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NuVasive acquires startup with Duke University roots
Vertera Spine, a startup with research origins at Duke University and the Georgia Institute of Technology, has been acquired by San Diego-based medical device company NuVasive (Nasdaq: NUVA), which reported revenues of more than $960 million last year. Ken Gall, chair of Duke’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, co-founded Vertera in 2013 while working as a professor at Georgia Tech. “NuVasive will use this to really dominate the market,” he says. “What we liked… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 22, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jennifer Henderson Source Type: news

Did NuVasive Investors Miss the Writing on the Wall?
When NuVasive shocked Wall Street in late July by announcing that two of its top executives were leaving the company, analysts ultimately concluded that the changes were unexpected but would not be all that disruptive to NuVasive’s day-to-day business. Now, a report from short-seller GlassHouse Research suggests there is more to the turnover than meets the eye. GlassHouse said the abrupt departure of former Chief Operating Officer Jason Hannon and Chief Financial Officer Quentin Blackford indicates that the clock may be running out for NuVasive, and that the company has been fooling investors with accounting tricks. ...
Source: MDDI - September 20, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: MD & M Minneapolis Medical Device Business Orthopedics Source Type: news

Rigaku to Present Latest X-Ray Analytical Technology at MS & T17
Rigaku will be in attendance at the 2017 Materials Science and Technology meeting, promoting its latest X-ray analytical solutions(PRWeb September 20, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/09/prweb14715852.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - September 20, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The refrigerant is also the pump
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Zhang, Q. M., Zhang, T. Tags: Materials Science perspective Source Type: news

A solid way to keep cool
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Grocholski, B. Tags: Engineering, Materials Science twis Source Type: news

More than just a cotton shirt
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lavine, M. S. Tags: Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Getting a hold with DNA
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lavine, M. S. Tags: Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Putting the pieces together
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lavine, M. S. Tags: Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Biological fabrication of cellulose fibers with tailored properties
We present an approach that allows biological incorporation of exogenous molecules into cotton fibers to tailor the material’s functionality. In vitro model cultures of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) are incubated with 6-carboxyfluorescein–glucose and dysprosium–1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid–glucose, where the glucose moiety acts as a carrier capable of traveling from the vascular connection to the outermost cell layer of the ovule epidermis, becoming incorporated into the cellulose fibers. This yields fibers with unnatural properties such as fluorescence or magnetism....
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Natalio, F., Fuchs, R., Cohen, S. R., Leitus, G., Fritz-Popovski, G., Paris, O., Kappl, M., Butt, H.-J. Tags: Materials Science reports Source Type: news

DNA sequence-directed shape change of photopatterned hydrogels via high-degree swelling
Shape-changing hydrogels that can bend, twist, or actuate in response to external stimuli are critical to soft robots, programmable matter, and smart medicine. Shape change in hydrogels has been induced by global cues, including temperature, light, or pH. Here we demonstrate that specific DNA molecules can induce 100-fold volumetric hydrogel expansion by successive extension of cross-links. We photopattern up to centimeter-sized gels containing multiple domains that undergo different shape changes in response to different DNA sequences. Experiments and simulations suggest a simple design rule for controlled shape change. B...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Cangialosi, A., Yoon, C., Liu, J., Huang, Q., Guo, J., Nguyen, T. D., Gracias, D. H., Schulman, R. Tags: Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Highly efficient electrocaloric cooling with electrostatic actuation
Solid-state refrigeration offers potential advantages over traditional cooling systems, but few devices offer high specific cooling power with a high coefficient of performance (COP) and the ability to be applied directly to surfaces. We developed a cooling device with a high intrinsic thermodynamic efficiency using a flexible electrocaloric (EC) polymer film and an electrostatic actuation mechanism. Reversible electrostatic forces reduce parasitic power consumption and allow efficient heat transfer through good thermal contacts with the heat source or heat sink. The EC device produced a specific cooling power of 2.8 watts...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ma, R., Zhang, Z., Tong, K., Huber, D., Kornbluh, R., Ju, Y. S., Pei, Q. Tags: Engineering, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Fabrication of fillable microparticles and other complex 3D microstructures
We describe a microfabrication method, termed StampEd Assembly of polymer Layers (SEAL), and create injectable pulsatile drug-delivery microparticles, pH sensors, and 3D microfluidic devices that we could not produce using traditional 3D printing. SEAL allows us to generate microstructures with complex geometry at high resolution, produce fully enclosed internal cavities containing a solid or liquid, and use potentially any thermoplastic material without processing additives. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: McHugh, K. J., Nguyen, T. D., Linehan, A. R., Yang, D., Behrens, A. M., Rose, S., Tochka, Z. L., Tzeng, S. Y., Norman, J. J., Anselmo, A. C., Xu, X., Tomasic, S., Taylor, M. A., Lu, J., Guarecuco, R., Langer, R., Jaklenec, A. Tags: Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Materials scientist Messing named Honorary Fellow of European Ceramics Society
(Penn State) Gary Messing, distinguished professor of ceramic science and engineering, has been sharing research advancements with his European colleagues for decades ,so being named one of the eight inaugural honorary fellows of the European Ceramics Society (ECerS) was a special accomplishment for the decorated scientist. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NuVasive Announces Acquisition Of Vertera Spine
NuVasive invests in advanced materials science portfolio with first-of-its-kind porous PEEK technology SAN DIEGO, Sept. 7, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- NuVasive, Inc. (NASDAQ: NUVA), a leading medical device company focused on tran... Devices, Orthopaedic, Neurosurgery, Mergers & Acquisitions NuVasive, Vertera Spine, Interbody Fusion, spine surgery (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - September 7, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

