Malaria parasites growing inside an infected red blood cell
(blue) will eventually burst out in unison, with millions of other parasites lurking in red blood cells around them, a feat of timing that's coordinated by the parasite’s internal clock. [Research supported by a U.S. National Science ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - July 21, 2020 Category: Science Source Type: video

IIG Seminar: Defining malaria vaccine responses by single B cell IG sequencing and plasma IgG proteomics
IIG Seminar Malaria elimination is a global priority and WHO has projected that malaria deaths could double due to COVID19-related health care disruptions. Vaccines have been pivotal for campaigns to eliminate or eradicate other infectious diseases. Malaria transmission blocking vaccines (TBVs) target surface antigens expressed by parasites during their development in mosquitoes in order to interrupt transmission and contribute to malaria elimination. We collected antigen-specific memory B cells from Malian adults immunized with TBV and obtained B cell receptor IG sequences that were used to define the antibody repertoire ...
Source: Videocast - All Events - June 15, 2020 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

CC Grand Rounds: 1) Experimental Blood Stage Infection to Study Malaria and 2) Progress on Malaria Vaccines
For more information go tohttps://clinicalcenter.nih.gov/about/news/grcurrent.htmlAir date: 4/22/2020 12:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - March 30, 2020 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Director's Seminar: Unraveling the mechanisms of immunity to malaria
NIH Director's Seminar Series Approximately 500 million cases of P. falciparum malaria occur annually among the world ’ s poorest populations, claiming the lives of nearly a million children each year in Africa alone. The development of a malaria vaccine is widely viewed as a key step toward malaria control and possibly eradication, yet current malaria vaccine candidates confer only partial, short-lived protection at best. Optimism that a highly effective malaria vaccine can be developed stems in part from the observation that humans can acquire immunity to malaria through repeated P. falciparum infections. However,...
Source: Videocast - All Events - January 14, 2020 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Some plumped-up prawns are doing their part to help curtail the spread of disease
New research provides a roadmap for how entrepreneurs can harness freshwater prawns' voracious appetite for snails to reduce the transmission of parasites that cause schistosomiasis -- the second most devastating parasitic disease worldwide, after malaria -- while still making a profit selling the ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - August 9, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: video

CC Grand Rounds: 1) Update on Malaria Vaccines and 2) Chemoprophylaxis Vaccination (PfSPZ-CVac) Using Pyrimethamine
CC Grand Rounds: 1) Update on Malaria Vaccines and 2) Pyrimethamine Chemoprophylaxis (PfSPZ-CVac): A Novel Whole Sporozoite Malaria Vaccine ApproachFor more information go tohttp://www.cc.nih.gov/about/news/grcurrent.htmlAir date: 1/16/2019 12:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - January 14, 2019 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

CC Grand Rounds: 1) Update on Malaria Vaccines and 2) Pyrimethamine Chemoprophylaxis (PfSPZ-CVac): A Novel Whole Sporozoite Malaria Vaccine Approach
For more information go tohttp://www.cc.nih.gov/about/news/grcurrent.htmlAir date: 1/16/2019 12:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - December 18, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Sounding the Alarm and Putting Out the Fire: New Mechanistic Insights into Inflammation Triggered by Invasive Infection
NIH Director ’ s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series The Lieberman laboratory studies cytotoxic T lymphocytes and their role in infection and tumor immunity. They study the molecular pathways used by killer lymphocytes and their cytotoxic granule proteases, called granzymes, and pore-forming proteins, perforin and granulysin, to induce programmed cell death. They have defined a caspase-independent programmed cell death pathway activated by granzyme A. Recent work has identified an unexpected role for granzymes and granulysin in protection against bacteria and parasites. They recently uncovered the molecular basis for ...
Source: Videocast - All Events - May 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

A cheaper, easier way to test for malaria
For many in sub-saharan Africa, finding out if a fever is due to Malaria often means trekking long miles to a clinic for a relatively pricey blood test, and anxious hours of waiting before the results come in. But the Urine Malaria Test kit developed by Fyodor Biotechnologies has begun to change ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - April 25, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: video

