Behind the Headlines' Top Five of Top Fives 2015
In this study, researchers wanted to see why this is and if there could be any human applications.Researchers collected white blood cells from African and Asian elephants. They found that elephants have at least 20 copies of a gene called TP53. TP53 is known to encourage cell "suicide" when DNA is damaged, stopping any potential cancer in its tracks. In contrast, humans are thought to have only a single copy of the TP53 gene.Of course the big question – the elephant in the room, if you will – is how we can boost TP53 activity in humans to stimulate a similar protective effect. The simple answer is: we...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Medical practice Special reports Source Type: news

Behind the Headlines Top Five of Top Fives 2015
In this study, researchers wanted to see why this is and if there could be any human applications. Researchers collected white blood cells from African and Asian elephants. They found elephants have at least 20 copies of a gene called TP53. TP53 is known to encourage cell "suicide" when DNA is damaged, stopping any potential cancer in its tracks. In contrast, humans are thought to have only a single copy of the TP53 gene. Of course the big question – the elephant in the room, if you will – is how we can boost TP53 activity in humans to stimulate a similar protective effect. The simple answer is: we do...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 24, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Medical practice Special reports Source Type: news

$1 million gift will support UCLA research on advanced lung disease
Philanthropists Michael and Linda Keston have made a gift of $1 million to the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. The donation will support research into advanced lung disease and the UCLA Lung Health Research Initiative, which was launched in November. The initiative is focused on developing new treatments for lung disease and finding a way to prevent the body from rejecting donor organs — a major challenge for people who have received organ transplants. “The Kestons’ contribution will enable our faculty to pursue innovative research that will...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 23, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

FDA approves new orphan drug to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension
On December 21, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Uptravi (selexipag) tablets to treat adults with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a chronic, progressive, and debilitating rare lung disease that can lead to death or the need for transplantation. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - December 22, 2015 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Targeting frailty in pre-lung transplant patients might improve survival rates, patient outcomes
Frailty can affect people of all ages and demographics. Defined simply as 'an increased vulnerability to adverse health outcomes,' frailty can affect a patient's chances of surviving a surgical procedure or needing a nursing home. A new study is among the first to show a definitive connection between frailty and survival after a lung transplant procedure. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 18, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

When rejection comes from within
A new cellular structure responsible for previously unexplained rejection of organ transplants has been identified. This discovery could one day revolutionize transplantation practice by modifying risk assessment of rejection in people who receive heart, lung, kidney, or liver transplants. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 16, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Pulmonary Hypertension No Bar to Single-Lung TransplantPulmonary Hypertension No Bar to Single-Lung Transplant
Pulmonary hypertension (PH) does not significantly affect outcome of single-lung transplantation, possibly increasing the number of potential recipients, according to Wisconsin-based researchers. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines)
Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines - December 15, 2015 Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Transplantation News Source Type: news

Targeting Frailty in Pre-Lung Transplant Patients Might Improve Survival Rates, Patient Outcomes
Rochester, Minn. — Frailty can affect people of all ages and demographics. Defined simply as “an increased vulnerability to adverse health outcomes,” frailty can affect a patient’s chances of surviving a surgical procedure or needing a nursing home. A new study from physicians at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., published recently in the Journal of [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Rochester News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Rochester News - December 15, 2015 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

New method of diagnosing deadly fungal lung infection in leukemia patients discovered
A new way detect early a potentially deadly fungal infection in patients with suppressed immune systems, such as those being treated for leukemia or have had an organ transplant, has been revealed by a team of scientists. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 14, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

New method of diagnosing deadly fungal lung infection in leukemia patients discovered
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) A team of researchers have discovered a new way for early detection of a potentially deadly fungal infection in patients with suppressed immune systems such as those being treated for leukemia or have had an organ transplant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 14, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Flavouring found in e-cigarettes linked to 'popcorn lung'
ConclusionThis study shows three chemicals reportedly linked to serious lung damage are present in many flavoured e-cigarettes in the US, raising concerns about their safety. Although the study tested US brands, it's likely similar findings would be found here in the UK, where e-cigarettes are similarly unregulated.However, this issue is not black and white. The researchers' concerns have been rightly raised, and their conclusion that urgent research needs to follow this study seems logical given the apparent lack of knowledge in this area.  Still, much of the potential health risk and alarm factor of this study ...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 8, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Source Type: news

