Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

NASA Plans Emergency Spacewalk To Replace Key Computer On International Space Station
A pair of astronauts will venture outside the International Space Station on Tuesday for an emergency spacewalk to replace a failed computer, one of two that control major U.S. systems aboard the orbiting outpost, NASA said on Sunday. The primary device failed on Saturday, leaving the $100 billion orbiting laboratory to depend on a backup system to route commands to its solar power system, radiators, cooling loops and other equipment. The station’s current five-member crew from the United States, Russia and France were never in any danger, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration said in a statement. The Ex...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Multiscale measurements for materials modeling
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Suter, R. Tags: Materials Science perspective Source Type: news

Drying natural gas efficiently
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Szuromi, P. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Hydrolytically stable fluorinated metal-organic frameworks for energy-efficient dehydration
We report a hydrolytically stable fluorinated metal-organic framework, AlFFIVE-1-Ni (KAUST-8), with a periodic array of open metal coordination sites and fluorine moieties within the contracted square-shaped one-dimensional channel. This material selectively removed water vapor from gas streams containing CO2, N2, CH4, and higher hydrocarbons typical of natural gas, as well as selectively removed both H2O and CO2 in N2-containing streams. The complete desorption of the adsorbed water molecules contained by the AlFFIVE-1-Ni sorbent requires relatively moderate temperature (~105°C) and about half the energy input for com...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Cadiau, A., Belmabkhout, Y., Adil, K., Bhatt, P. M., Pillai, R. S., Shkurenko, A., Martineau-Corcos, C., Maurin, G., Eddaoudi, M. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Bragg coherent diffractive imaging of single-grain defect dynamics in polycrystalline films
Polycrystalline material properties depend on the distribution and interactions of their crystalline grains. In particular, grain boundaries and defects are crucial in determining their response to external stimuli. A long-standing challenge is thus to observe individual grains, defects, and strain dynamics inside functional materials. Here we report a technique capable of revealing grain heterogeneity, including strain fields and individual dislocations, that can be used under operando conditions in reactive environments: grain Bragg coherent diffractive imaging (gBCDI). Using a polycrystalline gold thin film subjected to...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Yau, A., Cha, W., Kanan, M. W., Stephenson, G. B., Ulvestad, A. Tags: Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Chemists create the ultimate natural sunscreen
Chemists, materials scientists and nanoengineers have created what may be the ultimate natural sunscreen. They report the development of nanoparticles that mimic the behavior of natural melanosomes, melanin-producing cell structures that protect our skin, eyes and other tissues from the harmful effects of ultraviolet radiation. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 17, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

UC San Diego chemists create the ultimate natural sunscreen
(University of California - San Diego) Chemists, materials scientists and nanoengineers at UC San Diego have created what may be the ultimate natural sunscreen. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 17, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Oddball enzyme provides easy path to synthetic biomaterials
Materials scientists have written the recipe on how to use an oddball enzyme to build new biomaterials out of DNA. The work provides instructions for researchers the world over to build self-assembling molecules for applications ranging from drug delivery to nanowires. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 16, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Oddball enzyme provides easy path to synthetic biomaterials
(Duke University) Materials scientists have written the recipe on how to use an oddball enzyme to build new biomaterials out of DNA. The work provides instructions for researchers the world over to build self-assembling molecules for applications ranging from drug delivery to nanowires. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 16, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Battery-free implantable medical device draws energy directly from human body
Researchers from UCLA and the University of Connecticut have designed a new biofriendly energy storage system called a biological supercapacitor, which operates using charged particles, or ions, from fluids in the human body. The device is harmless to the body ’s biological systems, and it could lead to longer-lasting cardiac pacemakers and other implantable medical devices.The UCLA team was led by Richard Kaner, a distinguished professor of chemistry and biochemistry, and of materials science and engineering, and the Connecticut researchers were led by James Rusling, a professor of chemistry and cell biology. Apaper...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Intricacy anchored by uranium
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Szuromi, P. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Bottom-up construction of a superstructure in a porous uranium-organic crystal
We report a structurally complex, mesoporous uranium-based metal-organic framework (MOF) made from simple starting components. The structure comprises 10 uranium nodes and seven tricarboxylate ligands (both crystallographically nonequivalent), resulting in a 173.3-angstrom cubic unit cell enclosing 816 uranium nodes and 816 organic linkers—the largest unit cell found to date for any nonbiological material. The cuboctahedra organize into pentagonal and hexagonal prismatic secondary structures, which then form tetrahedral and diamond quaternary topologies with unprecedented complexity. This packing results in the forma...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 11, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Li, P., Vermeulen, N. A., Malliakas, C. D., Gomez-Gualdron, D. A., Howarth, A. J., Mehdi, B. L., Dohnalkova, A., Browning, N. D., OKeeffe, M., Farha, O. K. Tags: Chemistry, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Elusive atomic motion captured by electron microscopy
The movement of atoms through a material can cause problems under certain circumstances. Atomic-resolution electron microscopy has enabled researchers to observe for the first time a phenomenon that has eluded materials scientists for many decades. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 9, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

