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Clinical Laboratories Could Soon Diagnose 17 Diseases with a Single Breath Analyzer Test from Israel ’s Institute of Technology
The Technion breathalyzer would give pathology groups and medical laboratories unprecedented ability to support physicians in diagnosing and treating cancers, chronic diseases, and other illnesses Readers of Dark Daily know that several pathology research teams in America and the UK are developing breath analyzer tests that can detect everything from lung cancer to early-stage infections. Clinical […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - March 24, 2017 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing ACS Nano AI american chemical society artificial i Source Type: news

Artificial Lungs in a Backpack?
Thu, 03/23/2017 - 13:58News blog (Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates)
Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates - March 23, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: GAtherton Source Type: news

Cryogenic preservation: from single cells to whole organs – Science Weekly podcast
Hannah Devlin looks at recent advances in the field ofcryopreservation and asks how close we are to applying these technologies to whole organsSubscribe& Review oniTunes,Soundcloud,Audioboom,Mixcloud&Acast, and join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterLast year, around 3,500 organs were transplanted into patients in the UK alone. That said, a large number of organs were also discarded because the moment a donor dies, doctors have only eight or so hours to find a patient on the organ register who is a match and can be almost immediately ready for surgery. One recent estimate suggested that as many as 60% of the hear...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Hannah Devlin and produced by Max Sanderson Tags: Science Organ donation Health Society Source Type: news

UCLA performed most heart and lung transplants in the United States in 2016
Amanda GriswoldUCLA heart and lung transplants teams. UCLA performed the highest combined number of heart and lung transplants among all U.S. medical centers in 2016, according to United Network for Organ Sharing data, a nonprofit that manages the nation ’s organ transplant system.UCLA ’s thoracic transplant program performed 170 transplants during the 12-month period: 103 adult lung transplants, 58 adult heart transplants and nine pediatric heart transplants, according to UNOS.“This accomplishment is a tribute to our dedicated surgeons, physicians, nurses and allied health care professionals who are...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 14, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Cystic Fibrosis Survival Better in Canada Than in U.S.
Canadians with the lung disease live about 10 years longer on average, study finds (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - March 14, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Family Medicine, Nursing, Pulmonology, Nutrition, Organ Transplants, News, Source Type: news

Cystic fibrosis patients live 10 years longer in Canada
Although the neighboring countries have the same proportion of cystic fibrosis patients, Canadians are far more likely to receive a lung transplant than Americans with the same incurable disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New method rescues donor organs to save lives
Researchers have -- for the first time -- maintained a fully functional lung outside the body for several days. They designed the cross-circulation platform that maintained the viability and function of the donor lung and the stability of the recipient over 36-56 hours, used the advanced support system to fully recover the functionality of lungs injured by ischemia and made them suitable for transplant. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 6, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

New method rescues donor organs to save lives
(Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science) Researchers from Columbia Engineering and Columbia University Medical Center have -- for the first time -- maintained a fully functional lung outside the body for several days. They designed the cross-circulation platform that maintained the viability and function of the donor lung and the stability of the recipient over 36-56 hours, used the advanced support system to fully recover the functionality of lungs injured by ischemia and made them suitable for transplant. (Nature Biomedical Engineering 3/6) (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Researchers successfully thaw cryopreserved tissue with no damage
A group of US scientists have successfully thawed cryopreserved tissue without damage to the sample, a huge step towards being able to use frozen or preserved tissues in transplantation, according to a new study. Researchers out of the University of Minnesota have developed a new heating method, using iron oxide nanoparticles which surround frozen tissues, to uniformly warm frozen animal heart valves without causing harm to the tissue. While cryopreservation of tissue and organs has been possible for some time, thawing the organs and tissue without cracks and fissures forming has been a more difficult task. “This pap...
Source: Mass Device - March 2, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Regenerative Medicine Transplants Source Type: news

Exploring the cause of chronic lung transplant rejection, in a quest to stop it
Researchers have investigated the scarring process in the lungs of recent lung transplant patients in hopes of finding novel therapies to stop this dangerous process that leads to graft failure. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 1, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Exploring the cause of chronic lung transplant rejection, in a quest to stop it
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) A new paper from Michigan Medicine researchers examined the scarring process in transplanted lungs in hopes of identifying novel therapies to stop scarring before it starts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 1, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Chicago teen receives rare heart-lung transplant
Spencer Kolman, 15, from Chicago, Illinois, was the only child in the United States to receive a rare heart-lung transplant that year. His lungs had severe scarring due to long ago chemotherapy as a baby. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