Mosquito Multipartite Interactions in the Fight Against Arboviruses
This event is a Stadtman Candidate Seminar in the field of Vector Biology presented by Dr. Jos é Luis Ramirez entitled “ Understanding Mosquito Multipartite Interactions in the Fight Against Arboviruses. ” This seminar is hosted by the Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research (LMVR), Division of Intramural Research (DIR), NIAID.Air date: 2/2/2018 11:00:00 AM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - January 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Making the most of it: How malaria parasites use our fibrinolytic proteins to infect the mammalian host and the mosquito
This event is a Stadtman Candidate Seminar in the field of Vector Biology presented by Dr. Joel Vega-Rodr í guez entitled “ Making the most of it: How malaria parasites use our fibrinolytic proteins to infect the mammalian host and the mosquito. ” This seminar is hosted by the Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research (LMVR), Division of Intramural Research (DIR), NIAIDAir date: 1/24/2018 11:00:00 AM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - January 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

The salivary proteins of mosquitoes: role in blood feeding and pathogen transmission
This event is a Stadtman Candidate Seminar in the field of Vector Biology presented by Dr. Eric Calvo entitled “ The salivary proteins of mosquitoes: role in blood feeding and pathogen transmission. ” This seminar is hosted by the Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research (LMVR), Division of Intramural Research (DIR), NIAID.Air date: 1/23/2018 11:00:00 AM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - January 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

2018 Demystifying Medicine: The challenge of malaria: the world ’ s number one killer
The Demystifying Medicine Lecture Series is designed to help bridge the gap between advances in biology and their applications to major human diseases. The lectures include presentations of patients, pathology, diagnosis, and therapy in the context of major diseases and current research. All clinicians, trainees including fellows, medical students, Ph.D. students, and other healthcare and research professionals are welcome to attend.For more information go tohttps://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.govAir date: 3/20/2018 4:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - November 15, 2017 Category: General Medicine Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Team goes house to house to learn where new vaccine works best (Image 4)
Worldwide, malaria kills between 1 million and 3 million people per year. The majority are children in sub-Saharan Africa. [Image 4 of 5 related images. See Image 5.] More about this image Cameron Taylor, a University of North Carolina ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - September 15, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: video

Team goes house to house to learn where new vaccine works best (Image 2)
Malaria is endemic in Malawi, especially in the areas around Lake Malawi, the 350-mile-long lake that sits between Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania. Malawi has a high infant mortality rate, declining life expectancy and an estimated 1 million orphans, mostly because of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. In ...This is an NSF Multimedia Gallery item. (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - September 15, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: video

Team goes house to house to learn where new vaccine works best (Image 1)
Cameron Taylor, an undergraduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, spent two summers in Malawi, collecting data for a malaria vaccine trial. Each week, she took time out to play soccer with the neighborhood boys. [Image 1 of 5 related images. See (Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery)
Source: NSF Multimedia Gallery - September 15, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: video

Imaging Chemokine Function in Disease
Immunology Interest Group Dr. Luster studied medicine at Cornell University Medical College and obtained a Ph.D. degree under mentorship of Drs. Jeffrey Ravetch and Zanvil Cohn at the Rockefeller University. As a graduate student, he discovered and characterized the IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10/CXCL10) (Nature 1985; 315:672-676)! He completed residency and a clinical fellowship in medicine and infectious diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital and post-doctoral training in the laboratory of Dr. Philip Leder at Harvard Medical School. In 1994, he joined the faculty of Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts Ge...
Source: Videocast - All Events - June 15, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Causality and Chance in Cancer and in Other Clonal Diseases
NCI’s Center for Cancer Research (CCR) Grand Rounds Dr. Lucio Luzzatto received his M.D. from the University of Genova and then went on to do a fellowship in hematology at the University of Pavia and receive his Ph.D. in biochemistry from the Ministry of Education in Rome. The leitmotiv of his research has been to understand, in depth, blood diseases with the ultimate purpose to improve their management. In the area of G6PD he did extensive studies in population and biochemical genetics, and in the early eighties cloned the G6PD gene. He took part in solving the 3D structure of human G6PD, and thus eventually he an...
Source: Videocast - All Events - March 14, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

2015 Maurice B. Burg Lecture: Opening Doors Worldwide Through Medical Science
Presented by: Peter C. Agre, M.D., Johns Hopkins Malaria Research InstituteCategory: SpecialAired date: 11/16/2015 (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - November 17, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Past Events Source Type: video

Aquaporin water channels - from transfusion medicine to malaria
Presented by: Peter Agre, M.D., Johns Hopkins Malaria Research InstituteCategory: WALS - Wednesday Afternoon LecturesAired date: 09/09/2015 (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - September 10, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Past Events Source Type: video

Aquaporin water channels - from transfusion medicine to malaria
NIH Director’s Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Biochemical analysis of the Rhesus blood group antigen led to the serendipitous discovery of AQP1, the first molecular water channel. Found throughout nature, aquaporin water channels confer high water permeability to cell membranes. AQP1 has been characterized biophysically, and the atomic structure of AQP1 is known. Identification of the Colton blood group antigen on the extracellular domain of AQP1 allowed identification of rare individuals who are AQP1-null and manifest a subclinical form of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Thirteen homologous proteins exist in hu...
Source: Videocast - All Events - September 1, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Infectious Disease Research: Quantitative Methods and Models in the era of Big Data Statistical Workshop (Day 2)
The purpose of this workshop is to bring together quantitative methods researchers in infectious diseases in order to exchange ideas on the latest topics in infectious disease research and to provide a forum for rich discussion and future directions. The application areas that will be covered include methods to study spread of infectious agents (HIV, malaria, TB, HCV, dengue, etc.) and the interaction of these agents with hosts as well as the impact of prevention and treatment interventions. Air date: 11/10/2015 8:30:00 AM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - August 7, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Infectious Disease Research: Quantitative Methods and Models in the era of Big Data (Day 1)
The purpose of this workshop is to bring together quantitative methods researchers in infectious diseases in order to exchange ideas on the latest topics in infectious disease research and to provide a forum for rich discussion and future directions. The application areas that will be covered include methods to study spread of infectious agents (HIV, malaria, TB, HCV, dengue, etc.) and the interaction of these agents with hosts as well as the impact of prevention and treatment interventions. Air date: 11/9/2015 8:30:00 AM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - August 7, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Demystifying Medicine 2015 - Malaria: Bioengineering and the Global Epidemic of a Killer
Presented by: Sangeeta Bhatia, MD, PhD, MIT and Thomas Wellems, MD, PhD, NIAID, NIHCategory: Demystifying MedicineAired date: 03/03/2015 (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - March 5, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Past Events Source Type: video

Burkitt lymphoma: a model of polymicrobial carcinogenesis and global oncology
NIH Director's Seminar It has been just over 50 years since the description of Burkitt Lymphoma (BL) as an unusual tumor affecting jaws of African children. Seminal discoveries linked to BL includ Epstein-Barr virus, the first human virus linked to a human cancer, the linkage of BL to Plasmodium falciparum malaria, chromosomal translocations involving c-myc and immunoglobulin promoter elements, and demonstration of rapid and curative response to chemotherapy. Dubbed the Rosetta stone of cancer, BL became a complex model for carcinogenesis involving poly-microbes, immunity and host-genetics. Fifty years later, many fundam...
Source: Videocast - All Events - February 24, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Demystifying Medicine 2015 - Malaria: Bioengineering and the Global Epidemic of a Killer
The 2015 Demystifying Medicine Series, which is jointly sponsored by FAES and NIH, will begin January 6th and includes the presentation of patients, pathology, diagnosis and therapy in the context of major disease problems and current research. Primarily directed toward Ph.D. students, clinicians and program managers, the course is designed to help bridge the gap between advances in biology and their application to major human diseases. Each session includes clinical and basic science components presented by NIH staff and invitees. All students, fellows and staff are welcome, as well.For more information go to http://demys...
Source: Videocast - All Events - January 12, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

The Neurogenetics of Innate Behaviors
Wednesday Afternoon Lecture Series Female mosquitoes require a blood meal to complete egg development. In carrying out this innate behavior, mosquitoes spread dangerous infectious diseases such as malaria, dengue fever, and yellow fever. Humans attract mosquitoes via multiple sensory cues including emitted body odor, heat, and carbon dioxide in the breath. The mosquito perceives differences in these cues, both between and within species, to determine which animal or human to target for blood-feeding. This strong attraction to humans is strongly attenuated for up to 4 days after the female takes a blood-meal, suggesting th...
Source: Videocast - All Events - August 28, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

New National Academy of Sciences Members Minisymposium
A mini-symposium featuring NIH's three newest investigators elected to the National Academy of Sciences: Carolina Barillas-Mury (NIAID), Marius Clore (NIDDK), and Shiv Grewal (NCI). Each will speak about their latest research. Barillas-Mury is chief of the Mosquito Immunity and Vector Competence Section in the NIAID Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research. She investigates the interactions between the mosquito immune system and Plasmodium parasites to understand how they affect malaria transmission. Clore is an NIH Distinguished Investigator in the NIDDK Laboratory of Chemical Physics. His lab is developing no...
Source: Videocast - All Events - June 13, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Understanding Protective Immunity by an Attenuated Malaria Vaccine: A Collaborative Effort in Science and Clinical Care to Achieve Successful Protocol Implementation
Presented by: (1) Ann Marie Matlock, RN, DNP, MSN, NE-BC Service Chief, Medical Surgical Specialties and Commander, United States Public Health Service, CC, NIH (2) Robert Seder, MD Chief, Cellular Immunology Section, Vaccine Research Center, NIAID, NIHCategory: Clinical Center Grand RoundsAired date: 05/07/2014 (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - May 7, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Past Events Source Type: video