NuVasive acquires Vertera Spine
NuVasive Inc. (NSDQ:NUVA) said today that it acquired Vertera Spine and its interbody implants for an undisclosed amount. Atlanta, Ga.-based Vertera developed the Cohere and Coalesce implants using porous version of the  material polyetheretherketone, or PEEK. San diego-based NuVasive said the buyout makes it the only company to offer spinal implants made of PEEK and titanium. “With the addition of porous PEEK technology, NuVasive takes the next step in building out its advanced materials science technology focused on delivering the highest level of scientifically driven properties for best spinal fusi...
Source: Mass Device - September 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Mergers & Acquisitions Orthopedics Spinal Wall Street Beat Nuvasive Vertera Spine Source Type: news

Investigating Earth and fluid dynamics
Understanding how fluids and other materials flow in response to applied forces is critical to many industrial applications, energy production processes and even determining the stability of the ground beneath our feet. The field of study, known as rheology, is being advanced by an EU-funded research network combining expertise in geodynamics, mineral physics, seismology, fluid mechanics and materials science. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 7, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

A ductile steel shows its strength
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Grocholski, B. Tags: Engineering, Materials Science twis Source Type: news

High dislocation density-induced large ductility in deformed and partitioned steels
A wide variety of industrial applications require materials with high strength and ductility. Unfortunately, the strategies for increasing material strength, such as processing to create line defects (dislocations), tend to decrease ductility. We developed a strategy to circumvent this in inexpensive, medium manganese steel. Cold rolling followed by low-temperature tempering developed steel with metastable austenite grains embedded in a highly dislocated martensite matrix. This deformed and partitioned (D and P) process produced dislocation hardening but retained high ductility, both through the glide of intensive mobile d...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: He, B. B., Hu, B., Yen, H. W., Cheng, G. J., Wang, Z. K., Luo, H. W., Huang, M. X. Tags: Engineering, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

The New Edition of The Bridge, the Materials Science Newsletter from...
Issue 50 of The Bridge newsletter from Rigaku concentrates on materials science and is available from the company’s website.(PRWeb August 31, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/09/prweb14650874.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - August 31, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Improving on aquaporins
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Siwy, Z., Fornasiero, F. Tags: Materials Science perspective Source Type: news

Making the most of twists and turns
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lavine, M. S. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Go with the flow
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lavine, M. S. Tags: Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Cycling 2D crystal growth
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Szuromi, P. Tags: Physics, Applied, Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Harvesting electrical energy from carbon nanotube yarn twist
We report carbon nanotube yarn harvesters that electrochemically convert tensile or torsional mechanical energy into electrical energy without requiring an external bias voltage. Stretching coiled yarns generated 250 watts per kilogram of peak electrical power when cycled up to 30 hertz, as well as up to 41.2 joules per kilogram of electrical energy per mechanical cycle, when normalized to harvester yarn weight. These energy harvesters were used in the ocean to harvest wave energy, combined with thermally driven artificial muscles to convert temperature fluctuations to electrical energy, sewn into textiles for use as self-...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Kim, S. H., Haines, C. S., Li, N., Kim, K. J., Mun, T. J., Choi, C., Di, J., Oh, Y. J., Oviedo, J. P., Bykova, J., Fang, S., Jiang, N., Liu, Z., Wang, R., Kumar, P., Qiao, R., Priya, S., Cho, K., Kim, M., Lucas, M. S., Drummy, L. F., Maruyama, B., Lee, D. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science r-articles Source Type: news