UNOS Approves Child Priority Policy for Lung TransplantUNOS Approves Child Priority Policy for Lung Transplant
The U.S. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) and the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) Board of Directors revised its pediatric lung allocation policy at its December 1-2 meeting. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines)
Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines - December 5, 2015 Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Transplantation News Source Type: news

Medtech approvals: FDA releases October 2015 PMAs
The FDA today released its list of the pre-market approvals it granted for medical devices in October 2015: Summary of PMA Originals & Supplements Approved Originals: 9 Supplements: 133 Summary of PMA Originals Under Review Total Under Review: 58 Total Active: 32 Total On Hold: 26 Summary of PMA Supplements Under Review Total Under Review: 597 Total Active: 433 Total On Hold: 164 Summary of All PMA Submissions Originals: 7 Supplements: 74 Summary of PMA Supplement PMA Approval/Denial Decision Times Number of Approvals: 133 Number of Denials: 0 Average Days Fr Receipt to Decision (Total Time): 161.5 FDA Ti...
Source: Mass Device - December 4, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Source Type: news

LIBERATE Patients from Emphysema!
PITTSBURGH. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- More than four million Americans have emphysema, a chronic lung disease that makes it impossible to take a full breath. Major surgery to remove the damaged part of the lung or a lung transplant used to be the best options for some patients with advanced cases. Now, doctors at 17 sites nationwide are testing a minimally- invasive procedure that may save lives. (Source: Medical Headlines From Ivanhoe.com)
Source: Medical Headlines From Ivanhoe.com - December 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ALung’s artificial lung tech selected for landmark pivotal trial
ALung Technologies said today its Hemolung RAS extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal device has been selected for use in the world’s 1st pivotal trial of ECCO2R technology used to treat patients with acute respiratory failure. The U.K.’s National Institute for Health Research will supply $3.1 million (GBP £2.1 million) in funding for the 1,120 patient Rest trial, which looks to examine the effect of protective ventilation with veno-venous lung assist devices during respiratory failure. The trial will be jointly led by Queen’s University and Belfast Health and Social Services Trust, the company said....
Source: Mass Device - December 2, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Respiratory ALung Technologies Inc. Source Type: news

Experience Journal: The Transplant Journey
  When a vital organ is damaged beyond repair, the only path to health is transplantation- replacing the dysfunctional organ with an organ from the body of an organ donor.  The experience can be physically, psychologically, and emotionally trying for patients and families, especially when the patient is a child or teen. Experience Journal, a project of the Boston Children’s Hospital psychiatry program, interviewed numerous children, teens, young adults, and parents about their experience through the transplant journey— from accepting their diagnoses to waiting for the donor organ to connecting with t...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 27, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ray Hainer Tags: Our patients’ stories Experience Journal Pediatric Transplant Center (PTC) Source Type: news

The Holiday Warriors
This Thursday morning, I'll wake up at 5:30 a.m. to the sound of my alarm and take a bleary-eyed trip into the bathroom. I'll brush my teeth and wash my face and get ready to go to work at the hospital the same way I've done every shift for the past three and a half years. What makes this day so different, however, is that while you'll be prepping the oven for your afternoon roast, my hospital colleagues and I will be giving thanks within the walls of a surgical intensive care unit. We exist in a world where we cannot help but feel thankful, for we are not the ones confined to the bed or strapped to a ventilator or tethere...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 25, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Shorter People Less Likely to Get Lung Transplants
Title: Shorter People Less Likely to Get Lung TransplantsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 11/19/2015 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/20/2015 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Lungs General)
Source: MedicineNet Lungs General - November 20, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: news

These Lab-Grown Vocal Cords Sound Like The Real Thing
A team of scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has bioengineered vocal cord tissue capable of vibrating and generating sound as well as natural tissue. The feat is being hailed as a scientific first. The lab-grown tissue may one day be used to restore the voices of patients with damaged vocal cords or those who may have lost theirs to cancer surgery or injuries, according to a study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine on Wednesday. "I was surprised and even shocked at how well the tissue performed," Dr. Nathan Welham, a speech-language pathologist at the university and lead a...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 20, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

