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The Holiday Warriors
This Thursday morning, I'll wake up at 5:30 a.m. to the sound of my alarm and take a bleary-eyed trip into the bathroom. I'll brush my teeth and wash my face and get ready to go to work at the hospital the same way I've done every shift for the past three and a half years. What makes this day so different, however, is that while you'll be prepping the oven for your afternoon roast, my hospital colleagues and I will be giving thanks within the walls of a surgical intensive care unit. We exist in a world where we cannot help but feel thankful, for we are not the ones confined to the bed or strapped to a ventilator or tethere...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 25, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Shorter People Less Likely to Get Lung Transplants
Title: Shorter People Less Likely to Get Lung TransplantsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 11/19/2015 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/20/2015 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Lungs General)
Source: MedicineNet Lungs General - November 20, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: news

These Lab-Grown Vocal Cords Sound Like The Real Thing
A team of scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has bioengineered vocal cord tissue capable of vibrating and generating sound as well as natural tissue. The feat is being hailed as a scientific first. The lab-grown tissue may one day be used to restore the voices of patients with damaged vocal cords or those who may have lost theirs to cancer surgery or injuries, according to a study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine on Wednesday. "I was surprised and even shocked at how well the tissue performed," Dr. Nathan Welham, a speech-language pathologist at the university and lead a...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 20, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

These Lab-Grown Vocal Cords Sound Like The Real Thing
A team of scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has bioengineered vocal cord tissue capable of vibrating and generating sound as well as natural tissue. The feat is being hailed as a scientific first. The lab-grown tissue may one day be used to restore the voices of patients with damaged vocal cords or those who may have lost theirs to cancer surgery or injuries, according to a study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine on Wednesday. "I was surprised and even shocked at how well the tissue performed," Dr. Nathan Welham, a speech-language pathologist at the university and lead a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 20, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Shorter People Less Likely to Get Lung Transplants
They also have higher odds of dying while waiting for surgery, the study says Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Health Disparities, Lung Transplantation (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - November 19, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Parties Debate Validity Of Testimony In 'Popcorn Lung' Case Before 8th Circuit
ST. LOUIS - The Eighth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals heard oral arguments on Oct. 22 in a case brought by a couple contending that exposure to diacetyl and pentanedione, the chemicals used to make artificial butter flavoring in popcorn, caused the husband to develop lung disease, with attorneys for each party debating the propriety of testimony and the judge's jury instruction (David Stults, et al. v. International Flavors, Etc., et al., No. 14-3658, 8th Cir.). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - November 18, 2015 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

Lung transplant criteria biased against shorter patients
Short people have several health advantages over tall people, including lower risk for cancer and heart disease, and longer life expectancy. But there’s at least one health-related downside to being small: the odds of getting a lung transplant are considerably lower. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 16, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Lung transplant criteria biased against shorter patients
(Columbia University Medical Center) Short people have several health advantages over tall people, including lower risk for cancer and heart disease, and longer life expectancy. But there's at least one health-related downside to being small: the odds of getting a lung transplant are considerably lower. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Kidney failure and its treatment may impact cancer risk
Risk of kidney and thyroid cancers was especially high when kidney failure patients were on dialysis, researchers have discovered. Conversely, risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, melanoma, lung cancer, and certain skin cancers was highest following kidney transplantation, likely due to immunosuppressant medications. Kidney failure is on the rise and currently afflicts an estimated 2 million people worldwide. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 13, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

The Surprising Reason Wealthy People Get Organ Transplants Faster
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) -- You can't buy hearts, kidneys or other organs but money can still help you get one. Wealthy people are more likely to get on multiple waiting lists and score a transplant, and less likely to die while waiting for one, a new study finds. The work confirms what many have long suspected - the rich have advantages even in a system designed to steer organs to the sickest patients and those who have waited longest. Wealthier people can better afford the tests and travel to get on more than one transplant center's waiting list, and the new study shows how much this pays off. "Multiple-listed patients we...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Disrupting Today's Healthcare System
This week in San Diego, Singularity University is holding its Exponential Medicine Conference, a look at how technologists are redesigning and rebuilding today's broken healthcare system. Healthcare today is reactive, retrospective, bureaucratic and expensive. It's sick care, not healthcare. This blog is about why the $3 trillion healthcare system is broken and how we are going to fix it. First, the Bad News: Doctors spend $210 billion per year on procedures that aren’t based on patient need, but fear of liability. Americans spend, on average, $8,915 per person on healthcare – more than any other count...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rule Changes Might Lead to More Lung Transplants for Kids
Title: Rule Changes Might Lead to More Lung Transplants for KidsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 11/5/2015 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/6/2015 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Lungs General)
Source: MedicineNet Lungs General - November 6, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: news

