Blunt force trauma: an exceptional example of an ancient Egyptian mummy head - Zesch S, Madea B, Pommerening T, Panzer S, Henzler T, Polfer M, Janssen S, Friedrich R, Lindauer S, Rosendahl W.
In the course of a scientific cooperation between the German Mummy Project at the Reiss-Engelhorn-Museen, Mannheim (Germany) and the Mus ée National d'Histoire et d'Art Luxembourg (Luxembourg), an ancient Egyptian mummy head was analyzed using a multidisci... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Artificial Intelligence Algorithm can Learn the Laws of Quantum Mechanics and Speed Up Drug Delivery
Artificial Intelligence can be used to predict molecular wave functions and the electronic properties of molecules. This innovative AI method developed by a team of researchers at the University of Warwick, the Technical University of Berlin and the University of Luxembourg, could be used to speed-up the design of drug molecules or new materials. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - November 20, 2019 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Artificial Intelligence algorithm can learn the laws of quantum mechanics and speed up drug delivery
Artificial Intelligence can be used to predict molecular wave functions and the electronic properties of molecules. This innovative AI method developed by a team of researchers at the University of Warwick, the Technical University of Berlin and the University of Luxembourg, could be used to speed-up the design of drug molecules or new materials. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - November 20, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Digital data and AI to improve the lives of people with diabetes
(Luxembourg Institute of Health) CoLive Diabetes, an international research project aimed at raising the quality of life of people with diabetes launches today. Scientists of LIH will study how digital data can be used for better management of diabetes and prevention of diabetes-related complications. By making deep analyses of data, the researchers want to generate so-called digital twins of patients. This should enable medical professionals to predict the course of diabetes more accurately and to develop personalised treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Europe ’s Green Deal is Turning Red
This article first appeared in International Politics and Society published by the International Political Analysis Unit of the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, Hiroshimastrasse 28, D-10785 Berlin. The post Europe’s Green Deal is Turning Red appeared first on Inter Press Service. Excerpt: Delara Burkhardt is deputy federal chairman of Germany's Young Socialists (JUSOS) and a Member of the European Parliament since 2019. The post Europe’s Green Deal is Turning Red appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Delara Burkhardt Tags: Climate Change Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Africa: SoS Mediterranee and MSF Call On European Leaders to Urgently Allow Disembarkation of 104 Survivors
[MSF] SOS MEDITERRANEE and M édecins Sans Frontières (MSF) call on a broad coalition of European States to urgently facilitate the assignment of a port to the Ocean Viking and to finally put in place a predictable and coordinated disembarkation mechanism, as discussed in Luxembourg earlier this month. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 28, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

July 2019 Was the Earth ’s Hottest Month Ever Recorded, NOAA Says
July 2019 was the hottest July and the hottest month on record globally since temperature records began in a year of a number of record breaking temperatures as heatwaves hit many parts of the world. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced the figures Thursday, confirming that worldwide, July was 1.71 degrees Fahrenheit (.95 degrees Celsius) warmer than the average of 56.9 degrees Fahrenheit. The record-setting July follows the hottest June on record, rising .71 degrees Fahrenheit (0.95 Celsius) above the average temperature for that month. Regions across the world experienced record-breaking temperat...
Source: TIME: Science - August 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime weather Source Type: news

The Hottest July, How Climate Change is Breaking Temperature Records in 2019
July 2019 was the hottest July and the hottest month on record globally since temperature records began in a year of many record-breaking temperatures as heat waves hit many parts of the world. This trend of high temperatures and heatwaves looks set to continue. Scientists say that as long as the world continues to emit greenhouse gases at the current rates, climate change related impacts will continue to be felt. “If you put all of the Julys for the last 20 or 40 or 100 years, there’s a clear trend upward. That’s the concern — that long-term trend. Not a single day or single month in particular,&r...
Source: TIME: Science - August 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime weather Source Type: news

