Johns Hopkins Public Health Researchers Claim that Smoking May Be No More Hazardous than Vaping
In anarticle published in the Summer 2018 issue of theHopkins Bloomberg Public Health Magazine, two researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health are denying that smoking is known to be any more hazardous than vaping.According to the article, Dr. Ana Maria Rule, an assistant professor in the the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering, argued that: " Even if vaping proves safer than smoking, that's still a long way from a gold stamp for their safety. " This of course implies that we don't currently know that vaping is any safer than smoking. In turn, this means the professor's clai...
Source: The Rest of the Story: Tobacco News Analysis and Commentary - June 10, 2018 Category: Addiction Source Type: blogs

When outcomes are tragic, doctors suffer too
The vast majority of births and deliveries are joyful ones. Families celebrate the wonder of the new addition to their families, and clinicians go home at the end of the day with a sense of pride, deriving meaning from their professional lives. This is one of the reasons that many of us chose obstetrics in the first place. But unfortunately, that is not always the case. As an obstetrician, I know firsthand that there is virtually nothing as emotionally wrenching as a baby or mother suffering an injurious complication or dying during childbirth. Unanticipated, bad, even horrific outcomes sometimes happen — even when a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/meredith-d-davenport" rel="tag" > Meredith D. Davenport, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Malpractice OB/GYN Source Type: blogs

5 ways to live through medical malpractice lawsuits
Nothing troubles physicians more than an unforeseen outcome and a malpractice lawsuit. It cracks open self-doubts and assumptions about medicine and may be life-changing. It commonly fuels burnout, loss of confidence, PTSD and early retirement. And there are links to depression and physician suicide. There’s another side to this story, though. Like all of life’s great challenges, a patient’s unexpected loss, and professional litigation present us with huge opportunities for growth. I am a believer in more information and less isolation. And while I have 1,001 things I’d like to tell the doctor who i...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - June 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/stacia-dearmin" rel="tag" > Stacia Dearmin, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Malpractice Source Type: blogs

What to do if you want to be a cruise ship doctor
In 2013 I began searching for ways I could change my career to reduce my workload, but not give up medicine altogether. During that time I took a cruise and looked at various jobs I could do on a cruise ship. One of the jobs I was qualified for, I thought, was to be a Cruise Ship Doctor. After talking with the ship’s doctor to find out what it was like to be the doctor on a ship, I realized that I would enjoy that life. When I arrived back home I sent in an application to a cruise line. I was promptly informed that general surgeons were not qualified to be a ship’s doctor. They only accept physicians who practi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 25, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/cory-fawcett" rel="tag" > Cory Fawcett, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Practice Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

The good, bad, and the ugly of being a medical expert witness
I have spent a good part of my career investing time and energy towards side hustles.  I generally categorize them into two distinct types of ventures.  The lazy side hustle involves starting a business or consulting in a field tangential to ones main hustle.  For example, an accountant who works normally as an auditor may do a few tax returns on the side during tax season.  I call his type of work “lazy” because most likely, the professional does not need any extensive extra training on top of what they already have obtained for their primary career.  The non-lazy side hustle...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 24, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/docg" rel="tag" > DocG, MD < /a > Tags: Finance Practice Management Source Type: blogs

With all the turmoil and craziness, too much is flying under the radar
I didn't even know thatit appears a truly horrible version of so-called " right to try " is about to become federal law. I have written about this before, but when legislation was only being passed at the state level it didn't really matter. The FDA still controls access to experimental drugs and state law can't preempt it, so state legislation was purely symbolic.The link is to an essay by the notoriously long-winded David Gorski. Do read it if you want all the details, but I'll try to give a succinct version.For background, the drug approval process has several stages. First, trials in animals have to show some...
Source: Stayin' Alive - May 21, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

How this physician became a financial advisor
Growing up with a father who is a physician made for a natural draw to medicine. However, as young people are prone to do, I did my best to rebel. Early into my undergraduate career I proudly announced to my father that I had decided to go to law school. And perhaps to dig the needle a little deeper, I told him I planned on going into medical malpractice, on the plaintiff’s side. Fortunately, thanks to genetics and a small degree of maturity, eventually I found myself in medical school. From that point on I naturally assumed I would be a practicing physician for the rest of my life. Not so fast. As my mother was fond...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 14, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/blake-mcgowan" rel="tag" > Blake McGowan, MD < /a > Tags: Finance Primary Care Source Type: blogs

What Nurses Need to Know: Midwifery and Woman-Centered Care
Karen Trister Grace has spent her career as a midwife and a midwifery educator aside from, appropriately, a nine-month period as a labor and delivery nurse. Educating herself and others has given her perspective. The nursing gig gave her real-world confirmation of why her work as a builder of midwives is so important. Grace, working The post What Nurses Need to Know: Midwifery and Woman-Centered Care appeared first on Johns Hopkins Nursing Magazine. (Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University)
Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University - May 10, 2018 Category: Nursing Authors: Editor Tags: What Nurses Need to Know Childbirth delivery doctoral healthcare labor malpractice midwifery midwives Obstetrics PhD racism Source Type: blogs

Patient Modesty: Volume 87
EO, a visitor writing in the Comment section of Volume 86 of this thread title has set the stage for further discussion-- particularly the way male patients are treated within the medical system. I thought his narrative would be appropriate to start this Volume. ..Maurice.Graphic: My composition using ArtRage and appearing as the graphic on the thread "Order vs Chaos in Medical Practice"At Sunday, May 06, 2018 3:55:00 PM,  Though I am encouraged that many of the contributors to this blog have become activists as regards affording male clients (patients) the same rights as female clients when it com...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 7, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

What could be worse than being sued for malpractice? Prison.
Kang Se-hoon, a surgeon in South Korea, operated on a popular rock singer and song writer in October 2014. According to reports, Shin Hae-chul had abdominal pain, and the surgeon performed laparoscopic lysis of adhesions. Without having obtained consent, he decided to also do a weight reduction procedure. The patient was discharged a few days after surgery but returned a day later with fever and severe abdominal pain. Kang did not investigate the cause of the pain and instead prescribed pain medication. Shin Hae-chul was eventually transferred to another hospital where he underwent an attempt at life-saving surgery. Ten da...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/skeptical-scalpel" rel="tag" > Skeptical Scalpel, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Surgery Source Type: blogs

Why physicians should respect the pain patients report
We’re all human beings, but we’re not all alike. Each person experiences pain differently, from an emotional perspective as well as a physical one, and responds to pain differently. That means that physicians like myself need to evaluate patients on an individual basis and find the best way to treat their pain. Today, however, doctors are under pressure to limit costs and prescribe treatments based on standardized guidelines. A major gap looms between the patient’s experience of pain, and the limited “one size fits all” treatment that doctors may offer. Concerns about the opioid epidemic&...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 3, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/karen-s-sibert" rel="tag" > Karen S. Sibert, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Pain Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Radiology and Errors
Conclusion should use diagnostic terms /  reflect  one opinion about disease and not  an echogenic  …. Etc . one can take the help of , could rep …. in view of …… etcComparison with old  images should follow , expressing various components  including the effect of therapy/ progression of the disease  findings etcAlways proof read your report with the help of your data entry operators( who would even confirm that you have reported the correct patient , i.e. images and report belong to the same individual/ investigation done is  what the clini...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - April 24, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Has the U.S Department of Health and Human Services Gone too Far?
In conclusion, this exemplifies how the bioethics field continues to navigate gray areas. These areas become more undefined as laws and policies that contradict one another are introduced.    Works Cited Liptak, Adam. “Supreme Court Rejects Contraceptives Mandate for Some Corporations.” The New York Times, 30 June 2014, www.nytimes.com/2014/07/01/us/hobby-lobby-case-supreme-court-contraception.html. Works Cited Menikoff, Jerry. Law and Bioethics. Georgetown University Press, 2001. O'Brien, David M. Constitutional Law and Politics. 6th ed., vol. 2, W.W. Norton & Company, 2005. Pear, Robert, and J...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 23, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Health Care Doctor-Patient Relationships government Health Care Policy religion syndicated Source Type: blogs

Can Amazon, Chase, and Berkshire Help Medical Malpractice Victims?
By MINDY NUNEZ DUFFOURC A New Era of Amazon Healthcare Should Take a Cue From Germany to Provide Support for Medical Malpractice Victims Amazon, JP Morgan Chase, and Berkshire Hathaway recently announced plans to form a joint non-profit enterprise aimed at providing affordable, high-quality, transparent healthcare to hundreds of thousands of their U.S. employees. Although a healthcare venture departs from their prior expertise, the companies’ combined wealth, resources, and history of market innovation provide hope that this new alliance can reshape the delivery and cost of healthcare in the U.S. As Amazon and compan...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Eric Schmidt Discusses the Potential Value of Predictive Analytics in the ER
For me, one of the major future changes in diagnostic medicine will be the use of predictive analytics based on deep learning and big data (see:Integrated Clinical Research Databases: A New Way to"Monetize" Clinical Data;What Are the Consequences of Big Tech Entering the Healthcare Market?). This new science will enable the prediction of future"outcomes" for patients. This trend was emphasized by former Google CEO Eric Schmidt in a lecture at HIMSS 2018 (see:HIMSS 2018: ‘Run to the Cloud,’ says Former Google CEO Eric Schmidt). He referred to the trend as leveraging the power of predicti...
Source: Lab Soft News - March 13, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Testing Cost of Healthcare Healthcare Delivery Healthcare Information Technology Healthcare Innovations Lab Processes and Procedures Medical Research Medicolegal Issues Quality of Care Source Type: blogs

Jahi McMath – Major Case Management Conference on Friday
On Friday, March 16, the Alameda County Superior Court will conduct a major case management conference in Jahi McMath's medical malpractice action. One key management issue will be whether the parties will first litigate whether or not the g... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 11, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Unnecessary testing wastes money and can lead to further testing
. Why does it occur? Almost 60% of medical personnel surveyed at a large academic medical center believed that hospitalized patients should have daily laboratory testing. Of 1,580 attending physicians, fellows, residents, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses sent surveys, 837 (53%) responded; 393 (47%) were RNs, and 80% of those nurses felt that daily laboratory testing should be done on all patients. Nurses strongly felt that patient safety and protection against malpractice litigation were enhanced by daily laboratory testing. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Man...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 10, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/skeptical-scalpel" rel="tag" > Skeptical Scalpel, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Source Type: blogs

Clinicians May Have Used Advance Directive to Hide Malpractice
In August 2011, Cecilia Hoh was admitted to Glendale Adventist because of swelling in her right foot. Her family alleges that clinicians failed to perform the proper diagnostic tests, including an ultrasound, to rule out deep vein thrombosis.  The family further alleges that after learning Hoh had a “history of lung mass,” clinicians misrepresented  that she suffered from terminal lung cancer when they knew the mass was benign. Then,  when clinicians learned Ms. Hoh had an advance directive, they ceased providing any curative care, and assigned her to hospice care. Defendants misrepresented ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 8, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

To err is homicide in Britain
A single error oft inters the good that doctors do. The case of Dr. Hadiza Bawa-Garba, a trainee pediatrician in the NHS convicted for homicide for the death of a child from sepsis and hounded by the General Medical Council is every junior doctor’s primal fear. A boy in shock Friday, February 18th, 2011 was not a typically unusual day in a British hospital. Dr. Bawa-Garba had recently returned from a 13-month maternity break. She was the on-call pediatric registrar — the second in command for the care of sick children at Leicester Royal Infirmary. As a “registrar” she was both a master and an appren...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/dr-saurabh-jha" rel="tag" > Dr. Saurabh Jha < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Malpractice Residency Source Type: blogs

The unjust prosecution of physicians is not unique
Dr. Pramela Ganji had just finished her lunch when she was told that the appellate court had reversed and vacated her conviction.  At first, she didn’t believe it.    After all, this whole experience had been surreal.  Dr. Ganji, a 68-year-old well-respected medical doctor and married mother of 3 children, had practiced medicine for 40 years without incident.  Her patients loved her, and she had dedicated her life to helping others.   Towards the end of her career, she started working at Christian Home Health.  The government noticed that this company had a number of billing irregul...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 28, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/david-markus-and-mona-markus" rel="tag" > David Markus, JD and Mona Markus, JD < /a > Tags: Policy Hospital-Based Medicine Malpractice Pain Management Source Type: blogs

First, Do No (Self) Harm
When a doctor in your hospital system kills himself, the entire medical staff receives a mass email informing everyone of “Dr. So-and-So’s sudden unexpected death”. Thoughts and prayers for his family and loved ones. Perhaps a link to your Employee Assistance Program is provided, for those who may need counseling or grief assistance.  This is followed later that day with another email detailing the schedule for the final arrangements. Calling hours. Funeral. Directions to the church.Not everyone will have known the physician. So most scan the email and then go about thei...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - February 18, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD FACS Source Type: blogs

The Doctor Squared Movement: An Alternative to Regulatory Burden
By WES FISHER, MD and PAUL TIERSTEIN, MD The 4th amendment of the U.S. Constitution shields an individual (or business) from unreasonable government intrusion. It is inferred this right extends to ALL people, regardless of profession.  Advanced nurse practitioners are independently practicing medicine in 23 states yet are not subject to onerous Maintenance of Certification (MOC) requirements– physicians are not equally protected under the law.  Physicians must fight, as one group, against the burden of MOC.  We have two choices:  become a Doctor Squared (Dr. ²) or join an alternative certific...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Ending Qualified Immunity for Cops Is a Matter of Life and Death
Last week, Bartlesville, Oklahoma, police releasedvideo from a nighttime SWAT on the home of a man suspected of selling marijuana —yes, marijuana—during which officers fatally shot his mother, 72-year-old Geraldine Townsend, after she fired a BB gun at the officers. As he is being cuffed and dragged from the house, Mike Townsend can be heard pleading with the officers to let him see his dying mother, but they refuse.In December, Wichita, Kansas, police received what turned out to be a prank call regarding a non-existent hostage situation at the home of Andrew Finch. When the 28-year-old father of two went outsi...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 5, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Clark Neily Source Type: blogs

How not to get ripped off by IVF doctors
This is a great article, at http://www.conceptionadvice.com/how-not-to-be-ripped-off-by-fertility-clinics/Please do read it  - a lot of these malpractices are rampant in Indian IVF clinics as well.I especially love the following paragraph !Blinded by Pseudo ScienceIf a stranger down the pub told you the best way to get pregnant was to get a cheap bit of plastic and waggle it around inside your womb, would you believe them? Probably not. But if that advice came from a doctor and was given a fancy scientific sounding name, would you believe them?Some fertility clinics offer add-on services as a supplement to the co...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - January 29, 2018 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

Structured settlements are ruining patients ’ lives
There are a lot of TV commercials for structured settlement companies these days. You know, the companies that say if you are cash-strapped but have a structured settlement they will be happy to buy your settlement and give you “cash now.” Some of the commercials are quite clever and catchy featuring everything from operettas to boy bands. After seeing so many of these, one has to conclude that there has to be a lot of people in this situation but how is this possible? After all, if these people are getting ” large cash settlements” how come they are in this fix? Two experiences I had may hold provi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 10, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/thomas-d-guastavino" rel="tag" > Thomas D. Guastavino, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Malpractice Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Jahi McMath Now Directly Attacks Brain Death Medical Criteria
For the past few years in her ongoing medical malpractice litigation, Jahi McMath has focused on establishing that she no longer satisfies prevailing medical criteria for brain death, even though she satisfied those criteria in December 2013. However,... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 7, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Plastic surgeon quits and couldn ’t get a job at Chick-fil-A
I just got off the phone with Paul, a highly-sought-after plastic surgeon in New York. “I don’t want to be a doctor anymore,” Paul says. “What else can I do? I have lots of restaurant experience. I’ve worked in 15 restaurants during my life. It’s not easy, but I could do it. I did research on chains and franchises, and I chose Chick-fil-A. Three months ago I applied to be an owner/operator. I got through the first application and got declined the second round of applications. They are extremely picky. Nearly 20,000 apply, and only a few are chosen.” I’m shocked he was decline...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 4, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/pamela-wible" rel="tag" > Pamela Wible, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Surgery Source Type: blogs

Physician asset protection: Is it a good idea to pay down debts?
Being in a high income, high-risk field I often think of asset protection. The lawsuit may not come from medical work, but from an auto accident or someone slipping on my front step. All of these can lead to suits, and as a high-income earner, we all have a target on our back. The last thing I want to do is work hard to save money to then have it taken away by one lawsuit. There are of course many ways to protect your assets, and they should all be put into place. Insurance Malpractice insurance For one, having a good malpractice insurance as a physician is key. Hopefully, your group has paid for your insurance, and it has...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 17, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/dads-dollars-debts" rel="tag" > Dads Dollars Debts, MD < /a > Tags: Finance Practice Management Source Type: blogs

Hey Watson, Can I Sue You?
By JAYSON CHUNG & AMANDA ZINK Currently, three South Korean medical institutions – Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Pusan National University Hospital and Konyang University Hospital – have implemented IBM’s Watson for Oncology artificial intelligence (AI) system. As IBM touts the Watson for Oncology AI’s to “[i]dentify, evaluate and compare treatment options” by understanding the longitudinal medical record and applying its training to each unique patient, questions regarding the status and liability of these AI machines have arisen. Given its ability to interpret data and ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Could Artificial Intelligence destroy radiology by litigation claims?
By, Hugh Harvey MBBS BSc (Hons) FRCR MD (res) We’ve all heard the big philosophical arguments and debate between rockstar entrepreneurs and genius academics – but have we stopped to think exactly how the AI revolution will play out on our own turf? At RSNA this year I posed the same question to everyone I spoke to: What if radiology AI gets into the wrong hands? Judging by the way the crowds voted with their feet by packing out every lecture on AI, radiologists would certainly seem to be very aware of the looming seismic shift in the profession – but I wanted to know if anyone was considering th...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The accused physicians who are my colleagues
From the earliest days on the clinical wards, everyone probably worked with a senior physician who knew how to game the system. It might be doing a rigid sigmoidoscopy on admission for every patient who had a rectum — something not the standard of care forty years ago. Or maybe it was accepting a pharmaceutical company subsidized tax-deductible junket under the guise of CME at a place with sparkling white sand in February — something that might have been the standard of care 40 years ago. While people would question the propriety of these things, there did not seem to be any material challenge to the legality. ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 2, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/richard-plotzker" rel="tag" > Richard Plotzker, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Malpractice Public Health & Policy Source Type: blogs

The Six Worst U.S. Health Disasters of the Last 50 Years
Up until the first half of the twentieth century, large-scale health disasters were mostly due to natural causes (earthquakes, volcanoes, hurricanes, etc.) or infections (e.g., smallpox, influenza epidemics, cholera). But something peculiar happened as we entered the second half of the century: Health disasters due to natural causes became dwarfed by large-scale health disasters that are man-made. Here’s a list of the Six Worst U.S. Health Disasters of the Last 50 Years, mostly man-made phenomena that have exacted huge tolls: widespread disease, premature death, poorly managed (though nonetheless highly profitable fo...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - December 2, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle autoimmune gluten grain-free grains Inflammation low-carb Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

Practicing Medicine While Black (Part II)
By KIP SULLIVAN Managed care advocates see quality problems everywhere and resource shortages nowhere. If the Leapfrog Group, the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, or some other managed care advocate were in charge of explaining why a high school football team lost to the New England Patriots, their explanation would be “poor quality.” If a man armed with a knife lost a fight to a man with a gun, ditto: “Poor quality.” And their solution would be more measurement of the “quality,” followed by punishment of the losers for getting low grades on the “quality” report card and...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized CMS Kip Sullivan value-based care Source Type: blogs

These are the biggest medical issues of 2017
Periodically we should reflect on what challenges face patients and physicians.  Over the past few days, I have worked on a list of the issues that concern me the most.  I welcome suggestions for expanding the list. 1. Diagnostic errors. All patient care requires that we make the proper diagnosis.  Too often we make errors.  A recent paper estimated that 30 percent of cellulitis admissions did not have cellulitis.  A similar paper found almost the same estimate for community-acquired pneumonia admissions.  The most common reason for successful malpractice claims is diagnostic errors.  Hav...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 22, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/robert-centor" rel="tag" > Robert Centor, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Primary Care Public Health & Policy Source Type: blogs

HIPAA May be the Least of Your Compliance Worries
The following is a guest blog post by Mike Semel from Semel Consulting.  Check out all of Mike Semel’s EMR and HIPAA blog posts. What requirements have you hidden away? I visited a new healthcare client last week, and asked if anything in particular made them call us for help with their HIPAA compliance. They surprised me by saying that their insurance company had refused to sell them a cyber-liability/data breach insurance policy, after they saw the answers on our client’s application. When was the last time you heard about an insurance company not selling a policy? That’s like McDonalds looking you...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - November 21, 2017 Category: Information Technology Authors: Guest Blogger Tags: Healthcare HealthCare IT HIPAA General HIPAA Training HIPAA BA HIPAA Business Associates HIPAA Compliance Mike Semel Semel Consulting Source Type: blogs

