Scientists devise method to prevent deadly hospital infections without antibiotics
A hospital or medical clinic might be the last place you ’d expect to pick up a nasty infection, but approximately 1.7 million Americans do each year, resulting in nearly 100,000 deaths from infection-related complications and roughly $30 billion in direct medical costs.The biggest culprits, experts say — accounting for two-thirds of these infections — are medical devices like catheters, stents, heart valves and pacemakers, whose surfaces often become covered with harmful bacterial films. But a novel surface treatment developed by a UCLA-led team of scientists could help improve the safety of t hese devices and ease ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 19, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Materials science and bacteria are key to remediation, experts say
<div class="rxbodyfield">At NIEHS Superfund Research Program event, hundreds learned about grantees&rsquo; novel strategies to remove contaminants from the environment.</div> (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - May 3, 2022 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Medline and Hologenix Partner on New Curad Performance Series Line Powered By Celliant
LOS ANGELES, March 29, 2022 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Medline, a leading medical product distributor and manufacturer, and materials science innovator Hologenix® are excited to announce that they have partnered on a new line of CURA... Devices, Orthopaedic, Distribution Medline, Hologenix, CURAD, CELLIANT (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - March 29, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Sweating the small stuff: Smartwatch developed at UCLA measures key stress hormone
The human body responds to stress, from the everyday to the extreme, by producing a hormone called cortisol.To date, it has been impractical to measure cortisol as a way to potentially identify conditions such as depression and post-traumatic stress, in which levels of the hormone are elevated. Cortisol levels traditionally have been evaluated through blood samples by professional labs, and while those measurements can be useful for diagnosing certain diseases, they fail to capture changes in cortisol levels over time.Now, a UCLA research team has developed a device that could be a major step forward: a smartwatch that ass...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 7, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

2021 reflections: In an amazing year of achievements, nothing topped the return to campus
As we approach the end of December, it ’s a natural time to look back at the year that was. In 2021, UCLA welcomed students, faculty, staff, alumni and visitors back to our home in Westwood, though of course it wasn’t exactly the way things had been.Different from pre-pandemic times: Masks remain present. Better (much better): UCLA officially opened the Black Bruin Resource Center.Even with all the changes, UCLA persisted as a force for public good, guided by our mission of teaching, research and service. In the past year,  professors continued helping us better understand our world with their research, students kept ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 17, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

43 UCLA scholars among most highly cited researchers for 2021
​​The world’s most influential researchers include 43 UCLA scholars.In its latest annual list, Clarivate Analytics names the most highly cited researchers — the scholars whose work was most often referenced by other scientific research papers in 21 fields in the sciences and social sciences. The researchers rank in the top 1% in their fields, based on their widely cited studies. The 2021 list is produced using research citations from January 2010 to December 2020.Current UCLA faculty members and researchers who were named to the list, and their primary UCLA research field or fields, are:Carrie Bearden, psychiatr...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 16, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How ‘wonder material’ graphene became a national security concern
UK and China are racing to develop forms of super-strong technology – with potential aerospace and weaponry usesA large shed on an unassuming industrial estate beside Swansea ’s River Tawe does not at first glance seem vital to the UK’s national security. The facility, run by a small company called Perpetuus , sits beside a mortuary and a parcel depot.Earlier this month, the company, which makes graphene – a “wonder material” made of a single layer of carbon atoms – grabbed the attention of the government, which said it wouldinvestigate a possible takeover involving a Chinese academic, in a highly unusual mov...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 27, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jasper Jolly Tags: Manufacturing sector Materials science China Business UK news Wales Nanotechnology Kwasi Kwarteng Manchester Swansea Physics Source Type: news

Lesley Chow honored with national Early-Career Undergraduate Research Mentoring Award
(Lehigh University) Lehigh University assistant professor Lesley Chow (bioengineering; materials science and engineering) is a 2021 recipient of the Early-Career Undergraduate Research Mentoring Award presented by the Engineering Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research. The award recognizes her contributions as a mentor to undergrads 'from a diverse range of backgrounds and identities,' her support of their efforts to share their work with the scholarly community, and her track record of involving undergraduates in her research lab. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 17, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Detoxifiers from the landfill
(Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)) Bacteria from an Indian landfill could help eliminate contaminated chemicals. The focus is on pesticides such as lindane or brominated flame retardants, which accumulate in nature and in food chains. Researchers at Empa and Eawag used these bacteria to generate enzymes that can break down these dangerous chemicals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 17, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Anna Ploszajski: crafting to better understand material science – podcast
Material science allows us to understand the objects around us mathematically, but there is no formula to describe the sophistication of a handcrafted teacup. Dr Anna Ploszajski is a materials scientist who has travelled all over the UK, meeting makers to better understand her craft and theirs. She spoke to Shivani Dave about what she discovered and documented in her new book, Handmade.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Produced and presented by Shivani Dave Tags: Materials science Chemistry Physics Source Type: news

The biodegradable battery
(Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)) The number of data-transmitting microdevices, for instance in packaging and transport logistics, will increase sharply in the coming years. All these devices need energy, but the amount of batteries would have a major impact on the environment. Empa researchers have developed a biodegradable mini-capacitor that can solve the problem. It consists of carbon, cellulose, glycerin and table salt. And it works reliably. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 3, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lehigh Engineering PhD students earn prestigious STEM research fellowships from NSF, DoD
(Lehigh University) Mari-Therese Burton (materials science and engineering) and Nicole Malofsky (bioengineering), PhD students in Lehigh University's P.C. Rossin College of Engineering and Applied Science, have been selected for prestigious national STEM research fellowships. Malofsky (advised by assistant professor Lesley Chow) will receive support through the NSF's Graduate Research Fellowship Program to attend Vanderbilt University. Burton (advised by professor Martin Harmer) will continue PhD studies at Lehigh as a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellow. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rising energy demand for cooling
(Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)) Climate-related temperature rises will further increase the cooling demand of buildings. A projection by Empa researchers based on data from the NEST building and future climate scenarios for Switzerland shows that this increase in energy demand for cooling is likely to be substantial and could have a strong impact on our future - electrified - energy system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 18, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Not cricket? Scientists suggest bamboo bats are a match for willow
Researchers create bat with similar performance from what they say is cheap and sustainable materialCricket has been bowled a googly by scientists who have suggested the traditional willow used to make bats could be replaced by bamboo to increase their sustainability and boost the sport ’s reach.“Willow has been the principal material for cricket bats for centuries,” said Dr Darshil Shah at the University of Cambridge, who co-authored the study.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Materials science Cricket Sport UK news Environment Source Type: news

Tiny plastic particles in the environment
(Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)) Giant vortices of floating plastic trash in the world's oceans with sometimes devastating consequences for their inhabitants - the sobering legacy of our modern lifestyle. Weathering and degradation processes produce countless tiny particles that can now be detected in virtually all ecosystems. But how dangerous are the smallest of them, so-called nanoplastics? (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 4, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news