Record-Breaking Temperatures Around the World Are ‘Almost Entirely’ Due to Climate Change
July 2019 was the hottest July and the hottest month on record globally since temperature records began in a year of many record-breaking temperatures as heat waves hit many parts of the world. This trend of high temperatures and heatwaves looks set to continue. Scientists say that as long as the world continues to emit greenhouse gases at the current rates, climate change-related impacts will continue to be felt. “If you put all of the Julys for the last 20 or 40 or 100 years, there’s a clear trend upward. That’s the concern — that long-term trend. Not a single day or single month in particular,&r...
Source: TIME: Science - August 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime weather Source Type: news

Luxembourg Parkinson's study funded with an additional 6 million euros by the FNR
(Luxembourg National Research Fund) The National Centre for Excellence in Research on Parkinson's Disease was created as the first inter-institutional research programme of its kind in Luxembourg. The Luxembourg National Research Fund has committed 8.3 million euros to it for the past 4 years. At the end of this first funding period, the program has been evaluated with outstanding scores by an international jury of experts, paving the way for its second phase, funded with additional 6 million euros. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Novel computer model supports cancer therapy
(University of Luxembourg) Researchers from the Life Sciences Research Unit (LSRU) of the University of Luxembourg have developed a computer model that simulates the metabolism of cancer cells. They used the programme to investigate how combinations of drugs could be used more effectively to stop tumour growth. The biologists now published their findings in the scientific journal EBioMedicine of the prestigious Lancet group. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 2, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Walking, trip purpose, and exposure to multiple environments: a case study of older adults in Luxembourg - Perchoux C, Brondeel R, Wasfi R, Klein O, Caruso G, Vall ée J, Klein S, Thierry B, Dijst M, Chaix B, Kestens Y, Gerber P.
PURPOSE Understanding the geographical and environmental triggers for active transport among older adults is crucial to promote healthy and independent lifestyles. While transportation research has long considered trip purpose as a major determinant of tr... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Cancer cells are quick-change artists adapting to their environment
(Luxembourg Institute of Health) Until now, researchers have assumed that the growth of solid tumors originates from cancer stem cells characterized by specific surface markers, which develop in a fixed, hierarchical order. In a joint interdisciplinary project led by the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH), researchers now show that cancer cells of glioblastomas -- conspicuously aggressive solid brain tumors -- manifest developmental plasticity and their phenotypic characteristics are less constrained than believed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 24, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Right combination of diet and bacteria limits cancer progression
(University of Luxembourg) Researchers from the University of Luxembourg have discovered a combination of dietary factors and gut bacteria that inhibits the progression of colorectal cancer. Their findings, which were published in the prestigious, open-access journal Cell Reports, could help exploit dietary regimens for therapeutic purposes to improve chemotherapy efficacy and reduce toxicity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Full Professor in Digital Health (M/F) at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB)
Location: Luxembourg Job Type: Full-Time Employer: University of Luxembourg The newly recruited professor will join the LCSB - an interdisciplinary research centre within the University of Luxembourg. At LCSB we accelerate biomedical research by closing the link between systems biology and medical research. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - April 23, 2019 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Jobs Source Type: news

Scientists rejuvenate stem cells in the aging brain of mice
(University of Luxembourg) Scientists from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg and from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have been able to rejuvenate stem cells in the brain of aging mice. The revitalised stem cells improve the regeneration of injured or diseased areas in the brain of old mice. The researchers expect that their approach will provide fresh impetus in regenerative medicine and facilitate the development of stem cell therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New computational method reduces risk of drug formulation
One major factor that determines the efficacy of a drug is the structure that its molecules form in a solid state. Changed molecular structures can entail that pills stop functioning properly and are therefore rendered useless. A team led by researchers from the University of Luxembourg in collaboration with Princeton University, Cornell University, and Avant-garde Materials Simulation GmbH, has developed (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - January 31, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

