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Seventieth session of WHO Regional Committee for South-East Asia
WHO Director-General's speech at the Regional Comm for South-East Asia, WHO (Source: WHO Director-General speeches)
Source: WHO Director-General speeches - September 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: director-general [subject], director-general [subject], director-general [subject], governance [subject], Maldives [country], South-East Asia Region [region], Speech [doctype] Source Type: news

Saving olive ridleys of the Indian Ocean
Richard Aspinall talks to Martin Stelfox from the Olive Ridley project about protecting one of the world ’s smallest turtles from ‘ghost fishing’ in the MaldivesOne of the world ’s smallest turtle (some sources claim smallest is Kemp’s ridley) is also the most abundant, yet to me, it seems to be the hardest to find! I’ve dived on reefs across the tropics, with camera in hand, and have yet to encounter a single olive ridley. I’ve seen scores of hawksbills and greens, and even a few loggerheads, but the olive ridley, with its distinctive heart-shaped shell is an animal I’ve onl...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 31, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Richard Aspinall Tags: Science Endangered species Conservation Environment Wildlife Fishing Marine life Source Type: news

Teleradiology Solutions partners with Zebra Medical
Teleradiology Solutions and artificial intelligence software developer Zebra...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Zebra unveils deep learning in Australia, New Zealand Teleradiology Solutions, GE partner on India venture Intermountain adopts Zebra Medical machine learning Zebra unveils new software algorithm Teleradiology Solutions signs African contract Teleradiology Solutions inks Maldives deal (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 6, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Bhutan and Maldives Eliminate Measles - WHO Bhutan and Maldives Eliminate Measles - WHO
Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Maldives, Bhutan have eliminated measles: WHO
Bhutan and the Maldives have eliminated measles, becoming the first countries in their region to stop the highly contagious disease, the World Health Organization says. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - June 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

WHO: Maldives, Bhutan have eliminated measles
The World Health Organization says Bhutan and the Maldives have eliminated measles, becoming the first countries in their region to stop the highly contagious disease (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - June 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

World Order Could Hinge On Solving The Climate Crisis, Security Experts Warn
WASHINGTON — From flooding in coastal cities to conflicts driven by food and water shortages, people are already feeling the effects of climate change. And if the world does not mitigate climate-related impacts, they are likely to “intersect, amplify and ripple across countries,” disrupting international security, a team of climate and security experts warns in a new report.  The lengthy report from The Center for Climate and Security identifies 12 key climatic risks, or “epicenters,” and makes the case for why addressing them should be of the highest priority for worl...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 9, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Climate Change May Force Millions Of Americans To Move Inland
In low-lying island nations like Tuvalu and the Maldives, the term “climate migrant” is all too familiar. Rising sea levels have already forced some Pacific Ocean communities to flee from their homes and there are fears that several whole islands will be underwater in just a few decades. But it’s not just island dwellers who need to worry about climate-related migration. As coastal areas are deluged over this century, millions of mainland Americans could be forced to flee inland, where they may overwhelm already crowded cities, according to new research from the University of Georgia. &ldqu...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Teleradiology Solutions, GE partner on India venture
Teleradiology Solutions and GE Healthcare have inked a partnership to provide...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: GE, Partners HealthCare team up for deep-learning venture GE reaches development milestone in Check-Cap deal GE joins with Check-Cap for x-ray colon camera pill Teleradiology Solutions signs African contract Teleradiology Solutions inks Maldives deal (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - May 18, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Nigeria: Furore Over Efforts to Eliminate Malaria
[Guardian] As Nigeria joins the rest of the globe to celebrate the World Malaria Day (WMD), today, April 25, seven countries have been certified by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as having eliminated malaria: United Arab Emirates (2007), Morocco (2010), Turkmenistan (2010), Armenia (2011), Maldives (2015), Sri Lanka (2016) and Kyrgyzstan (2016). This certification is granted by WHO when countries achieve at least three consecutive years of zero locally-acquired cases of malaria. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - April 26, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