US teen,15, receives rare heart-lung transplant
Spencer Kolman, 15, from Chicago, Illinois, was the only child in the United States to receive a rare heart-lung transplant that year. His lungs had severe scarring due to long ago chemotherapy as a baby. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

US teen undergoes rare heart-lung transplant
"I want to do more stuff," says Spencer Kolman. His voice is a whisper, a painful-to-hear rasp as it comes across the telephone line. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Teen: 'I want to do more stuff'
Spencer Kolman, 15, is the only US patient to undergo a heart/lung transplant in 2016. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ALung raises $2.6m
Artificial lung-like device developer ALung Technologies raised $2.6 million in a new round of debt and options financing, according to an SEC filing posted this week. The Pittsburgh, Penn.-based company is developing the Hemolung device, an extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal system that works by removing carbon dioxide and delivering oxygen directly to a patient’s blood via a small catheter inserted into the jugular or femoral vein. ALung Technologies has not yet stated how it plans to spend money raised in the round. Money in the round came from 37 unnamed sources, with the company seeking another $1.4 mill...
Source: Mass Device - February 17, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Respiratory ALung Technologies Inc. Source Type: news

The Island of Dr. Moreau For Real
By Drs. David Niesel and Norbert Herzog, Medical Discovery News H.G. Wells was a writer of fantastic science fiction during the 1890s. He is considered one of the fathers of science fiction and wrote novels whose stories remain popular today. He wrote about time travel in "The Time Machine", about interplanetary conflict originally made popular by the Orson Wells' "The War of the Worlds" and in "The Island of Dr. Moreau" he described beings that were part human and part animal. Two of the three remain pure science fiction but one is on the verge of becoming a reality. Do you know which one? ...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 9, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Dignity Health St. Joseph's forges heart relationship with Los Angeles institute
Dignity Health St Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center is teaming up with Los Angeles-based Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute to provide complex heart procedures at the Phoenix hospital. Under the arrangement, Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute staff will act as mentors so the St. Joseph's transplant team — which includes lung, liver and kidney — can begin offering ventricular assist devices, or VADs. The VAD procedure, which is an extremely complex heart procedure that doctors use at Cedars-Sinai, is… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 7, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Angela Gonzales Source Type: news

Lung disease symptoms could be eased with tiny metal coils
In the past, Peter Fuller from Southampton could smoke 40 cigarettes a day. The habit caused his lungs to deteriorate, and as it spared him waiting for a lung transplant, the new procedure saved his life. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pitt receives NIH grant to develop children's artificial lung
A team of researchers and engineers led by the University of Pittsburgh has received a $2.35 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a compact, wearable artificial lung for children. Pitt's Swanson School of Engineering will lead the effort to develop the "Pittsburgh Pediatric Ambulatory Lung," a self-contained, minimally invasive breathing assistance device that will allow children to remain mobile while awaiting lung transplant, according to the school. “Standard existing … (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - February 6, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Lydia Nuzum Source Type: news

A bridge to breathing
(University of Pittsburgh) To safely bridge the time between diagnosis and transplant for pediatric patients with lung disease, a research team led by the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering is developing a compact respiratory assist device for children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Cells to Society: Women's Health / Research News
This study analyzed data on U.S. immigrants in the 2010–2014 National Health Interview Surveys and examined the association between length of U.S. residence and cardiometabolic risk factors.     Read more   Violence ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - February 1, 2017 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Woman kept alive for six days with no lungs
A woman was kept alive with no lungs for six days while she waited for a transplant in April last year. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - January 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Living without lungs for six day saves a mom's life
In a bold and very challenging move, thoracic surgeons removed severely infected lungs from a dying mom, keeping her alive without them for six days, so that she could recover enough to receive a life-saving lung transplant. This is believed to be the first such procedure in the world. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 27, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Meet the woman who lived for six days without lungs – video
Doctors saved a Canadian woman ’s life by removing her lungs for six days while she waited for a double lung transplant. In what is believed to be the first procedure of its kind in the world, Melissa Benoit arrived at Toronto hospital with just hours to live when staff and her family decided to take the unprecedented procedureDoctors save Canadian woman ’s life by removing her lungs for six daysContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Canada Health World news Doctors Americas Biology Science Society Source Type: news

Awaiting transplant, mom lives 6 days without lungs
Given the choice between his wife possibly dying in her bed or on an operating table, Chris Benoit chose an experimental, first-of-its-kind surgical procedure. The surgeons would remove not just one but both of Melissa Benoit's lungs. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fresh off raising $1.8M, Chapel Hill startup preps for $8 million
Chapel Hill-based startup Renovion – which is developing a nebulized therapy called Arina-1 for the treatment of lung transplant patients– has its eyes on submitting a New Drug Application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in early 2019, according to chief executive officer Dan Copeland. The company has raised more than $ 1.8 million of a planned $2 million offering to “fund pre-clinical and clinical programs,” he says, and is looking to raise another $8 million in the lead up to the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 19, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Jennifer Henderson Source Type: news