These Lab-Grown Vocal Cords Sound Like The Real Thing
A team of scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has bioengineered vocal cord tissue capable of vibrating and generating sound as well as natural tissue. The feat is being hailed as a scientific first. The lab-grown tissue may one day be used to restore the voices of patients with damaged vocal cords or those who may have lost theirs to cancer surgery or injuries, according to a study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine on Wednesday. "I was surprised and even shocked at how well the tissue performed," Dr. Nathan Welham, a speech-language pathologist at the university and lead a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 20, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Shorter People Less Likely to Get Lung Transplants
They also have higher odds of dying while waiting for surgery, the study says Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Health Disparities, Lung Transplantation (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - November 19, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Parties Debate Validity Of Testimony In 'Popcorn Lung' Case Before 8th Circuit
ST. LOUIS - The Eighth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals heard oral arguments on Oct. 22 in a case brought by a couple contending that exposure to diacetyl and pentanedione, the chemicals used to make artificial butter flavoring in popcorn, caused the husband to develop lung disease, with attorneys for each party debating the propriety of testimony and the judge's jury instruction (David Stults, et al. v. International Flavors, Etc., et al., No. 14-3658, 8th Cir.). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - November 18, 2015 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

Lung transplant criteria biased against shorter patients
Short people have several health advantages over tall people, including lower risk for cancer and heart disease, and longer life expectancy. But there’s at least one health-related downside to being small: the odds of getting a lung transplant are considerably lower. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 16, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Lung transplant criteria biased against shorter patients
(Columbia University Medical Center) Short people have several health advantages over tall people, including lower risk for cancer and heart disease, and longer life expectancy. But there's at least one health-related downside to being small: the odds of getting a lung transplant are considerably lower. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Kidney failure and its treatment may impact cancer risk
Risk of kidney and thyroid cancers was especially high when kidney failure patients were on dialysis, researchers have discovered. Conversely, risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, melanoma, lung cancer, and certain skin cancers was highest following kidney transplantation, likely due to immunosuppressant medications. Kidney failure is on the rise and currently afflicts an estimated 2 million people worldwide. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 13, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Surprising Reason Wealthy People Get Organ Transplants Faster
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) -- You can't buy hearts, kidneys or other organs but money can still help you get one. Wealthy people are more likely to get on multiple waiting lists and score a transplant, and less likely to die while waiting for one, a new study finds. The work confirms what many have long suspected - the rich have advantages even in a system designed to steer organs to the sickest patients and those who have waited longest. Wealthier people can better afford the tests and travel to get on more than one transplant center's waiting list, and the new study shows how much this pays off. "Multiple-listed patients we...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Disrupting Today's Healthcare System
This week in San Diego, Singularity University is holding its Exponential Medicine Conference, a look at how technologists are redesigning and rebuilding today's broken healthcare system. Healthcare today is reactive, retrospective, bureaucratic and expensive. It's sick care, not healthcare. This blog is about why the $3 trillion healthcare system is broken and how we are going to fix it. First, the Bad News: Doctors spend $210 billion per year on procedures that aren’t based on patient need, but fear of liability. Americans spend, on average, $8,915 per person on healthcare – more than any other count...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rule Changes Might Lead to More Lung Transplants for Kids
Title: Rule Changes Might Lead to More Lung Transplants for KidsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 11/5/2015 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/6/2015 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Lungs General)
Source: MedicineNet Lungs General - November 6, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: news

Rule Changes Might Lead to More Lung Transplants for Kids
Study suggests that widening the geographic pool could increase available organs Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Children's Health, Lung Transplantation, Organ Donation (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - November 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Five years after stem cell transplant complications, he’s an active teenager
Drew at 2014 Be the Match Walk in NYC. His stem cell donor lives in Germany. “It’s eye-opening to realize how fragile life really is when you’re young.” Drew D’Auteuil certainly knows whereof he speaks. He is a 16-year-old animal-loving, skiing, rowing, volleyball-playing, honor roll student and licensed driver with braces and a shock of red hair. In April 2010, five months after receiving a stem cell transplant to treat the blood disorder severe aplastic anemia, Drew suffered rare, life-threatening complications. One day Drew was biking with a friend near his New Hampshire home, sufferin...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 5, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Irene Sege Tags: All posts Cancer Diseases & conditions Allison O'Neill Aplastic anemia Dana-Farber/ Children's Hospital Cancer Center stem cell transplant Source Type: news

