-Related Kidney Damage in Mice
RAGE is the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), the mechanism by which cells react to the presence of AGEs. AGEs are metabolic byproducts that are both created in the body and present in the diet; cooking animal fat produces AGEs, for example. Diets heavy in meat and the related, fun, unhealthy products so prevalent in this modern calorie-packed world of ours are also heavy in AGEs of various sorts. It remains a topic for discussion as to the degree to which dietary AGEs are a problem, however. Do they contribute significantly to the issues caused by AGEs in general, or only in conditions in which metaboli...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 6, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Sweeteners: Time to rethink your choices?
When it comes to low-calorie sweeteners, you have a lot of choices. There’s the blue one, the pink one, the yellow one, or the green one. Whichever one you choose, know that scientists have probably studied it extensively. What they’ve found may surprise you. Artificial and other non-caloric sweeteners: The major players The marketers for artificial sweeteners have color-coded their products, but they differ in some important ways beyond their packaging. In the US, the most popular FDA-approved non-sugar sweeteners (NSSs) and their most common packaging color are: aspartame (blue): examples include Nutrasweet ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 11th 2019
We report that the bone marrow stromal cell senescence is driven by p16INK4a expression. The p16INK4a-expressing senescent stromal cells then feedback to promote AML blast survival and proliferation via the SASP. Importantly, selective elimination of p16INK4a-positive senescent bone marrow stromal cells in vivo improved the survival of mice with leukemia. Next, we find that the leukemia-driven senescent tumor microenvironment is caused by AML induced NOX2-derived superoxide. Finally, using the p16-3MR mouse model we show that by targeting NOX2 we reduced bone marrow stromal cell senescence and consequently reduced A...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 10, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Autophagy is Everywhere in Aging
Researchers who work on autophagy might well feel justified in issuing the claim that the processes of autophagy are involved in near every aspect of aging. Autophagy is cellular housekeeping, the recycling of damaged or unwanted structures and molecules inside the cell. In chaperone-mediated autophagy, very selective chaperone proteins pick up other molecules and carry them to lysosomes. In macroautophagy, materials to be broken down are engulfed in an autophagosome, which then travels to the lysosome and fuses with it. In microautophagy, the lysosome engulfs materials directly. In all cases, the lysosome is the end of th...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 6, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 21st 2019
In this study, scientists screened cells from old animals to identify any RBPs that change upon aging. The screening showed that one particular protein, Pumilio2 (PUM2), was highly induced in old animals. PUM2 binds mRNA molecules containing specific recognition sites. Upon its binding, PUM2 represses the translation of the target mRNAs into proteins. Using a systems genetics approach, the researchers then identified a new mRNA target that PUM2 binds. The mRNA encodes for a protein called Mitochondrial Fission Factor (MFF), and is a pivotal regulator of mitochondrial fission - a process by which mitochondria break u...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 20, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Versican May Increase Cellular Senescence and Calcification in the Blood Vessels of Hyperglycemic Patients
I found this paper quite intriguing, as it links together a number of themes in vascular aging and the similar forms of vascular dysfunction seen in metabolic syndrome and diabetes. The molecular damage of aging in blood vessel walls causes stiffness of blood vessels, which in turn causes hypertension. This is one of the more important means by which low level biochemical damage is translated to high level structural damage to tissues, as raised blood pressure causes all sorts of harm. The damage that leads to vascular stiffness includes (a) cross-linking, in which sugary metabolic byproducts form links between molecules o...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 15, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 14th 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 13, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs