4 Climbers Die in Swiss Alps After Unexpected Storm
GENEVA (AP) — An unexpected snowstorm coupled with high winds killed four climbers in the Swiss Alps and left five others in critical condition early Monday after they became trapped overnight and couldn't reach shelter, officials said. A total of 14 hikers from France, Germany and Italy were left stranded in the Pigne d'Arolla region, police in southwestern Valais canton said. Authorities deployed seven helicopters as part of rescue efforts. The climbers were caught off-guard by high winds, snow and bitter cold, and were forced to spend the night outdoors, Valais police spokesman Markus Rieder said. Several of those...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - April 30, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jamey Keaten, Associated Press Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

4 Climbers Die in Swiss Alps After Unexpected Storm
GENEVA (AP) — An unexpected snowstorm coupled with high winds killed four climbers in the Swiss Alps and left five others in critical condition early Monday after they became trapped overnight and couldn't reach shelter, officials said. A total of 14 hikers from France, Germany and Italy were left stranded in the Pigne d'Arolla region, police in southwestern Valais canton said. Authorities deployed seven helicopters as part of rescue efforts. The climbers were caught off-guard by high winds, snow and bitter cold, and were forced to spend the night outdoors, Valais police spokesman Markus Rieder said. Several of those...
Source: JEMS Operations - April 30, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jamey Keaten, Associated Press Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

4 Climbers Die in Swiss Alps After Unexpected Storm
GENEVA (AP) — An unexpected snowstorm coupled with high winds killed four climbers in the Swiss Alps and left five others in critical condition early Monday after they became trapped overnight and couldn't reach shelter, officials said. A total of 14 hikers from France, Germany and Italy were left stranded in the Pigne d'Arolla region, police in southwestern Valais canton said. Authorities deployed seven helicopters as part of rescue efforts. The climbers were caught off-guard by high winds, snow and bitter cold, and were forced to spend the night outdoors, Valais police spokesman Markus Rieder said. Several of those...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - April 30, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jamey Keaten, Associated Press Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

4 Climbers Die in Swiss Alps After Unexpected Storm
GENEVA (AP) — An unexpected snowstorm coupled with high winds killed four climbers in the Swiss Alps and left five others in critical condition early Monday after they became trapped overnight and couldn't reach shelter, officials said. A total of 14 hikers from France, Germany and Italy were left stranded in the Pigne d'Arolla region, police in southwestern Valais canton said. Authorities deployed seven helicopters as part of rescue efforts. The climbers were caught off-guard by high winds, snow and bitter cold, and were forced to spend the night outdoors, Valais police spokesman Markus Rieder said. Several of those...
Source: JEMS Operations - April 30, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jamey Keaten, Associated Press Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

How LabCorp's sale of Covance Food Solutions will impact headcounts
Eurofins Scientific, a bioanalytical testing firm based in Luxembourg,  will gain 850 employees from Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings when it acquires the latter's food solutions business for $670 million. LabCorp (NYSE: LH) said Monday it is selling Covance Food Solutions to focus primarily on its health care operations. The business provides laboratory t esting and consulting services for food and beverage products, and became a part of LabCorp when the Burlington-based company acquired… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 30, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Seaman Source Type: news

Efficient control of leukaemia with treatment by dual immune-checkpoint blockade
(Luxembourg Institute of Health) Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a haematological malignancy. When infiltrating tissues, CLL cells come in contact with healthy cells, including immune cells. Researchers from the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) succeeded in characterising in depth the composition of immune cells and circulating cytokines of the CLL microenvironment in mouse models using mass cytometry. Based on this knowledge, they propose an immunotherapeutic strategy with two immune checkpoint inhibitors that efficiently blocks disease development in preclinical tests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Associating frailty to cardiovascular disease and mortality
(Luxembourg Institute of Health) Frailty is common in elderly people with cardiovascular disease and goes along with elevated mortality. Dr. Gloria Aguayo from the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) and co-workers examined the predictive ability of 35 frailty scores for cardiovascular disease, cancer and all-cause mortality using data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. The analysis, recently published in PLOS Medicine, reveals that all frailty scores are associated with future mortality, and that some are linked to cardiovascular disease but none to cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientific misconduct harms prior collaborators
(University of Luxembourg) Luxembourg, 14 March 2018 - Scientists should choose their associates carefully, researchers at the University of Luxembourg and the Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW), Mannheim, recommend, as future misconduct by colleagues could seriously impact the reputation of their former collaborators. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Donors pledge over US$15 million to WHO ’s Contingency Fund for Emergencies
27 March 2018 – Donors have pledged an additional US$15.3 million to support quick action by the World Health Organization to tackle disease outbreaks and humanitarian health crises through its emergency response fund in 2018, the Contingency Fund for Emergencies (CFE). Canada, Denmark, Estonia, Germany, the Republic of Korea, Kuwait, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland announced contributions ranging from US$20,000 to US$5.6 million at a conference hosted at WHO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland on Monday (March 26) – increasing CFE funding lev...
Source: WHO news - March 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: emergencies [subject], emergency preparedness, crises, emergency preparedness, health financing [subject], health economics, health systems financing Source Type: news