Rule Changes Might Lead to More Lung Transplants for Kids
Study suggests that widening the geographic pool could increase available organs Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Children's Health, Lung Transplantation, Organ Donation (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - November 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Five years after stem cell transplant complications, he’s an active teenager
Drew at 2014 Be the Match Walk in NYC. His stem cell donor lives in Germany. “It’s eye-opening to realize how fragile life really is when you’re young.” Drew D’Auteuil certainly knows whereof he speaks. He is a 16-year-old animal-loving, skiing, rowing, volleyball-playing, honor roll student and licensed driver with braces and a shock of red hair. In April 2010, five months after receiving a stem cell transplant to treat the blood disorder severe aplastic anemia, Drew suffered rare, life-threatening complications. One day Drew was biking with a friend near his New Hampshire home, sufferin...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 5, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Irene Sege Tags: All posts Cancer Diseases & conditions Allison O'Neill Aplastic anemia Dana-Farber/ Children's Hospital Cancer Center stem cell transplant Source Type: news

Can I Have a Lung Transplant for Lung Cancer?
Can a lung transplant be used as a treatment for lung cancer? If so, when. And why wouldn't a lung transplant work for most people with lung cancer? (Source: About.com Lung Cancer)
Source: About.com Lung Cancer - November 2, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: lungcancer.guide at about.com Tags: health Source Type: news

No tricks — only treats and happy times for sick kids hospitalized at UCLA
If laughter is the best medicine, then kids staying at Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA got a healthy dose of it today during a Halloween celebration filled with giggles and smiles. For 6-year-old patient Abby Karr, Halloween couldn’t come soon enough. She had been planning her transformation into a pink, bedazzled Batgirl all week long, said her mother Megan Karr. Abby, who suffers from a heart and lung condition and has been hospitalized on and off since she was 16 months old, couldn't wait for today to arrive. Without ever leaving the hospital, she saw it all: Star Wars characters, super heroes, kitten outfit...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 31, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Depression Common in Patients Awaiting Lung TransplantDepression Common in Patients Awaiting Lung Transplant
More than half of patients waiting for a lung transplant suffered from psychologic stress in a new study, which might be serious enough to affect transplant outcomes. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pulmonary Medicine News Source Type: news

Husband of mother dying from cystic fibrosis writes letter pleading for more organ donors
Ashley Harris Moore is waiting for a double lung transplant after suffering all her life from cystic fibrosis (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - October 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: cystic fibrosis alastair transplant lung donor donation organ lungs husband ashley harris moore Source Type: news

Stop Using My Disease to Stop Smoking
As part of its 2015 "Tips From Former Smokers" campaign, the CDC aired an anti-smoking ad that portrayed ostomies as punishment for a bad habit. This turned out to be part of a larger campaign that took advantage of diseases and complications tied to much more than smoking, twisting life-saving and preventative medical care into something akin to torture. Case in point, an ostomy isn't simply what you get for smoking your way to colorectal cancer. Ostomies also save thousands living with severe, incurable Irritable Bowel Disease (IBD). I'm a nonsmoker living with IBD, and I work in advertising. When I saw the CD...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Patients awaiting lung transplant commonly suffer depression-related symptoms
(American College of Chest Physicians) Researchers from Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, have found patients awaiting lung transplant often suffer from stress, anxiety, or depressive symptoms, and these symptoms are not isolated to patients with pre-existing psychiatric diagnoses. Pre-existing psychiatric diagnoses have been investigated previous to lung transplant. Little is known about the prevalence and burden of active depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms pretransplant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 19, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

25-year-old Georgina Compton with cystic fibrosis gets much needed lung transplant
Georgina Compton, 25, from Surrey, has battled the genetic condition cystic fibrosis since birth. But being just 4'11" tall, her body was too small for most adult organs. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 13, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Artificial lung demonstrates how aerosols move and behave in deepest part of lungs
A life-sized artificial human lung is the first diagnostic tool for understanding in real time how tiny particles behave in the deepest part of the human lungs. It could shed light on airborne pollution risks, and be used for the evaluation/design respiratory system drugs. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 8, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Portable bionic lung 'breathes' oxygen directly into the bloodsteam
A portable bionic lung that 'breathes' oxygen directly into the bloodstream is being offered to critically ill patients – handing them valuable extra time while they wait for a transplant. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 5, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

From Bahrain to Boston for very early onset IBD care
During a recent visit to Boston Children’s Hospital, three-year-old Gassen Boabed quietly entered the waiting room of the hospital’s Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center. With Mom and big brother in tow, the tiny toddler, boasting a pretty pink headband and nail polish to match, sat at a child-sized table, picked up crayons and started coloring. She was at ease, and her surroundings were familiar. For the past year and a half, Gassen, a native of Bahrain, a small island country east of Saudi Arabia, has been receiving treatment at Boston Children’s for a rare and debilitating condition called very early onse...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 30, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Maureen McCarthy Tags: Diseases & conditions Our patients’ stories Stem cell Athos Bousvaros Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) International Scott Snapper Source Type: news

Sickle Cell Disease vs. the California Stem Cell Agency: Disease-a-week Challenge #19
Imagine: inside the veins of an African-American child, red blood cells: round and soft, doing their job, keeping the person alive. What would happen if those cells hardened and changed shape, curving into the letter "C", like a wheat-cutting sickle? First, the capillaries would clog, in what Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) doctors call a "crisis". Excruciating agony, like broken glass in the veins, a crisis may last an hour or a day, and the pain is just the beginning. "By twenty years of age, about 15% of children with SCD suffer major strokes...by 40 years of age, almost half have central nervous sys...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 29, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Smog Linked to Organ Rejection, Deaths in Lung Transplant Patients
But some antibiotics seem to reduce the risk, researchers find Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Air Pollution, Antibiotics, Lung Transplantation (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - September 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Air pollution, traffic linked to deaths, organ rejection in lung transplant patients
For the first time, research shows that lung transplant patients in Europe who live on or near busy roads with high levels of air pollution are more likely to die or to experience chronic organ rejection, than those living in less polluted areas. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 29, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Smog Linked to Organ Rejection, Deaths in Lung Transplant Patients
Title: Smog Linked to Organ Rejection, Deaths in Lung Transplant PatientsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 9/29/2015 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 9/29/2015 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Lungs General)
Source: MedicineNet Lungs General - September 29, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: news

Smog Linked to Organ Rejection, Deaths in Lung Transplant Patients
But some antibiotics seem to reduce the risk, researchers find (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - September 29, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Family Medicine, Pulmonology, Organ Transplants, Preventive Medicine, News, Source Type: news

Terminally ill gymnast Sonny Lang has the 'heart and lungs of an 80-year-old'
Sonny Lang, 22, from Tadcaster, North Yorkshire, has cystic fibrosis, but has been told her body is too weak for another heart and lung transplant, so her prognosis is terminal. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lung 'filtering' technique can reduce transplant rejection
A new technique to recondition poorly functioning lungs and remove donor white blood cells has been used by researchers in an attempt to increase the number of lungs available for transplant, and at the same time reduce the risk of acute rejection. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - September 14, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Lung 'filtering' technique can reduce transplant rejection
(University of Manchester) University of Manchester researchers have used a new technique to recondition poorly functioning lungs and remove donor white blood cells in an attempt to increase the number of lungs available for transplant, and at the same time reduce the risk of acute rejection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Case report: use of ECMO in colchicine poisoning
Colchicum autumnale (Autumn crocus) 3.5 out of 5 stars Extracorporeal life support in the treatment of colchicine poisoning. Boisramé-Helms J et al. Clin Toxicol 2015;53:827-829. Abstract Colchicine toxicity occurs roughly in 3 phases. During the initial 24 hours, severe gastrointestinal symptoms — nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea — can cause hypotension and shock if fluid losses are not adequately replaced. During the second phase, severe toxicity can manifest with pancytopenia, sepsis, rhabdomyolysis, and renal failure. In addition, within days after ingestion, patients can develop cardiogenic shock...
Source: The Poison Review - September 11, 2015 Category: Toxicology Authors: Leon Tags: Medical autumn crocus colchicine poisoning colchicum autumnale ECLS ECMO extracorporeal life support extracorporeal membrane oxygenation Source Type: news

Bobby Donovan’s double lung transplant journey
Twenty-two-year-old Bobby Donovan was diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis (CF) at 4 months old. He was relatively healthy for someone with CF. However, in November of 2008 his health began to deteriorate. Every three months or so, he was admitted to Boston Children’s Hospital for two to four weeks at a time. In April of 2014, with his lungs not expected to last the year, Bobby received the double lung transplant, which not only saved, but transformed his life. One year following surgery, he shares his remarkable story. Learn more about the Boston Children’s Lung Transplant Program. The post ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 10, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Emily Williams Tags: Diseases & conditions Our patients’ stories cystic fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Center double lung transplant Lung Transplant Program lungs Pediatric Transplant Center (PTC) Source Type: news

