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Could Artificial Intelligence destroy radiology by litigation claims?
By, Hugh Harvey MBBS BSc (Hons) FRCR MD (res) We’ve all heard the big philosophical arguments and debate between rockstar entrepreneurs and genius academics – but have we stopped to think exactly how the AI revolution will play out on our own turf? At RSNA this year I posed the same question to everyone I spoke to: What if radiology AI gets into the wrong hands? Judging by the way the crowds voted with their feet by packing out every lecture on AI, radiologists would certainly seem to be very aware of the looming seismic shift in the profession – but I wanted to know if anyone was considering th...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The accused physicians who are my colleagues
From the earliest days on the clinical wards, everyone probably worked with a senior physician who knew how to game the system. It might be doing a rigid sigmoidoscopy on admission for every patient who had a rectum — something not the standard of care forty years ago. Or maybe it was accepting a pharmaceutical company subsidized tax-deductible junket under the guise of CME at a place with sparkling white sand in February — something that might have been the standard of care 40 years ago. While people would question the propriety of these things, there did not seem to be any material challenge to the legality. ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 2, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/richard-plotzker" rel="tag" > Richard Plotzker, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Malpractice Public Health & Policy Source Type: blogs

The Six Worst U.S. Health Disasters of the Last 50 Years
Up until the first half of the twentieth century, large-scale health disasters were mostly due to natural causes (earthquakes, volcanoes, hurricanes, etc.) or infections (e.g., smallpox, influenza epidemics, cholera). But something peculiar happened as we entered the second half of the century: Health disasters due to natural causes became dwarfed by large-scale health disasters that are man-made. Here’s a list of the Six Worst U.S. Health Disasters of the Last 50 Years, mostly man-made phenomena that have exacted huge tolls: widespread disease, premature death, poorly managed (though nonetheless highly profitable fo...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - December 2, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle autoimmune gluten grain-free grains Inflammation low-carb Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Practicing Medicine While Black (Part II)
By KIP SULLIVAN Managed care advocates see quality problems everywhere and resource shortages nowhere. If the Leapfrog Group, the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, or some other managed care advocate were in charge of explaining why a high school football team lost to the New England Patriots, their explanation would be “poor quality.” If a man armed with a knife lost a fight to a man with a gun, ditto: “Poor quality.” And their solution would be more measurement of the “quality,” followed by punishment of the losers for getting low grades on the “quality” report card and...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized CMS Kip Sullivan value-based care Source Type: blogs

These are the biggest medical issues of 2017
Periodically we should reflect on what challenges face patients and physicians.  Over the past few days, I have worked on a list of the issues that concern me the most.  I welcome suggestions for expanding the list. 1. Diagnostic errors. All patient care requires that we make the proper diagnosis.  Too often we make errors.  A recent paper estimated that 30 percent of cellulitis admissions did not have cellulitis.  A similar paper found almost the same estimate for community-acquired pneumonia admissions.  The most common reason for successful malpractice claims is diagnostic errors.  Hav...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 22, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/robert-centor" rel="tag" > Robert Centor, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Primary Care Public Health & Policy Source Type: blogs

HIPAA May be the Least of Your Compliance Worries
The following is a guest blog post by Mike Semel from Semel Consulting.  Check out all of Mike Semel’s EMR and HIPAA blog posts. What requirements have you hidden away? I visited a new healthcare client last week, and asked if anything in particular made them call us for help with their HIPAA compliance. They surprised me by saying that their insurance company had refused to sell them a cyber-liability/data breach insurance policy, after they saw the answers on our client’s application. When was the last time you heard about an insurance company not selling a policy? That’s like McDonalds looking you...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - November 21, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Guest Blogger Tags: Healthcare HealthCare IT HIPAA General HIPAA Training HIPAA BA HIPAA Business Associates HIPAA Compliance Mike Semel Semel Consulting Source Type: blogs

Could MIPS Data Be Used Against Physicians?
One of the major changes thanks to MACRA and its associated Quality Payment Program (QPP) is the creation of MIPS, of the Merit-based Incentive Payment System. Much has been made about this new way physicians will be evaluated under Medicare. However, we have not seen the take of MIPS scores being used in other domains, such as medical malpractice lawsuits, until we came across this consulting firm’s hypothetical. Could MIPS data be used against physicians? Hypothetical Malpractice Case As described on MyMipsScores’ blog: “[H]ere is another collateral effect of the MIPS score. This one is for our frie...
Source: Policy and Medicine - November 20, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Got real rights? Not when seeking health care.               
Until genuine rights are extended to all patients, the ongoing health-care-reform saga perpetrated by Congress and executive leadership will continue to fail the American people. Many Americans have suffered and died because of a broken health-care-delivery system. One of us lost a 19-year old son due to lack of certain patient rights – specifically the right to evidence-based medicine and the right to a complete discharge plan from his hospital. His cardiologists failed to replace potassium as required by an evidence based guideline for patients with low serum potassium and concomitant cardiac arrhythmias.  He ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 18, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/john-t-james-and-michael-f-mascia" rel="tag" > John T. James, PhD and Michael F. Mascia, MD, MPH < /a > Tags: Patient Hospital-Based Medicine Medicare Patients Source Type: blogs

Physician wellness at the personal, institutional, and cultural levels
Do you know we have record rates of physician burnout, dissatisfaction, and suicide? Ongoing shortages in primary care, without improvement in sight? Physicians exiting medicine earlier  than in the past? What about burnout? Do you know it affects patients as well as their doctors? Affects physicians’ families and friends? Increases mistakes and malpractice risk? Affects patient adherence and outcomes? Is costly to the entire system? How do we start to fix this? The framework for a discussion on physician wellness begins with attention to three levels: personal wellness, organizational wellness, and wellness wit...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 15, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/kathy-stepien" rel="tag" > Kathy Stepien, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Practice Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

It ’s time for medicine to share its power
In the movie Malice, Alec Baldwin plays Dr. Jed Hill, a surgeon who gives a famous speech during a deposition in a medical malpractice case. “”If you’re looking for God, he was in operating room #2 on November 17th, and he doesn’t like to be second-guessed … I am God.” No one wants a doctor like that. And yet, maybe we do. We yearn for someone capable of healing all of our wounds, fixing what is wrong, performing miracles in the OR. We expect someone to be able to cut into our brains, hearts, and bellies, but somehow also expect that same someone to deny the inherent power of those...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 15, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/heather-hansen" rel="tag" > Heather Hansen < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Practice Management Surgery Source Type: blogs

Why we need a new approach to end of life care
Looking at how incredibly expensive the last few months of life are for anyone in this country, I think most would be quite shocked. In 2014, there were approximately 2.6 million deaths in the U.S. According to a Keiser Permanente study, 2.1 million of those deaths were Medicare related. Medicare’s annual budget is right around $600 billion, and it has been revealed that one-third of that total is spent in relation to the last six months of life. That is a staggering amount of money. What does this say about our approach to health care and quality of life in general? Fact: Everybody dies. No matter what, no matter wh...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 9, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/sebastian-sepulveda" rel="tag" > Sebastian Sepulveda, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Palliative Care Source Type: blogs

Medical Futility Jury Trial Begins against Hospital that Stopped Life Support without Consent
It is rare for any medical malpractice case to reach a jury. Most are settled or dismissed at earlier stages of litigation.  It is even rarer for a medical futility case to reach a jury. But that is happening this month in Milford, Connecticut (Ma... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 9, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The major medical issues of 2017
Periodically we should reflect on what challenges face patients and physicians.  Over the past few days I have worked on a list of the issues that concern me the most.  I welcome suggestions for expanding the list. Diagnostic errors – all patient care requires that we make the proper diagnosis.  Too often we make errors.  A recent paper estimated that 30% of cellulitis admissions did not have cellulitis.  A similar paper found almost the same estimate for community acquired pneumonia admissions.  The most common reason for successful malpractice claims is diagnostic errors.  Have t...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - November 3, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