Risks for Post-Transplant Skin Cancer Identified Risks for Post-Transplant Skin Cancer Identified
The first U.S. population-based study of skin cancer in organ transplant recipients found the highest risk in patients who are older, male, white and had pre-transplant skin cancer or received a heart or lung transplant, researchers report.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Lung Transplant Receipients: Increased Skin Cancer Risk Lung Transplant Receipients: Increased Skin Cancer Risk
The first U.S. population-based study of skin cancer in organ transplant recipients found the highest risk in patients who are older, male, white and had pre-transplant skin cancer or received a heart or lung transplant, researchers report.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - January 18, 2017 Category: Surgery Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

High-risk patient gets life-saving transplant when UCLA team accepts her case
A 24-year-old cystic fibrosis patient is starting the new year with new hope thanks to help from the U.S. Air Force, the actor who played Chewbacca in the “Star Wars” movies and a UCLA surgeon who said yes to a high-risk case.Kathlyn Chassey of San Antonio, Texas, was born with cystic fibrosis, a genetic disease characterized by the build-up in the lungs of thick, sticky mucus that traps infection-causing bacteria. While there is no cure, lung transplantation can help alleviate many of the symptoms.Courtesy of the Chassey familyKathlyn Chassey walks after her lung transplant surgery at Reagan UCLA Medical Cente...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 14, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

ALung Technologies brings in $2.6m
  Artificial lung-like device developer ALung Technologies has raised $2.6 million in a new round of financing, according to an SEC filing posted this week. Pittsburgh-based ALung’s Hemolung device is an extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal system that works by removing carbon dioxide and delivering oxygen directly to a patient’s blood via a small catheter inserted into the jugular or femoral vein. Money in the round so far has come from 36 anonymous investors, with the company seeking another $1.4 million before closing the debt and option round, according to the SEC filing. The company has not yet state...
Source: Mass Device - January 10, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Respiratory ALung Technologies Inc. Source Type: news

What lies ahead for healthcare in Wales in 2017 and beyond?
With a narrow window in which to move the Welsh NHS onto a pathway to sustainability, Michael Trickey considers what needs to happen in the years ahead Related items fromOnMedica Hospitals in Wales failing to give GPs discharge information GP leaders call for primary care boost from Budget Deemed consent for organ donation increases transplants in Wales Wales has UK ’s lowest five-year survival rate for lung cancer Wales offers incentives for GPs to train and stay in Wales (Source: OnMedica Views)
Source: OnMedica Views - January 9, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Top Ten Medical Research Issues and Trends to Watch in 2017
2016 will go down as a year that taught us to question our assumptions. The election of Donald Trump, an outcome almost no one predicted, left many with a sense of uncertainty about what 2017 will bring in the biomedical and health-care space. To bring clarity to these unsure times, FasterCures has compiled a list of issues critical to the future of medical innovation that we'll be tracking over the coming year. While some issues will be closely linked with the people and policies of the new presidential administration, we think all will be important to continuing the progress toward faster cures and treatments. 1. FDA...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - January 5, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

South Africa: 'God Has a Plan for Me' - Lung Transplant Patient
[News24Wire] Fifty-six-year-old Fanie Swart from Boksburg has something extra to be grateful for this festive season after he became the 100th patient to receive a lung transplant at the Netcare Milpark Hospital. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 23, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Cochrane Priority Reviews List: December 2016 Update
Cochrane-wide prioritisation remains an important project, with over 140 priority reviews or updates have been published since it began in January 2015.The December 2016 revision of the Cochrane Priority Reviews List includes new titles from the Cochrane Airways, Anaesthesia, Dementia& Cognitive Improvement, ENT, Epilepsy, Gynaecological, Neuro-oncology and Orphan Cancers, Gynaecology& Fertility, Haematological Malignancies, Heart, Incontinence, Kidney& Transplant, Lung Cancer, Neuromuscular Disease, Oral Health, Skin, Stroke, and Urology Groups.The following titles on the list are open to new authors:Long-acti...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - December 14, 2016 Category: Information Technology Authors: mumoquit at cochrane.org Source Type: news