The New Edition of The Bridge, the Materials Science Newsletter from...
Issue 46 of The Bridge newsletter from Rigaku concentrates on materials science and is available from the company’s website(PRWeb May 09, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/05/prweb14311297.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - May 9, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

3-D printers open new design space for wireless devices
Materials scientists and chemists have shown a way to bring electromagnetic metamaterials into the third dimension using commercial 3-D printers. Printed metamaterial cubes were found to interact with radio and microwave electromagnetic waves 14 times more strongly than their 2-D counterparts. The breakthrough could revolutionize the rapid design and prototyping of radio frequency devices for Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, wireless sensing and communications. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 4, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

'Smart Contact Lens Sensor' for Diabetic and Glaucoma Diagnosis
This study has been jointly conducted by Professor Jang-Ung Park of Materials Science and Engineering, Professor Chang Young Lee of Life Science, and Professor Franklin Bien of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UNIST in collaboration with (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - May 4, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Surprising states of order for linear diblock copolymers
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Stein, G. E. Tags: Materials Science perspective Source Type: news

When polymers behave like metals
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lavine, M. S. Tags: Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Wet, soft, squishy, and tunable
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lavine, M. S. Tags: Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Inducing DNA methylation where it wasn't
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Purnell, B. A. Tags: Materials Science, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Thermal processing of diblock copolymer melts mimics metallurgy
Small-angle x-ray scattering experiments conducted with compositionally asymmetric low molar mass poly(isoprene)-b-poly(lactide) diblock copolymers reveal an extraordinary thermal history dependence. The development of distinct periodic crystalline or aperiodic quasicrystalline states depends on how specimens are cooled from the disordered state to temperatures below the order-disorder transition temperature. Whereas direct cooling leads to the formation of documented morphologies, rapidly quenched samples that are then heated from low temperature form the hexagonal C14 and cubic C15 Laves phases commonly found in metal al...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Kim, K., Schulze, M. W., Arora, A., Lewis, R. M., Hillmyer, M. A., Dorfman, K. D., Bates, F. S. Tags: Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Advances in engineering hydrogels
Hydrogels are formed from hydrophilic polymer chains surrounded by a water-rich environment. They have widespread applications in various fields such as biomedicine, soft electronics, sensors, and actuators. Conventional hydrogels usually possess limited mechanical strength and are prone to permanent breakage. Further, the lack of dynamic cues and structural complexity within the hydrogels has limited their functions. Recent developments include engineering hydrogels that possess improved physicochemical properties, ranging from designs of innovative chemistries and compositions to integration of dynamic modulation and sop...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Zhang, Y. S., Khademhosseini, A. Tags: Materials Science, Online Only review Source Type: news

Springer signs landmark eBooks agreement with ABES in France
Springer and ABES (agence bibliographique de l’enseignement supérieur) have signed a groundbreaking national license which gives access to four complete eBook collections. The agreement entitles French researchers to use one of the world´s largest scientific and technical eBook collections, available on Springer’s platform SpringerLink. The agreement provides access to over 33.000 eBook titles in Mathematics, Physics and Astronomy, Chemistry and Materials Science, and Engineering which have been published up to the year 2013 as part of Springer´s historical and contemporary collections. The n...
Source: News from STM - May 3, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: European Featured Source Type: news

Extracting the contents of living cells
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Higgins, S. G., Stevens, M. M. Tags: Materials Science perspective Source Type: news

When forces depend on orientation
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lavine, M. S. Tags: Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Direction-specific van der Waals attraction between rutile TiO2 nanocrystals
We report measurement of this attraction between rutile nanocrystals, as a function of their mutual orientation and surface hydration extent. At tens of nanometers of separation, the attraction is weak and shows no dependence on azimuthal alignment or surface hydration. At separations of approximately one hydration layer, the attraction is strongly dependent on azimuthal alignment and systematically decreases as intervening water density increases. Measured forces closely agree with predictions from Lifshitz theory and show that dispersion forces can generate a torque between particles interacting in solution and between g...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Zhang, X., He, Y., Sushko, M. L., Liu, J., Luo, L., De Yoreo, J. J., Mao, S. X., Wang, C., Rosso, K. M. Tags: Materials Science reports Source Type: news