Donors pledge over US$ 15 million to WHO ’s Contingency Fund for Emergencies
Donors have pledged an additional US$15.3 million to support quick action by the World Health Organization to tackle disease outbreaks and humanitarian health crises through its emergency response fund in 2018, the Contingency Fund for Emergencies (CFE). Canada, Denmark, Estonia, Germany, the Republic of Korea, Kuwait, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland announced contributions ranging from US$20,000 to US$5.6 million at a conference hosted at WHO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland on Monday (March 26) – increasing CFE funding levels to US$23 million. (Source: WHO news)
Source: WHO news - March 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: emergencies [subject], emergency preparedness, crises, emergency preparedness, health financing [subject], health economics, health systems financing Source Type: news

Chernobyl Is Now the World ’s Unlikeliest Green Energy Experiment
A hundred yards from the rusting ruins at the site of the world’s worst nuclear disaster, a gossamer array of almost 4,000 photovoltaic panels sits atop a thick concrete slab capping a grave of radioactive waste. When it comes to clean energy, it’s hard to think of a less likely place than Ukraine’s infamous Chernobyl nuclear plant. But final preparations are being made to generate electricity again, this time using safer power from the sun. It’s part of the country’s plan to reduce dependency on increasingly unreliable Russian gas deliveries and disrupted coal supplies. Dominated by the 300 f...
Source: TIME: Science - March 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: James M Gomez and Kateryna Choursina / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized Bloomberg Chernobyl energy onetime Source Type: news

Thanks to Cheddar Man, I feel more comfortable as a brown Briton | Aarathi Prasad
I grew up being told that a prerequisite for our national identity was white skin – that prejudice has been proved falseThe results of 10,000-year oldCheddar Man ’s DNA analysis have hit the headlines in the past few days, accompanied by a striking portrait that needed no words. Here was this bona fide European – indeed, an ancestral Brit – and the man was black. Genetic analysis suggests he had blue eyes, and that his skin was probably darker, even, than the portrait shows. Three hundred generations later, allowing for a little variation between individuals, about 10% of the genome of many white Br...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Aarathi Prasad Tags: Genetics Race issues Biology UK news Science Migration Source Type: news

DNA From 10,000-Year-Old Skeleton Found in Britain Reveals Man Had Dark Skin and Blue Eyes
(LONDON) — DNA from a 10,000-year-old skeleton found in an English cave suggests the oldest-known Briton had dark skin and blue eyes, researchers said Wednesday.Scientists from Britain’s Natural History Museum and University College London analyzed the genome of “Cheddar Man,” who was found in Cheddar Gorge in southwest England in 1903.Scientists led by museum DNA expert Ian Barnes drilled into the skull to extract DNA from bone powder. They say analysis indicates he had blue eyes, dark curly hair and “dark to black” skin pigmentation.The researchers say the evidence suggests that Europe...
Source: TIME: Science - February 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jill Lawless / AP Tags: Uncategorized APW Archaeology onetime Source Type: news

New biomarkers for colorectal cancer
(University of Luxembourg) Researchers from the University of Luxembourg found a new biomarker for colorectal cancer (CRC) that might improve therapy and survival rates of patients. Biomarkers are measurable biological indicators for a specific disease, such as changes in the amounts of certain proteins that occur in combination with certain illnesses. Such biomarkers help physicians to diagnose a condition, identify the disease stage, and determine a patient's risk for recurrence of the disease. This supports the doctor in choosing the best-fitting treatment plan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Siemens Healthineers closes Fast Track Diagnostics buy
Siemens (NYSE:SI) Healthineers said today it completed its acquisition of Fast Track Diagnostics, marking the official date of the closing as December 19, 2017. With the acquisition, FTD’s sites in Luxembourg, Malta and India and its approximately 80 employee workforce will be folded into Siemens Healthineers business. FTD produces a range of CE Mark approved infectious disease detection tests and syndromic panels, and will continue to operate under the brand name Fast Track Diagnostics, Siemens said. “The closing of this deal enables both Siemens Healthineers and FTD—now joined as one—to ...
Source: Mass Device - January 10, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Diagnostics Mergers & Acquisitions Siemens Source Type: news

No Health Protection for Migrant-Women Healthcare Givers
Credit: UNBy Baher KamalROME, Dec 18 2017 (IPS)While the media may be attracted by images of migrants drowning or sold as slaves, another flagrant but lesser-known drama is that of care workers, who are overwhelmingly women, often migrants, and who make a very large contribution to global public health, but are exposed to great health risks themselves with little or no protection, let alone basic labour rights. Migrant women care workers buttress health systems in countries where there are shortfalls in health-care provision, while their own rights to health and well-being can be eroded and their health-care needs unfulfil...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Migration & Refugees Poverty & SDGs Projects TerraViva United Nations Women's Health International Organizatio Source Type: news

Siemens buys Fast Track Diagnostics to boost molecular offering
FRANKFURT (Reuters) - Siemens said it has agreed to buy Luxembourg-based Fast Track Diagnostics to boost its molecular-testing offering, one of the areas it is keen to expand as it prepares to float its healthcare unit, Healthineers. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

ECDC (European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control) Country Visit to Luxembourg to Discuss Antimicrobial Resistance Issues
European Union, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. 11/21/2017 This 24-page report summarizes visits and meetings held on May 29- June 2, 2017, to discuss antimicrobial resistance (AMR) issues in Luxembourg with the overall objective of providing an evidence-based assessment of the situation in Luxembourg regarding prevention and control of AMR through prudent use of antibiotics and infection control. The report provides an overview, observations, and options for action. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

On the influence of the research university in the 20th century
(University of Luxembourg) In a new book entitled 'The Century Of Science: The Global Triumph of the Research University', international authors explore global scientific developments through the 20th century, as well as how university-based research has become worldwide the driving force of scientific productivity in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, including health (STEM+). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bringing natural killer cells to the tumor battlefield
(Luxembourg Institute of Health) By studying melanoma, a highly malignant form of skin cancer, Dr Bassam Janji's research team at the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) has revealed a mechanism by which the immunosuppressive environment can be switched to an immunosupportive one. They found that if autophagy -- the intracellular recycling process -- is blocked in tumor cells, they produce cytokines that attract NK cells. The massive recruitment of NK cells allows killing cancer cells and lets the tumors shrink. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research on the impact of war on electoral behavior in Balkan states receives ERC Grant
(University of Luxembourg) Prof Josip Glaurdic of the University of Luxembourg has been awarded a Starting Grant from the European Research Council (ERC) for the research project ELWar, a five-year venture assessing the impact of war on political behavior in South-east Europe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Invited commentary on … When unbearable suffering incites psychiatric patients to request euthanasia - Kelly BD.
Euthanasia is available in Belgium and Luxembourg for untreatable and unbearable suffering resulting from 'physical and/or psychological suffering that cannot be alleviated and results from a serious and incurable disease, caused by accident or illness'. V... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

The World Is Running Out of Much Needed New Antibiotics
Posters: Misuse of antibiotics and risks. Credit: WHOBy Baher KamalROME, Oct 4 2017 (IPS)The world is running out of new antibiotics to combat the growing threat of antimicrobial resistance, a new specialised report warns ahead of this year’s World Antibiotic Awareness Week, adding that most of the drugs currently in the clinical pipeline are modifications of existing classes of antibiotics and are only short-term solutions. The latest World Health Organization (WHO) report on this issue “Antibacterial agents in clinical development – an analysis of the antibacterial clinical development pipeline, includi...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

How a tax haven is leading the race to privatise space – podcast
Luxembourg has shown how far a tiny country can go by serving the needs of global capitalism. Now it has set its sights on outer space•Read the text version hereSubscribe viaAudioboom,Apple Podcasts,Soundcloud,Mixcloud,Acast&Sticherand join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 29, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Written by Atossa Araxia Abrahamian, read by Christopher Ragland and produced by Simon Barnard Tags: Luxembourg Space Mining Tax havens Source Type: news

How Pirate Radio Ships Paved the Way for Britain ’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Revolution
The British pop invasion that took over American airwaves in the 1960s might never have happened, had it not been for a radio revolution in the United Kingdom. In 1964, there was nowhere easy for British youngsters to listen to rock ‘n’ rollers like The Beatles, The Who and The Rolling Stones. Commercial radio wasn’t yet an option, and the guardians of the publicly-owned British Broadcasting Corporation considered such music immoral, antisocial and unfit for public broadcast. Yet just three years later, on Sept. 30, 1967 — a half-century ago this Saturday — the BBC switched on the transmitters...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rachel Lewis Tags: Uncategorized mi amigo Music onetime pirate radio radio caroline radio one uk Source Type: news

How a tax haven is leading the race to privatise space
Luxembourg has shown how far a tiny country can go by serving the needs of global capitalism. Now it has set its sights on outer spaceOn a drizzly afternoon in April, Prince Guillaume, the hereditary grand duke of Luxembourg, and his wife, Princess St éphanie, sailed through the front doors of an office building in the outskirts of Seattle and into the headquarters of an asteroid-mining startup called Planetary Resources, which plans to “expand the economy into space”.The company ’s engineers greeted the royals with hors d’oeuvres, craft beer and bottles upon bottles of Columbia Valley riesli...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Atossa Araxia Abrahamian Tags: Luxembourg Space Mining Tax havens World news Source Type: news

The bilingual brain calculates differently depending on the language used
(University of Luxembourg) How do multilingual people solve arithmetical tasks presented to them in different languages? The question will gain in importance in the future, as an increasingly globalized job market and accelerated migration will mean that ever more people seek work and study outside of the linguistic area of their home countries. This question was investigated by a research team led by Dr Amandine Van Rinsveld and Professor Dr Christine Schiltz from the Cognitive Science and Assessment Institute (COSA) at the University of Luxembourg. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Luxembourg Stock Exchange and University of Luxembourg enter partnership on Fintech
(University of Luxembourg) Representatives from the Interdisciplinary Centre for Security, Reliabity and Trust (SnT) and the Luxembourg Stock Exchange met at LuxSE headquarters in Luxembourg on 12 September 2017 to formally sign a Partnership Framework Agreement. The aim of this research project is to devise techniques together with LuxSE to realize its vision of automated document classification, smart document routing and processing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are register-based data better than surveys in estimating burden of injuries among adults? Results from Luxembourg (Safety-2016 abstract #223) - Bejko D, Ruiz-Castell M, Lyons RA, Kisser R, Larsen B, Rogmans W, Turner S, Bauer R, Ellsessaer G, Valkenberg H.
BACKGROUND Injury is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. The emergency department (ED) registry based data, provides a cost-effective way to estimate the burden of injuries. Previous studies in general population have suggested that survey based data... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Altered bacterial communities in the gut could be an indicator for Parkinson's disease
(University of Luxembourg) By the time Parkinson's disease manifests as the typical motor dysfunctions, portions of the brain have already been irreversibly destroyed. In search of an early portent of the disease, researchers of the University of Luxembourg, may now have found one in the gut: they have shown that the bacterial community in the gut of Parkinson's patients differs from that of healthy people even at a very early stage of the disease. results in the scientific journal Movement Disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

M & As this week: Eurofins Scientific, Baxter International
Luxembourg-based life sciences company Eurofins Scientific plans to acquire DiscoverX, a reagents provider based in the US. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - August 3, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

What happened next to the giant Larsen C iceberg?
Scientists have revealed exactly how the trillion-tonne A68 iceberg broke free of the Antarctic ice shelf last month – and say it has spawned smaller icebergsThe fate of thegiant iceberg that broke free from Antarctica ’s Larsen C ice shelf last month has been revealed.Twice the size of Luxembourg, the trillion-tonne iceberg known as A68 was found to have broken off the ice shelf on 12 July after months of speculation about a rift which had been growing for years, with the iceberg “hanging by a thread” for weeks.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Antarctica Science Glaciers Environment Polar regions Climate change Source Type: news

CryoLife shares down despite Q2 EPS beat
CryoLife Inc. (NYSE:CRY) saw shares fall today despite the medical device maker meeting earnings per share expectations on Wall Street with its 2nd quarter earnings results. The Atlanta-based company posted profits of $3.2 million, or 9¢ per share, on sales of $47.8 million for the 3 months ended June 30 for bottom-line growth of 34.8% while sales grew 1.6% compared with the same period in the previous fiscal year. After adjusting to exclude 1-time items, earnings per share were 12¢, ahead of consensus on Wall Street where analysts were looking for EPS of 10¢. “We had a solid 2nd quarter and excee...
Source: Mass Device - July 25, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News MassDevice Earnings Roundup Wall Street Beat CryoLife Source Type: news

ISMA Early Bird Registration and Abstract Deadline
Date: Wednesday, July 19, 2017Year: 2017Location: Luxembourg (Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates)
Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates - July 19, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: GAtherton Source Type: news

International Symposium on Molecular Allergology
Date: Wednesday, July 19, 2017Year: 2017Location: Luxembourg (Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates)
Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates - July 19, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: GAtherton Source Type: news

Iceberg twice size of Luxembourg breaks off Antarctic ice shelf
Satellite data confirms ‘calving’ of trillion-tonne, 5,800 sq km iceberg from the Larsen C ice shelf, dramatically altering the landscapeA giant iceberg twice the size of Luxembourg has broken off an ice shelf on the Antarctic peninsula and is now adrift in the Weddell Sea.Reported to be “hanging by a thread” last month, the trillion-tonne iceberg was found to have split off from the Larsen C segment of the Larsen ice shelf on Wednesday morning after scientists examined the latest satellite data from the area.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Antarctica European Space Agency Science Environment Glaciers Polar regions Climate change Paris climate agreement Donald Trump Source Type: news

Critical text mining in historical newspapers from Luxembourg, Germany, France and Sw
(University of Luxembourg) The aim of the project 'Impresso: Media monitoring of the past. Mining 200 years of historical newspapers' is to link digitized corpora of newspapers from Switzerland, Luxembourg, France and Germany and to develop new methods to analyse them. The project will develop 'deep learning' method, a subfield of machine learning. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Happy Asteroid Day! A conversation about peaceful, global scientific collaboration
Today is the 3rd annual Asteroid Day, and the first to be presented under the auspices of the United Nations, with live global broadcasts raising awareness about asteroidsToday, more than 1,000 local events in around 200 countries are being organised to celebrate Asteroid Day. Sanctioned by the United Nations in 2016, it is a global day of education to raise awareness about asteroids.In addition to the local events, a day-long broadcast will be transmitted from around the world, with a six-hour live stretch coming from Luxembourg. This is where I will be, sharing the hosting duties withProfessor Brian Cox from 11am BST. Yo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 30, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: Science Asteroids Nasa European Space Agency Astronomy United Nations Source Type: news

Researchers refute textbook knowledge in molecular interactions
(University of Luxembourg) Van der Waals interactions between molecules are among the most important forces in biology, physics, and chemistry, as they determine the properties and physical behavior of many materials. For a long time, it was considered that these interactions between molecules are always attractive. Now, researchers from the University of Luxembourg found that in many rather common situations in nature the van der Waals force between two molecules becomes repulsive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Algorithms gather brain data to train brain surgeons
[Image from unsplash.com]Researchers in Europe have developed mathematical models and numerical algorithms that break down medical images like Lego bricks to help guide surgeons during brain surgery. University of Luxembourg and University of Strasbourg researchers collaborated to create algorithms to predict the deformation of the brain during surgery and give information pertaining to the current position of the targeted surgical area and its vulnerable areas. Traditionally, surgeons have a limited view of the organ they are operating on and cannot see what is on the inside of the organ. medical images can be taken prior...
Source: Mass Device - June 27, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Research & Development Surgical brain surgery MedTech University of Luxembourg University of Strasbourg Source Type: news