Can I Have a Lung Transplant for Lung Cancer?
Can a lung transplant be used as a treatment for lung cancer? If so, when. And why wouldn't a lung transplant work for most people with lung cancer? (Source: About.com Lung Cancer)
Source: About.com Lung Cancer - November 2, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: lungcancer.guide at about.com Tags: health Source Type: news

No tricks — only treats and happy times for sick kids hospitalized at UCLA
If laughter is the best medicine, then kids staying at Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA got a healthy dose of it today during a Halloween celebration filled with giggles and smiles. For 6-year-old patient Abby Karr, Halloween couldn’t come soon enough. She had been planning her transformation into a pink, bedazzled Batgirl all week long, said her mother Megan Karr. Abby, who suffers from a heart and lung condition and has been hospitalized on and off since she was 16 months old, couldn't wait for today to arrive. Without ever leaving the hospital, she saw it all: Star Wars characters, super heroes, kitten outfit...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 31, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Depression Common in Patients Awaiting Lung TransplantDepression Common in Patients Awaiting Lung Transplant
More than half of patients waiting for a lung transplant suffered from psychologic stress in a new study, which might be serious enough to affect transplant outcomes. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pulmonary Medicine News Source Type: news

Husband of mother dying from cystic fibrosis writes letter pleading for more organ donors
Ashley Harris Moore is waiting for a double lung transplant after suffering all her life from cystic fibrosis (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - October 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: cystic fibrosis alastair transplant lung donor donation organ lungs husband ashley harris moore Source Type: news

Stop Using My Disease to Stop Smoking
As part of its 2015 "Tips From Former Smokers" campaign, the CDC aired an anti-smoking ad that portrayed ostomies as punishment for a bad habit. This turned out to be part of a larger campaign that took advantage of diseases and complications tied to much more than smoking, twisting life-saving and preventative medical care into something akin to torture. Case in point, an ostomy isn't simply what you get for smoking your way to colorectal cancer. Ostomies also save thousands living with severe, incurable Irritable Bowel Disease (IBD). I'm a nonsmoker living with IBD, and I work in advertising. When I saw the CD...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Patients awaiting lung transplant commonly suffer depression-related symptoms
(American College of Chest Physicians) Researchers from Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, have found patients awaiting lung transplant often suffer from stress, anxiety, or depressive symptoms, and these symptoms are not isolated to patients with pre-existing psychiatric diagnoses. Pre-existing psychiatric diagnoses have been investigated previous to lung transplant. Little is known about the prevalence and burden of active depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms pretransplant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 19, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

25-year-old Georgina Compton with cystic fibrosis gets much needed lung transplant
Georgina Compton, 25, from Surrey, has battled the genetic condition cystic fibrosis since birth. But being just 4'11" tall, her body was too small for most adult organs. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Artificial lung demonstrates how aerosols move and behave in deepest part of lungs
A life-sized artificial human lung is the first diagnostic tool for understanding in real time how tiny particles behave in the deepest part of the human lungs. It could shed light on airborne pollution risks, and be used for the evaluation/design respiratory system drugs. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 8, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Portable bionic lung 'breathes' oxygen directly into the bloodsteam
A portable bionic lung that 'breathes' oxygen directly into the bloodstream is being offered to critically ill patients – handing them valuable extra time while they wait for a transplant. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

From Bahrain to Boston for very early onset IBD care
During a recent visit to Boston Children’s Hospital, three-year-old Gassen Boabed quietly entered the waiting room of the hospital’s Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center. With Mom and big brother in tow, the tiny toddler, boasting a pretty pink headband and nail polish to match, sat at a child-sized table, picked up crayons and started coloring. She was at ease, and her surroundings were familiar. For the past year and a half, Gassen, a native of Bahrain, a small island country east of Saudi Arabia, has been receiving treatment at Boston Children’s for a rare and debilitating condition called very early onse...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 30, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Diseases & conditions Our patients’ stories Stem cell Athos Bousvaros Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) International Scott Snapper Source Type: news