New computational method reduces risk of drug formulation
(University of Luxembourg) A team of researchers has developed a new method to calculate and predict how drug molecules in molecular crystals arrange themselves under changing energetic conditions. For pharmaceutical companies, this approach could be used to avoid expensive development failures, production errors, and potential litigation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Eb144/conf./8
Global action on patient safety Draft resolution proposed by Argentina, Australia, Austria, Botswana, Eswatini, Germany, Japan, Kenya, Latvia, Luxembourg, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Switzerland and United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (Source: WHO Governing Body Documentation)
Source: WHO Governing Body Documentation - January 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Altered microbiome after caesarean section impacts baby's immune system
(University of Luxembourg) Together with colleagues from Sweden and Luxembourg, scientists from the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) of the University of Luxembourg have observed that, during a natural vaginal birth, specific bacteria from the mother's gut are passed on to the baby and stimulate the baby's immune responses. This transmission is impacted in children born by caesarean section. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Actin cytoskeleton remodeling protects tumor cells against immune attack
(Luxembourg Institute of Health) Cancer cells have evolved multiple escape strategies to circumvent the body's immune defenses such as the attack by Natural Killer (NK) cells which normally swiftly kill abnormal cells by releasing cytotoxic products. While studying breast cancer cell lines, Dr. Cl é ment Thomas' research team at the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) uncovered a previously unknown mechanism that leaves tumor cells unharmed by NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Working with HTAs: It ’s Your Move
In June last year, the heads of European health technology assessment (HTA) bodies came together at a meeting facilitated by EUnetHTA (European Network for Health Technology Assessment) and the European Commission ’s Directorate General for Health and Food Safety.A key focus of the event was the creation of earlier and more engaging dialogue between pharma and HTA bodies. This is not surprising. As critical gatekeepers for new medicine seeking access to national markets, HTAs are playing central roles in moves to tighten control over drug spending across Europe. As part of this, bodies are going further than ever bef...
Source: EyeForPharma - October 16, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ross Davies Source Type: news

Vygon leads French investors in funding Canadian startup OxyNov
Single-use medical device maker Vygon said today that it has acquired a 20% stake in OxyNov, a Canadian startup specializing in oxygen therapy and respiratory assistance medical devices. The financial terms of the transaction, in which Desjardins-Innovatech and other private investors in Quebec also participated, were not disclosed. Founded in 2009, OxyNov (Quebec) launched FreeO2, a medical device CE marked in May 2017. FreeO2 automatically and continuously adjusts the flow of oxygen delivered to the patient based on a clinician-defined target for oxygen saturation and patient needs. The French group decided to invest in ...
Source: Mass Device - September 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Source Type: news

Towards a better understanding of how colon cancer develops and progresses
(University of Luxembourg) Researchers from the University of Luxembourg have discovered a molecular mechanism that is responsible for the spread of cancer cells in the body and the development of metastases in patients with colon cancer. Their findings could help to develop treatments that inhibit tumor growth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

LabCorp completes $670M sale of Covance Food Solutions
The acquisition of Covance Food Solutions by a European firm from Burlington-based LabCorp (LH: NYSE) is final. The $670 million deal, which Triad Business Journal reported in April, transfers ownership of the food testing company to Eurofins Scientific, a bioanaylitical testing firm located in Luxembourg.  Eurofins Scientific (EUFI: PA) CEO Giles Martin said the opportunity to acquire such a high quality asset as Covance represents a clear milestone for his firm, pushing it further along in its… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 2, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John Joyce Source Type: news

LabCorp completes $670M sale of Covance Food Solutions
The acquisition of Covance Food Solutions by a European firm from Burlington-based LabCorp (LH: NYSE) is final. The $670 million deal, which Triad Business Journal reported in April, transfers ownership of the food testing company to Eurofins Scientific, a bioanaylitical testing firm located in Luxembourg.  Eurofins Scientific (EUFI: PA) CEO Giles Martin said the opportunity to acquire such a high quality asset as Covance represents a clear milestone for his firm, pushing it further along in its… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - August 2, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: John Joyce Source Type: news