Could MIPS Data Be Used Against Physicians?
One of the major changes thanks to MACRA and its associated Quality Payment Program (QPP) is the creation of MIPS, of the Merit-based Incentive Payment System. Much has been made about this new way physicians will be evaluated under Medicare. However, we have not seen the take of MIPS scores being used in other domains, such as medical malpractice lawsuits, until we came across this consulting firm’s hypothetical. Could MIPS data be used against physicians? Hypothetical Malpractice Case As described on MyMipsScores’ blog: “[H]ere is another collateral effect of the MIPS score. This one is for our frie...
Source: Policy and Medicine - November 20, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Got real rights? Not when seeking health care.               
Until genuine rights are extended to all patients, the ongoing health-care-reform saga perpetrated by Congress and executive leadership will continue to fail the American people. Many Americans have suffered and died because of a broken health-care-delivery system. One of us lost a 19-year old son due to lack of certain patient rights – specifically the right to evidence-based medicine and the right to a complete discharge plan from his hospital. His cardiologists failed to replace potassium as required by an evidence based guideline for patients with low serum potassium and concomitant cardiac arrhythmias.  He ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 18, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/john-t-james-and-michael-f-mascia" rel="tag" > John T. James, PhD and Michael F. Mascia, MD, MPH < /a > Tags: Patient Hospital-Based Medicine Medicare Patients Source Type: blogs

Physician wellness at the personal, institutional, and cultural levels
Do you know we have record rates of physician burnout, dissatisfaction, and suicide? Ongoing shortages in primary care, without improvement in sight? Physicians exiting medicine earlier  than in the past? What about burnout? Do you know it affects patients as well as their doctors? Affects physicians’ families and friends? Increases mistakes and malpractice risk? Affects patient adherence and outcomes? Is costly to the entire system? How do we start to fix this? The framework for a discussion on physician wellness begins with attention to three levels: personal wellness, organizational wellness, and wellness wit...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 15, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/kathy-stepien" rel="tag" > Kathy Stepien, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Practice Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

It ’s time for medicine to share its power
In the movie Malice, Alec Baldwin plays Dr. Jed Hill, a surgeon who gives a famous speech during a deposition in a medical malpractice case. “”If you’re looking for God, he was in operating room #2 on November 17th, and he doesn’t like to be second-guessed … I am God.” No one wants a doctor like that. And yet, maybe we do. We yearn for someone capable of healing all of our wounds, fixing what is wrong, performing miracles in the OR. We expect someone to be able to cut into our brains, hearts, and bellies, but somehow also expect that same someone to deny the inherent power of those...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 15, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/heather-hansen" rel="tag" > Heather Hansen < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Practice Management Surgery Source Type: blogs

Why we need a new approach to end of life care
Looking at how incredibly expensive the last few months of life are for anyone in this country, I think most would be quite shocked. In 2014, there were approximately 2.6 million deaths in the U.S. According to a Keiser Permanente study, 2.1 million of those deaths were Medicare related. Medicare’s annual budget is right around $600 billion, and it has been revealed that one-third of that total is spent in relation to the last six months of life. That is a staggering amount of money. What does this say about our approach to health care and quality of life in general? Fact: Everybody dies. No matter what, no matter wh...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 9, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/sebastian-sepulveda" rel="tag" > Sebastian Sepulveda, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Palliative Care Source Type: blogs

Medical Futility Jury Trial Begins against Hospital that Stopped Life Support without Consent
It is rare for any medical malpractice case to reach a jury. Most are settled or dismissed at earlier stages of litigation.  It is even rarer for a medical futility case to reach a jury. But that is happening this month in Milford, Connecticut (Ma... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - November 9, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The major medical issues of 2017
Periodically we should reflect on what challenges face patients and physicians.  Over the past few days I have worked on a list of the issues that concern me the most.  I welcome suggestions for expanding the list. Diagnostic errors – all patient care requires that we make the proper diagnosis.  Too often we make errors.  A recent paper estimated that 30% of cellulitis admissions did not have cellulitis.  A similar paper found almost the same estimate for community acquired pneumonia admissions.  The most common reason for successful malpractice claims is diagnostic errors.  Have t...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - November 3, 2017 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