Sickle Cell Disease vs. the California Stem Cell Agency: Disease-a-week Challenge #19
Imagine: inside the veins of an African-American child, red blood cells: round and soft, doing their job, keeping the person alive. What would happen if those cells hardened and changed shape, curving into the letter "C", like a wheat-cutting sickle? First, the capillaries would clog, in what Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) doctors call a "crisis". Excruciating agony, like broken glass in the veins, a crisis may last an hour or a day, and the pain is just the beginning. "By twenty years of age, about 15% of children with SCD suffer major strokes...by 40 years of age, almost half have central nervous sys...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 29, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Smog Linked to Organ Rejection, Deaths in Lung Transplant Patients
But some antibiotics seem to reduce the risk, researchers find Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Air Pollution, Antibiotics, Lung Transplantation (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - September 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Air pollution, traffic linked to deaths, organ rejection in lung transplant patients
For the first time, research shows that lung transplant patients in Europe who live on or near busy roads with high levels of air pollution are more likely to die or to experience chronic organ rejection, than those living in less polluted areas. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 29, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Smog Linked to Organ Rejection, Deaths in Lung Transplant Patients
Title: Smog Linked to Organ Rejection, Deaths in Lung Transplant PatientsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 9/29/2015 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 9/29/2015 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Lungs General)
Source: MedicineNet Lungs General - September 29, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: news

Smog Linked to Organ Rejection, Deaths in Lung Transplant Patients
But some antibiotics seem to reduce the risk, researchers find (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - September 29, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Family Medicine, Pulmonology, Organ Transplants, Preventive Medicine, News, Source Type: news

Terminally ill gymnast Sonny Lang has the 'heart and lungs of an 80-year-old'
Sonny Lang, 22, from Tadcaster, North Yorkshire, has cystic fibrosis, but has been told her body is too weak for another heart and lung transplant, so her prognosis is terminal. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lung 'filtering' technique can reduce transplant rejection
A new technique to recondition poorly functioning lungs and remove donor white blood cells has been used by researchers in an attempt to increase the number of lungs available for transplant, and at the same time reduce the risk of acute rejection. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 14, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Lung 'filtering' technique can reduce transplant rejection
(University of Manchester) University of Manchester researchers have used a new technique to recondition poorly functioning lungs and remove donor white blood cells in an attempt to increase the number of lungs available for transplant, and at the same time reduce the risk of acute rejection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Case report: use of ECMO in colchicine poisoning
Colchicum autumnale (Autumn crocus) 3.5 out of 5 stars Extracorporeal life support in the treatment of colchicine poisoning. Boisramé-Helms J et al. Clin Toxicol 2015;53:827-829. Abstract Colchicine toxicity occurs roughly in 3 phases. During the initial 24 hours, severe gastrointestinal symptoms — nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea — can cause hypotension and shock if fluid losses are not adequately replaced. During the second phase, severe toxicity can manifest with pancytopenia, sepsis, rhabdomyolysis, and renal failure. In addition, within days after ingestion, patients can develop cardiogenic shock...
Source: The Poison Review - September 11, 2015 Category: Toxicology Authors: Leon Tags: Medical autumn crocus colchicine poisoning colchicum autumnale ECLS ECMO extracorporeal life support extracorporeal membrane oxygenation Source Type: news

Bobby Donovan’s double lung transplant journey
Twenty-two-year-old Bobby Donovan was diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) at 4 months old. He was relatively healthy for someone with CF. However, in November of 2008 his health began to deteriorate. Every three months or so, he was admitted to Boston Children’s Hospital for two to four weeks at a time. In April of 2014, with his lungs not expected to last the year, Bobby received the double lung transplant, which not only saved, but transformed his life. One year following surgery, he shares his remarkable story. Learn more about the Boston Children’s Lung Transplant Program. The post ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 10, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Diseases & conditions Our patients’ stories cystic fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Center double lung transplant Lung Transplant Program lungs Pediatric Transplant Center (PTC) Source Type: news