Robust epitaxial growth of two-dimensional heterostructures, multiheterostructures, and superlattices
We report a general synthetic strategy for highly robust growth of diverse lateral heterostructures, multiheterostructures, and superlattices from two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals. A reverse flow during the temperature-swing stage in the sequential vapor deposition growth process allowed us to cool the existing 2D crystals to prevent undesired thermal degradation and uncontrolled homogeneous nucleation, thus enabling highly robust block-by-block epitaxial growth. Raman and photoluminescence mapping studies showed that a wide range of 2D heterostructures (such as WS2-WSe2 and WS2-MoSe2), multiheterostructures (such as W...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Zhang, Z., Chen, P., Duan, X., Zang, K., Luo, J., Duan, X. Tags: Physics, Applied, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Enhanced water permeability and tunable ion selectivity in subnanometer carbon nanotube porins
We report that water permeability in 0.8-nanometer-diameter carbon nanotube porins (CNTPs), which confine water down to a single-file chain, exceeds that of biological water transporters and of wider CNT pores by an order of magnitude. Intermolecular hydrogen-bond rearrangement, required for entry into the nanotube, dominates the energy barrier and can be manipulated to enhance water transport rates. CNTPs block anion transport, even at salinities that exceed seawater levels, and their ion selectivity can be tuned to configure them into switchable ionic diodes. These properties make CNTPs a promising material for developin...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 24, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Tunuguntla, R. H., Henley, R. Y., Yao, Y.-C., Pham, T. A., Wanunu, M., Noy, A. Tags: Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Johns Hopkins materials scientists probe a protein's role in speeding Ebola's spread
(Johns Hopkins University) Scientists have pinpointed how a tiny protein seems to make the deadly Ebola virus particularly contagious. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When you don't want things to stick
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lavine, M. S. Tags: Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Conjugated covalent networks
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Szuromi, P. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science twis Source Type: news

A spin-valve solar cell
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Szuromi, P. Tags: Physics, Applied, Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Preventing mussel adhesion using lubricant-infused materials
Mussels are opportunistic macrofouling organisms that can attach to most immersed solid surfaces, leading to serious economic and ecological consequences for the maritime and aquaculture industries. We demonstrate that lubricant-infused coatings exhibit very low preferential mussel attachment and ultralow adhesive strengths under both controlled laboratory conditions and in marine field studies. Detailed investigations across multiple length scales—from the molecular-scale characterization of deposited adhesive proteins to nanoscale contact mechanics to macroscale live observations—suggest that lubricant infusi...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amini, S., Kolle, S., Petrone, L., Ahanotu, O., Sunny, S., Sutanto, C. N., Hoon, S., Cohen, L., Weaver, J. C., Aizenberg, J., Vogel, N., Miserez, A. Tags: Materials Science r-articles Source Type: news

Two-dimensional sp2 carbon-conjugated covalent organic frameworks
We synthesized a two-dimensional (2D) crystalline covalent organic framework (sp2c-COF) that was designed to be fully -conjugated and constructed from all sp2 carbons by C=C condensation reactions of tetrakis(4-formylphenyl)pyrene and 1,4-phenylenediacetonitrile. The C=C linkages topologically connect pyrene knots at regular intervals into a 2D lattice with conjugations extended along both x and y directions and develop an eclipsed layer framework rather than the more conventionally obtained disordered structures. The sp2c-COF is a semiconductor with a discrete band gap of 1.9 electron volts and can be chemically oxidized ...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jin, E., Asada, M., Xu, Q., Dalapati, S., Addicoat, M. A., Brady, M. A., Xu, H., Nakamura, T., Heine, T., Chen, Q., Jiang, D. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

A molecular spin-photovoltaic device
We fabricated a C60 fullerene–based molecular spin-photovoltaic device that integrates a photovoltaic response with the spin transport across the molecular layer. The photovoltaic response can be modified under the application of a small magnetic field, with a magnetophotovoltage of up to 5% at room temperature. Device functionalities include a magnetic current inverter and the presence of diverging magnetocurrent at certain illumination levels that could be useful for sensing. Completely spin-polarized currents can be created by balancing the external partially spin-polarized injection with the photogenerated carrie...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sun, X., Velez, S., Atxabal, A., Bedoya-Pinto, A., Parui, S., Zhu, X., Llopis, R., Casanova, F., Hueso, L. E. Tags: Physics, Applied, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Big Pharma just developed a way to medicate unborn babies with prescription drugs ... Will they be treated with antidepressants?
(Natural News) Researchers from the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA) have developed a three-dimensional cell model of a human placental barrier that is being used to study how substances like nanoparticles can cross the placental barrier. Even small doses of toxic substances can be very harmful to a fetus, which is... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nemours, UD technology pushes cancer research forward
(Nemours) Nemours Biomedical Research and the University of Delaware (UD) Department of Materials Science and Engineering have developed a patent-pending process to make 3-D models work in high throughput screening labs, allowing drug discovery to move into more meaningful screening systems. Sigrid Langhans, PhD, of Nemours, along with Darrin Pochan, PhD, of UD and colleagues, published an article about their findings this week in Analytical Biochemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 10, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Connecting the dots for European materials researchers
The EU-funded ESTEEM2 project is connecting European researchers in Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) for materials science with state-of-the-art TEM instrumentation, methodology and tools. The result: new insight into the complex materials in everything from optics and electronics to lightweight parts in aircraft. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - August 10, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Replacing platinum in air-fed fuel cells
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Szuromi, P. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Direct atomic-level insight into the active sites of a high-performance PGM-free ORR catalyst
Platinum group metal–free (PGM-free) metal-nitrogen-carbon catalysts have emerged as a promising alternative to their costly platinum (Pt)–based counterparts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) but still face some major challenges, including (i) the identification of the most relevant catalytic site for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and (ii) demonstration of competitive PEFC performance under automotive-application conditions in the hydrogen (H2)–air fuel cell. Herein, we demonstrate H2-air performance gains achieved with an iron-nitrogen-carbon catalyst synthesized with two nitrogen precursor...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Chung, H. T., Cullen, D. A., Higgins, D., Sneed, B. T., Holby, E. F., More, K. L., Zelenay, P. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Slug Slime Inspires Scientists To Invent Sticky Surgical Glue
The words "strong" and "inspiring" are not usually assigned to garden slugs. But slug slime inspired materials scientists to invent a new kind of adhesive that could one day help heal human wounds.(Image credit: Nigel Cattlin/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - July 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rae Ellen Bichell Source Type: news