Demystifying Medicine 2014 - Malaria: Origin and Advances in the World's Major Killer
Presented by: Carolyn Beebe Smith, PhD, NIMH, NIH and Susan Harbison, PhD, NHLBI, NIHCategory: Demystifying MedicineAired date: 04/29/2014 (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - April 30, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Past Events Source Type: video

Understanding Protective Immunity by an Attenuated Malaria Vaccine: A Collaborative Effort in Science and Clinical Care to Achieve Successful Protocol Implementation
For more information go to http://www.cc.nih.gov/about/news/grcurrent.htmlAir date: 5/7/2014 12:00:00 PM (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - April 29, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Demystifying Medicine 2014-Malaria: Origin and Advances in the World's Major Killer
Presented by: Beatrice Hahn, MD (University of Pennsylvania) Carolina V. Barillas-Mury, MD, PhD (NIAID)Category: Demystifying MedicineAired date: 04/15/2014 (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - April 17, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Past Events Source Type: video

Demystifying Medicine 2014-Malaria: Origin and Advances in the World's Major Killer
The 2014 Demystifying Medicine Series, which is jointly sponsored by FAES and NIH, will begin January 7th and includes the presentation of patients, pathology, diagnosis and therapy in the context of major disease problems and current research. Primarily directed toward Ph.D. students, clinicians and program managers, the course is designed to help bridge the gap between advances in biology and their application to major human diseases. Each session includes clinical and basic science components presented by NIH staff and invitees. All students, fellows and staff are welcome, as well. For more information go to http://demy...
Source: Videocast - All Events - January 6, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Discovery of Vaccine and/or Drug Targets in Plasmodium Falciparum using Irradiated Long-Lived Merozoites
Presented by: Dr. David Narum, Malaria Vaccine Development Branch NIAID, NIHCategory: ProteomicsAired date: 11/07/2013 (Source: Videocast - All Events)
Source: Videocast - All Events - November 8, 2013 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Past Events Source Type: video

Bill Gates to Deliver 2013 David E. Barmes Global Health Lecture: Why the Future Needs Biomedical Innovation
The David E. Barmes Global Health Lecture is the single most important named lecture at NIH on global health. This year's speaker is Bill Gates. The lecture series honors the late David Edward Barmes, special expert for international health at NIDCR. The lecture was established in 2001 to honor his lifelong dedication to research aimed at improving health for people in low-income countries. About Bill Gates: Known for his philanthropy, Mr. Gates advocates for research and innovation to help people live healthy and productive lives. He also is an outspoken supporter of federal investment in basic scientific research. I...
Source: Videocast - All Events - November 6, 2013 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

Discovery of Vaccine and/or Drug Targets in Plasmodium Falciparum using Irradiated Long-Lived Merozoites
Development of a malaria vaccine, as well as, new drugs is crucial for the future control of Plasmodium falciparum, the most severe form of human malaria causing nearly a million deaths each year. Unfortunately, no licensed malaria vaccine is available and development of drug resistant parasites is a continual problem. To provide future opportunities for development, we aimed to identify the phenotypic difference(s) between a novel irradiated P. falciparum long-lived merozoite line and its parental line that displays up to a 20 fold increase in erythrocyte invasion rates, in vitro. Using the tools of systems biology, the ...
Source: Videocast - All Events - October 28, 2013 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video

2013 David E. Barmes Global Health Lecture
The David E. Barmes Global Health Lecture is the single most important named lecture at NIH on global health. This year's speaker is Bill Gates. The lecture series honors the late David Edward Barmes, special expert for international health at NIDCR. The lecture was established in 2001 to honor his lifelong dedication to research aimed at improving health for people in low-income countries. About Bill Gates: Known for his philanthropy, Mr. Gates advocates for research and innovation to help people live healthy and productive lives. He also is an outspoken supporter of federal investment in basic scientific research. I...
Source: Videocast - All Events - September 24, 2013 Category: Journals (General) Tags: Upcoming Events Source Type: video