Modeling the Brain with 'Lego Bricks'
Researchers from the University of Luxembourg, in cooperation with the University of Strasbourg, have developed a computational method that could be used to guide surgeons during brain surgery. Surgeons often operate in the dark. They have a limited view of the surface of the organ, and can typically not see what lies hidden inside. Quality images can routinely be taken prior to the surgery, but as soon as the operation begins, the position of the surgeon's target and risky areas he must avoid, continuously change. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - June 19, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Modeling the brain with 'Lego bricks'
(University of Luxembourg) Researchers from the University of Luxembourg, in cooperation with the University of Strasbourg, have developed a computational method that could be used to guide surgeons during brain surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The art market bubble has burst
(University of Luxembourg) The most comprehensive global art market index, compiled by Prof. Roman Kr ä ussl at the Luxembourg School of Finance at the University of Luxembourg, shows that the price for post-war and contemporary art fell by 21 percent in 2016, confirming his warning of an overheating market. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research underlines positive impact of press freedom on stock markets
(University of Luxembourg) In one of the first studies to assess the relationship between a country's Press Freedom Index and its stock market characteristics, researchers at the University of Luxembourg have highlighted how press freedom is linked to stock market volatility, and why this is beneficial for the overall economy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 20, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Master detox molecule boosts immune defenses
(Luxembourg Institute of Health) Scientists of the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) have discovered an unknown molecular mechanism promoting the activation of the human immune system. The team has been studying the glutathione molecule known for its role in cleaning the body from harmful metabolic wastes and revealed that glutathione also stimulates T cells energy metabolism. This discovery offers perspectives to develop new therapeutic strategies for targeting cancer and autoimmune diseases. The scientists publish their findings in Immunity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 18, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

RedHill Biopharma and IntelGenx Announce Marketing Approval of RIZAPORT(R) for Migraines in Luxembourg
The national marketing approval in Luxembourg completes the current approval process of RIZAPORT® under the European Decentralized Procedure (DCP); RIZAPORT® is also approved for marketing in Germany and a national Marketing Authorization Applicati... Biopharmaceuticals, Drug Delivery, Regulatory RedHill Biopharma, IntelGenx, RIZAPORT, rizatriptan, migraine (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - April 13, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Brain tissue from a petri dish
The most complex organ in humans is the brain. Due to its complexity and, of course, for ethical reasons, it is extremely difficult to do scientific experiments on it - ones that could help us to understand neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's, for example. Scientists at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg have now succeeded in turning human stem cells derived from skin samples into tiny, three-dimensional, brain-like cultures that behave very similarly to cells in the human midbrain. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - April 13, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Brain tissue from a petri dish
(University of Luxembourg) The most complex organ in humans is the brain. Due to its complexity, it is extremely difficult to do scientific experiments on it -- ones that could help us to understand neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's, for example. Scientists at the University of Luxembourg have now succeeded in turning human stem cells derived from skin samples into tiny, 3-D, brain-like cultures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 13, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

SpaceX Makes History With Launch of First Recycled Rocket
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — SpaceX has launched its first recycled rocket. It’s the biggest leap yet in the company’s bid to drive down costs and speed up flights. The Falcon 9 rocket blasted off from Florida’s Kennedy Space Center Thursday evening on the historic reflight. It’s the first time SpaceX founder Elon Musk has tried to fly a salvaged booster. The first stage landed on an ocean platform almost a year ago after a launch for NASA. SpaceX refurbished and tested the booster, which still has its original engines. The booster will aim for another sea landing once it hoists a broadcasting sat...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - March 30, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Watch Live: SpaceX Attempts First Rocket Relaunch
SpaceX is shooting a used Falcon 9 Rocket into space tonight, marking the first relaunch attempt for the space industry. Elon Musk’s company has successfully landed 8 out of 13 rocket attempts since Dec. 2015. The reuse-and-recycle approach it’s testing today is meant to save money, as SpaceX projects it can cut costs by 30% if it relaunches rockets rather than building new ones each time, Reuters reports. “If one can figure out how to effectively reuse rockets just like airplanes, the cost of access to space will be reduced by as much as a factor of a hundred,” Musk said, according to a 2015 SpaceX...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - March 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Julia Zorthian Tags: Uncategorized Elon Musk livestream onetime space SpaceX Travel Source Type: news