Directing reconfigurable DNA nanoarrays
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Yang, Y., Lin, C. Tags: Materials Science, Molecular Biology perspective Source Type: news

Photolithography based on nanocrystals
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Striccoli, M. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science perspective Source Type: news

Sticky even when wet
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lavine, M. S. Tags: Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Relaying information on DNA tiles
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Szuromi, P. Tags: Materials Science, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Patterning without polymers
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lavine, M. S. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Atomic hydrogen with an iron assist
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Grocholski, B. Tags: Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Flat-out failure of copper films
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Szuromi, P. Tags: Engineering, Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Tough adhesives for diverse wet surfaces
We report a bioinspired design for adhesives consisting of two layers: an adhesive surface and a dissipative matrix. The former adheres to the substrate by electrostatic interactions, covalent bonds, and physical interpenetration. The latter amplifies energy dissipation through hysteresis. The two layers synergistically lead to higher adhesion energies on wet surfaces as compared with those of existing adhesives. Adhesion occurs within minutes, independent of blood exposure and compatible with in vivo dynamic movements. This family of adhesives may be useful in many areas of application, including tissue adhesives, wound d...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Li, J., Celiz, A. D., Yang, J., Yang, Q., Wamala, I., Whyte, W., Seo, B. R., Vasilyev, N. V., Vlassak, J. J., Suo, Z., Mooney, D. J. Tags: Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Synthesis of FeH5: A layered structure with atomic hydrogen slabs
High pressure promotes the formation of polyhydrides with unusually high hydrogen-to-metal ratios. These polyhydrides have complex hydrogenic sublattices. We synthesized iron pentahydride (FeH5) by a direct reaction between iron and H2 above 130 gigapascals in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. FeH5 exhibits a structure built of atomic hydrogen only. It consists of intercalated layers of quasicubic FeH3 units and four-plane slabs of thin atomic hydrogen. The distribution of the valence electron density indicates a bonding between hydrogen and iron atoms but none between hydrogen atoms, presenting a two-dimensional metallic...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Pepin, C. M., Geneste, G., Dewaele, A., Mezouar, M., Loubeyre, P. Tags: Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Direct optical lithography of functional inorganic nanomaterials
Photolithography is an important manufacturing process that relies on using photoresists, typically polymer formulations, that change solubility when illuminated with ultraviolet light. Here, we introduce a general chemical approach for photoresist-free, direct optical lithography of functional inorganic nanomaterials. The patterned materials can be metals, semiconductors, oxides, magnetic, or rare earth compositions. No organic impurities are present in the patterned layers, which helps achieve good electronic and optical properties. The conductivity, carrier mobility, dielectric, and luminescence properties of optically ...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Wang, Y., Fedin, I., Zhang, H., Talapin, D. V. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Nanocrystalline copper films are never flat
We used scanning tunneling microscopy to study low-angle grain boundaries at the surface of nearly planar copper nanocrystalline (111) films. The presence of grain boundaries and their emergence at the film surface create valleys composed of dissociated edge dislocations and ridges where partial dislocations have recombined. Geometric analysis and simulations indicated that valleys and ridges were created by an out-of-plane grain rotation driven by reduction of grain boundary energy. These results suggest that in general, it is impossible to form flat two-dimensional nanocrystalline films of copper and other metals exhibit...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Zhang, X., Han, J., Plombon, J. J., Sutton, A. P., Srolovitz, D. J., Boland, J. J. Tags: Engineering, Materials Science reports Source Type: news