House Democrat Fact-Checks Science Committee’s Climate Nonsense
WASHINGTON — Fed up with the anti-science nonsense that now dominates hearings of the House Science, Space and Technology Committee, vice ranking member Rep. Don Beyer (D-Va.) has launched a project to make it easier for scientists to set the record straight. The appropriately named FactCheck Project was sparked in particular by last month’s hearing on climate change, which committee Chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas) stacked with three likeminded climate change skeptics. The panel’s Democratic minority got to name one witness: Michael Mann, a climate scientist at Pennsylvania State U...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 14, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

We Must End TB By 2030
“From the Indian Prime Minister to the Russian President, from the Indonesian Vice President to the First Lady of Nigeria, from Ministers of Health from South Africa, Thailand and Belarus to people asking for their rights to diagnosis and treatment ― is TB finally getting the political attention and visibility it needs and deserves?” Ending TB by 2030 is one of the SDGs and an ambitious goal that the world must achieve. It will not be easy as the burden is huge: an estimated 2 billion people infected globally, 10.5 million new TB cases every year with just a bit more than 6 000 000 detected and treated with p...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Saudi king postpones visit to Maldives over flu outbreak
(Reuters) - Saudi Arabia's King Salman has postponed a visit to the Maldives due to an outbreak of flu, the government of the Indian Ocean archipelago said on Friday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Scientists Are Racing to Prevent a Total Wipeout of the World ’s Coral Reefs
(SOUTH ARI ATOLL, Maldives) — There were startling colors here just a year ago, a dazzling array of life beneath the waves. Now this Maldivian reef is dead, killed by the stress of rising ocean temperatures. What’s left is a haunting expanse of gray, a scene repeated in reefs across the globe in what has fast become a full-blown ecological catastrophe. The world has lost roughly half its coral reefs in the last 30 years. Scientists are now scrambling to ensure that at least a fraction of these unique ecosystems survives beyond the next three decades. The health of the planet depends on it: Coral reefs support a...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - March 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elena Becatoros / AP Tags: Uncategorized climate change Conservation Coral Reefs Environment Marine research onetime Source Type: news

CDC Updates Zika Travel Advice for Pregnant Women CDC Updates Zika Travel Advice for Pregnant Women
The CDC says pregnant women should not travel to any area where there is a risk for Zika, and it adds Angola, Guinea-Bissau, Maldives, and Solomon Islands to travel advisory list.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Sandoz announces winners of inaugural Healthcare Access Challenge #SandozHACk
Sandoz, a Novartis Division, announced today the three winners of the inaugural Healthcare Access Challenge (Sandoz HACk). The winners, chosen by a panel of judges at the Wired Health 2017 event in London, identified innovative approaches to address challenges in Ghana, the Maldives and the Philippines. The winning ideas all proposed novel ways to use mobile technologies to connect patients with caregivers and essential medicines, addressing access issues specific to their country but with the potential for solutions to be applied elsewhere. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - March 13, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Novartis Business and Industry Source Type: news

Sandoz Announces Winners of Inaugural Healthcare Access Challenge #SandozHACk
Sandoz, a Novartis Division, announced today the three winners of the inaugural Healthcare Access Challenge (Sandoz HACk). The winners, chosen by a panel of judges at the Wired Health 2017 event in London, identified innovative approaches to address challenges in Ghana, the Maldives and the Philippines. The winning ideas all proposed novel ways to use mobile technologies to connect patients with caregivers and essential medicines, addressing access issues specific to their country but with the potential for solutions to be applied elsewhere. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - March 13, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Industry Business and Industry Source Type: news