A Medical Mockery – 10 healthcare adverts that show just how far we’ve come!
The post A Medical Mockery – 10 healthcare adverts that show just how far we’ve come! appeared first on Hysterectomy Association. You don’t have to look far to hear about brilliant and exciting strides being made in medical science. 3D printing is being used to create artificial limbs and organs; diabetics can now control their condition with the artificial pancreas; news has broken in 2015 about revolutionary new treatments which provide hope for patients with skin cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. These outstanding breakthroughs are in fact part of a much bigger picture – our attitudes towards...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - September 9, 2015 Category: OBGYN Authors: Linda Parkinson-Hardman Tags: Latest News covance medical adverts Source Type: news

Case report: veno-venous ECMO as a bridge to lung transplantation in paraquat poisoning
3 out of 5 stars Successful extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy as a bridge to sequential bilateral lung transplantation for a patient after severe paraquat poisoning. Tang X et al.  Clin Toxicol 2015 Aug 28 [Epub ahead of print] Abstract Conceptually, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) seems a perfect technique for treating some of the sickest toxicology patients,  buying time until failing vital functions can recover. With severe cardiotoxins — for example, calcium channel blockers, beta blockers or bupropion — veno-arterial ECMO can provide complete cardiopulmonary bypass, replacin...
Source: The Poison Review - September 9, 2015 Category: Toxicology Authors: Leon Tags: Medical ECMO extracorporeal membrane oxygenation lung transplantation paraquat poisoning Source Type: news

UCSF Heart and Lung Transplant Patients Gather for Celebration
Transplant recipients David Brown and Michele DesMarais served as emcees at the celebration. Heart and lung transplant recipients are living longer than ever before, thanks to rapid advances in technology, medications and surgical procedures. That progress was cause for celebration on Aug. 22 at UCSF's Mission Bay campus, where about 400 heart and lung transplant patients and their family members gathered for a special event in their honor. (Source: UCSF Medical Center)
Source: UCSF Medical Center - September 9, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: webservices at ucsfhealth.org Source Type: news

Genome Pioneer: We Have The Dangerous Power To Control Evolution
J. Craig Venter is the pioneering cartographer of the human genome, the sequence of which he and other scientists mapped in 2000. The WorldPost recently spoke with this modern Prometheus about the promises and perils of being able to read, write and edit the human genome. You have said that humankind is entering a “new phase of evolution” -- from natural selection to intelligent direction. Why is this so, and what does it mean? Biological evolution has taken three and a half or four billion years to get us where we are. Social evolution has been much faster. Now that we can read and write the genetic c...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 8, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

UCSF study shows voriconazole increases risk for skin cancer in lung transplant recipients
A study conducted by researchers at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) has showed that voriconazole, a prescription drug commonly used to treat fungal infections in lung transplant patients, significantly increases the risk of skin can… (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - September 7, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Scientists Use DNA 'Velcro' To Print Human Tissue In The Lab
We need more organs. At any given moment, more than 123,000 Americans are waiting for an organ transplant. Each year, 6,500 of them die for want of a donor. Moreover, between 15 and 50 percent of patients lucky enough to receive a transplant from a donor -- depending on the organ -- suffer from acute organ rejection within five years. For that reason, scientists across the country are racing to develop a way to grow organs in the lab. The dream is to eventually use a patient's own cells to construct new kidneys, livers, hearts and lungs that would be impervious to rejection by their ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Scientists Use DNA 'Velcro' To Print Human Tissue In The Lab
We need more organs. At any given moment, more than 123,000 Americans are waiting for an organ transplant. Each year, 6,500 of them die for want of a donor. Moreover, between 15 and 50 percent of patients lucky enough to receive a transplant from a donor -- depending on the organ -- suffer from acute organ rejection within five years. For that reason, scientists across the country are racing to develop a way to grow organs in the lab. The dream is to eventually use a patient's own cells to construct new kidneys, livers, hearts and lungs that would be impervious to rejection by their ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - September 4, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Use DNA 'Velcro' To Print Human Tissue In The Lab
We need more organs. At any given moment, more than 123,000 Americans are waiting for an organ transplant. Each year, 6,500 of them die for want of a donor. Moreover, between 15 and 50 percent of patients lucky enough to receive a transplant from a donor -- depending on the organ -- suffer from acute organ rejection within five years. For that reason, scientists across the country are racing to develop a way to grow organs in the lab. The dream is to eventually use a patient's own cells to construct new kidneys, livers, hearts and lungs that would be impervious to rejection by their ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 4, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Potential skin cancer danger for lung transplant recipients with antifungal drug
Researchers suggest that a common drug prescribed to treat fungal infections could put lung transplant recipients at a higher risk of skin cancer. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 3, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Melanoma / Skin Cancer Source Type: news