Data points to no age-related cutoff for mammogram screenings | RSNA 2016 Roundup
There is no clear cut-off age to stop breast cancer screening, according to new data from the largest-ever study on mammogram screening outcomes. Data from the study was presented this week at the Radiological Society of North America’s annual meeting. Age-based cutoffs for screenings have been a source of controversy for many years in the healthcare field. Results from the massive study, however, support guidelines that support making breast cancer screening decisions based on individual patients and health status over a specific age, according to study researchers. Data in the study came from over 5.6 million mammo...
Source: Mass Device - December 5, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Imaging Oncology Radiological Society of North America Source Type: news

Genetic factors control regenerative properties of blood-forming stem cells, UCLA studies show
FINDINGSResearchers from the UCLA Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology Oncology and the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have published two studies that define how key genetic factors affect blood-forming stem cells by either accelerating or hindering the cells ’ regenerative properties. The findings could one day lead to improved treatments for people undergoing common therapies for cancer such as chemotherapy and radiation. BACKGROUNDBlood-forming stem cells, or hematopoietic stem cells, are found in the bone marrow. These cells have two unique...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 5, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists create artificial blood that delivers oxygen to tissues in the body
Dennis Thompson, HealthDay News Scientists created an artificial red blood cell that picks up oxygen in the lungs and takes it to tissues, and may improve trauma victims' chance of survival. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - December 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Longer Preservation Time Doesn't Harm Lungs for Transplant Longer Preservation Time Doesn't Harm Lungs for Transplant
Extending overall preservation time via ex-vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) appears to have no negative impact on short-term outcomes of lung transplantation, according to Canadian and Swiss investigators.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines)
Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines - November 29, 2016 Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Transplantation News Source Type: news

Cold-Warm-Cold Lung Preservation Extends Transplant Window (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Harvested lungs kept viable up to 21 hours (Source: MedPage Today Pulmonary)
Source: MedPage Today Pulmonary - November 21, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: news

New technique keeps donor lungs viable longer: Study
HealthDay News A technique that allows lungs destined for transplants to be preserved longer works well, a new Canadian study finds. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - November 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Technique Keeps Donor Lungs Viable Longer
Strategy allows doctors more time to assess organs, transport for transplant Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Page: Lung Transplantation (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - November 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Technique Keeps Donor Lungs Viable Longer: Study
FRIDAY, Nov. 18, 2016 -- A technique that allows lungs destined for transplants to be preserved longer works well, a new Canadian study finds. The strategy, called ex-vivo lung perfusion (EVLP), allows preservation of lungs for up to 12 hours,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 18, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Preserving donor lungs longer makes transplant more elective than emergency surgery
(University Health Network) A new method which doubles the usual time donor lungs can remain outside the body can benefit patients, staff and allow retrieval of donor lungs across greater geographical areas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Can artery 'banks' transform vascular medicine?
(Morgridge Institute for Research) The Morgridge Institute for Research and the University of Wisconsin-Madison will address both the engineering and biomedical hurdles involved in creating stem cell-derived arteries for transplant as part of a five-year, $8 million project funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 15, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

How To Boost Melatonin Naturally
Most people know melatonin as the sleep hormone. And that’s right. It helps your body cycle down every night so you can rest. But melatonin is so much more than that… It’s also one of your body’s most powerful cancer killers. Studies show melatonin boosts the immune system. It protects against the toxic side effects of chemo and radiation. It improves wound healing after surgery. And it even increases cancer survival rates.1 And new research proves that melatonin suppresses the growth of breast cancer tumors. How does melatonin affect breast cancer? Mammograms detect cancer. In a lab at Michig...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - November 10, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Health Women's Health Source Type: news

Meet The Doctor Behind The Most Extreme Face Transplant Ever
Last August, Dr. Eduardo Rodriguez performed the most extensive face transplant operation ever.  In the 26-hour operation, which took place at New York University Langone Medical Center, the dentist-turned-plastic-surgeon and his team removed the face and scalp of a young victim of a fatal accident and successfully grafted the tissue onto the head of Patrick Hardison, a firefighter who had been horribly burned in a 2001 fire.  The operation showed in dramatic fashion just how far organ transplantation has come since its start in 1954, when surgeons at Brigham Hospital in Boston took a kidney from one ma...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Meet The Doctor Behind The Most Extreme Face Transplant Ever
Last August, Dr. Eduardo Rodriguez performed the most extensive face transplant operation ever.  In the 26-hour operation, which took place at New York University Langone Medical Center, the dentist-turned-plastic-surgeon and his team removed the face and scalp of a young victim of a fatal accident and successfully grafted the tissue onto the head of Patrick Hardison, a firefighter who had been horribly burned in a 2001 fire.  The operation showed in dramatic fashion just how far organ transplantation has come since its start in 1954, when surgeons at Brigham Hospital in Boston took a kidney from one ma...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news