Luxembourgish researchers predict cell conversion factors
(University of Luxembourg) Thanks to a newly developed computational method, Luxembourg researchers can accurately predict how one subpopulation of cells can be converted into another. " The method has great potential for regenerative medicine when it comes to replacing cell subpopulations that have been lost in the course of disease, for example, " explains Prof. Dr Antonio del Sol, head of the Computational Biology group of the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB) at the University of Luxembourg. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Steba Biotech's TOOKAD(R) Vascular Photodynamic Therapy Maintains Significant Reduction in Overall Progression and Conversion to Radical Therapy in Low-risk Prostate Cancer Patients at 4 Years
LUXEMBOURG, June 20, 2018 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Steba Biotech, a privately-owned biotechnology company focused on the development of innovative and minimally invasive photodynamic therapies and systems to treat cancers, today announ... Biopharmaceuticals, Urology, Oncology Steba Biotech, photodynamic therapy, TOOKAD, prostate cancer (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - June 20, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

4 Climbers Die in Swiss Alps After Unexpected Storm
GENEVA (AP) — An unexpected snowstorm coupled with high winds killed four climbers in the Swiss Alps and left five others in critical condition early Monday after they became trapped overnight and couldn't reach shelter, officials said. A total of 14 hikers from France, Germany and Italy were left stranded in the Pigne d'Arolla region, police in southwestern Valais canton said. Authorities deployed seven helicopters as part of rescue efforts. The climbers were caught off-guard by high winds, snow and bitter cold, and were forced to spend the night outdoors, Valais police spokesman Markus Rieder said. Several of those...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - April 30, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jamey Keaten, Associated Press Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

4 Climbers Die in Swiss Alps After Unexpected Storm
GENEVA (AP) — An unexpected snowstorm coupled with high winds killed four climbers in the Swiss Alps and left five others in critical condition early Monday after they became trapped overnight and couldn't reach shelter, officials said. A total of 14 hikers from France, Germany and Italy were left stranded in the Pigne d'Arolla region, police in southwestern Valais canton said. Authorities deployed seven helicopters as part of rescue efforts. The climbers were caught off-guard by high winds, snow and bitter cold, and were forced to spend the night outdoors, Valais police spokesman Markus Rieder said. Several of those...
Source: JEMS Operations - April 30, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jamey Keaten, Associated Press Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

4 Climbers Die in Swiss Alps After Unexpected Storm
GENEVA (AP) — An unexpected snowstorm coupled with high winds killed four climbers in the Swiss Alps and left five others in critical condition early Monday after they became trapped overnight and couldn't reach shelter, officials said. A total of 14 hikers from France, Germany and Italy were left stranded in the Pigne d'Arolla region, police in southwestern Valais canton said. Authorities deployed seven helicopters as part of rescue efforts. The climbers were caught off-guard by high winds, snow and bitter cold, and were forced to spend the night outdoors, Valais police spokesman Markus Rieder said. Several of those...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - April 30, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jamey Keaten, Associated Press Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

4 Climbers Die in Swiss Alps After Unexpected Storm
GENEVA (AP) — An unexpected snowstorm coupled with high winds killed four climbers in the Swiss Alps and left five others in critical condition early Monday after they became trapped overnight and couldn't reach shelter, officials said. A total of 14 hikers from France, Germany and Italy were left stranded in the Pigne d'Arolla region, police in southwestern Valais canton said. Authorities deployed seven helicopters as part of rescue efforts. The climbers were caught off-guard by high winds, snow and bitter cold, and were forced to spend the night outdoors, Valais police spokesman Markus Rieder said. Several of those...
Source: JEMS Operations - April 30, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jamey Keaten, Associated Press Tags: News Operations Source Type: news

How LabCorp's sale of Covance Food Solutions will impact headcounts
Eurofins Scientific, a bioanalytical testing firm based in Luxembourg,  will gain 850 employees from Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings when it acquires the latter's food solutions business for $670 million. LabCorp (NYSE: LH) said Monday it is selling Covance Food Solutions to focus primarily on its health care operations. The business provides laboratory t esting and consulting services for food and beverage products, and became a part of LabCorp when the Burlington-based company acquired… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 30, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Seaman Source Type: news