The Fabric On These Adidas Shoes Will Decompose In Your Sink
Adidas has unveiled a new shoe featuring biodegradable fabric that’s designed to break down within hours of its disposal using a water and enzyme solution. The one catch: the design appears to be attached to a foam sole ― suggesting that a large portion of the shoe would still end up in a landfill. Adidas’ Futurecraft Biofabric was presented at last week’s Biofabricate conference in New York. The unique design features a synthetic spider silk called Biosteel that is 100 percent biodegradable, according to the shoemaker. The sneaker, which touts itself as the first biodegradable shoe of its kind, is...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 21, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

MGH picks teleradiology firm for 3D postprocessing
Teleradiology Solutions was selected by Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Teleradiology Solutions signs African contract Teleradiology Solutions inks Maldives deal (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - November 7, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Traveling To Southeast Asia? Here's What You Need To Know About Zika Virus
The Zika virus epidemic in Latin America and the Caribbean has infected potentially millions of people and is pegged as the cause of congenital Zika syndrome, a birth defect affecting thousands of children in the region. It can cause brain damage, seizures, deafness, blindness and other neurological and physiological problems.  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued travel advisories for 59 countries and territories throughout the world, including neighborhoods in Miami where the Zika virus continues to spread locally. Most of these areas are in Latin America and the Caribbean, while eight...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Traveling To Southeast Asia? Here's What You Need To Know About Zika Virus
The Zika virus epidemic in Latin America and the Caribbean has infected potentially millions of people and is pegged as the cause of congenital Zika syndrome, a birth defect affecting thousands of children in the region. It can cause brain damage, seizures, deafness, blindness and other neurological and physiological problems.  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued travel advisories for 59 countries and territories throughout the world, including neighborhoods in Miami where the Zika virus continues to spread locally. Most of these areas are in Latin America and the Caribbean, while eight...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Stunning plunge in maternal deaths recorded in Maldives
Language EnglishMALE, Maldives –The Maldives has seen a stunning 90 per cent plunge in its maternal death rate over the last 25 years, the largest such drop in the world over this time period, according tojoint United Nations estimates.In 1990, out of every 100,000 live births, 677 women died ofpregnancy-related causes. Last year, that number was 68, according to the UN ’sTrends in Maternal Mortality report. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - October 11, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: zerzan Source Type: news

U.S. Officials Launch A Zika Travel Advisory For Southeast Asia
U.S. health officials issued a Zika virus travel warning on Thursday, recommending that pregnant women consider postponing nonessential travel to 11 counties in Southeast Asia. The new travel warning was issued for Brunei, Myanmar (Burma), Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Maldives, Philippines, Thailand, Timor-Leste (East Timor) and Vietnam, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Travelers have returned from certain areas of Southeast Asia with Zika virus infection,” the agency noted on its website. On Friday, officials reported two cases of Zika-linked microcephaly in Thailand, ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CDC issues Zika travel notice for 11 Southeast Asian countries
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a travel notice Thursday urging pregnant women to consider postponing nonessential travel to 11 countries in Southeast Asia because of the risk of Zika virus infections. The countries are Brunei, Burma (Myanmar), Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Maldives, Philippines, Thailand, East Timor and Vietnam. The travel information is […]Related:CDC officials worry that new flu vaccine recommendations could reduce useMystery Zika case in Utah was likely spread through sweat or tearsCancer immunotherapy is moving fast. Here’s what you need to know. (Source: Wash...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - September 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers pinpoint abrupt onset of modern day Indian Ocean monsoon system
A new study by an international team of scientists reveals the exact timing of the onset of the modern monsoon pattern in the Maldives 12.9 million years ago, and its connection to past climate changes and coral reefs in the region. The analysis of sediment cores provides direct physical evidence of the environmental conditions that sparked the monsoon conditions that exist today around the low-lying island nation and the Indian subcontinent. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 29, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Honeymoon turns to horror when bride suffers heart failure and nearly dies snorkeling  
Sarah Corthorn, 37, of Nottingham, began gasping for air within minutes of the snorkelling session during a £5,400 Maldives holiday with her 32-year-old husband, Chris. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Honeymoon turns to horror when bride suffers heart failure and nearly dies snorkeling 
Sarah Corthorn, 37, of Nottingham, began gasping for air within minutes of the snorkelling session during a £5,400 Maldives holiday with her 32-year-old husband, Chris. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

(Ca)Nine Reasons An Office Dog Is Good For Business
For some time now experts have hailed the health benefits of having an office dog. Now, Professor Paul Zak, neuroeconomics professor at Claremont Graduate University in California is taking it a step further saying that an office dog can in fact create a rise in profits. This is good news for my daughter, Catherine and I who run a media management company. Business is very good but, like any new company, there have been a lot of unexpected costs, so it's good to know that our office dog, Bailey, is an asset rather than a deficit. Our chocolate lab is also a health boost. While we stress out over deadlines, edits and cl...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Essex bride gets her dream honeymoon after beating Hodgkin's lymphoma TWICE
Polly Demetriou, 30, from Grays, Essex. was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma a year before her wedding and the police community officer had to wait until last year to jet off to the Maldives. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cancer-stricken bride who postponed her honeymoon gets her dream trip after beating Hodgkin's lymphoma TWICE
Polly Demetriou, 30, from Grays, Essex. was diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma a year before her wedding and the police community officer had to wait until last year to jet off to the Maldives. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Latest On Zika: Asia's Research Arms Race Has One Major Holdup
Brazilian abortion activists face an uphill battle as they lobby for fewer restrictions in a heavily Catholic country where many of the women most affected by Zika virus hold anti-abortion views.  The virus, which is spread by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, is strongly suspected to be causing a new wave of microcephaly cases in Brazil. Babies born with the birth defect have smaller heads and brains that aren't fully developed, which can result in life-long developmental problems.    And across the world, scientists in China, India and Singapore -- each of which have large populations and histories of mosqu...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 10, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zika virus infection – Maldives
On 7 January 2016, the National IHR Focal Point of Maldives notified WHO of a case of Zika virus infection with onset of symptoms in June 2015, in a patient returning to Finland. The patient is a 37-year-old Finnish male who returned to Finland on 16 June 2015 after spending several months in the Maldives. On 18 June, the patient developed symptoms (mild fever and rash on the face and trunk, as well as eye pain and arthralgia); however, after a few days, these subsided. (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - February 8, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: pesticide [subject], insecticides, fungicides, risk assessment [subject], zika, zika, Disease outbreak news [doctype], Maldives [country], South-East Asia Region [region] Source Type: news

From Fish Bladder Beer to Hurricane Hacks: This Week's Curios
Every day of the year, Curious.com CEO Justin Kitch writes a quirky fact, known as the Daily Curio, intended to tickle the brains of lifelong learners everywhere. This is a weekly digest. Last week's Curios covered why fish bladders are in your Guinness beer, tropical islands made of parrotfish poop, and the debate over "geohacking" hurricanes. Curio #881 | Hacking hurricanes Climate change isn't just warming the planet. It's almost certainly causing more frequent and intense hurricanes, thanks to warmer oceans. Some scientists are worried deadly storms could get very bad very soon. Possibly presenting a greater...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 11, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

From Fish Bladder Beer to Hurricane Hacks: This Week's Curios
Every day of the year, Curious.com CEO Justin Kitch writes a quirky fact, known as the Daily Curio, intended to tickle the brains of lifelong learners everywhere. This is a weekly digest. Last week's Curios covered why fish bladders are in your Guinness beer, tropical islands made of parrotfish poop, and the debate over "geohacking" hurricanes. Curio #881 | Hacking hurricanes Climate change isn't just warming the planet. It's almost certainly causing more frequent and intense hurricanes, thanks to warmer oceans. Some scientists are worried deadly storms could get very bad very soon. Possibly presenting a great...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 11, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Why This Goal To Curb Climate Change 'Is Not Ideal'
If you're planning to follow the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change's Conference of the Parties -- which starts today and runs through Dec. 11 in Paris -- you'll likely hear a lot about the threshold of 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit). That number separates us from climate change-induced floods, droughts, storms, heat waves and rising sea levels more severe than those we've already seen, according to some scientists. Keeping our world from warming more than 2 degrees Celsius by 2100 -- so the average global temperature doesn't rise above roughly 61.6 deg...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 30, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