What I ’ve learned from 547 doctor suicides
Five years ago today I was at a memorial. Another suicide. Our third doctor in 18 months. Everyone kept whispering, “Why?” I was determined to find out. So I started counting dead doctors. I left the service with a list of 10. Now I have 547. Immediately, I began writing and speaking about suicide. So many distressed doctors (and med students) wrote and phoned me. Soon I was running a de facto international suicide hotline from my home. To date, I’ve spoken to thousands of suicidal doctors; published a book of their suicide letters (free audiobook); attended more funerals; in...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 31, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/pamela-wible" rel="tag" > Pamela Wible, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Medical school Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Medical Malpractice – Who’s Being Sued and What Is It Costing
Shutterstock A baby is born. The delivery was rocky, with the infant’s heart rate showing occasional signs of distress. Later, the parents learn that their child has cerebral palsy, and may never walk normally. Was the obstetrician to blame and, … Continue reading → The post Medical Malpractice – Who’s Being Sued and What Is It Costing appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 31, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Peter Ubel Tags: Health Care healthcare costs Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The key to health care is to have a great team
I was a chubby kid, but my parents still introduced me to lots of sports. Soccer, swimming, tennis, basketball; so many sports, when all I wanted to do was read and eat Doritos.  I wasn’t particularly good at any of them, but some of my teams were better than good. We were champs. My swim team won the Cape Cod Summer League, my soccer team won its division one year, and my high school tennis team was state champions all four of the years I was there. I didn’t come in first in butterfly, score the winning goal, or take the final set. But I like to think I contributed. I swam well enough to place. I defended...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 30, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/heather-hansen" rel="tag" > Heather Hansen < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Malpractice Public Health & Policy Source Type: blogs

Health Affairs Web First: Choosing Wisely Campaign
This study was supported by the ABIM Foundation and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). How To Fulfill The Promise In The Next 5 Years In this analysis, the authors discuss the Choosing Wisely® campaign’s accomplishments over the past five years and summarize what steps could fulfill its promise. They take note of movement’s growth since its founding, with seventy new societies signing on, ; more than 400 recommendations issued, and a steady increase in the number of studies testing interventions to reduce low-value care (see the exhibit below). Exhibit 1: Cumulative Numbers Of Choosing ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - October 24, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Health Affairs Tags: Elsewhere@ Health Affairs Choosing Wisely Source Type: blogs

Could being vulnerable lead to better health?
Long ago, I represented a doctor who was … difficult. He was a phenomenal surgeon, world famous in his field, but he was not warm and fuzzy — not even close. Cold and hard were more his speed. We spent two weeks together, on trial in city hall. It takes about two years from the time a case is filed to the time the case goes to court. During that time, all I got was cold and hard. If the research is right, and people sue their doctors for bad communication rather than bad medicine, this doctor was showing me why that might be true. But then we went to trial, and he began to crack. Leonard Cohen once said, &ldqu...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 17, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/heather-hansen" rel="tag" > Heather Hansen < /a > Tags: Physician Malpractice Surgery Source Type: blogs

Primary Care Docs Spending About Half Their Work Days Interacting with EHRs
I have posted a number of previous notes about the inefficiencies introduced by EHRs, particularly particularly relating to the fact that their use now constitutes a major time sink for physicians (see:Some of the Major Criticisms of EHRs; Why Few Changes Anticipated;Problems Associated with EHRs: A Medical Malpractice Perspective). A recent article quoted a research study about the time logged by primary care physicians on their EHRs (see:Family doctors spend 86 minutes of “pajama time” with EHRs nightly). Below is an excerpt from it:A new study using electronic health record (EHR) system event-logging data to...
Source: Lab Soft News - October 13, 2017 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Cost of Healthcare Electronic Health Record (EHR) Healthcare Business Healthcare Delivery Healthcare Information Technology Hospital Executive Management Hospital Financial Quality of Care Source Type: blogs

Veterans Health Failure
This study explored why there is so much failure and mismanagement in the federal government. Federal agencies lack incentives for efficiency and quality, and the environment in some workplaces seems to breed unethical behavior. The government has also become far too large to manage effectively and for Congress to oversee adequately.A new investigation byUSA TODAY reveals a pattern of rather disgraceful mismanagement in the Department of Veterans Affairs:… the VA—the nation’s largest employer of health care workers—has for years concealed mistakes and misdeeds by staff members entrusted with the ca...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 13, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Chris Edwards Source Type: blogs

Defendants to Physically Examine Jahi McMath to Confirm Brain Death
In late September 2017, five defendants and the plaintiff filed case management statements in Jahi McMath's medical malpractice lawsuit in California state court. Of note, some defendants note that their planned discovery includes an IME (independent ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 6, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Wine Glass in the Foot: A Case Study
​Emergency department providers welcome the weird, the wild, the wonderful, and the unexpected. Routine chest pain workups and negative abdominal CTs occasionally bore us. Last summer we had the pleasure of meeting a man who was a line cook at a local restaurant. He came via ambulance for a foreign body in his foot. What we saw was unanticipated—he arrived with half a wine glass lodged in the sole of his foot.​ The stemware was lodged in the patient's foot, going through his shoe and sock. Photos by Martha Roberts.The patient was laughing and not in much pain. He said he had a high pain tolerance and could b...
Source: The Procedural Pause - October 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

We Can Improve Care Management
As a physician and CIO, I ’m quick to spot inefficiencies in healthcare workflow. More importantly, as the care navigator for my family, I have extensive firsthand experience with patient facing processes.My wife ’s cancer treatment, my father’s end of life care, and my own recent primary hypertension diagnosis taught me how we can do better.Last week, when my wife received a rejection in coverage letter from Harvard Pilgrim/Caremark, it highlighted the imperative we have to improve care management workflow in the US.Since completing her estrogen positive, progesterone positive, HER2 negative breast ...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - September 12, 2017 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs

Governors Testify In Second Day Of HELP Hearings
At the beginning of the second day of the bipartisan Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee hearings on short term market stabilization, committee chair Lamar Alexander (R-TN) summarized what he thinks is needed to achieve stabilization. His list began with funding of the cost-sharing reduction program. He also acknowledged widespread support for short-term reinsurance funding, although he suggested that states should have a role in providing it. In other news, on September 5, a federal trial court judge denied motions to dismiss in a case claiming discrimination in violation of section 1557 of the ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - September 7, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Timothy Jost Tags: Following the ACA Insurance and Coverage Source Type: blogs

Jahi McMath Case Now Headed to a Jury Trial on Whether She Is Now Alive
Alan Shewmon  allowed to testify Earlier this year, the medical defendants in Jahi McMath's medical malpractice lawsuit filed a motion to dismiss her claims. They argued that McMath lacks standing to sue for personal injuries because she was p... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 6, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Information technology-naive defense lawyers vs. " strident critic of electronic health records "
A tale from the trenches.In recent years, as a result of the 2010 IT-related injury and 2011 death of my mother, I have engaged myself as an independent EHR forensic expert regarding evidentiary and patient harm issues in medical malpractice litigation. Interestingly and disappointingly, I still often find that hospital attitudes towards health IT safety and information transparency have changed little since 2010 or, for that matter, the 1990s when I did my postdoc in medical informatics.  Hospitals and defense attorneys often (ab)use the lack of technology experience of judges to delay or prevent evidentiary tra...
Source: Health Care Renewal - September 1, 2017 Category: Health Management Tags: bad health IT Heathkit H8 Jay Hancock Kaiser Health News medical malpractice PICIS Pulsecheck Source Type: blogs

Business Associates are NOT Responsible for Clients ’ HIPAA Compliance, BUT They Still Might Be At-Risk
The following is a guest blog post by Mike Semel from Semel Consulting. “Am I responsible for my client’s HIPAA compliance?” “What if I tell my client to fix their compliance gaps, and they don’t? Am I liable?” “I told a client to replace the free cable Internet router with a real firewall to protect his medical practice, but the doctor just won’t spend the money. Can I get in trouble?” “We are a cloud service provider. Can we be blamed for what our clients do when using our platform?”  “I went to a conference and a speaker said that Business Asso...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - August 25, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: John Lynn Tags: Healthcare HealthCare IT HIPAA General HIPAA Training HIPAA BA HIPAA Business Associates HIPAA Compliance Mike Semel Semel Consulting Source Type: blogs

Diagnostic errors in 2017 (part 2)
Fortuitously this article just appeared – Malpractice claims related to diagnostic errors in the hospital characteristics significantly associated with diagnosis-related paid claims were as follows: male patients, patient aged>50 years, provider aged
Source: DB's Medical Rants - August 14, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Jahi McMath – Impact Even if the Lawsuit Fails
Jahi McMath continues to litigate medical malpractice claims against the Oakland healthcare providers who treated her in 2013.  In July, the medical defendants argued that Jahi's claims must fail, because there is no valid evidence that she&nbsp... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 8, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Thoughts on diagnostic errors in 2017
The Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine has on its website this quote: Reducing Harm from Diagnostic Error 1 in 10 diagnoses are incorrect. Diagnostic error accounts for 40,000-80,000 US deaths annually—somewhere between breast cancer and diabetes. Chances are, we will all experience diagnostic error in our lifetime. (US Institute of Medicine 2015, BMJ Quality & Safety 25-Year Summary of US Malpractice Claims, 2013.) The current focus on diagnostic error raises an interesting question:  Is this a larger problem in 2017 than in the 1970s and 1980s? In this post, I postulate that the problem has increas...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - August 7, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Does the high-risk psychiatric patient pose a risk for the patient or the doctor?
A woman recently requested a medication evaluation at the suggestion of her psychotherapist.  The caller told me her diagnosis was borderline personality disorder. She hoped medication might ease her anxiety.  She also admitted that two other psychiatrists refused to see her because she was too “high risk.”  I asked if she was suicidal.  Yes, thoughts crossed her mind. However, she never acted on them, and was not suicidal currently.  I was curious whether my colleagues recoiled at the caller’s diagnosis, her suicide risk, her wish for anxiety-relieving medication, or something el...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 30, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/steven-reidbord" rel="tag" > Steven Reidbord, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

We adjust the pitch of our voice based on the status of who we ’re talking to
By guest blogger Lexie Thorpe In most human societies those with a higher social status enjoy privileges beyond the reach of others. Such status can be obtained through dominance, using intimidation or force, or acquiring prestige by demonstrating knowledge and skill. To make best use of the benefits though, other people need to know that you are top dog. On the other hand, if you’re of a lower status, there are probably times when it pays to avoid challenging those higher up the pecking order. In which case, you might want to convey your recognition of their authority. Using body language, such as by taking up more ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - July 28, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: guest blogger Social Source Type: blogs

IN MY VIEW: American Lung Association Guilty of Public Health Malpractice
Yesterday, researchers from the University of California, San Diego published a landmarkpaper in theBMJ (British Medical Journal) which reported that for the first time in 15 years, the smoking cessation rate among adults in the U.S. has increased. The researchers tie this unprecedented increase in the smoking cessation rate to the availability of electronic cigarettes. The paper reports that the advent of electronic cigarettes was associated with a significant increase in the population smoking cessation rate. It also finds that smokers who use e-cigarettes are more likely to quit smoking than those who do not.Combined wi...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - July 27, 2017 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

Should McCain Fight or Fold?
ANISH KOKA, MD There are 80,000 new cases of primary brain tumors diagnosed every year in the United States.  About 26,000 of these cases are of the malignant variety – and John McCain unfortunately joined their ranks last week.  In cancer, fate is defined by cell type, and the adage is of particular relevance here. Cancer is akin to a mutiny arising within the body, formed of regular every day cells that have forgotten the purpose they were born with. In the case of brain tumors, the mutinous cell frequently happens to not be the brain cell, but rather the lowly astrocyte that normally forms a matrix ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: anish_koka Tags: Physicians Anish Koka John McCain Source Type: blogs

Giving Cancer Hell
ANISH KOKA, MD There are 80,000 new cases of primary brain tumors diagnosed every year in the United States.  About 26,000 of these cases are of the malignant variety – and John McCain unfortunately joined their ranks last week.  In cancer, fate is defined by cell type, and the adage is of particular relevance here. Cancer is akin to a mutiny arising within the body, formed of regular every day cells that have forgotten the purpose they were born with. In the case of brain tumors, the mutinous cell frequently happens to not be the brain cell, but rather the lowly astrocyte that normally forms a matrix ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - July 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: anish_koka Tags: Physicians Anish Koka John McCain Source Type: blogs

We need a more comprehensive approach to investigating medical mistakes
From the wrong diagnosis to the incorrect medication, medical mistakes kill as many as 250,000 people annually in the United States — and injure thousands more. This figure could be much higher, considering there’s never been an actual count of how many patients experience preventable harm. We only have an approximate figure, which may indeed be very far off from the truth, considering the inaccuracies in medical records and the unwillingness of some providers to report medical errors. Regardless, the number is staggering enough as-is, making medical errors the third-leading cause of death in America, after hea...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 20, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/vania-silva" rel="tag" > Vania Silva < /a > Tags: Patient Malpractice Source Type: blogs