Efficient control of leukaemia with treatment by dual immune-checkpoint blockade
(Luxembourg Institute of Health) Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a haematological malignancy. When infiltrating tissues, CLL cells come in contact with healthy cells, including immune cells. Researchers from the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) succeeded in characterising in depth the composition of immune cells and circulating cytokines of the CLL microenvironment in mouse models using mass cytometry. Based on this knowledge, they propose an immunotherapeutic strategy with two immune checkpoint inhibitors that efficiently blocks disease development in preclinical tests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Associating frailty to cardiovascular disease and mortality
(Luxembourg Institute of Health) Frailty is common in elderly people with cardiovascular disease and goes along with elevated mortality. Dr. Gloria Aguayo from the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) and co-workers examined the predictive ability of 35 frailty scores for cardiovascular disease, cancer and all-cause mortality using data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. The analysis, recently published in PLOS Medicine, reveals that all frailty scores are associated with future mortality, and that some are linked to cardiovascular disease but none to cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientific misconduct harms prior collaborators
(University of Luxembourg) Luxembourg, 14 March 2018 - Scientists should choose their associates carefully, researchers at the University of Luxembourg and the Centre for European Economic Research (ZEW), Mannheim, recommend, as future misconduct by colleagues could seriously impact the reputation of their former collaborators. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Donors pledge over US$15 million to WHO ’s Contingency Fund for Emergencies
27 March 2018 – Donors have pledged an additional US$15.3 million to support quick action by the World Health Organization to tackle disease outbreaks and humanitarian health crises through its emergency response fund in 2018, the Contingency Fund for Emergencies (CFE). Canada, Denmark, Estonia, Germany, the Republic of Korea, Kuwait, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland announced contributions ranging from US$20,000 to US$5.6 million at a conference hosted at WHO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland on Monday (March 26) – increasing CFE funding lev...
Source: WHO news - March 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: emergencies [subject], emergency preparedness, crises, emergency preparedness, health financing [subject], health economics, health systems financing Source Type: news

Donors pledge over US$ 15 million to WHO ’s Contingency Fund for Emergencies
Donors have pledged an additional US$15.3 million to support quick action by the World Health Organization to tackle disease outbreaks and humanitarian health crises through its emergency response fund in 2018, the Contingency Fund for Emergencies (CFE). Canada, Denmark, Estonia, Germany, the Republic of Korea, Kuwait, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland announced contributions ranging from US$20,000 to US$5.6 million at a conference hosted at WHO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland on Monday (March 26) – increasing CFE funding levels to US$23 million. (Source: WHO news)
Source: WHO news - March 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: emergencies [subject], emergency preparedness, crises, emergency preparedness, health financing [subject], health economics, health systems financing Source Type: news

Chernobyl Is Now the World ’s Unlikeliest Green Energy Experiment
A hundred yards from the rusting ruins at the site of the world’s worst nuclear disaster, a gossamer array of almost 4,000 photovoltaic panels sits atop a thick concrete slab capping a grave of radioactive waste. When it comes to clean energy, it’s hard to think of a less likely place than Ukraine’s infamous Chernobyl nuclear plant. But final preparations are being made to generate electricity again, this time using safer power from the sun. It’s part of the country’s plan to reduce dependency on increasingly unreliable Russian gas deliveries and disrupted coal supplies. Dominated by the 300 f...
Source: TIME: Science - March 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: James M Gomez and Kateryna Choursina / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized Bloomberg Chernobyl energy onetime Source Type: news

Thanks to Cheddar Man, I feel more comfortable as a brown Briton | Aarathi Prasad
I grew up being told that a prerequisite for our national identity was white skin – that prejudice has been proved falseThe results of 10,000-year oldCheddar Man ’s DNA analysis have hit the headlines in the past few days, accompanied by a striking portrait that needed no words. Here was this bona fide European – indeed, an ancestral Brit – and the man was black. Genetic analysis suggests he had blue eyes, and that his skin was probably darker, even, than the portrait shows. Three hundred generations later, allowing for a little variation between individuals, about 10% of the genome of many white Br...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Aarathi Prasad Tags: Genetics Race issues Biology UK news Science Migration Source Type: news