World's Pledges To Reduce Carbon Emissions Aren't Enough To Tackle Climate Change, UN Warns
Countries around the world are pledging to cut their carbon emissions ahead of next month's climate meeting in Paris, part of a desperate team effort to stave off catastrophic climate change. But even if these promises are kept, they won't go nearly far enough, according to an analysis released Friday by the United Nations Environment Programme. In its sixth annual "Emissions Gap" report, the UNEP analyzed pledges submitted by nearly 150 countries, which collectively contributed more than 85 percent of total global greenhouse gas emissions in 2012. The report found that the pledges would amount to only about...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 6, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Weekend Roundup: Turkey's 'Two Souls' Are Being Torn Apart
We report as well on a "Thank You Concert" in Munich by the so-called Syrian refugee "piano man," Ayham Ahmad, who has played for audiences along his route to Europe. Also from Munich, Sophia Maier describes what it was like to take in four refugees. In an act of "joy without borders" we report on a Jordanian couple who invited over 200 refugees to their wedding feast. From Athens, Danae Leivada reports on how non-profit organizations are "bringing hope and care" to senior citizens who have suffered years of cuts on social services during Greece's sovereign debt crisis. In a new ser...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 16, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

At the Mercy of Mother Nature (and of Policies of Larger Nations)
The Vienna Convention for Protection of the Ozone Layer this month celebrates 30 years of environmental protection, including the establishment of the Montreal Protocol, which has successfully phased down hundreds of chemicals harmful to the ozone layer and to global climate. The one remaining challenge, the management of the powerful greenhouse gases called HFCs, is finally being negotiated after several years of calls for action by the Federated States of Micronesia and fellow island nations. Phasing down HFCs under the Montreal Protocol is essential to global climate-change mitigation this century and would enhance inte...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Spratly Islands: Burying Coral Reefs Alive
It was tough to read the news a few weeks ago. My news feed was inundated with articles about islands being built on top of coral reefs from The Huffington Post, New York Times, and Washington Post, among others. China's recent efforts to build and expand islands in the South China Sea have serious geopolitical implications. But beyond any international jockeying, China's actions have environmental consequences that will affect the very future of coral reefs. The world's oceans have thousands of isolated reefs and atolls like those in the Spratly Islands. These reefs--far from the local threats that emanate from large huma...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 27, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