15 ys of blogging – unintended consequences
When I started blogging in 2002, I did not understand where blogging would go.  I took a rather vanilla name – medical rants – due purely to naivety.  Perhaps if I could have seen the future I would have used the phrase unintended consequences in the blog’s title. Medical care in 2017 suffers often from the unintended consequences that government has induced.  I have written about this problem many times over the past 15 years.  This problem is not just a US problem, but seemingly a problem throughout the world. Our jobs have become unnecessarily complex.  When Congress passes law...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - July 18, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Things to think about while working on a possible new project
The other day I received two emails which turned out to maybe be pivotal. One from someone I worked on the Jung and feminism book asked me what I am working on these days. Good question. The other was an invitation to apply for a multidisciplinary retreat to develop a next step in our work - intimidating and intriguing. Both emails set me off on a lot of reflection and a mixture of excitement and anxiety.  As is my habit when an new possibility is gestating, I spent time today cleaning out old files and ran across   this piece on the state  of Post-Jungian psychoanalysis and  psychotherapy by Andre...
Source: Jung At Heart - July 11, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: blogs

Lang v. Rogue Valley Medical Center – Unilateral DNR and Withholding Lawsuit
The Oregon Supreme Court has just issued a judgment allowing a medical futility lawsuit to proceed to trial. In 2001, Ruth Miller was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. Seven years later, in 2008, she executed an advance directive, naming Phillip Lang as her health care representative.   On August 1, 2008, Miller was admitted into Rogue Valley Medical Center, where she died that night. Lang brought a lawsuit against the Medical Center and Miller's oncologist, asserting claims for wrongful death, negligence, medical malpractice, and abuse of a vulnerableperson. Lang alleges that Miller was not capable of making medical d...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 1, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Medication errors haven ’t gone away
A 10-year analysis of medical malpractice cases indicates that medication errors continue to represent a significant risk to patients and health care providers, despite myriad efforts to eliminate that risk. For events that occurred beginning in 2003 (12 percent) to those from 2012 (12 percent) the proportion of cases alleging a medication error was, essentially, unchanged. Raised awareness, advances in technology, and millions of dollars directed at improving the medication process, have not yet initiated a downward trend. But that does not mean that nothing has changed: patients now encounter fewer errors in the more mec...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 29, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jock-hoffman" rel="tag" > Jock Hoffman < /a > Tags: Meds Medications Source Type: blogs

The law against giving cuts in the healthcare system
I'm very pleased that the Maharashtra government is passing a law which makes the payment of cuts, kickbacks, and commissions to doctors an offense for which they can be punished. I've always been vocal about the fact that kickbacks have corrupted the medical profession and damaged the doctor-patient relationship. These cuts impose a burden on the honest doctors who refuse to give kickbacks ; and helps bad doctors who are willing to take shortcuts to enrich themselves. In the long run, it hurts patients as well , because the cost is passed on to them, and they end up paying for these under the table bribes.A practise which...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - June 28, 2017 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

Anti-MOC Laws Picking Up Steam Across the United States
Conclusion The anti-MOC rhetoric is real, and heated. A quick google search shows at least two websites dedicated to the anti-MOC movement. Change Board Recertification, seems to collect articles about MOC and re-publish them all in one convenient website. The DOCS4Patient Care Foundation shows that – presumably in an attempt to gain more followers – proponents of anti-MOC legislation like to frame the issue as “right to care” laws, an interesting tactic. Proponents of the anti-MOC laws believe that MOC restricts patient access by forcing older physicians into early retirement. It is our belief, h...
Source: Policy and Medicine - June 28, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

A doctor ’s place is in the exam room
An orthopedic surgeon and a neurosurgeon walk into a room … Unfortunately, this is not the start of a joke. While we would prefer to be sharing best practices and treating patients in our exam rooms, the fact is we’re spending more time than we’d like in a courtroom. Because our medical liability system is broken, orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, OB-GYNs and other specialty physicians continue to find themselves on the receiving end of meritless lawsuits. As a pediatric orthopedic surgeon practicing for more than 40 years in Iowa City, I’ve seen countless colleagues forced to defend their treatm...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 27, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/stuart-l-weinstein" rel="tag" > Stuart L. Weinstein, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Malpractice Source Type: blogs