Drug for fungal infections in lung transplant recipients increases risk for cancer, death
(University of California - San Francisco) Voriconazole, a prescription drug commonly used to treat fungal infections in lung transplant recipients, significantly increases the risk for skin cancer and even death, according to a new study by UCSF researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 3, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Research Using Fetal Tissue
Hello HuffPo! Some of you may know me from junkscience.com or healthnewsdigest.com. My main focus here will be on science, or what passes for science these days. Many people of good will are not aware that our government spends more than $400 billion per year on R & D. Regrettably, a substantial amount of that ends of being little more than a form of academic welfare, for research that has almost no chance of ever leading to anything practical, and in many cases does not even add to so-called "basic knowledge." By way of example (and I will have many more), let's take a look at a current hot topic: Research u...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 1, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Man's Life Saved When He Gets Heart Still Beating In A Box
Lee Hall got the gift of life -- and it was still beating when it arrived. The 26-year-old Cornwall, U.K. resident was diagnosed with heart failure at age 14. At age 20, he had a mechanical pump installed to keep the blood flowing around his body. But Hall got some bad news in May. Doctors said his heart pump cables were infected, and he'd need a new heart within two days or he would die, according to South West News Service. But Hall got a lucky break when he learned he had a heart donor. The dead patient's heart was revived for Hall, using a method called a "heart in a box" that keeps the organ beating outside ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 31, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Family From Ireland Hopes Boston Doctors Can Save Boy’s Life
BOSTON (CBS) — Cian McDonnell-Lynch is just four years old. He’s been given until Christmas to live. His family, saying they refuse to give up, has traveled to Boston Children’s Hospital in the hopes that one of the world’s premiere hospitals can help keep him alive. Cian has been fighting an often deadly bone marrow disorder called Dyskeratosis Congenita since birth. “It’s a very rare disease,” his mother, Lisa McDonnell, told WBZ-TV Tuesday. “It affects one in a million. And Cian is actually at the more severe end of the syndrome.” Cian McDonnell-Lynch and h...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: deanreddington Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Cian McDonnell-Lynch Hope For Cian liam martin Source Type: news

Why President Carter's Melanoma Announcement Was Groundbreaking
Former President Jimmy Carter announced in a press conference Thursday that cancer has spread to his brain, and that he will be receiving radiation over the next few months to treat it.  With candor that's typical for Carter, but remarkable compared to how other American presidents have announced illnesses, the former president described that he first sought treatment for a bad cold in May. Instead, doctors found a mass on his liver that turned out to be melanoma. Surgeons removed the cancer, as well as about one-tenth of his liver, in an operation August 3, but discovered that the cancer had spread to his brain. Thes...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - August 21, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Medtech approvals: FDA releases June 2015 PMAs
The FDA today released its list of the pre-market approvals it granted for medical devices in June 2015: Summary of PMA Originals & Supplements Approved Originals: 5 Supplements: 80 Summary of PMA Originals Under Review Total Under Review: 53 Total Active: 22 Total On Hold: 31 Summary of PMA Supplements Under Review Total Under Review: 575 Total Active: 418 Total On Hold: 157 Summary of All PMA Submissions Originals: 4 Supplements: 72 Summary of PMA Supplement PMA Approval/Denial Decision Times Number of Approvals: 80 Number of Denials: 0 Average Days Fr Receipt to Decision (Total Time): 115.2 FDA Time: 9...
Source: Mass Device - August 20, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: MassDevice Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Source Type: news

Interior life: UCLA doctors use the body's own microorganisms to fight disease
This may strike many people as distasteful, but human stool now is used as a medical therapy against at least one dangerous infection. It is happening at UCLA and at a small number of other major medical centers, where processed stool from healthy donors is being introduced into the gastrointestinal tracts of patients with Clostridium difficile, or C. diff. The infection is most commonly acquired in the hospital, causing diarrhea, intestinal pain and cramps, fever and potentially worse — 14,000 people die from C. diff in the U.S. each year. While the cure may sound worse than the disease, the therapy, known as fecal ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 6, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news