13 Photos To Remind Us How Amazing The Ocean Is
Did you know that 71% of the earth is covered by the ocean? Two thirds of which is still undiscovered in terms of wildlife. The ocean does a lot of amazing and essential things for us. Here's a quick short list: - Generates most of the oxygen we breathe - Helps feed us - Regulates our climate - Produces oxygen - Cleans the water we drink - Offers a pharmacopoeia of potential medicines - Provides homes for an incredible array of wildlife If this isn't enough to convince you how important it is for us to preserve the ocean as much as we can, check out these amazing Instagram photos that will. 1. @daviddoubilet - The Great B...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 28, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Meet Rajeesh, The Man Who Has To Live With Our Plastic Pollution
Imagine if you were confronted with overwhelming plastic pollution every single day. That's life for Rajeesh, the supervisor and resident of Thilafushi, an artificial "trash island" in the Maldives where 300 to 400 tons of trash are dumped every day. To combat the literal mountains of trash in the country's only landfill, Rajeesh burns some piles, but his health suffers for it. Adventure filmmaker and reality star Alison Teal spoke with Rajeesh about the fumes he inhales and the ailments he's suffered as a result. The exchange (start at 8:42, above) is featured in the latest episode of her web series, &qu...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 8, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Mohamed Nasheed: 'There's Nothing More Conservative Than Conserving The Planet'
For Mohamed Nasheed, former president of the Maldives, stopping carbon emissions and adapting to climate change is a necessity. The Maldives sit at an average height of four feet above sea level, making them extremely vulnerable to rising seas. Nasheed, the the first democratically-elected president of the Maldives, called attention to the issue in 2009 by holding the first ever underwater cabinet meeting. Dressed in scuba gear, Nasheed called on world leaders to cut their carbon emissions. He was also the subject of a 2011 documentary about his work on climate change, called "The Island President." Nasheed at t...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 14, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Floating homes to tackle overcrowding in the Maldives
A tourism project comprising floating structures in the Maldives could show how to tackle a big housing shortage. (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - November 14, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The Maldives and the whale shark: The world's biggest fish adds value to paradise
(PeerJ) They are the largest fish in the world but the impact of this majestic and charismatic animal on the economy of the island nation of the Maldives was largely unknown. A new study by scientists of the Maldives Whale Shark Research Programme reveals that a small group of whale sharks in a single Maldivian Atoll accounts for nearly 3 percent of the global shark ecotourism and nearly half that of the Maldives'. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 12, 2014 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Five Species That Are Quietly Dying Off While Nobody Pays Attention
Everyone knows that rhinos or pandas are threatened with extinction. But there are plenty of species slipping away silently, without celebrity advocates or high-profile campaigns. “So many species are just not popular enough, or well-known enough to share the spotlight with the world’s threatened megafauna,” says Chris Shepherd, director of conservation group Traffic South East Asia. MoreThere’s Now Facial Recognition Software for CatsLittle Girl Breaks Down Crying When Her Parents Surprise Her With a PuppyDefending Bergdahl: Can Star Lawyer Clear Freed Soldier's Name? NBC NewsThis Dog's Final Day P...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - July 17, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Liam Fitzpatrick Tags: Uncategorized animals Conservation dugongs Environment freshwater turtles Seahorses slow lorises sun bears tortoises Source Type: news

Determinants of road traffic injury among adult motorcyclists in Malé, Maldives - Waseela M, Laosee O.
This study investigates the incidence of nonfatal road traffic injuries (RTIs) in Malé, the capital city of the Maldives, and identifies risk factors associated with RTIs. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted among young adult motorcyclists i... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - July 1, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Asia Analysis: Battling climate impacts in low-lying Maldives
Going carbon neutral and protecting marine environment are key to fighting climate change in the tiny island nation, says Nalaka Gunawardene. (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - June 3, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

10 Amazing Places to Visit Before They Vanish
The world is filled with jaw-dropping sights, but rapid climate change is threatening some of the most spectacular natural wonders. Here are just a few of the world’s most majestic places that could disappear in as little as a few decades. (Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - April 7, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Katie Hogin Tags: Uncategorized climate change Elements of Life Environment Great Barrier Reef holiday hot spots Maldives Seychelles Tourism Travel Source Type: news

It won't be long before the victims of climate change make the west pay | Chris Huhne
The scientific case is strengthening: developed countries are to blame for global warming – and there will soon be a legal reckoningWould you enjoy the cosiness and warmth of Christmas with your children or grandchildren just that little bit less if you knew that other people's children were dying because of it? More than four million children under five years old are now at risk of acute malnutrition in the Sahel, an area of the world that is one of the clearest victims of the rich world's addiction to fossil fuels.About 18 million people in the Sahel – the vulnerable pan-African strip of land that runs f...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 29, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Chris Huhne Tags: Comment The Guardian Asia Pacific World news Sea level United Nations Climate change Palau Climate change scepticism Environment Science Comment is free Source Type: news

Triathlete Andrew Britton dies 6 times while on honeymoon after catching heart-attacking virus
Andrew Britton, from Buckinghamshire, developed myocarditis while on honeymoon in the Maldives. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 30, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news