DNA From 10,000-Year-Old Skeleton Found in Britain Reveals Man Had Dark Skin and Blue Eyes
(LONDON) — DNA from a 10,000-year-old skeleton found in an English cave suggests the oldest-known Briton had dark skin and blue eyes, researchers said Wednesday.Scientists from Britain’s Natural History Museum and University College London analyzed the genome of “Cheddar Man,” who was found in Cheddar Gorge in southwest England in 1903.Scientists led by museum DNA expert Ian Barnes drilled into the skull to extract DNA from bone powder. They say analysis indicates he had blue eyes, dark curly hair and “dark to black” skin pigmentation.The researchers say the evidence suggests that Europe...
Source: TIME: Science - February 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jill Lawless / AP Tags: Uncategorized APW Archaeology onetime Source Type: news

New biomarkers for colorectal cancer
(University of Luxembourg) Researchers from the University of Luxembourg found a new biomarker for colorectal cancer (CRC) that might improve therapy and survival rates of patients. Biomarkers are measurable biological indicators for a specific disease, such as changes in the amounts of certain proteins that occur in combination with certain illnesses. Such biomarkers help physicians to diagnose a condition, identify the disease stage, and determine a patient's risk for recurrence of the disease. This supports the doctor in choosing the best-fitting treatment plan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Siemens Healthineers closes Fast Track Diagnostics buy
Siemens (NYSE:SI) Healthineers said today it completed its acquisition of Fast Track Diagnostics, marking the official date of the closing as December 19, 2017. With the acquisition, FTD’s sites in Luxembourg, Malta and India and its approximately 80 employee workforce will be folded into Siemens Healthineers business. FTD produces a range of CE Mark approved infectious disease detection tests and syndromic panels, and will continue to operate under the brand name Fast Track Diagnostics, Siemens said. “The closing of this deal enables both Siemens Healthineers and FTD—now joined as one—to ...
Source: Mass Device - January 10, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Diagnostics Mergers & Acquisitions Siemens Source Type: news

No Health Protection for Migrant-Women Healthcare Givers
Credit: UNBy Baher KamalROME, Dec 18 2017 (IPS)While the media may be attracted by images of migrants drowning or sold as slaves, another flagrant but lesser-known drama is that of care workers, who are overwhelmingly women, often migrants, and who make a very large contribution to global public health, but are exposed to great health risks themselves with little or no protection, let alone basic labour rights. Migrant women care workers buttress health systems in countries where there are shortfalls in health-care provision, while their own rights to health and well-being can be eroded and their health-care needs unfulfil...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Migration & Refugees Poverty & SDGs Projects TerraViva United Nations Women's Health International Organizatio Source Type: news

Siemens buys Fast Track Diagnostics to boost molecular offering
FRANKFURT (Reuters) - Siemens said it has agreed to buy Luxembourg-based Fast Track Diagnostics to boost its molecular-testing offering, one of the areas it is keen to expand as it prepares to float its healthcare unit, Healthineers. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

ECDC (European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control) Country Visit to Luxembourg to Discuss Antimicrobial Resistance Issues
European Union, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. 11/21/2017 This 24-page report summarizes visits and meetings held on May 29- June 2, 2017, to discuss antimicrobial resistance (AMR) issues in Luxembourg with the overall objective of providing an evidence-based assessment of the situation in Luxembourg regarding prevention and control of AMR through prudent use of antibiotics and infection control. The report provides an overview, observations, and options for action. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

On the influence of the research university in the 20th century
(University of Luxembourg) In a new book entitled 'The Century Of Science: The Global Triumph of the Research University', international authors explore global scientific developments through the 20th century, as well as how university-based research has become worldwide the driving force of scientific productivity in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, including health (STEM+). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bringing natural killer cells to the tumor battlefield
(Luxembourg Institute of Health) By studying melanoma, a highly malignant form of skin cancer, Dr Bassam Janji's research team at the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) has revealed a mechanism by which the immunosuppressive environment can be switched to an immunosupportive one. They found that if autophagy -- the intracellular recycling process -- is blocked in tumor cells, they produce cytokines that attract NK cells. The massive recruitment of NK cells allows killing cancer cells and lets the tumors shrink. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news