How Can We Improve Patient Satisfaction?
Patient satisfaction is the focal point of healthcare. It ’s the ultimate way to measure the effectiveness of a facility and the quality of practitioners. High patient satisfaction means strong patient retention and reduced risk of malpractice. Over the years, facilities have started to take patient satisfaction more seriously. A clinician’s CMS reimbu rsement depends on patient satisfaction scores via the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey. Poor HCAHPS scores result in loss in funds for both facilities and underperforming physicians. However, constant innovation an...
Source: radRounds - June 24, 2017 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Making Practice Guidelines And ‘Choosing Wisely’ More Effective
I always thought I was an informed patient, favoring conservative treatment and helping to save Medicare and the health system money; but when push came to shove, I was a coward that did not speak up when unnecessary tests were ordered. I think my reaction says something about the limits that even informed patients have in their ability to save the system money and ultimately raises questions about the usefulness of practice guidelines, “choosing wisely,” and evidence-based medicine to do the same. This isn’t an attack on these crucial efforts to bring more science to the practice of medicine. It is a ple...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - June 20, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: William Vaughan Tags: Costs and Spending Featured Medicare Quality Choosing Wisely practice guidelines Source Type: blogs

Stop asking doctors for free advice
My husband is a doctor. Similar to any other career, this is what he spends most of his time doing. It’s also our family’s livelihood — how we pay our mortgage, our bills and send our daughter to preschool. He went to through seven years of training after college, often working all night or even 24-plus hour calls. He’s had to miss family dinners, birthday parties, nights of putting our daughter to bed and countless other personal events to be there for children and families who need him. He is both a work superhero and a family superhero at the same time, carefully finding the balance of time betwe...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 12, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/anonymous" rel="tag" > Anonymous < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

A Not Very Good Proposal to Reduce Emergency Room Visits
By JIM PURCELL A recent article posits that an Anthem company, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Georgia (BCBSGA), is poised to “punish” its members for “unnecessary” emergency room (ER) visits by charging subscribers the entire bill for unnecessary ER visits.  This is a variation on a theme which has been playing out in virtually every state and every insurer:  how do we reduce the number of unnecessary emergency room visits?  Of course, expecting a lay person to be able to parse out what is medically necessary for ER care and what is not is probably expecting too much.  Example: &...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized ER Visits Jim Purcell Urgi-Care Center Source Type: blogs

Think you can do anything you set your mind to? Think again.
During my salad days, I — like a lot of physicians — thought I could take on the world. Despite working in a smaller, community hospital, our ER saw a lot of the same type of orthopedic trauma I saw during residency. And my young partners and I took virtually every case that came in except spinal trauma. We did this whether we were on unassigned ER call or not and irrespective of insurance coverage. If I was on call for a weekend, it was not uncommon for me to not make it home until late Monday. Looking back, I can’t believe I actually did what I did, but I was quite proud of the results — comparabl...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 8, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/thomas-d-guastavino" rel="tag" > Thomas D. Guastavino, MD < /a > Tags: Policy Emergency Orthopedics Source Type: blogs

Dr Ferrari
Kevin Williamson wrote a piece last month in the National Review bemoaning the hand wringing he sees occurring across America surrounding the threat of millions of Americans losing their health coverage with the intended repeal of the ACA and its replacement with TrumpCare. He calls this piece: The "Right" to Health Care, with the scare quotes performing the task expected. (What? Did you think you had a "right" to health care when you get sick, silly boy?) appended with the self-answering subtitleThere isn't oneboldly patched in the space before the opening lede.He then goes on to constru...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - June 6, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD FACS Source Type: blogs

What to do when dementia patients cannot eat
I'm so distraught over my father. He has a Peg tube in, and hasn't had any solid food for over 2 months.Our reader Denise wrote: I'm so distraught over my father. Has a Peg tube andhasn't had any solid food for over 2 months.He asks me all the time for food. Seeing him suffer is too much. If I give him food and then he'll aspirate and he is DNR.I feel like by giving him food i will be contributing to his death sooner. Oh Lord ...so painful.Article -16 Ways to Get a Dementia Patient to Eat More FoodSubscribe to the Alzheimer's Reading RoomEmail:By Dr. Rita A. JablonskiAlzheimer's Reading RoomTo the reader, I would reco...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - June 4, 2017 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimers alzheimers care can't eat care of dementia patients dementia care feeding health lifestyle Source Type: blogs