Study unravels long-held Fermi puzzle tied to nonlinear systems
Nonlinear systems can indeed reach equilibrium, according to new research from an international team of physicists. The work has implications in materials science and other fields. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 17, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Issue 45 of The Bridge, the Materials Science Newsletter from Rigaku,...
The latest edition of The Bridge newsletter from Rigaku concentrates on materials science and is available from the company’s website(PRWeb April 17, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/04/prweb14248512.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - April 17, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Study unravels long-held Fermi puzzle tied to nonlinear systems
(University at Buffalo) Nonlinear systems can indeed reach equilibrium, according to new research from an international team of physicists. The work has implications in materials science and other fields. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Predicting the limits of friction: Scientists look at properties of material
Materials scientists have developed a model to predict the limits of friction behavior of metals based on materials properties -- how hard you can push on materials or how much current you can put through them before they stop working properly. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 5, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Sculpting optical microstructures with slight changes in chemistry
In 2013, materials scientists grew a'garden'of self-assembled crystal microstructures. Now, applied mathematicians have developed a framework to better understand and control the fabrication of these microstructures. Together, the researchers used that framework to grow sophisticated optical microcomponents. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 30, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Ivanka Trump Promotes 'Hidden Figures' As Her Dad Tries To Slash NASA Education Funding
WASHINGTON ― Ivanka Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos held an event at the National Air and Space Museum Tuesday, promoting the administration’s support for young women in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. They even appeared with astronaut Kay Hire and showed the movie “Hidden Figures,” a story about the achievements of African-American women at NASA.  Trump paid homage to the women featured in the movie for “paving the way for greater representation of women and African-Americans in these fields.”  “My father’s administration ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 28, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Newest Edition of The Bridge, the Materials Science Newsletter from...
The Bridge newsletter from Rigaku concentrates on material sciences and is available from the company’s website(PRWeb March 22, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/03/prweb14176387.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - March 23, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Japanese science stalls over past decade, threatening position among world ’s elite
According to the Nature Index, Japan’s scientific output has failed to keep pace with other leading nations over the past decade, risking its position among the world’s elite if renewed government efforts fail to reverse a downward trend in its performance. Japan’s share of high-quality papers included in the Nature Index dropped by 6% between 2012 and 2016. Furthermore, while China’s rapid growth has meant that other leading nations – including the US – have also experienced a relative decline, Japan’s output has also fallen in absolute terms. Publications by its authors in high-q...
Source: News from STM - March 22, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

Reducing Risk Through Materials Science: Shedding Light on Mysterious Design Failures
(Source: MDDI)
Source: MDDI - March 22, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Medical Materials - Raw Materials Source Type: news

Carbon fibre: the wonder material with a dirty secret
Researchers are scrambling for ways to get the strong, light material out of landfill and make it ready for recycling and reuseCarbon fibre is increasingly celebrated as a wonder material for the clean economy. Its unique combination of high strength and low weight has helped drive the wind power revolution and make planes more fuel efficient.Carbon fibre turbine blades can be longer and more rigid than traditional fibreglass models, making them more resilient at sea and more efficient in less breezy conditions.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mark Harris Tags: Guardian sustainable business Materials science Automotive industry Recycling Environment Waste Renewable energy Wind power Ethical and green living Technology Chemistry Physics Source Type: news

[Perspective] Atoms on the move —finding the hydrogen
Hydrogen wreaks havoc in many alloy systems, leading to embrittlement that can cause catastrophic failure. This is a serious issue for any industry that produces or uses hydrogen—affecting production, transport, storage, and use—and is a real challenge for the development of a hydrogen economy. However, the design of new materials that resist hydrogen embrittlement is limited by the difficulty of experimentally measuring or observing hydrogen; precisely locating hydrogen at the atomic scale is a notorious challenge in materials science. Other examples of where this information is required include the developmen...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Julie Cairney Tags: Materials Science Source Type: news

Thieme launches “SynOpen” – the new open access journal for chemists
SynOpen, the Thieme Publishing Group’s latest addition to its range of open access journals, reports on current research results in the field of chemical synthesis. The new English-language journal gives interested authors in chemistry the option to publish their articles in open access format. Manuscripts can be submitted as of now. The new open access publication SynOpen rounds off Thieme’s range of journals for synthetic chemists. “The launch of SynOpen gives chemical researchers the possibility to choose between publishing in an open access or a traditional subscription journal,” says Dr. Susann...
Source: News from STM - March 13, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: European Featured Source Type: news

[Perspective] It's whom you know that counts
Universalism—the evaluation of scientists' achievements based on merit alone rather than on functionally irrelevant factors (1–3)—has long been an unquestioned norm in science. Its existence is best illustrated by the reactions of outrage whenever a violation of universalism in science is exposed. For example, a study by Moss-Racusin et al. received a lot of attention in the scientific community because it found that when assessing application materials, science faculty rated students with male names as more competent than students who were otherwise identical but had been given female names (4). In a rec...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Y. Xie Tags: Scientific Community Source Type: news