What I ’ve learned from 547 doctor suicides
Five years ago today I was at a memorial. Another suicide. Our third doctor in 18 months. Everyone kept whispering, “Why?” I was determined to find out. So I started counting dead doctors. I left the service with a list of 10. Now I have 547. Immediately, I began writing and speaking about suicide. So many distressed doctors (and med students) wrote and phoned me. Soon I was running a de facto international suicide hotline from my home. To date, I’ve spoken to thousands of suicidal doctors; published a book of their suicide letters (free audiobook); attended more funerals; in...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 31, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/pamela-wible" rel="tag" > Pamela Wible, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Medical school Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Medical Malpractice – Who’s Being Sued and What Is It Costing
Shutterstock A baby is born. The delivery was rocky, with the infant’s heart rate showing occasional signs of distress. Later, the parents learn that their child has cerebral palsy, and may never walk normally. Was the obstetrician to blame and, … Continue reading → The post Medical Malpractice – Who’s Being Sued and What Is It Costing appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 31, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Peter Ubel Tags: Health Care healthcare costs Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The key to health care is to have a great team
I was a chubby kid, but my parents still introduced me to lots of sports. Soccer, swimming, tennis, basketball; so many sports, when all I wanted to do was read and eat Doritos.  I wasn’t particularly good at any of them, but some of my teams were better than good. We were champs. My swim team won the Cape Cod Summer League, my soccer team won its division one year, and my high school tennis team was state champions all four of the years I was there. I didn’t come in first in butterfly, score the winning goal, or take the final set. But I like to think I contributed. I swam well enough to place. I defended...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 30, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/heather-hansen" rel="tag" > Heather Hansen < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Malpractice Public Health & Policy Source Type: blogs

Health Affairs Web First: Choosing Wisely Campaign
This study was supported by the ABIM Foundation and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). How To Fulfill The Promise In The Next 5 Years In this analysis, the authors discuss the Choosing Wisely® campaign’s accomplishments over the past five years and summarize what steps could fulfill its promise. They take note of movement’s growth since its founding, with seventy new societies signing on, ; more than 400 recommendations issued, and a steady increase in the number of studies testing interventions to reduce low-value care (see the exhibit below). Exhibit 1: Cumulative Numbers Of Choosing ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - October 24, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Health Affairs Tags: Elsewhere@ Health Affairs Choosing Wisely Source Type: blogs

Could being vulnerable lead to better health?
Long ago, I represented a doctor who was … difficult. He was a phenomenal surgeon, world famous in his field, but he was not warm and fuzzy — not even close. Cold and hard were more his speed. We spent two weeks together, on trial in city hall. It takes about two years from the time a case is filed to the time the case goes to court. During that time, all I got was cold and hard. If the research is right, and people sue their doctors for bad communication rather than bad medicine, this doctor was showing me why that might be true. But then we went to trial, and he began to crack. Leonard Cohen once said, &ldqu...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 17, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/heather-hansen" rel="tag" > Heather Hansen < /a > Tags: Physician Malpractice Surgery Source Type: blogs

Primary Care Docs Spending About Half Their Work Days Interacting with EHRs
I have posted a number of previous notes about the inefficiencies introduced by EHRs, particularly particularly relating to the fact that their use now constitutes a major time sink for physicians (see:Some of the Major Criticisms of EHRs; Why Few Changes Anticipated;Problems Associated with EHRs: A Medical Malpractice Perspective). A recent article quoted a research study about the time logged by primary care physicians on their EHRs (see:Family doctors spend 86 minutes of “pajama time” with EHRs nightly). Below is an excerpt from it:A new study using electronic health record (EHR) system event-logging data to...
Source: Lab Soft News - October 13, 2017 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Cost of Healthcare Electronic Health Record (EHR) Healthcare Business Healthcare Delivery Healthcare Information Technology Hospital Executive Management Hospital Financial Quality of Care Source Type: blogs

Veterans Health Failure
This study explored why there is so much failure and mismanagement in the federal government. Federal agencies lack incentives for efficiency and quality, and the environment in some workplaces seems to breed unethical behavior. The government has also become far too large to manage effectively and for Congress to oversee adequately.A new investigation byUSA TODAY reveals a pattern of rather disgraceful mismanagement in the Department of Veterans Affairs:… the VA—the nation’s largest employer of health care workers—has for years concealed mistakes and misdeeds by staff members entrusted with the ca...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 13, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Chris Edwards Source Type: blogs

Defendants to Physically Examine Jahi McMath to Confirm Brain Death
In late September 2017, five defendants and the plaintiff filed case management statements in Jahi McMath's medical malpractice lawsuit in California state court. Of note, some defendants note that their planned discovery includes an IME (independent ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 6, 2017 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs