Childhood syndrome combining lung disease, arthritis identified
Using the latest genome sequencing techniques, a research team has identified a new autoimmune syndrome characterized by a combination of severe lung disease and arthritis. The hereditary disorder, which appears in early childhood, had never been diagnosed as a single syndrome. The new research revealed that it is caused by mutations in a single gene that disrupt how proteins are shuttled around within cells. Patients with the newly discovered syndrome have a poor prognosis, and at present can only be treated with anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant drugs. Many have lung disease so severe that they must receive lung tr...
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 20, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

LVADs: Thoratec study a Roadmap to lower-risk patients?
Results from Thoratec's Roadmap study of its HeartMate II implantable heart pump in less-sick heart failure patients shows significant benefit over optimal medical therapy alone. HeartWare International Inc., International Society for Heart & Lung Transplantation, Thoratec Corp.News Well, Clinical Trials, Cardiac Assist Devicesread more (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - April 20, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Physicians Present New Research on Heart Transplant Care and Long-term Outcomes
ROCHESTER, Minn. — Heart transplant experts from Mayo Clinic presented findings from three recent clinical studies involving heart transplant patients. The presentations took place during the 2015 International Society of Heart & Lung Transplant (ISHLT) in Nice, France, April 15–18. Mayo Clinic physicians presented oral and poster presentations on 16 studies at ISHLT this year. [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 20, 2015 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Breethe Aims To Bring First Wearable 'Out-Of-Hospital' Artificial Lung System To Market
University of Maryland (UM) Ventures and Breethe, Inc. announced today that Breethe, an early-stage, Baltimore-based medical device company, has obtained exclusive rights to University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) intellectual property (IP) for the development of a wearable, portable blood pump oxygenator that will function as an artificial lung system for patients suffering from respiratory failure and cardiopulmonary collapse. (Source: Medical Design Online News)
Source: Medical Design Online News - April 15, 2015 Category: Medical Equipment Source Type: news

After lung transplantation: Go back to work and feel better
Returning to everyday life and resuming work in one's regular occupation are common goals of transplant patients, yet not all who undergo lung transplantation can go back to work. In a new article, researchers report the findings of the first study ever performed in Germany on the percentage of lung-transplant patients who resume employment after transplantation and the reasons that keep the others from going back to work. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 14, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Avoid voriconazole in transplant patients at risk for skin cancer
SAN FRANCISCO – Voriconazole increased the risk of squamous cell carcinoma by 73% in a review of 455 lung transplant patients at the University of California, San Francisco. The increase was for any exposure to the drug after transplant (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.73; P = .03). The... (Source: Skin and Allergy News)
Source: Skin and Allergy News - April 6, 2015 Category: Dermatology Tags: FPN Conferences IMN Conferences SAN Conference News SN Conferences SN News FPN News FPN Dermatology FPN Oncology HOSP News Source Type: news

Renowned Heart-Lung Transplant Expert Robert Higgins to Become Johns Hopkins’ New Surgeon-in-Chief - 4/6/15
Renowned cardiothoracic and heart-lung transplant surgeon Robert S.D. Higgins, M.D., M.S.H.A., will become the new surgeon-in-chief of Johns Hopkins Medicine. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - April 6, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Renowned Heart-Lung Transplant Expert Robert Higgins to Become Johns Hopkins ’ New Surgeon-in-Chief - 4/6/15
Renowned cardiothoracic and heart-lung transplant surgeon Robert S.D. Higgins, M.D., M.S.H.A., will become the new surgeon-in-chief of Johns Hopkins Medicine. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - April 6, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

Idaho mom goes the distance to help teen with scoliosis
“You want a hospital with the best technology and the best nurses and doctors in the country. You expect that, and you expect it to be clean. Boston Children’s has all of that,” says Lisa Findlay, a mom from Hayden, Idaho. “What made the difference was how much everyone loves these kids. Everyone who walked into Aaron’s room, from the surgeons to nurses’ aides to janitors and child life specialists, was on a mission to help Aaron.” From the time he was born, Aaron encountered one medical challenge after another. He was born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), a serious con...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 2, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Lisa Fratt Tags: Orthopedics Our patients’ stories Source Type: news

Lung transplant breathes new life into father’s world
At 77, John Bunton rode a ski lift up a mountain near Ogden, Utah, and spent an hour hiking around at 11,000 feet, admiring the craggy scenery and breathing in deeply the crisp mountain air. In June, he plans to walk his daughter down the aisle. (Source: UT Southwestern Medical Center News)
Source: UT Southwestern Medical Center News - April 1, 2015 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Lung Transplant Patients in the UK Fare Better Than Publicly Insured Americans - 3/24/15
Publicly insured Americans who undergo lung transplantation for cystic fibrosis fare markedly worse in the long run than both publicly insured patients in the United Kingdom and privately insured Americans, according to the results of a study conducted by researchers from Johns Hopkins in Baltimore and U.K. colleagues working in that nation’s government-funded National Health Service. (Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News)
Source: Johns Hopkins Medicine News - March 24, 2015 Category: Research Source Type: news

VIDEO: Once-yearly skin cancer screening might not be enough after organ transplants
SAN FRANCISCO – Older white men are most at risk to die from skin cancer after organ transplants, especially if they’ve had a heart or lung transplant, according to a review of more than a half million U.S. organ transplants from 1987-2013. It’s long been known that skin cancer is far more likely... (Source: Skin and Allergy News)
Source: Skin and Allergy News - March 22, 2015 Category: Dermatology Tags: ONCR Video FPN News FPN Dermatology IMN News IMN Dermatology SAN Clinical News SAN News SAN SCN: Melanoma Source Type: news

Infant leaves UCLA’s Mattel hospital for home with a transplanted heart
Staff at Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA witnessed a happy ending today instead of what could have easily been a tragic one when they bid farewell to five-week-old Drayvn Johnson, who went home with his mother, Nicole Eggleston, and two older brothers after becoming the hospital’s second youngest heart transplant recipient. He was only 23 days old when he received his new heart, which was the size of a strawberry. “All of our heart transplant patients are special, but I think this one was special because we knew there was a risk we might not find a donor in time,” said Dr. Juan Alejos, professo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 11, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Outcomes of lung transplantations since implementation of need-based allocation system
Since implementation of a medical need-based allocation system of donor lungs in 2005, double-lung transplantation has been associated with better graft survival than single-lung transplantation in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF); at 5 years, there has been no survival difference between single- and double-lung transplant recipients in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 3, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

How 3D Printing Could End The Deadly Shortage Of Donor Organs
Three-dimensional printing has been used to make everything from pizza to prostheses, and now researchers are working on using the emerging technology to fabricate hearts, kidneys, and other vital human organs. That would be very big news, as the number of people who desperately need an organ transplant far outstrips the number of donor organs available. On average, about 21 Americans die every day because a needed organ was unavailable. What exactly is the promise of 3D printing organs and tissues, or "bioprinting?" How does the technology work, and when might it start saving lives? For answers to these a...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 1, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

How 3D Printing Could End The Deadly Shortage Of Donor Organs
Three-dimensional printing has been used to make everything from pizza to prostheses, and now researchers are working on using the emerging technology to fabricate hearts, kidneys, and other vital human organs. That would be very big news, as the number of people who desperately need an organ transplant far outstrips the number of donor organs available. On average, about 21 Americans die every day because a needed organ was unavailable. What exactly is the promise of 3D printing organs and tissues, or "bioprinting?" How does the technology work, and when might it start saving lives? For answers to these a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kristin’s story: From open heart surgery patient to child life specialist
There’s a saying: “Life’s roughest storms prove the strength in our anchors.” I have faced many storms in my life, and my anchors have grounded me with hope and strength. I was born with complex congenital heart disease. By the time I was 36 hours old, I had been diagnosed with an atrial septal defect (ASD), ventricular septal defect (VSD), double outlet right ventricle, left and right ventricles reversed, dextracardia, mitral valve regurgitation and pulmonary stenosis. For many, this sounds like a long laundry list of defects, but for me and my family it became everyday life. At 10 days old, ...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - February 24, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Guest Blogger Tags: Heart conditions Our patients’ stories congenital heart disease Heart Center Source Type: news

Race Against Time for Baby in Need of Heart, Lung Transplant
Baby Olive's parents say time is running out for her. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - February 19, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Couple: Diacetyl In Microwave Popcorn Caused Permanent Lung Disease
ST. LOUIS - A couple whose lawsuit against popcorn manufacturers was dismissed by an Iowa federal court filed a brief in the Eighth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals on Feb. 6 contending that their claims for personal injury related to alleged exposure to diacetyl and pentanedione, the chemicals used to make artificial butter flavoring in popcorn, are valid because "it has been proven" that diacetyl can cause the permanent lung disease known as bronchiolitis obliterans (David Stults, et al. v. American Popcorn Company, No. 14-3658, 8th Cir.). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - February 18, 2015 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

Plain packaging 'may help smokers to cut down'
Conclusion This small study showed that priming adult smokers with a picture of a branded cigarette packet causes more of them to seek cigarettes compared with unbranded cigarettes – around 10% more. But this study has problems, meaning we can't really rely on its findings. The biggest of these was fully acknowledged by the study authors themselves. Professor Marcus Munafò, a co-author of the study, explained: "The experimental procedure only modelled the ability of pack stimuli to promote a cigarette-seeking choice. In the natural environment, smoking may be governed by a whole range of factors, inclu...
Source: NHS News Feed - February 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Cancer Medical practice Mental health Source Type: news

The Fragility of Life and Lung: My Dad's Severe Pneumonia Story
The first message arrived midday on a Sunday, picking up the latest in the long paper and electronic trail that chronicles our family's health. Mom, Jan. 4, 12:49 p.m.: Yesterday morning Dad woke up very sick. He has a terrible cough. Mom, Jan. 5, 2:52 p.m.: Dad has the flu. Mom, Jan. 6, 3:40 p.m.: Doc said Dad has to get down fluid. He spit up water twice. If he can't, I have to take him to an urgent care clinic. Don't come home! This is highly contagious. Dad, Jan. 7, 2:15 p.m.: I will be visiting the doctor again today. I had a very bad night last night and I am very weak. You must stay away from the house. When I w...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - January 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lung Transplants From Heavy Drinkers Linked to Higher Complication Risk
Title: Lung Transplants From Heavy Drinkers Linked to Higher Complication RiskCategory: Health NewsCreated: 1/21/2015 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 1/22/2015 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Lungs General)
Source: MedicineNet Lungs General - January 22, 2015 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: news

Lung Transplants from Heavy Drinkers Linked to Higher Complication Risk
Study finds problem may affect as many as 1 in 4 recipients Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Alcohol, Lung Transplantation (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - January 21, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tara tells StoryCorps about surviving her heart and double lung transplant
Listening to patients is what medical teams at Mayo Clinic do each day. To honor Mayo's 150th Anniversary, StoryCorps was asked to listen to and record several patient stories. Tara Klein tells StoryCorps facilitator Christina Stanton about her heart and double lung transplant at Mayo Clinic. She was diagnosed at age 17 and had to wait eight years [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - December 26, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

The Guardian view on high-end science in the National Health Service
The genome project and improving ambulance response times both matterThe NHS has an extraordinary record of medical innovation. The link between smoking and lung cancer, the first baby born through IVF and the first heart, lung and liver transplant were all achievements of the health service. Now the 11 hospital trusts which will pioneer the 100,000 genome project have been named. They will recruit participants in an ambitious attempt to sequence the genetic make-up of up to 100,000 NHS patients, creating a database to allow researchers to identify the links between genetic variations and cancers and other rare diseases. A...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 23, 2014 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: NHS Health Society Medical research Science Source Type: news

Resistance to anti-viral drug may be more likely in cystic fibrosis patients
Following lung transplantation, resistance to the anti-viral drug ganciclovir may be more likely in cystic fibrosis patients, scientists report. Ganciclovir is given to lung transplant patients to protect against a life-threatening virus that is common after transplantation, and reduces mortality due to the virus from 34 percent to between 3 and 6 percent. But between 5 percent and 10 percent of patients infected with the virus have strains that are resistant to the drug. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 18, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Resistance to anti-viral drug may be more likely in cystic fibrosis patients
(Loyola University Health System) Following lung transplantation, resistance to the anti-viral drug ganciclovir may be more likely in cystic fibrosis patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 18, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

The Most Exciting Health Stories Of 2014
While 2014 will forever be known as the year of the world's biggest Ebola outbreak -- and the first cases of Ebola contracted in the United States -- the virus is just one of several impactful changes in our medical and personal health landscape. From cancer research breakthroughs to innovative food policies to strides in the search for an HIV vaccine, we're quite a bit further in our understanding of medicine than we were last year. Thanks to research in 2014... Your Fitness Tracker Data Could Lead To The Next Big Medical Discovery Your FitBit, Jawbone and other personal tracking devices and apps are logging every s...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 16, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Landreneau Forging New Path for Mesothelioma Patients in Pittsburgh
Renowned thoracic surgeon Dr. Rodney Landreneau once hoped the number of pleural mesothelioma patients would have declined significantly by now — decades after the widespread use of asbestos dropped dramatically in America. But his hope never materialized. Landreneau, a mesothelioma and lung cancer specialist, and pioneer in treatment advances, remains in high demand today. Last month, he moved back to Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, where he helped carve his reputation as a surgical innovator 25 years ago. "Unfortunately, there still are a lot of patients being diagnosed with mesothelioma in this area...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 15, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

North Texas Fracking Zone Sees Growing Health Worries
This story was published by The Center for Public Integrity, a nonprofit, nonpartisan investigative news organization in Washington, D.C. DALLAS—Propped up on a hospital bed, Taylor Ishee listened as his mother shared a conviction that choked her up. His rare cancer had a cause, she believes, and it wasn’t genetics. Others in Texas have drawn the same conclusions about their confounding illnesses. Jana DeGrand, who suffered a heart attack and needed both her gallbladder and her appendix removed. Rebecca Williams, fighting off unexplained rashes, sharp headaches and repeated bouts of pneumonia. Maile Bush, who...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - December 11, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

UCLA researchers unlock protein key to harnessing regenerative power of blood stem cells
In this study, the authors showed that a cell surface protein called protein tyrosine phosphatase-sigma (PTP-sigma) regulates the critical process called engraftment, which is how HSCs start to grow and make healthy blood cells after transplantation. Mamle Quarmyne, a graduate student Chute’s lab and first author of the study, demonstrated that PTP-sigma is produced (expressed) on a high percentage of mouse and human HSCs. She showed further that genetic deletion of PTP-sigma in mice markedly increased the ability of HSCs to engraft in transplanted mice.  In a complementary study, Quarmyne demonstrated that...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 8, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Cannabis users in their 30s 'have lungs of 80-year-olds'
Smokers of the drug in their 30s have lungs so badly damaged they are put on long-term oxygen therapy while one patient in Bangor, north Wales, is awaiting a lung transplant, a study found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 3, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UCLA researcher pioneers gene therapy cure for ‘Bubble Baby’ disease
UCLA stem cell researchers have pioneered a stem cell gene therapy cure for children born with a life-threatening condition called adenosine deaminase–deficient severe combined immunodeficiency, or ADA-deficient SCID. Often called Bubble Baby disease, the condition can be fatal within the first year of life if left untreated. The groundbreaking treatment was developed by Dr. Donald Kohn, a renowned stem cell researcher and member of the UCLA Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research . Kohn’s breakthrough was developed over three decades of research aimed at creating a gene ther...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 20, 2014 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Donor Smoking Associated With Pulmonary EdemaDonor Smoking Associated With Pulmonary Edema
How much does chronic exposure to cigarette smoke impact donor lung status? American Journal of Transplantation (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 18, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Transplantation Journal Article Source Type: news

Lung Transplant Valid in SSc
(MedPage Today) -- Patients with systemic sclerosis shouldn't be denied lung transplants. (Source: MedPage Today Meeting Coverage)
Source: MedPage Today Meeting Coverage - November 17, 2014 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Genetic Big Data: What It Means
Researchers finished the first draft of the human genome in the year 2000. Although the decreasing cost of the technology has far outpaced Moore’s Law since then, we have yet to fully leverage all that new information to make it really useful. In a wide ranging talk on his work, from transcribing the first complete human genome to building synthetic life forms, genomic pioneer Craig Venter confessed he was disappointed that genomics has taken as long as it has to scale up. “We just got to the starting line,” Venter said, speaking at Singularity University’s Exponential Medicine conference. “...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 17, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Bioengineered Lungs Successfully Transplanted Into Pigs
(Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - November 11, 2014 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Family Medicine, Pulmonology, Research, Emergency Medicine, Organ Transplants, News, Source Type: news

U.S. Supreme Court Refuses To Hear 'Popcorn Lung' Personal Injury Case
WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Supreme Court on Nov. 3 denied certiorari in a personal injury case for what is called "popcorn lung" brought against the makers of artificial butter flavoring used in microwave popcorn (Diacetyl Plaintiffs v. Aaroma Holdings LLC, No. 14-71, U.S. Sup.; See 10/7/14, Page 4). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - November 4, 2014 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

Judge: Couple Fails To Show They Are Entitled To New Trial In 'Popcorn Lung' Case
SIOUX CITY, Iowa - A federal judge in Iowa on Oct. 23 ruled that a husband and wife who lost their personal injury action against popcorn manufacturers related to claims that they were injured by exposure to diacetyl and pentanedione, which are chemicals used to make artificial butter flavoring in popcorn, failed to show that they were entitled to a new trial (David Stults, et al. v. International Flavors and Fragrances Inc., et al., No. 11-4077, N.D. Iowa; 2014 U.S. District LEXIS 151392). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - November 4, 2014 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

Cystic fibrosis sufferer Naomi Hulme, died before she could have lung transplant
Naomi Hulme, from Macclesfield, suffered from the genetic condition cystic fibrosis. Her condition worsened before doctors could arrange an operation. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 29, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Revised Article-Heart Transplant
A heart transplant is surgery to remove a diseased heart and replace it with a healthy heart from a deceased donor. (Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Topics)
Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Topics - October 27, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Revised Article-Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant
A blood and marrow stem cell transplant is a procedure that replaces a person's faulty stem cells with healthy ones. (Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Topics)
Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Health Topics - October 27, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Australian doctors transplants first circulatory death human heart
The St Vincent's Hospital Heart Lung Transplant Unit has carried out the world's first distant procurement of hearts donated after circulatory death (DCD). These hearts were subsequently resuscitated and then successfully transplanted into patients with end-stage heart failure. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 24, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Australian doctors transplant first circulatory death human heart
The St Vincent's Hospital Heart Lung Transplant Unit has carried out the world's first distant procurement of hearts donated after circulatory death (DCD). These hearts were subsequently resuscitated and then successfully transplanted into patients with end-stage heart failure. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 24, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Surgeon David Mason Building Thoracic Program at Baylor in Dallas
A decade after thoracic surgeon and mesothelioma specialist Dr. David Mason built his practice at the Cleveland Clinic, he has begun building a new multidisciplinary program at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas. The progression has been invigorating for Mason, the center's new chief of thoracic surgery and lung transplantation, as well as for the patients he now serves. Mason is constructing the new thoracic surgery program - the first of its kind in Dallas - that will attract top specialists in pulmonology, radiology, pathology, oncology and surgery. These specialists will work together to improve patient care ac...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 23, 2014 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Treatment & Doctors Source Type: news

"Spinning" a Solution for Tracheal Surgery
Joyce Laird Innovative use of an old technology to solve a new challenge. Macchiarini performed the world’s first transplant of a regenerated trachea in 2008. The patient is still alive today, more than five years later. Green explained that all of the other heart and lung regeneration work at that time was being done on animals. He saw this as a very strong incentive to expand into the regeneration of all types of hollow organs using bioreactive technology. read more (Source: Articles from MedicalDesign.com)
Source: Articles from MedicalDesign.com - October 20, 2014 Category: Medical Equipment Tags: Implantables Prototyping Source Type: news

'Popcorn Lung' Plaintiffs: High Court Must Hear Case Due To 'National Importance'
WASHINGTON, D.C. - The plaintiffs who want the U.S. Supreme Court to hear their personal injury lawsuit for what is called "popcorn lung" against the makers of artificial butter flavoring used in microwave popcorn on Oct. 1 filed a brief contending that the high court should hear the case to resolve circuit court splits concerning the power of a bankruptcy trustee, and because the case "presents issues of national importance" (Diacetyl Plaintiffs v. Aaroma Holdings LLC, No. 14-71, U.S. Sup.; See 9/16/14, Page 4). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - October 7, 2014 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

Non-traditional donor lungs appear safe for transplant
Patients receiving lungs from donors whose cause of death was asphyxiation or drowning have similar outcomes and long-term survival as patients receiving lungs from traditional donors, researchers report. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 1, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Non-traditional donor lungs appear safe for transplant
(Elsevier) Patients receiving lungs from donors whose cause of death was asphyxiation or drowning have similar outcomes and long-term survival as patients receiving lungs from traditional donors, according to a study in the October 2014 issue of the Annals of Thoracic Surgery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 1, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Sarcoid-Associated Pulmonary Hypertension and Lung TransplantSarcoid-Associated Pulmonary Hypertension and Lung Transplant
What's the role for lung transplantation in patients with sarcoidosis? Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - September 15, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pulmonary Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news