Pitt researchers receive grant to study wearable hybrid exoskeleton
University of Pittsburgh researchers have received an award from the National Science Foundation ’s Cyber program to develop an ultrasound sensor system for a hybrid exoskeleton that utilizes both electrical nerve stimulation and external motors to help minimize muscle injury and fatigue while helping disabled patients walk. The three-year, $400,000 award will help further the work of Nitin Sharma, assistant professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Pitt’s Swanson School of… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - March 7, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Lydia Nuzum Source Type: news

These nanostraws can sample cells without damaging them
[Image by Royroydeb – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0]Stanford University researchers say they’ve developed nanostraws capable of sampling cell contents—all without disrupting natural processes. The innovation has the potential to provide non-destructive cell monitoring versus lysing, the cell sampling method presently used. Lysing ruptures the cell, while the sampling method developed at Stanford relies on tiny tubes that are 600 times smaller than a strand of hair. The nanostraws penetrate the cell’s outer membrane without damage, sampling proteins and genetic material inside the cell. The method is like a...
Source: Mass Device - February 22, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Research & Development Stem Cells lysing MedTech nanostraws Stanford Source Type: news

New approach for the capture of tumor-derived exosomes from a prostate cancer cell line
(Springer) In a new paper in Springer's Journal of Materials Science, researchers at Washington State University report a new approach for the effective capture of tumor-derived exosomes from a prostate cancer cell line. Exosomes are small secreted vesicles that play a key role in intercellular communication and cancer progression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Future trends for top materials by Mario J F Calvete
(Bentham Science Publishers) In the last four decades materials science has evolved and developed into a very diverse range of highly specialized family of compounds -- from what were once essentially esoteric, often topical, basic research specialties -- into what one would clearly class today as one of the most significant and important industrial fields and specializations of our modern era. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 17, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Measuring entropy
(Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA)) A scanning-tunneling microscope (STM), used to study changes in the shape of a single molecule at the atomic scale, impacts the ability of that molecule to make these changes -- the entropy of the molecule is changed and, in turn, can be measured. The study is published in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 15, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Not Just Any Day
The evening before the National Cancer Prevention Day Workshop is Less Cancer board member Donna Eacho, Less Cancer Founder Bill Couzens, Ambassador Bill Eacho, U.S. Senator Maggie Hassan and Less Cancer Chairman Tom Sherman, M.D. February 4th marked the 2017 resolution for National Cancer Prevention Day. Activities around "National Cancer Prevention Day" included the United States Congressional Cancer Prevention Caucus. This years caucus met on February 1st. Caucus chair speakers included Representatives Debbie Dingell and Barbara Comstock. The following day, February 2nd was the National Cancer Prevention D...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rutgers develops eco-friendly concrete
(Rutgers University) In the future, wide-ranging composite materials are expected to be stronger, lighter, cheaper and greener for our planet, thanks to an invention by Rutgers' Richard E. Riman. Nine years ago, Riman, a distinguished professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, invented an energy-efficient technology that harnesses largely low-temperature, water-based reactions. As a result, he and his team can make things in water that previously were made at temperatures well above those required to thermally decompose plastics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hand-held Breath Monitor to Detect Flu
Perena Gouma, a professor in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at The University of Texas at Arlington, has published an article in the journal Sensors that describes her invention of a hand-held breath monitor that can potentially detect the flu virus. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - February 6, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

UTA materials scientist invents breath monitor to detect flu
(University of Texas at Arlington) Perena Gouma, a professor in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at The University of Texas at Arlington, has published an article in the journal Sensors that describes her invention of a hand-held breath monitor that can potentially detect the flu virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 31, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

[In Depth] Unique free electron laser laboratory opens in China
China has become the latest country making a free electron laser available to its scientists. Researchers around the world want access to these lasers because they are an advance on the synchrotron light sources that have been the workhorses of protein crystallography, cell biology, and materials science. The completion of the $30 million Dalian Coherent Light Source, announced this week in Beijing, has a twist that makes it unique: It is the only large laser light source in the world dedicated to the particular wavelengths of light called vacuum ultraviolet, which researchers will use to probe and analyze molecules underg...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Dennis Normile Tags: Light Sources Source Type: news

RIT wins NSF grant to transform physics graduate education admissions and retention
(Rochester Institute of Technology) A Rochester Institute of Technology professor won funding from the National Science Foundation to develop an inclusive approach to physics graduate education admission and retention of traditionally underrepresented US citizens. Casey Miller, associate professor and director of RIT's materials science and engineering graduate program, is collaborating with the American Physical Society on a $428,022 NSF Research Traineeship award in Innovations in Graduate Education to increase diversity and physics Ph.D. completion rates among women, African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Native Amer...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 18, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news